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Rodina fazole

Počet produktů: 77

Zobrazení 1-15 z 77 položek

Variety from Croatia
Green Beans Seeds SLAVONSKI ZELENI 1.35 - 1

Green Beans Seeds SLAVONSKI...

Cena 1,35 € (SKU: VE 44 (10g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Green Beans Seeds “Slavonski Zeleni”</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 (10g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Originated from the coastal Danube plains in Serbia and Croatia. This variety is of low growth about 40 cm, excellent taste, early variety, low, greenish grain. The shape of the grain is cylindrical-elliptical. Vegetation, 70-75 days.</p> <p>The absolute weight of 1000 grains amounts to 330-380 g.</p> <p>Sowing:</p> <p>Optimal sowing period: April</p> <p>Sowing depth: 4 - 5 cm</p> <p>Distance between rows: 50 cm</p> <p>Distance in a row: 5 cm</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 44 (10g)
Green Beans Seeds SLAVONSKI ZELENI 1.35 - 1

Variety from Holland
Blauwschokker Pea Seeds 1.95 - 5

Blauwschokker Pea Seeds

Cena 1,95 € (SKU: P 437)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Blauwschokker Pea Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Purple field pea Blauwschokkers is a firm crop and a dwarf type. Both the flowers and legumes are purple. Suited for fresh use and conservation.</p> <p>Field peas are comparable to green peas, which means that only the seeds are consumable. Best is to consume the peas when they are fresh; freezing is perfectly fine as well (Blanche shortly before freezing). It is also possible to let the crop ripen longer so you can use the dried seeds as well.</p> <p>Climbing types have to be cultivated along a wire netting in any case. In this process, it is possible to sow a series on both sides of the net. It is also important to sow sufficiently deep (3-4 cm) in order to prevent mice and birds from eating the seeds. There are little problems with diseases and plagues, which makes it all the much more attractive to cultivate this crop yourself.</p>
P 437
Blauwschokker Pea Seeds 1.95 - 5
Dwarf French bean Purple Queen Seeds 1.95 - 2

Dwarf French bean Purple...

Cena 1,95 € (SKU: VE 153 (3g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Dwarf French bean Purple Queen Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>One of the best flavored Dwarf French Beans there is producing heavy yields of glossy purple, smooth and straight string-less beans. Pods should be picked young and regularly to encourage cropping over a long period.  Delicious eaten raw or when cooked they change color to an appetizing dark green color.  Very easy to grow and little maintenance required.</p> <p>Time to harvest: 8-12 weeks</p> <p>Germination time: 7-14 days</p> <p>Planting Depth:  1 inch</p> <p>Spacing, Row:  18 inches</p> <p>Spacing, Seeds:  4-6 inches</p> <p>Light:  Sunny Location</p> <p>For an early crop sow in warmth in mid spring 6 weeks before the last expected frost in your area.</p> <p>Sow seeds individually in 7.5cm (3in) pots at 18-21C (65-70F). Otherwise sow outdoors 4-6 in between seeds when the soil has warmed during late spring after all danger of frost as they are sensitive to low soil temperatures.</p> <p>Keep weed free and protect from pests whilst young.</p> <p>Plants do not require support.</p> <p>Harvest as pods are ripen, the plants should continue to flower if picked steadily</p>
VE 153 (3g)
Dwarf French bean Purple Queen Seeds 1.95 - 2

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Giant White LIMA Bean Seeds

Giant White LIMA Bean Seeds

Cena 1,95 € (SKU: P 258)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Giant White LIMA Bean Seeds</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.  </strong></span></h3> <p>Phaseolus lunatus is a legume grown for its edible seeds. It is commonly known as the butter bean, sieva bean or lima bean.</p> <p>Phaseolus lunatus is of Andean and Mesoamerican origin. Two separate domestication events are believed to have occurred. The first, taking place in the Andes around 2000 BC, produced a large-seeded variety (lima type), while the second, taking place in Mesoamerica around 800 AD, produced a small-seeded variety (Sieva type). By around 1300, cultivation had spread north of the Rio Grande, and in the 1500s, the plant began to be cultivated in the Old World.</p> <p> </p> <p>The small-seeded (Sieva) type is found distributed from Mexico to Argentina, generally below 1,600 m (5,200 ft) above sea level, while the large-seeded wild form (lima type) is found distributed in the north of Peru, from 320 to 2,030 m (1,050 to 6,660 ft) above sea level.</p> <p> </p> <p>The Moche Culture (0–800 CE) cultivated lima beans heavily and often depicted them in their art. During the Spanish Viceroyalty of Peru, lima beans were exported to the rest of the Americas and Europe, and since the boxes of such goods had their place of origin labeled "Lima, Peru", the beans got named as such. Despite the origin of the name, when referring to the bean, the word "lima" is generally pronounced differently than the Peruvian capital.</p> <p> </p> <p>The term "butter bean" is widely used for a large, flat and yellow/white variety of lima bean (P. lunatus var. macrocarpus, or P. limensis).</p> <p> </p> <p>In the United States Sieva-type beans are traditionally called butter beans, also otherwise known as the Dixie or Henderson type. In that area, lima beans and butter beans are seen as two distinct types of beans.</p> <p> </p> <p>In Spain, it is called garrofón, and constitutes one of the main ingredients of the famous Valencian paella.</p> <p> </p> <p>In the United Kingdom and the United States, "butter beans" refers to either dried beans which can be purchased to rehydrate, or the canned variety which are ready to use. In culinary use there, lima beans and butter beans are distinct, the latter being large and yellow, the former small and green. In areas where both are considered to be lima beans, the green variety may be labelled as "baby" (and less commonly "junior") limas.</p> <p> </p> <p>Both bush and pole (vine) cultivars exist, the latter range from 1 to 5 m in height. The bush cultivars mature earlier than the pole cultivars. The pods are up to 15 cm (5.9 in) long. The mature seeds are 1 to 3 cm (0.39 to 1.18 in) long and oval to kidney-shaped. In most cultivars the seeds are quite flat, but in the "potato" cultivars, the shape approaches spherical. White seeds are common, but black, red, orange, and variously mottled seeds are also known. The immature seeds are uniformly green. Lima beans typically yield 2,900 to 5,000 kg (6,400 to 11,000 lb) of seed and 3,000 to 8,000 kg (6,600 to 17,600 lb) of biomass per hectare.</p> <p> </p> <p>The seeds of the cultivars listed below are white unless otherwise noted. Closely related or synonymous names are listed on the same line.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Bush types</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>    'Henderson' / 'Thorogreen', 65 days (heirloom)</p> <p>    'Eastland', 68 days</p> <p>    'Jackson Wonder', 68 days (heirloom, seeds brown mottled with purple)</p> <p>    'Dixie Butterpea', 75 days (heirloom, two strains are common: red speckled and white seeded)</p> <p>    'Fordhook 242', 75 days, 1945 AAS winner</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Pole types</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>    'Carolina' / 'Sieva', 75 days (heirloom)</p> <p>    'Christmas' / 'Giant Speckled' / 'Speckled Calico', 78 days (heirloom, seeds white mottled with red)</p> <p>    'Big 6' / 'Big Mama', 80 days</p> <p>    'King of the Garden', 85 days (heirloom)</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Health and nutrition</strong></p> <p>Lima beans, like many other legumes, are a good source of dietary fiber, and a virtually fat-free source of high-quality protein.</p> <p> </p> <p>Lima beans contain both soluble fiber, which helps regulate blood sugar levels and lowers cholesterol, and insoluble fiber, which aids in the prevention of constipation, digestive disorders, irritable bowel syndrome and diverticulitis.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Health hazards</strong></p> <p>Like many beans, butter beans are toxic if not boiled for 10-15 minutes. In one case all the people who ate falafel made with dried butter beans (rather than traditional broad beans or chickpeas) that had been soaked but not boiled, then ground, made into patties, and shallow fried, had serious food poisoning.</p> </body> </html>
P 258
Giant White LIMA Bean Seeds
Bean Seeds Jerusalem (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

Bean Seeds Jerusalem...

Cena 1,35 € (SKU: VE 139 (4g))
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong>Bean Seeds&nbsp;Jerusalem (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 (4g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div> <div>JERUSALEM POLE BEAN (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is a very fine bean heirloom with broad flat yellow pods and brown beans. Very early to bear and the beans are delicious picked young and cooked whole. Also used in minestrone and for fresh shelling beans This is the white seeded variety. Pole habit, 58-72 days.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>GROWING TIP: All beans and peas are legumes and benefit from "inoculating" with rhizobacteria. These bacteria do the work of taking gaseous nitrogen from the air and "fixing" or concentrating it in pink root nodules which then slough off, adding nitrogen to the soil in a form other plants can take up as a nutrient. Inoculating your beans and peas will increase germination, and the health of your plants, helping them growing large roots and thus healthier plants. Growing pole beans with corn provides an extra shot of nitrogen to the corn, a wonderful natural symbiotic relationship that the Native Americans understood very well. You will see a big difference in overall results. Healthy legumes should also be turned under the soil when production ends as they are excellent green manure for your next crops.</div> </div> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 139 (4g)
Bean Seeds Jerusalem (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

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Lima Bean Ping Zebra Seeds (Phaseolus lunatus)  - 4

Lima Bean Ping Zebra Seeds...

Cena 1,95 € (SKU: P 172)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Giant Lima Bean Ping Zebra Seeds (Phaseolus lunatus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #d0121a;"><strong>Price for package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Phaseolus lunatus Ping Zebra is one of many varieties of Lima beans. The appearance of the seed, ie, the grain itself, is called the zebra because it is very specific and completely resembles the zebras stripes.</p> <p>Phaseolus lunatus, commonly known as the lima bean, butter bean, sieva bean or Madagascar bean is a legume grown for its edible seeds or beans.</p> <p>Although lima beans have been cultivated in Peru for more than 7,000 years, historians are unsure whether they originated there or in Guatemala. Soon after Columbus' discovery of America, Spanish explorers noticed different varieties of lima beans growing throughout the South America, Central America and the Caribbean. They introduced them to Europe and Asia, while the Portuguese explorers introduced lima beans into Africa. Since lima beans can withstand humid tropical weather better than most beans, they have become an important crop in areas of Africa and Asia. Lima beans were introduced into the United States in the 19th century with the majority of domestic commercial production centered in California.</p> <p>Lima bean is a herbaceous plant with two main types of growth habit. The perennial form is an indeterminate, vigorous, climbing and trailing plant, up to 2-6 m tall, with axillary flowering only. It has swollen and fleshy roots up to 2 m long. Annual lima bean is a pseudo-determinate, bushy plant, 0.3-0.9 m tall with both terminal and axillary flowering. It has thin roots .The stems may be up to 4.5-8 m long. The leaves are alternate and trifoliate with ovate leaflets, 3-19.5 cm long x 1-11 cm broad. Inflorescences are 15 cm long and bear 24 white or violet bisexual flowers. The fruits are 5-12 cm long, dehiscent pods with 2 to 4 seeds. Seeds are very variable in size, shape and color. Cultivar groups have been distinguished according to seed differences.</p> <p>Lima bean sprouts, leaves, young pods and green seeds (immature or dry) are edible and eaten as vegetables. The dry seeds are eaten boiled, fried, ground into powder and baked, and used in soups and stews. The vines, leaves and empty pods left after the harvest can serve as fodder, and can be made into hay or silage. Lima bean may be used for green manure or as a cover crop. Lima bean might be valuable in intercropping systems, though only few cultivars are suitable for this.</p> <p><strong>Health Benefits</strong></p> <p>Lima beans are a very good source of cholesterol-lowering fiber, as are most other legumes. In addition to lowering cholesterol, lima beans' high fiber content prevents blood sugar levels from rising too rapidly after a meal, making these beans an especially good choice for individuals with diabetes, insulin resistance or hypoglycemia. When combined with whole grains such as rice, lima beans provide virtually fat-free high quality protein. You may already be familiar with beans' fiber and protein, but this is far from all lima beans have to offer.</p> <p><strong>Lower Your Heart Attack Risk</strong></p> <p>Lima beans' contribution to heart health lies not just in their fiber, but in the significant amounts of folate, and magnesium these beans supply. Folate helps lower levels of homocysteine, an amino acid that is an intermediate product in an important metabolic process called the methylation cycle. Elevated blood levels of homocysteine are an independent risk factor for heart attack, stroke, or peripheral vascular disease, and are found in between 20-40% of patients with heart disease. It has been estimated that consumption of 100% of the daily value (DV) of folate would, by itself, reduce the number of heart attacks suffered by Americans each year by 10%.</p> <p>Lima beans' good supply of magnesium puts yet another plus in the column of its beneficial cardiovascular effects. Magnesium is Nature's own calcium channel blocker. When enough magnesium is around, veins and arteries breathe a sigh of relief and relax, which lessens resistance and improves the flow of blood, oxygen and nutrients throughout the body. Studies show that a deficiency of magnesium is not only associated with heart attack but that immediately following a heart attack, lack of sufficient magnesium promotes free radical injury to the heart. Want to literally keep your heart happy? Eat lima beans.</p> <p><strong>How to Grow Lima Beans</strong></p> <p>Lima bean is a tender annual. Sow lima beans in the garden 3 to 4 weeks after the average date of the last frost in spring when the soil temperature has warmed to 65° or more for at least 5 days and daytime temperatures are consistently warm. Start lima beans indoors as early as 2 to 3 weeks before the average last frost date in spring for transplanting into the garden. Lima beans require 60 to more than 90 warm, frost-free days to reach harvest depending upon type and variety.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>Lima beans are tender annuals grown for their flat, crescent-oval-shaped seeds. There are two types of lima beans: bush and pole or vine varieties. Bush types grow to about 2 feet tall and tend to have smaller seeds; they bear more quickly than pole lima bean varieties. Pole lima beans have large seeds and can grow 10 to 12 feet high. Small-seeded limas, usually bush types, are also called butter beans, sieva beans, Burma beans, Madagascar beans, Carolina beans, and “baby limas.” Large-seeded lima beans are sometimes called potato limas. Large-seeded limas are often sold as dry beans. Lima beans have pale green pods that vary from 3 to 4 inches long to 5 to 8 inches long depending upon variety. Lima bean seeds are eaten, not the pods. Leaves are commonly composed of three leaflets and the flowers are white. Bush lima bean varieties are ready for harvest from 60 to 80 days from sowing; pole bean varieties are ready for harvest in 85 to 90 days.</p> <p><strong>Yield</strong></p> <p>Grow 4 to 8 lima bean plants per each household member.</p> <p><strong>Site</strong></p> <p>Grow lima beans in full sun; they will grow in partial shade but the harvest will not be full. Lima beans prefer loose, well-drained soil rich in organic matter. Beans prefer a soil pH of 6.0 to 6.8. Prepare planting beds in advance by working in plenty of aged compost. Avoid planting beans where soil nitrogen is high or where green manure crops have just grown; these beans will produce green foliage but few beans.</p> <p><strong>Planting time</strong></p> <p>Lima beans are a tender annual that grow best in air temperatures between 60° and 70°F. Sow lima beans in the garden 3 to 4 weeks after the average date of the last frost in spring when the soil temperature has warmed to 65° or more for at least 5 days. Start beans indoors as early as 2 or 3 weeks before the average last frost date in spring for transplanting into the garden 3 or 4 weeks after the last frost. Start beans indoors in a biodegradable peat or paper pot that can be set whole into the garden so as not to disturb plant roots. For continuous harvest through the growing season, sow succession crop bush lima beans every two weeks or follow bush lima beans with long-maturing pole lima beans. Beans can continue in the garden until the first frost in fall. Pole lima beans require a long growing period and are not a good choice where the season is short. Lima beans will not set pods in temperatures above 80°F or in cold or wet weather. Time your plantings to avoid hot weather. In mild-winter regions, lima beans can be sown in autumn for winter harvest.</p> <p><strong>Planting and spacing</strong></p> <p>Sow lima beans 1½ to 2 inches deep. Plant bush lima beans 3 to 6 inches apart; set rows 24 to 30 inches apart. Plant pole lima beans 6 to 10 inches apart; set rows 30 to 36 inches apart. Set poles, stakes, or supports in place at planting time. Pole beans also can be planted in inverted hills–5 or 6 seeds to a hill; space hills 40 inches apart. Thin strong seedlings from 4 to 6 inches apart. Remove weaker seedlings by cutting them off at soil level with a scissors being careful not to disturb the roots of other seedlings. Bean can be crowded; they will use each other for support.</p> <p><strong>Water and feeding</strong></p> <p><strong></strong>Grow lima beans in soil that is evenly moist and well drained. Bean seeds may crack and germinate poorly if the soil moisture is too high at sowing. Do not soak seeds in advance of planting or they may crack; do not over-water after sowing. Keep the soil evenly moist during flowering and pod formation. Rain or overhead irrigation during flowering can cause flowers and small pods to fall off. Once the soil temperature averages greater than 60°F, mulch to conserve moisture.</p> <p>Beans are best fertilized with aged garden compost; they do not require extra nitrogen. Beans set up a mutual exchange with soil microorganisms called nitrogen-fixing bacteria which produce the soil nitrogen beans require. Avoid using green manures or nitrogen-rich fertilizers.</p> <p><strong>Companion plants</strong></p> <p>Bush beans: cucumbers, corn, cucumbers, celery, potatoes, summer savory. Pole beans: corn, scarlet runner beans, summer savory, sunflowers. Do not plant beans with onions, beets, or kohlrabi.</p> <p><strong>Care</strong></p> <p>Large lima bean seed may have trouble pushing through soil that has not been well worked; at sowing, cover the seeds with sand, vermiculite, or a peat moss-vermiculite mix instead. Cultivate around beans carefully to avoid disturbing the shallow root system. Do not handle beans when they are wet; this may spread fungus spores. Set poles, stakes, or trellises in place before planting pole beans. Select supports that are tall enough for the variety being grown. Rotate beans to plots where lettuce, squash, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, or collards have grown in the past year or two.</p> <p><strong>Container growing</strong></p> <p>Bush lima beans can be grown in containers, but you may need several containers for a practical harvest. Beans will grow in 8-inch containers.</p> <p><strong>Pests</strong></p> <p>Beans can be attacked by aphids, bean beetles, flea beetles, leafhoppers and mites. Aphids, leafhoppers, and mites can be sprayed away with a blast of water from the hose or controlled with insecticidal soap. Look for eggs and infestations and crush them between your fingers and thumb. Pinch out and remove large infestations. Aphids can spread bean mosaic virus. Keep the garden clean and free of debris so that pests can not harbor or over-winter in the garden.</p> <p><strong>Diseases</strong></p> <p>Beans are susceptible to blight, mosaic, and anthracnose. Plant disease-resistant varieties. Keep the garden clean and free of debris. Avoid handling plants when they are wet so as not to spread fungal spores. Removed diseased plants; put them in a paper bag and throw them away. Beans are susceptible to many soil-borne diseases; rotating beans so that they do not grow in the same location more than every three years will reduce soil-borne diseases.</p> <p><strong>Harvest</strong></p> <p>Bush lima beans will be ready for harvest 60 to 80 after sowing; pole beans will be ready for harvest 85 to 90 days after harvest. Pick lima beans when pods are plump and firm. Continue to pick pods as soon as they become plump to extend flowering and the production of new pods. When seeds mature, the plant will die. Pods left too long will result in seeds that are tough and mealy. Bush lima beans should produce 2 or 3 pickings in a season.</p> </body> </html>
P 172
Lima Bean Ping Zebra Seeds (Phaseolus lunatus)  - 4

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Fava Beans Seeds

Fava Beans Seeds

Cena 2,55 € (SKU: VE 162)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Broad Bean Aquadulce Fava Beans Seeds&nbsp;(Vicia faba)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 10 (16g) seeds. </strong></span></h2> <div>Hardy Annual.&nbsp;Aquadulce is highly prolific and easy to grow, and yet remains one of the most delicious in terms of flavour and texture. It is a white seeded variety; with pods up to 23cm (9in) long, crops in 90 days with a height of 90 to 100cm (36 to 40in). They are an ideal variety for children to grow.&nbsp;This variety is universally recognised as being best hardy broad bean for an autumn sowing; it can be sown anytime from autumn until spring. It establishes itself very quickly and will produce a very early crop.&nbsp;We should, of course, all grow Broad Beans, as they are so much more delicious eaten young and just picked. When they're smaller than a thumbnail, you can even eat them raw. But it does take cooking - albeit just two minutes in lightly salted simmering water to bring out maximum sweetness. The first pick of the year, tossed with a slightly overindulgent knob of butter, is a high point of early summer.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Broad Bean “Aquadulce” has been awarded the RHS Award of Garden Merit</div> <div>It is also recommended by the River Cottage Handbook Veg Patch.&nbsp;</div> <div>&nbsp;&nbsp;</div> <div><strong>Sowing</strong></div> <div>For the earliest crops sow from early autumn to late winter or sow in spring</div> <div>Broad beans are best suited to a cool climate, and they only grow satisfactorily at temperatures below 15*C (60*F).</div> <div>If sowing in the autumn, choose a sheltered position. The ideal soil is one which has been manured for a previous crop.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><strong>Direct sowing:</strong></div> <div>Broad beans are traditionally sow in double rows 7cm (2in.) deep, 23cm (9in.) apart in the row.</div> <div>The double rows should be spaced 23cm (9in.) apart and a distance of 40-60cm (18-24in.) should be left before the next set of double rows.</div> <div>Plant seed 5cm deep. They should be planted or thinned to 20cm apart in staggered rows 30cm apart. Sow extra seeds at the end of the row for transplants.&nbsp;</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><strong>Support</strong></div> <div>As the beans get taller, you will need to provide extra support to your plants. A common mistake of the first-time gardener is not giving plants support ties that allow growing space. The haulm (stalk) of the broad bean plant is very brittle and easily broken, so the best way to support the plant is to construct a narrow box of stakes pegged in at 120cm intervals. Twist lengths of string from stake to stake to create a supporting frame that the bean plants can lean against when being blown around by the winter winds. Further levels of string can be added as the beans grow taller.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><strong>Care</strong></div> <div>Once the pods start to form, ensure the beans are well watered around the base of the plant during dry periods. If the plants send out side shoots from the base, these should be cut off. At the end of cropping the plants should be removed from the soil. If the plants are left in the ground after their work is done, young sucker shoots can emerge which will exhaust the soil for follow-on crops.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><strong>Pinching out</strong></div> <div>One of the gardening formalities with broad beans - undertaken when the flowers have just wilted to black, sooty curls and the first tiny pods are about to appear in their place - is to pinch out the little cluster of leaves at the top of the plant. This arrests further growth, directing the energy of the plant into the developing pods.</div> <div>Don't discard these leafy bean tops - stir-fried in butter until lightly wilted, they are a delicious vegetable side dish in their own right - think of them as beany greens. They are also a fine filling for a tart or omelette.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><strong>Harvesting:</strong></div> <div>8 to 10 weeks from spring sowing. Regular picking (ideally 2 or 3 times a week) will keep production going for about 4-6 weeks</div> <div>For the best flavour, pick the beans when they are starting to show through the pod while the scar on the end of the beans is still white or green (although they can still be enjoyed after the scar has turned black). To remove the pods from the plant, give them a sharp twist in a downward direction.</div> <div>With the last pick of the summer, the fat, bulging pods need a good 10 minutes boiling, after which the tender green kernels can be slipped out of their pale, leathery skins.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 162 10 S
Fava Beans Seeds

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Runner Bean Seeds Lady Di

Giant Runner Bean Seeds...

Cena 1,85 € (SKU: P 250)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Giant Runner Bean Seeds Lady Di</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Outstanding quality runner bean producing good length pods (35cm) of uniform shape and size from red flowers.  Stringless with excellent texture and taste.</p> <p>·         Pre-prepare growing site with ample organic matter.</p> <p>·         Sow in early spring under-cover in warmth a single seed 1in depth per pot.</p> <p>·         Gradually  harden off after all risk of frost has passed.</p> <p>·         Alternatively plant direct outside after the soil temperature is above 50F in late spring.</p> <p>·         Protect young plants from pests.</p> <p>·         Ensure plants have support to ramble (canes / wire / netting).</p> <p>·         Keep well watered whilst flowers are setting.</p> <p>·         Pick regularly to encourage the plants to keep flowering.</p> <p> </p> </body> </html>
P 250
Runner Bean Seeds Lady Di
Hyacinth Bean, Lablab-Bean Seeds (Lablab purpureus) 2.049999 - 2

Hyacinth Bean, Lablab-Bean...

Cena 2,05 € (SKU: VE 156)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Hyacinth Bean, Lablab-Bean Seeds (Lablab purpureus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Lablab purpureus is a species of bean in the family Fabaceae. It is native to Africa and it is cultivated throughout the tropics for food. English language common names include hyacinth bean, lablab-bean bonavist bean/pea, dolichos bean, seim bean, lablab bean, Egyptian kidney bean, Indian bean, bataw and Australian pea. It is the only species in the monotypic genus Lablab.</p> <p>The plant is variable due to extensive breeding in cultivation, but in general, they are annual or short-lived perennial vines. The wild species is perennial. The thick stems can reach six meters in length. The leaves are made up of three pointed leaflets each up to 15 centimeters long. They may be hairy on the undersides. The inflorescence is made up of racemes of many flowers. Some cultivars have white flowers, and others may have purplish or blue.[2] The fruit is a legume pod variable in shape, size, and color. It is usually several centimeters long and bright purple to pale green.[7] It contains up to four seeds. The seeds are white, brown, red, or black depending on the cultivar, sometimes with a white hilum. Wild plants have mottled seeds. The seed is about a centimeter long.</p> <h2><strong>Uses</strong></h2> <p>The hyacinth bean is an old domesticated pulse and multi-purpose crop. Due to seed availability of one forage cultivar (cv. Rongai), it is often grown as forage for livestock and as an ornamental plant. In addition, it is cited both as a medicinal plant and a poisonous plant.</p> <p>The fruit and beans are edible if boiled well with several changes of the water. Otherwise, they are toxic due to the presence of cyanogenic glycosides, glycosides that are converted to hydrogen cyanide when consumed. Signs of poisoning include weakness, vomiting, dyspnea, twitching, stupor, and convulsions. It has been shown that there is a wide range of cyanogenic potential among the varieties.</p> <p>The leaves are eaten raw or cooked like spinach. The flowers can be eaten raw or steamed. The root can be boiled or baked for food. The seeds are used to make tofu and tempeh.</p> <p>In Bangladesh and West Bengal, the green pods along with the beans, known as Sheem (শিম), are cooked as vegetables or cooked with fish as a curry.</p> <p>In China, the seeds are known as Bai Bian Dou. They are usually dried and baked before being used in traditional Chinese herbal remedies to strengthen spleen, reduce heat and dampness, and promote appetite.</p> <p>In Kerala, it is known as Amarakka, Avara or Amara Payar (Malayalam: അമര പയർ ).[17] The beans as well as the bean pods are used in cooking curries. The bean pods are also used (along with spices) for preparing stir-fried dish known as Thoran.</p> <p>In Maharashtra, dry preparations with green masala is often made out of these green beans (Ghevda varirties - Shravan ghevda (french beans), Bajirao Ghevda, Ghevda, Walwar, Pavta sheng..) mostly found at the end of monsoon during fasting festivals of Shravan month.</p> <p>In Karnataka, the hyacinth bean is made into curry (avarekalu saaru)(Kannada: ಅವರೆಕಾಳು ಸಾರು), salad (avarekaalu usli), added to upma (avrekaalu uppittu), and as a flavoring to Akki rotti. Sometimes the outer peel of the seed is taken out and the inner soft part is used for a variety of dishes. This form is called hitakubele avarekalu, which means "pressed (hitaku) hyancinth bean, and a curry known as Hitikida Avarekaalu Saaru is made out of this deskinned beans.</p> <p>In Telangana and Andra Pradesh, the bean pods are cut into small pieces and cooked as spicy curry in Pongal festival season. Sometimes the outer peel of the seed when tender and soaked over night is taken out and the inner soft part is used for a variety of dishes. This form is called pitakapappu,hanupa/anapa, which means "pressed (pitaku) hyancinth bean, and a curry known as Pitikida Anapaginjala Chaaru is made out of this deskinned beans along with bajra bread; it has been a very special delicacy for centuries.</p> <p>In Huế, Vietnam, hyacinth beans are the main ingredient of the dish chè đậu ván (Hyacinth Bean Sweet Soup).</p> <p>In Kenya, the bean called 'Njahe' is popular among several communities, especially the Kikuyu. Seasons were actually based on it i.e the Season of Njahe (Kīmera kīa njahī). It is thought to encourage lactation and has historically been the main dish for breastfeeding mothers. Beans are boiled and mashed with ripe and/or semi-ripe bananas, giving the dish a sweet taste. Today the production is in decline in eastern Africa. This is partly attributed to the fact that under colonial rule in Kenya, farmers were forced to give up their local bean in order to produce common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) for export.</p> <h3><strong>Common names</strong></h3> <p>Other common names include Tonga bean, papaya bean, poor man bean (Australia), Seim (Trinidad), and butter bean (Caribbean).</p>
VE 156
Hyacinth Bean, Lablab-Bean Seeds (Lablab purpureus) 2.049999 - 2

Calypso - Orca - Yin Yang Bean Seeds 2.75 - 1

Calypso - Orca - Yin Yang...

Cena 2,75 € (SKU: P 15)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Calypso - Orca - Yin Yang Bean Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Beautiful and rare beans! We are so tickled to offer these popular beans, which look just like a yin-yang symbol, even down to the little dot! Calypso Beans are a variety of kidney bean. They grow on a bush-type bean plant that grows up to 15 inches (38 cm) tall. There will be 4 to 5 beans per pod. 70 to 90 days from seed for harvest. The beans are small, 3/8 inch (1 cm) long, but plump. </span></p> <p><span>When young, the pods can be harvested as a green bean. But when full-grown, they are used as a bean for drying.</span></p> <p><span>Calypso Beans double in size when cooked, and have a smooth texture: 1 cup dried beans = 2 cups cooked beans.</span></p> <p><span>Mild flavor and almost potato-like texture make this Caribbean bean adaptable to different flavors.</span></p> <p><span>Widely adapted to both cool, short summers.</span></p>
P 15
Calypso - Orca - Yin Yang Bean Seeds 2.75 - 1

Variety from North Macedonia

Tato rostlina má obrovské plody
Tetovac big white Bean Seeds 1.95 - 1

Tetovac big white Bean Seeds

Cena 1,25 € (SKU: VE 145 (11g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Tetovac big white Bean Seeds</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Beans Tetovac is extremely big. The most popular beans in Serbia. One of the best and oldest varieties of beans in Serbia and Macedonia. It is the old, original variety Tetovac, which hardly anyone today has in Serbia. Today you can find Tetovac beans in any store.&nbsp; But what kind of?&nbsp; Tetovac which is sold in stores is generally hybridized and even imported from China. Also, seeds are smaller and thinner.</p> <p>Our Tetovac is the old original variety.</p> <p>This variety comes from the Macedonian town of Tetovo area.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 145 (11g)
Tetovac big white Bean Seeds 1.95 - 1
Blauhilde Bean Seeds 1.95 - 1

Blauhilde Bean Seeds

Cena 1,95 € (SKU: VE 148 (3g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Blauhilde Bean Seeds (Phaseolus vulgaris)</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Spectacular climbing type makes enormous purple pods! Pods stay tender and stringless, even at 10 inches long! Plants are gorgeous in the garden as well, with the rose-purple of the blooms contrasting nicely with the rich, deep purple of the developing pods. Vigorous, productive vines reach a moderate 9 feet in height. The richly-flavored pods are best appreciated when used fresh off the vines. This heirloom from Germany is tolerant to mosaic virus, too.</p>
VE 148 (3g)
Blauhilde Bean Seeds 1.95 - 1

Variety from Japan
Adzuki Bean Finest Seeds (Vigna angularis)

Adzuki Bean Finest Seeds...

Cena 1,75 € (SKU: VE 73 (4g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Adzuki Bean Finest Seeds (Vigna angularis)</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 20 (4g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The adzuki bean (Vigna angularis; from the Japanese アズキ(小豆) (azuki?), sometimes transliterated as azuki or aduki, or English Red Mung Bean) is an annual vine widely grown throughout East Asia and the Himalayas for its small (approximately 5 mm) bean. The cultivars most familiar in Northeast Asia have a uniform red colour, however, white, black, gray, and variously mottled varieties also are known. Scientists presume Vigna angularis var. nipponensis is the progenitor.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Speciation and domestication</strong></p> <p>The wild ancestor of cultivated adzuki bean is probably Vigna angularis var. nipponensis,[1] which is distributed across Japan, Korea, China, Nepal and Bhutan.[2] Speciation between Vigna angularis var. nipponensis and Vigna angularis var. angularis occurred around 50,000 years ago.[3] Archaeologists estimate it was domesticated around 3000 BCE.[4] However, adzuki beans (as well as soy beans) dating from 3000 BCE to 2000 BCE are indicated to still be largely within the wild size range. Enlarged seeds occurred during the later Bronze Age or Iron Age, periods with plough use.[5] Domestication of adzuki beans resulted in a trade-off between yield and seed size. Cultivated adzuki beans have fewer but longer pods, fewer but larger seeds and a shorter stature, but also a smaller overall seed yield than wild forms. The exact place of domestication is not known, multiple domestication origins in northeast Asia (for example Japan, China, and Korea) have been suggested.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Breeding</strong></p> <p>In Japan, the adzuki bean was one of the first crops subjected to scientific plant breeding.</p> <p>Important breeding traits are yield, pureness of the bean colour and the maturing time.[6] Separate cultivars with smaller seeds and higher biomass are bred for fodder production and as green manure.[6] Locally adapted cultivars are available in China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan.[7] More than 300 cultivars/landraces/breeding lines are registered in Japan.</p> <p>Moreover, China (Institute of Crop Germplasm Resources (CAAS), Beijing, more than 3700 accessions) and Japan (Tokachi Agricultural Experiment Station, Hokkaido-ken, about 2500 accessions) accommodate large germplasm collections of adzuki bean.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Weed forms</strong></p> <p>Furthermore, also weed forms of adzuki bean are frequently occurring in Japan. The wide spread of weed forms is due to adaptation to human-disturbed habitats, escapes of old cultivars, natural establishment from derivatives of hybrids between cultivars and wild forms.[1] In contrast to wild forms, the weed forms of adzuki bean are used as a substitute for the cultivated form and consumed as sweet beans, especially if cultivated adzuki beans are attacked by pests. However, in cultivated gardens the weed form is recognized as contamination and lowers seed quality of adzuki cultivars.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Names</strong></p> <p>The name adzuki is a transliteration of the native Japanese name. Japanese also has a Chinese loanword, shōzu (小豆?), which means "small bean", its counterpart "large bean" (大豆 daizu?) being the soybean. It is common to write 小豆 in kanji but pronounce it as azuki About this sound listen (help·info), an example of jukujikun.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In China, the corresponding name (Chinese: 小豆; pinyin: xiǎodòu) still is used in botanical or agricultural parlance, however, in everyday Chinese, the more common terms are hongdou (紅豆; hóngdòu) and chidou (赤豆; chìdòu), both meaning "red bean", because almost all Chinese cultivars are uniformly red. In English-language discussions of Chinese topics, the term "red bean" often is used (especially in reference to red bean paste), but in other contexts this usage may cause confusion with other beans that also are red. In normal contexts, "red cowpeas" have been used to refer to this bean.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Korean name is pat (hangul: 팥), and in Vietnamese it is called đậu đỏ (literally: red bean). In some parts of India, they are referred to as "Red Chori".[8] In Punjabi it is called "ravaa'n" and is a common ingredient of chaat. In Marathi, it is known as Lal Chavali (लाल चवळी)- literally meaning 'red cowpea'. In Iraq its name is (لوبيا حمره) and that mean "red cowpeas".</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><em>Cultivation</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Area and yield</strong></p> <p>The adzuki bean is mainly cultivated in China (670,000 ha), Japan (60,000 ha), South Korea (25,000 ha) and Taiwan (15,000 ha) (data published 2006).[7] Additionally, commercial growth takes place in the US, South America and India,[9] as well as New Zealand, Kongo and Angola.</p> <p>In Japan, the adzuki bean is the second most important legume after soy bean, an annual yield of around 100,000t (data published 1998) is reached.[6] With a consumption of about 140,000 t/year (data published 2006), Japan is as well the most important importer of adzuki bean.[7] The imports are received from China, Korea, Columbia, Taiwan, US, Thailand and Canada.</p> <p>The bean yields per area spread over a broad range due to differing cultivation intensity. Amounts of 4 to 8 dt/ha are reported. But in Japan and China also bean yields between 20 and 30 dt/ha are reached.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Ecological requirements</strong></p> <p>Optimal temperature range for adzuki bean growth is between 15 °C and 30 °C. The crop is not frost-hardy and needs soil temperatures above 6-10 °C (30°-34 °C optimal) for germination. Hot temperatures stimulate vegetative growth and are therefore less favorable for pea production.[6][7][9] The adzuki bean is usually not irrigated. Annual rainfall ranges from 500–1750 mm in areas where the bean is grown. The plant can withstand drought but severe reduction in yield is expected.[6][7] The cultivation of the adzuki bean is possible on preferably well drained soils with pH 5-7.5.[7][9] Fertilizer application differs widely depending on expected yield but is generally similar to soybean. Due to nodulation with rhizobia nitrogen fixation of up to 100 kg/ha is possible.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Production</strong></p> <p>The sowing of the peas is in 2–3 cm depth in rows 30–90 cm apart and 10–45 cm within the row. Rarely seeds are sown by broadcast. The amount of seeds ranges between 8–70 kg/ha. Growth of the crop is slow, therefore weed control is crucial mainly between germination and flowering. Cultivation systems differ largely among different countries. In China adzuki bean is often grown in intercrops with maize, sorghum and millet while in Japan the bean is grown in crop rotations. Harvest of the peas should not be done as long as moisture content of the seed is higher than 16%.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Pests and diseases</strong></p> <p>Fungal and bacterial diseases of the adzuki bean are powdery mildew, brown stem rot and bacterial blight. Furthermore, pests as adzuki pod worm, Japanese butterbur borer and cutworm attack the crop. Bean weevil is an important storage pest.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Botany</strong></p> <p>The description of the adzuki bean can vary between authors because there are wild [10] and cultivated forms [6] of the plant. The adzuki bean is an annual,[7][10] rarely biennial [6] bushy erect or twining herb [7][10] usually between 30 and 90 centimeters high.[10][11] There exist climbing or prostrate forms of the plant.[7] The stem is normally green [11] and sparsely pilose.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Roots</strong></p> <p>The adzuki bean has a taproot type of root system that can reach a depth of 40–50 cm from the point of seed germination.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Leaves</strong></p> <p>The leaves of the adzuki bean are trifoliate, pinnate and arranged alternately along the stem on a long petiole. Leaflets are ovate and about 5–10 cm long and 5–8 cm wide.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Flowers</strong></p> <p>Adzuki flowers are papilionaceous and bright yellow. The inflorescence is an axillary false raceme&nbsp;&nbsp; consisting of six&nbsp; to ten (two to twenty) flowers.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Fruits</strong></p> <p>Adzuki pods are smooth, cylindrical and thin-walled. The colour of the pods is green turning white to grey as they mature. The size is between 5–13 cm x 0.5 cm with 2 to 14 seeds per pod. Pod shatter during seed ripening and harvesting might be a difficulty under certain conditions.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Seeds</strong></p> <p>The seeds are smooth and subcylindric with a length of 5.0-9.1 mm, width of 4.0-6.3 mm, thickness of 4.1-6.0 mm. The thousand kernel weight is between 50 and 200 g. There are many different seed colours from maroon to blue-black mottled with straw.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>In East Asian cuisine, the adzuki bean is commonly sweetened before eating. In particular, it often is boiled with sugar, resulting in red bean paste (anko), a very common ingredient in all of these cuisines. It also is common to add flavoring to the bean paste, such as chestnut.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Red bean paste is used in many Chinese dishes, such as tangyuan, zongzi, mooncakes, baozi, and red bean ice. It also serves as a filling in Japanese sweets such as anpan, dorayaki, imagawayaki, manjū, monaka, anmitsu, taiyaki, and daifuku. A more liquid version, using adzuki beans boiled with sugar and a pinch of salt, produces a sweet dish called red bean soup. Adzuki beans commonly are eaten sprouted, or boiled in a hot, tea-like drink. Some Asian cultures enjoy red bean paste as a filling or topping for various kinds of waffles, pastries, baked buns, or biscuits.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Traditionally in Japan, rice with adzuki beans (赤飯; sekihan) is cooked for auspicious occasions. Adzuki beans are used in amanattō and ice cream with the whole bean (such as in the 'Cream &amp; Red Bean' product produced by IMEI) or as paste.</p> <p>On October 20, 2009, Pepsi Japan released an adzuki-flavored Pepsi product.</p> <p>Adzuki beans, along with butter and sugar, form the basis of the Somali supper dish cambuulo. In Gujarat, India, they are known as chori.[8] In Malaysia and Singapore, red beans are a major component of the dessert Ais kacang.</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 73 (4g)
Adzuki Bean Finest Seeds (Vigna angularis)
Berggold Early Dwarf French Bean Seed

Berggold Early Dwarf French...

Cena 1,85 € (SKU: VE 59 (5g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Berggold Early Dwarf French Bean Seed</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5g (20) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Berggold Early Dwarf French Bean with white seeds.&nbsp; The plant is approximately 2 feet tall grows vigorously and produces yellow, stringless, meaty, straight pods about 11-13 cm long.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Berggold is part of the Phaseolus genus and is a Bean variety. Its scientific name is Phaseolus vulgaris 'Berggold'. 'Berggold' is considered a OP (open polliated) cultivar. This variety is an Vegetable that typically grows as an Annual/Perennial, which is defined as a plant that can matures and completes its lifecycle over the course of one year or more.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Typically, Berggold Bean is normally fairly low maintenance and can thus be quite easy to grow - only a basic level of care is required throughout the year to ensure it thrives. Being aware of the basic growing conditions this plant likes (soil, sun and water) will result in a strong and vibrant plant.</p>
VE 59 (5g)
Berggold Early Dwarf French Bean Seed

Variety from France
French Beans Seeds DUBBELE WITTE

French Beans Seeds DUBBELE...

Cena 1,85 € (SKU: VE 144 (2g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>French Beans Seeds DUBBELE WITTE</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Dubbele Witte is an early, stringless, tasty bush bean with good yields and approximately 14 - 15 cm medium length, green pods. The variety is suitable for fresh consumption as well as for wet preservation. The bush beans can be cooked used for salads, stews or casseroles.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 144 (2g)
French Beans Seeds DUBBELE WITTE

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