Last customers

  •  
    Antoine, Switzerland
  •  
    Susanne, Germany
  •  
    Hermann, Germany
  •  
    FAUSTO, Italy
  •  
    Lars, Germany
  •  
    Judith, Netherlands
  •  
    Kristin, Germany
  •  
    Romero, Portugal
  •  
    spiros, Greece
  •  
    Tomas, Lithuania
  •  
    Deni, Slovenia
  •  
    Yannik, Germany
  •  
    Benito, Italy
  •  
    Swen, Germany
  •  
    Benito, Italy
  •  
    Georgios, Greece
  •  
    Mariska, France
  •  
    Eduard, Germany
  •  
    Vicente, Mexico
  •  
    Aleksandrs, Latvia
  •  
    Susan, Finland
  •  
    Raveendran, Swaziland
  •  
    Eric, Germany
  •  
    Tiago, Portugal
  •  
    PATRICK, France
  •  
    Hanspeter, Switzerland
  •  
    henrique, Portugal
  •  
    Rubén, Spain
  •  
    Phillip, United Kingdom
  •  
    Stefania , Chile

New products

There are 18 products.

Showing 1-15 of 18 item(s)
Plumiers Bromelia Seeds...

Plumiers Bromelia Seeds...

Price €2.95 (SKU: V 62 BK)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Plumier's Bromelia Seeds (Bromelia karatas)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> Bromelia karatas is a species of tropical plants in the Bromeliaceae family, widely distributed from the Caribbean to Central and South America. Its edible fruit is consumed by humans in fruit juice or raw.<br><br>The species is hemicryptophyte. It occurs in rosettes with short and robust stems which reproduces by runners or seedlings. The leaves are 2 to 3 meters in length and 4 to 6 centimeters in width. Strong thorns are arranged on the edge of the blade. The flowers are sessile.<br><br>The spindle-shaped greyish-yellow to red fruit is 4 to 8 centimeters in length, contains very many small black seeds in a white juicy flesh<br><br>Food use<br><br>The species is widely found in the wild but is also cultivated in hedges. Its red-skinned fruit with a flavor similar to that of the best-known species of Bromeliaceae, pineapple or Ananas comosus, is eaten raw or in fruit juice. Due to its high bromelina content, the fruit is susceptible to attack the mucous membranes of the mouth.<br><br>The fruit is known by many names, especially in Venezuela (camburito, chigüichigüe, curibijil, quiribijil, curujujul or cuscuta), in Mexico (cocuixtle, jocuiste or jocuixtle, timbiriche, timbirichi, in Cuba (maya cimarrona, maya piñon, maya de ratón), in Mexico, Colombia and Venezuela as piñuela, in Puerto Rico as piña de cuervo, in Portuguese as caraguata, carauata, coroata, croata and in French as carata , karatas, “penguin pineapple” 4 or even penguin bayyonnet.<br><br>In Mexico, especially Chiapas and the Hidalgo, the fruit is known as timbiriche and the fruit juice common in popular markets as agua de sabor. In the state of Jalisco, the fruit is known by several names, including piñuela, cocuixtle, or jocuixtle, and is eaten raw or used as the base for a taco sauce. It is also consumed in the state of Zacatecas where it is imported from Jalisco. In Peru, the juice is sucked directly from the fruit.
V 62 BK
Plumiers Bromelia Seeds (Bromelia karatas)
  • New
Rare Chocola Seeds (Jarilla...

Rare Chocola Seeds (Jarilla...

Price €18.00 (SKU: V 161 JC)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Rare Chocola Seeds (Jarilla chocola)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div><span style="color: #333333; font-size: 17px;">This extraordinary papaya relative is a dry deciduous, perennial herb about 1 m tall that grows upright stems with broad, lobed leaves from a succulent underground tuber. The white and pink flowers are followed by remarkable pink fruits with five conspicuous ridges. The fruits are edible and have a very pleasant scent.&nbsp;<br><br>Jarilla chocola is widespread in valleys, canyons, and deciduous forests along Mexico's Pacific coast from the State of Sonora to Guatemala and El Salvador at elevations below 1300 m.&nbsp;<br><br>The fruits contain a white pulp with a creamy consistency and a slightly acidic taste, evoking that of a lemon. The starchy tubers could also be an interesting crop in their own right, comparable to potatoes.&nbsp;<br><br>In Chihuahua in northern Mexico, the locals eat the root raw or toasted and the fruit raw. Jarilla chocola is little known outside of Mexico and even less commonly cultivated. It grows best in tropical and warm temperate climates, in partial shade, and moist, well-drained soils.</span></div> <div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.5 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">about 25-28 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2-4 Weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">regular watering during the growth period + dry between waterings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div>
V 161 JC
Rare Chocola Seeds (Jarilla chocola)
  • New
Cat's Tail Aloe Seeds (Aloe...

Cat's Tail Aloe Seeds (Aloe...

Price €4.00 (SKU: CT 4 ACT)
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2 id="short_description_content"><strong>Cat's Tail Aloe Seeds (Aloe castanea)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div> <p>Aloe castanea (Cat's Tail Aloe) is a species of aloe endemic to South Africa.<br>A wonderful Aloe that forms a shrub or small tree to nearly 4 m tall with short, thick branches that hold rosettes of narrow, green, or pale blue leaves. The inflorescences are sparsely branched and look like cat's tails.&nbsp;<br><br>Easily grown from seed in warm temperate and tropical climates in USDA Zones 9 to 11.</p> </div> </div>
CT 4 ACT
Cat's Tail Aloe Seeds (Aloe castanea)
  • New

Product with time reduced price
Cayenne Chili Seeds (Mixed...

Cayenne Chili Seeds (Mixed...

Regular price €1.95 -8% Price €1.79 (SKU: C 19 MIX)
Offer ends in:
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Cayenne Chili Seeds (Mixed Colors)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 50 seeds.&nbsp;</strong></span></h2> <div>Strong upright plants produce large-shouldered, wrinkled, tapered, and curved fruit ranging from 15 to 20 cm long by 3 cm in diameter with medium-thick flesh.&nbsp;<br><br>The fruit color is dark green turning to yellow, orange, red when ripe. 30,000 - 40,000 SHU's.&nbsp;<br><br>Matures in 70-80 days.</div> <div><br>Tips on Growing Cayenne Long Slim Chili Pepper Seeds:</div> <div>GROWING SEEDLINGS:</div> <div>Sow Chili Pepper seeds in shallow flats, 4 seeds/in., 1/4" deep, in late February or March or about 8-12 weeks prior to transplanting outdoors.</div> <div>If possible, maintain soil temperatures 80-85°F (27-29°C). Pepper seed germinates very slowly in cooler soil, and may very well rot before they germinate.</div> <div>Well-drained, fertile soil with abundant amounts of phosphorus, magnesium and calcium is best. Peppers do well without much added nitrogen. They are also more tolerant of acid soil than many other Garden Vegetables. Chili Peppers are less likely than bell or sweet peppers to object to the low level of aeration in heavy clay soils. Just remember to water them well in hot and dry weather.</div> <div>When the first true leaves just show, transplant 2-3" apart in flats or 2" cell-type containers.</div> <div>The use of 2" or larger cells will produce larger plants with better-developed root systems.</div> <div>Harden off the pepper plants one to two weeks before your last frost by setting them outdoors, if the plants have blossoms cover the tomato plants at night until the night temperature is warmer.</div> <div>Grow plants at approx. 70°F (21°C) day and 60°F (16°C) nights.</div> <div>Do not let people that smoke handle your peppers or pick your peppers before they wash their hands. The virus that causes tobacco mosaic which will affect peppers, survives the cigarette manufacturing processes.</div> <div>COLD TREATMENT:</div> <div>Exposing the seedlings to controlled cold treatments can increase the number of flowers and fruits.</div> <div>When the third true leaf appears, grow the plants at a minimum night temp. of 53-55°F (12-13°C) for 4 weeks.</div> <div>The plants should receive full sunlight.</div> <div>After 4 weeks adjust temperature to 70°F (21°C) day and night. If this technique is used, peppers should be seeded 1-2 weeks earlier than usual.</div> <div>TRANSPLANTING:</div> <div>Transplant out after frost when the soil is warm and weather is settled.</div> <div>Ideal seedlings have buds, but no open flowers.</div> <div>When setting out peppers plants I bury them 2 inches deeper than what they were in the pots or trays. Set plants 12-18" apart in rows 24-36" apart, or 2 rows on poly/paper mulch, 18" between plants.</div> <div>Water-in transplants using a high phosphorus solution.</div> <div>Use Row Covers: Cold weather is buffered and earliness increased by using plastic mulch, especially in combination with a slotted row cover or lightweight fabric row cover supported by wire hoops.</div> <div> <p>Remove row covers when in sunny weather above 85°F (29°C) to prevent heat damage.</p> </div>
C 19 MIX
Cayenne Chili Seeds (Mixed Colors)
  • -8%
  • New
Chinese Passion Fruit Seeds...

Chinese Passion Fruit Seeds...

Price €3.25 (SKU: V 490 CM)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Chinese Passion Fruit Seeds (Cionosicys macranthus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> This climbing vine in the pumpkin family is distributed from Mexico to Central America, where it grows in forests, along riverbanks and roadsides. It climbs to about 20 m and has deeply lobed leaves, creamy yellow flowers, and yellow, edible, delicious fruits, about the size of a grapefruit and similar in flavor to sweet, milky papaya.&nbsp;<br><br>Despite its common name in Spanish (Maracuja Chino), which translates as Chinese passion fruit, Cionosicyos macranthus is not from China and does not resemble at all a passion fruit.&nbsp;<br><br>It also makes a nice ornamental for tropical, humid climates.
V 490 CM
Chinese Passion Fruit Seeds (Cionosicys macranthus)
  • New

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.
Saskatoon Serviceberry...

Saskatoon Serviceberry...

Price €1.65 (SKU: V 208 AA)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Saskatoon Serviceberry Seeds (Amelanchier alnifolia)</strong></h2> <div> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> </div> <div>Amelanchier alnifolia, the&nbsp;saskatoon,&nbsp;Pacific serviceberry,&nbsp;western serviceberry,&nbsp;alder-leaf shadbush,&nbsp;dwarf shadbush,&nbsp;chuckley pear, or&nbsp;western juneberry,&nbsp;is a shrub with edible berry-like fruit, native to&nbsp;North America&nbsp;from&nbsp;Alaska&nbsp;across most of western&nbsp;Canada&nbsp;and in the western and north-central&nbsp;United States.<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><br></span></span> <p style="color: #000000; font-size: large;"><span lang="EN" style="font-size: 13pt;">Saskatoon Serviceberry</span><span lang="EN" style="font-size: 13pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size: 13pt;" class="">each year announces their presence in the early springtime when the slender pinkish buds turn to 1-inch white flowers blooming so profusely that the branches are obscured by their feathery petals. The blooms are reminiscent of the witch hazel. Deciduous, ranging in height to 35 feet and up to 20 feet wide, the<span>&nbsp;</span></span><span lang="EN" style="font-size: 13pt;">Saskatoon<span>&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size: 13pt;">Serviceberry begins its annual growth cycle with these flowers even before the leaves sprout in their shades of silver or red which turn to green.</span></p> <p style="color: #000000; font-size: large;"><span style="font-size: 13pt;">The leaves are downy when they are young and similar to those of cherry cultivars. The mature leaf color is dark green or even a slightly blue tint on top, not glossy, and pale on the underside. They are thicker and more firm in texture than the cherry leaves.</span></p> <p style="color: #000000; font-size: large;"><span style="font-size: 13pt;">After the blooms fade the fruits appear in the latter part of June or early July, hence another of its common names, the Juneberry. These plentiful red-purple fruits are sweet and juicy, soft in texture, and often said to be similar in taste to apples. This is quite natural, as they are a member of the apple family. The fruits are about 1/4 to 1/2 inch in diameter with 2 to 5 very small seeds in the pear or apple-like core. They resemble high bush blueberries in size and shape, but they are not related to the blueberry.</span></p> <p style="color: #000000; font-size: large;"><span style="font-size: 13pt;">One would think the lovely blooms and delicious fruit would be enough of a gift from these trees, but in autumn the oval or oblong-shaped leaves, 2 to 5 inches long and 1 to 2 inches wide, turn to wondrous shades of yellow-orange to reddish-purple before they fall to carpet the ground beneath.</span></p> <p style="color: #000000; font-size: large;"><span style="font-size: 13pt;">In winter the overall rounded shape of the branches is pleasing to the eye with their gray to black coloration until the new red-brown twigs start the cycle anew come spring. The bark itself is interesting, tightly holding the trunk(s) and branches, it has very distinctive vertical lines. It becomes more scaly as the tree matures.</span></p> <p style="color: #000000; font-size: large;"><b><u><span style="font-size: 13pt;">Uses:</span></u></b><span style="font-size: 13pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span>A wonderful landscape plant, the flowers, foliage, and bark are attractive year-round. Not invasive, the Serviceberry can be planted without fear in beds with other shrubs or trees or as specimen plants. Very resistant to air pollution, they can be grown with a single trunk or multiple trunked groves. They make an excellent windbreak when planted fairly close together so the branches can intertwine to form a living fence.</span></p> <p style="color: #000000; font-size: large;"><span style="font-size: 13pt;">Economically the wood of the Serviceberry is occasionally made into tool handles, but its most common contribution to humans and wildlife is the delicious berries.</span></p> <p style="color: #000000; font-size: large;"><b><u><span lang="EN" style="font-size: 13pt;">Berries:</span></u></b><span lang="EN" style="font-size: 13pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span>Sweet in taste, the fruits have long been eaten by Canada's Aboriginal people as pemmican, a preparation of dried meat to which Saskatoon berries are added as flavor and preservative. They are also often used in pies, jams, wines, cider, beers, and sugar-infused berries similar to dried cranberries are used for cereals, trail mix and snack foods, Nutritional.<br></span></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><b><span style="font-size: 13pt;">Other Names:</span></b><span style="font-size: 13pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span>Saskatoon Serviceberry, Western Serviceberry, Shadbush, Shadblow, Indian pear, Juneberry, May cherry</span></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><b><span style="font-size: 13pt;">Zone:</span></b><span style="font-size: 13pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span>3 to 10</span></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><b><span style="font-size: 13pt;">Growth Rate:</span></b><span style="font-size: 13pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span>Medium</span></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><b><span style="font-size: 13pt;">Plant Type:</span></b><span style="font-size: 13pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span>Deciduous small tree or large shrub</span></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><b><span style="font-size: 13pt;">Family:</span></b><span style="font-size: 13pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span>Rosaceae</span></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><b><span style="font-size: 13pt;">Native Range:</span></b><span style="font-size: 13pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span>Northwestern North America<br><b>Height:</b><span>&nbsp;</span></span><span lang="EN" style="font-size: 13pt;">6 to 35 feet</span><span style="font-size: 13pt;"><br><b>Spread:</b><span>&nbsp;</span></span><span lang="EN" style="font-size: 13pt;">3 to 20 feet</span><span style="font-size: 13pt;"><br><b>Shape:</b><span>&nbsp;</span>Rounded</span></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><b><span style="font-size: 13pt;">Bloom Time:</span></b><span style="font-size: 13pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size: 13pt;">April</span></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><b><span style="font-size: 13pt;">Bloom Color:</span></b><span style="font-size: 13pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span>White</span><span style="font-size: 13pt;"><br><b>Flower/Fruit:</b><span>&nbsp;</span>Small, 5-petaled, showy, slightly fragrant, white flowers in clusters in early spring, followed by small, roundish, green berries which mature to a dark purple in early summer. Edible berries</span></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><b><span style="font-size: 13pt;">Sun:<span>&nbsp;</span></span></b><span style="font-size: 13pt;">Full Sun to Part Shade</span></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><b><span style="font-size: 13pt;">Fall Color:</span></b><span style="font-size: 13pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span>yellow-orange to reddish-purple</span></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><b><span style="font-size: 13pt;">Drought Tolerance:</span></b><span style="font-size: 13pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span>Moderate</span></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><b><span style="font-size: 13pt;">Water:</span></b><span style="font-size: 13pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span>Medium</span><span style="font-size: 13pt;"><br><b>Maintenance:</b><span>&nbsp;Low</span><a name="lbl_culture"></a></span></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><span><b><span style="font-size: 13pt;">Site Requirements /Soil Tolerances</span></b></span><span><span style="font-size: 13pt;">: Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Tolerant of a somewhat wide range of soils, but prefers moist, well-drained loams.</span></span></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><b><span style="font-size: 13pt;">Uses:</span></b><span style="font-size: 13pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span>Attractive shrub borders as a hedge or screen/windbreak, open woodland gardens or rock gardens. Good plant for bird gardens. Bonsai.</span></p> <h3 style="font-size: large;"><b><span style="font-size: 14pt;">Sowing<span>&nbsp;</span></span></b><b><span lang="EN" style="font-size: 14pt;">Amelanchier alnifolia</span></b><b><span lang="EN" style="font-size: 14pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span></span></b><b><span style="font-size: 14pt;">Seeds:</span></b></h3> <p style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-size: 13pt;">For best results, please follow the instructions in the order provided.</span></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="color: black; font-size: 13pt;">Scarify:</span></strong><strong><span style="color: black; font-size: 13pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span>Soak in water 24 Hours</span></strong></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="color: black; font-size: 13pt;">Stratify</span></strong><strong><span style="color: black; font-size: 13pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span>Cold 90 days, 40 Degrees F in a Moist Medium.</span></strong></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="color: black; font-size: 13pt;">Germination:</span></strong><strong><span style="color: black; font-size: 13pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span>Sow 1/8” Deep</span></strong></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-size: 14pt;">For more information about seed pretreatment and growing trees and shrubs from seed, please download this .pdf:</span></p> <p style="font-size: large;"><a href="https://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/documents/1449/fcpg018.pdf" target="_blank"><span style="color: #002cfd; font-size: 14pt;">https://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/documents/1449/fcpg018.pdf</span></a><strong><span style="font-size: 14pt;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p style="color: #000000; font-size: large;"><span lang="EN" style="font-size: 13pt;">&nbsp;</span></p> </div>
V 208 AA
Saskatoon Serviceberry Seeds (Amelanchier alnifolia)
  • New

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.
Adam's needle seeds (Yucca...

Adam's needle seeds (Yucca...

Price €1.55 (SKU: CT 8 YF)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Adam's needle seeds (Yucca filamentosa)</strong></h2> <div style="color: #232323; font-size: 16px;"> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><i><b>Yucca filamentosa</b></i>,<sup id="cite_ref-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span><b>Adam’s needle and thread</b>,<sup id="cite_ref-RHSPF_2-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>is a<span>&nbsp;</span>species<span>&nbsp;</span>of<span>&nbsp;</span>flowering plant<span>&nbsp;</span>in the<span>&nbsp;</span>family<span>&nbsp;</span>Asparagaceae<span>&nbsp;</span>native<span>&nbsp;</span>to the<span>&nbsp;</span>southeastern United States. Growing to 3&nbsp;m (10&nbsp;ft) tall, it is an<span>&nbsp;</span>evergreen<span>&nbsp;</span>shrub valued in horticulture for its architectural qualities.</p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><i>Y. filamentosa</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is closely related to<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Yucca flaccida</i><span>&nbsp;</span>and it is possible they should be classified as a single species.</p> </div> </div> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Names">Names</span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">Its<span>&nbsp;</span>common names<span>&nbsp;</span>include<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Adam's needle</b>,<span>&nbsp;</span><b>common yucca</b>,<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Spanish bayonet</b>,<sup id="cite_ref-ns_5-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[5]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span><b>bear-grass</b>,<span>&nbsp;</span><b>needle-palm</b>,<span>&nbsp;</span><b>silk-grass</b>, and<span>&nbsp;</span><b>spoon-leaf yucca</b>.</p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;" class="">Usually trunkless, it is<span>&nbsp;</span>multisuckering<span>&nbsp;</span>with heads of 75&nbsp;cm (30&nbsp;in) long, filamentous, blue-green, strappy leaves.<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Y. filamentosa</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is readily distinguished from other yucca species by white, thready filaments along the leaf margins.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[7]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Flower stems up to 3&nbsp;m (10&nbsp;ft) tall bear masses of pendulous cream flowers in early summer.<sup id="cite_ref-fna_4-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[4]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>They are<span>&nbsp;</span>pollinated<span>&nbsp;</span>by the yucca moth<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Tegeticula yuccasella</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[8]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[9]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Other moth species, such as<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Tegeticula intermedia</i>, also use this yucca as a host plant to lay their eggs.</p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Distribution_and_habitat">Distribution and habitat</span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><i>Yucca filamentosa</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is found from southeast Virginia south to Florida, and as far west as south and southeast Texas.<sup id="cite_ref-fna_4-2" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[4]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>It has become naturalized along the Atlantic coastal plain north to Long Island Sound and into areas of the lower Midwest. It is reportedly also naturalized in France, Italy and Turkey.<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[11]</sup></p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">This plant is most commonly found in sandy soils, especially in beach scrub and dunes, but also in fields, barrens, and rocky slopes, though it grows well also in silt or clay soils.</p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><i>Y. filamentosa</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is widely cultivated in mild<span>&nbsp;</span>temperate<span>&nbsp;</span>and subtropical climates. A fairly compact species, it nevertheless presents a striking appearance with its sword-like leaves and dramatic flowerheads. It is naturally a focal point in the landscape, also providing a tropical touch in temperate gardens. It needs full sun and a well-drained soil, preferring an acid or slightly alkaline pH range of 5.5 to 7.5. It develops a large, fleshy, white taproot with deep lateral roots. Once planted and established, it is difficult to remove, as the roots keep sending up new shoots for many years. It is normally hardy down to −15 °C (5 °F) (USDA hardiness zones of 5 to 9: UK H5).</p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">Once the seeds have been removed, the fruits can be cooked and eaten. The large flower petals can also be eaten in salads.</p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">The leaves, stems, and roots of this plant can be used to<span>&nbsp;</span>stun fish. The<span>&nbsp;</span>Cherokee<span>&nbsp;</span>used it for this purpose.</p>
CT 8 YF
Adam's needle seeds (Yucca filamentosa)
  • New
Key lime seeds (Citrus...

Key lime seeds (Citrus...

Price €2.25 (SKU: V 119 CAKL)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Key lime seeds (Citrus aurantiifolia)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">The<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Key lime</b><span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>Citrus</i><span>&nbsp;</span>×<span>&nbsp;</span><i>aurantiifolia</i>) is a<span>&nbsp;</span>citrus hybrid<span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>C. hystrix</i><span>&nbsp;</span>x<span>&nbsp;</span><i>C. medica</i>) with a spherical fruit, 25–50&nbsp;mm (1–2&nbsp;in) in diameter. The Key lime is usually picked while it is still green, but it becomes yellow when ripe.</p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">The Key lime is smaller, seedier, has higher acidity, stronger aroma, and thinner<span>&nbsp;</span>rind<span>&nbsp;</span>than the<span>&nbsp;</span>Persian lime<span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>Citrus × latifolia</i>). It is valued for its characteristic flavor. The name comes from its association with the<span>&nbsp;</span>Florida Keys, where it is best known as the<span>&nbsp;</span>flavoring<span>&nbsp;</span>ingredient in<span>&nbsp;</span>Key lime pie. It is also known as<span>&nbsp;</span><b>West Indian lime</b>,<span>&nbsp;</span><b>bartender's lime</b>,<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Omani lime</b>, or<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Mexican lime</b>, the last classified as a distinct<span>&nbsp;</span>race<span>&nbsp;</span>with a thicker skin and darker green color. Philippine varieties have various names, including<span>&nbsp;</span><i><b>dayap</b></i><span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span><i>bilolo</i>.</p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2> <p><i>C. aurantiifolia</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is a shrubby tree, to 5&nbsp;m (16&nbsp;ft), with many<span>&nbsp;</span>thorns. Dwarf varieties exist that can be grown indoors during winter months and in colder climates. Its trunk, which rarely grows straight, has many branches, and they often originate quite far down on the trunk. The leaves are ovate, 25–90&nbsp;mm (1–<span class="frac nowrap">3<span class="visualhide">&nbsp;</span><sup style="font-size: 11.2px;">1</sup>⁄<sub style="font-size: 11.2px;">2</sub></span>&nbsp;in) long, resembling<span>&nbsp;</span>orange<span>&nbsp;</span>leaves (the scientific name<span>&nbsp;</span><i>aurantiifolia</i><span>&nbsp;</span>refers to this resemblance to the leaves of the orange,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Citrus aurantium</i>). The<span>&nbsp;</span>flowers<span>&nbsp;</span>are 25 mm (1 in) in diameter, are yellowish-white with a light purple tinge on the margins. Flowers and fruit appear throughout the year but are most abundant from May to September in the Northern Hemisphere.<sup id="cite_ref-purdue1_5-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <p>Skin contact can sometimes cause<span>&nbsp;</span>phytophotodermatitis,<sup id="cite_ref-Weber_et_al._1999_6-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>which makes the skin especially sensitive to<span>&nbsp;</span>ultraviolet<span>&nbsp;</span>light.</p> <h3 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.2em;"><strong><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation_and_propagation">Cultivation and propagation</span></strong></h3> <div class="thumb tright" style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>There are various approaches to the cultivation of Key limes. This variety of&nbsp;</span>citrus<span>&nbsp;can be propagated from seed and will grow true to the parent.<br><span>If the plants are propagated from seed, the seeds should be stored at least 5–6 months before planting.</span></span></div>
V 119 CAKL
Key lime seeds (Citrus aurantiifolia)
  • New
Giant Roselle Seeds...

Giant Roselle Seeds...

Price €1.75 (SKU: MHS 19 G)
,
5/ 5
<div> <h2 class=""><b>Giant Roselle Seeds (Hibiscus sabdariffa)</b></h2> <h2 class=""><strong style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 2rem;">Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></h2> <p><strong>The fruits of this roselle are twice as big as any other roselle.&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>The roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) is a species of Hibiscus native to the Old World tropics, used for the production of bast fiber and as an infusion. It is an annual or perennial herb or woody-based subshrub, growing to 2–2.5 m (7–8 ft) tall. The leaves are deeply three- to five-lobed, 8–15 cm (3–6 in) long, arranged alternately on the stems.</p> </div> <p>The flowers are 8–10 cm (3–4 in) in diameter, white to pale yellow with a dark red spot at the base of each petal, and have a stout fleshy calyx at the base, 1–2 cm (0.39–0.79 in) wide, enlarging to 3–3.5 cm (1.2–1.4 in), fleshy and bright red as the fruit matures. It takes about six months to mature.</p> <p><span><strong>Names</strong></span></p> <p><span>The roselle is known as the rosella or rosella fruit in Australia. It is also known as 'Belchanda' among Nepalese, Tengamora among Assamese and "mwitha" among Bodo tribals in Assam, চুকর Chukor in Bengali, Gongura in Telugu, Pundi in Kannada, Ambadi in Marathi, LalChatni or Kutrum in Mithila] Mathipuli in Kerala, chin baung in Burma, กระเจี๊ยบแดง KraJiabDaeng in Thailand, ສົ້ມ ພໍດີ som phor dee in Lao PDR, bissap in Senegal, Guinea Bissau, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Benin and Niger, the Congo and France, dah or dah bleni in other parts of Mali, wonjo in the Gambia, zobo in western Nigeria (the Yorubas in Nigeria call the white variety Isapa (pronounced Ishapa)), Zoborodo in Northern Nigeria, Chaye-Torosh in Iran, karkade (كركديه; Arabic pronunciation: [ˈkarkade])[dubious – discuss] in Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Sudan, omutete in Namibia, sorrel in the Caribbean and in Latin America, Flor de Jamaica in Mexico, Saril in Panama, grosella in Paraguay and vinagreira, caruru-azedo or quiabo-roxo in Brazil. Rosela in Indonesia, asam belanda[1] in Malaysia. In Chinese it is 洛神花 (Luo Shen Hua) . In Zambia the plant is called lumanda in ciBemba, katolo in kiKaonde, or wusi in chiLunda.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Uses</strong></span></p> <p><span>The plant is considered to have antihypertensive properties. In some places, the plant is primarily cultivated for the production of bast fibre from the stem of the plant. The fibre may be used as a substitute for jute in making burlap.[2] Hibiscus, specifically Roselle, has been used in folk medicine as a diuretic, mild laxative, and treatment for cardiac and nerve diseases and cancer.[3]</span></p> <p><span>The red calyces of the plant are increasingly exported to America and Europe, where they are used as food colourings. Germany is the main importer. It can also be found in markets (as flowers or syrup) in some places such as France, where there are Senegalese immigrant communities. The green leaves are used like a spicy version of spinach. They give flavour to the Senegalese fish and rice dish thiéboudieune. Proper records are not kept, but the Senegalese government estimates national production and consumption at 700 t (770 short tons) per year. Also in Burma their green leaves are the main ingredient in making chin baung kyaw curry.</span></p> <p><span>In East Africa, the calyx infusion, called "Sudan tea", is taken to relieve coughs. Roselle juice, with salt, pepper, asafoetida and molasses, is taken as a remedy for biliousness.</span></p> <p><span>The heated leaves are applied to cracks in the feet and on boils and ulcers to speed maturation. A lotion made from leaves is used on sores and wounds. The seeds are said to be diuretic and tonic in action and the brownish-yellow seed oil is claimed to heal sores on camels. In India, a decoction of the seeds is given to relieve dysuria, strangury and mild cases of dyspepsia. Brazilians attribute stomachic, emollient and resolutive properties to the bitter roots.[4]</span></p> <p><span><strong>Leafy vegetable/Greens</strong></span></p> <p><span>In Andhra cuisine, Hibiscus cannabinus, called Gongura, is extensively used. The leaves are steamed along with lentils and cooked with Dal. The other unique dish prepared is gongura pachadi, it is prepared by mixing fried leaves with spices and made into a Gongura Pacchadi, the most famous dish of Andhra cuisine and is often described as king of all foods of Andhra ethnics(andhrulu)</span></p> <p><span>In Burmese cuisine, called chin baung ywet (lit. sour leaf), the roselle is widely used and considered an affordable vegetable for the population. It is perhaps the most widely eaten and popular vegetable in Burma.[5] The leaves are fried with garlic, dried or fresh prawns and green chili or cooked with fish. A light soup made from roselle leaves and dried prawn stock is also a popular dish.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Beverage</strong></span></p> <p><span>Cuisine: Among the Bodo tribals of Bodoland, Assam (India) the leaves of both hibiscus sabdariffa and hibiscus cannabinus are cooked along with chicken, fish or pork, one of their traditional cuisines</span></p> <p><span>In the Caribbean sorrel drink is made from sepals of the roselle. In Malaysia, roselle calyces are harvested fresh to produce pro-health drink due to high contents of vitamin C and anthocyanins. In Mexico, 'agua de Flor de Jamaica' (water flavored with roselle) frequently called "agua de Jamaica" is most often homemade. Also, since many untrained consumers mistake the calyces of the plant to be dried flowers, it is widely, but erroneously, believed that the drink is made from the flowers of the non-existent "Jamaica plant". It is prepared by boiling dried sepals and calyces of the Sorrel/Flower of Jamaica plant in water for 8 to 10 minutes (or until the water turns red), then adding sugar. It is often served chilled. This is also done in Saint Kitts and Nevis, Guyana, Antigua, Barbados, St. Lucia, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago where it is called 'sorrel'. The drink is one of several inexpensive beverages (aguas frescas) commonly consumed in Mexico and Central America, and they are typically made from fresh fruits, juices or extracts. A similar thing is done in Jamaica but additional flavor is added by brewing the tea with ginger and adding rum. It is a popular drink of the country at Christmas time. It is also very popular in Trinidad &amp; Tobago but cinnamon, cloves and bay leaves are preferred to ginger. In Mali, Senegal, The Gambia, Burkina Faso and Benin calyces are used to prepare cold, sweet drinks popular in social events, often mixed with mint leaves, dissolved menthol candy, and/or various fruit flavors. The Middle Eastern and Sudanese drink "Karkade"(كركديه) is a cold drink made by soaking the dried Karkade flowers in cold water over night in a refrigerator with sugar and some lemon or lime juice added.It is then consumed with or without ice cubes after the flowers have been strained.In Lebanon, sometimes toasted pine nuts are tossed into the drink.</span></p> <p><span>With the advent in the U.S. of interest in south-of-the-border cuisine, the calyces are sold in bags usually labeled "Flor de Jamaica" and have long been available in health food stores in the U.S. for making a tea that is high in vitamin C. This drink is particularly good for people who have a tendency, temporary or otherwise, toward water retention: it is a mild diuretic.</span></p> <p><span>In addition to being a popular homemade drink, Jarritos, a popular brand of Mexican soft drinks, makes a Flor de Jamaica flavored carbonated beverage. Imported Jarritos can be readily found in the U.S.</span></p> <p><span>In the UK the dried calyces and ready-made sorrel syrup are widely and cheaply available in Caribbean and Asian grocers. The fresh calyces are imported mainly during December and January in order to make Christmas and New Year infusions, which are often made into cocktails with additional rum. They are very perishable, rapidly developing fungal rot, and need to be used soon after purchase – unlike the dried product, which has a long shelf-life.</span></p> <p><span>In Africa, especially the Sahel, roselle is commonly used to make a sugary herbal tea that is commonly sold on the street. The dried flowers can be found in every market. Roselle tea is also quite common in Italy where it spread during the first decades of the 20th century as a typical product of the Italian colonies. The Carib Brewery Trinidad Limited, a Trinidad and Tobago brewery, produces a Shandy Sorrel in which the tea is combined with beer.</span></p> <p><span>In Thailand, Roselle is generally drunk as a cool drink,[6] but also as a tea, believed to also reduce cholesterol. It can also be made into a wine.</span></p> <p><span>Hibiscus flowers are commonly found in commercial herbal teas, especially teas advertised as berry-flavoured, as they give a bright red colouring to the drink.</span></p> <p><span>Rosella flowers are sold as Wild Hibiscus flowers in syrup in Australia as a gourmet product. Recipes include filling them with goats cheese, serving them on baguette slices baked with brie, &amp; placing one plus a little syrup, in a champagne flute before adding the champagne when the bubbles cause the flower to open.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Jam and preserves</strong></span></p> <p><span>In Nigeria, rosella jam has been made since Colonial times and is still sold regularly at community fetes and charity stalls. It is similar in flavour to plum jam, although more acidic. It differs from other jams in that the pectin is obtained from boiling the interior buds of the rosella flowers. It is thus possible to make rosella jam with nothing but rosella buds and sugar. Roselle is also used in Nigeria to make a refreshing drink known as Zobo.</span></p> <p><span>In Burma, the buds of the roselle are made into 'preserved fruits' or jams. Depending on the method and the preference, the seeds are either removed or included. The jams, made from roselle buds and sugar, are red and tangy.</span></p> <p><span>"Sorrel jelly" is manufactured in Trinidad.</span></p> <p><span>Rosella Jam is also made in Queensland, Australia as a home-made or speciality product sold at fetes and other community events.[7]</span></p> <p><span><strong>Medicinal uses</strong></span></p> <p><span>Many parts of the plant are also claimed to have various medicinal values. They have been used for such purposes ranging from Mexico through Africa and India to Thailand. Roselle is associated with traditional medicine and is reported to be used as treatment for several diseases such as hypertension and urinary tract infections.[8]</span></p> <p><span>Although Roselle has well documented hypotensive effects,[9] there is currently insufficient evidence to support the benefit of Roselle for either controlling or lowering blood pressure due to a lack of well designed studies that measure the efficacy of Roselle on patients with hypertension.[10]</span></p> <p><span>A double blind, placebo controlled, randomized trial was conducted to determine the effect of Roselle leaf extract on a group of 60 subjects with serum LDL values in the range of 130-190 ml/dl (&lt;130 ml/dl is a goal value for most patients[11]) and no history of coronary heart disease. The experimental group received 1g of Roselle leaf extract while the placebo group received a similar amount of maltodextrin in addition to dietary and physical activity advice. Both groups had decreases in body weight, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides that can likely be attributed to the dietary and physical activity advice. At a dose of 1g/day, Roselle leaf extract did not appear to have a blood lipid lowering effect.[12]</span></p> <p><span>Hibiscus sabdariffa has shown in vitro antimicrobial activity against E. coli.[13] A recent review stated that specific extracts of H. sabdariffa exhibit activities against atherosclerosis, liver disease, cancer, diabetes and other metabolic syndromes.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Phytochemicals</strong></span></p> <p><span>The plants are rich in anthocyanins, as well as protocatechuic acid. The dried calyces contain the flavonoids gossypetin, hibiscetine and sabdaretine. The major pigment, formerly reported as hibiscin, has been identified as daphniphylline. Small amounts of myrtillin (delphinidin 3-monoglucoside), Chrysanthenin (cyanidin 3-monoglucoside), and delphinidin are also present. Roselle seeds are a good source of lipid-soluble antioxidants, particularly gamma-tocopherol.[15]</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span><strong>Production</strong></span></p> <p><span>China and Thailand are the largest producers and control much of the world supply. Thailand invested heavily in roselle production and their product is of superior quality, whereas China's product, with less stringent quality control practices, is less reliable and reputable. The world's best roselle comes from the Sudan, but the quantity is low and poor processing hampers quality. Mexico, Egypt, Senegal, Tanzania, Mali and Jamaica are also important suppliers but production is mostly used domestically.[16]</span></p> <p><span>In the Indian subcontinent (especially in the Ganges Delta region), roselle is cultivated for vegetable fibres. Roselle is called meśta (or meshta, the ś indicating an sh sound) in the region. Most of its fibres are locally consumed. However, the fibre (as well as cuttings or butts) from the roselle plant has great demand in various natural fibre using industries.</span></p> <p><span>Roselle is a relatively new crop to create an industry in Malaysia. It was introduced in early 1990s and its commercial planting was first promoted in 1993 by the Department of Agriculture in Terengganu. The planted acreage was 12.8 ha (30 acres) in 1993, but had steadily increased to peak at 506 ha (1,000 acres) in 2000. The planted area is now less than 150 ha (400 acres) annually, planted with two main varieties.[citation needed] Terengganu state used to be the first and the largest producer, but now the production has spread more to other states. Despite the dwindling hectarage over the past decade or so, roselle is becoming increasingly known to the general population as an important pro-health drink in the country. To a small extent, the calyces are also processed into sweet pickle, jelly and jam. jimmon rubillos</span></p> <p><span><strong>Crop research</strong></span></p> <p><span>In the initial years, limited research work were conducted by University Malaya (UM) and Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI). Research work at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) was initiated in 1999. In many respect, the amount of research work is still considered meagre in supporting a growing roselle industry in Malaysia.</span></p> <p><span>Crop genetic resources &amp; improvement[edit]</span></p> <p><span>Genetic variation is important for plant breeders to increase the crop productivity. Being an introduced species in Malaysia, there is a very limited number of germplasm accessions available for breeding. At present, UKM maintains a working germplasm collection, and also conducts agronomic research and crop improvement.</span></p> <p><span>Mutation breeding[edit]</span></p> <p><span>Genetic variation is important for plant breeders to increase its productivity. Being an introduced crop species in Malaysia, there is a limited number of germplasm accessions available for breeding. Furthermore, conventional hybridization is difficult to carry out in roselle due to its cleistogamous nature of reproduction. Because of this, a mutation breeding programme was initiated to generate new genetic variability.[17] The use of induced mutations for its improvement was initiated in 1999 in cooperation with MINT (now called Malaysian Nuclear Agency), and has produced some promising breeding lines. Roselle is a tetraploid species; thus, segregating populations require longer time to achieve fixation as compared to diploid species. In April 2009, UKM launched three new varieties named UKMR-1, UKMR-2 and UKMR-3, respectively. These three new varieties were developed using variety Arab as the parent variety in a mutation breeding programme which started in 2006.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Natural outcrossing under local conditions</strong></span></p> <p><span>A study was conducted to estimate the amount of outcrossing under local conditions in Malaysia. It was found that outcrossing occurred at a very low rate of about 0.02%. However, this rate is much lower in comparison to estimates of natural cross-pollination of between 0.20% and 0.68% as reported in Jamaica.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Source: Wikipedia</strong></span></p>
MHS 19 G (5 S)
Giant Roselle Seeds (Hibiscus sabdariffa)
  • New
Black sesame seeds (Sesamum...

Black sesame seeds (Sesamum...

Price €1.65 (SKU: P 285 B)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Black sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum)</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;" class="">Price is for package 1 g (350) seeds.</span></strong></h2> <p>Seeds of black sesame are best when lightly fry one minute because it enhances the earthy, nutty taste. It is usually used in Asian dishes in sushi, rice dishes and salads. It is good with eggplant, fish, green vegetables, honey, root vegetables, lemon, pasta, rice, sugar, zucchini. Seeds of black sesame, which are not removed from the membrane, contain as much as 60 percent more calcium hulled. Sesame is considered to be the oldest oilseed in human use.</p> <p>Extremely rich in magnesium and calcium, it helps regulate blood pressure and prevents the appearance of migraines due to a bad state of blood vessels. In addition, suppresses the occurrence of asthma spasms.</p>
P 285 B (1 g)
Black sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum)
  • New

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.
Wild forest banana seeds...

Wild forest banana seeds...

Price €3.05 (SKU: V 125 MY)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Wild forest banana seeds (Musa yunnanensis )</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><strong>A new, cold-tolerant species from the mountains of southwest China.</strong><br>Musa yunnanensis, commonly known as the Yunnan banana or the wild forest banana, is a recently described plant in the banana and plantain family that is native to Yunnan, southern China. The sample was collected in 2005 in Xishuangbanna (an autonomous prefecture on the border with Indochina) at an altitude of 1,150 meters.<br><br>Very fast growing, with slender pseudo stems and bluish petioles. The history of this species in horticultural culture is short but rather confused. We originally introduced it as Ensete wilsonii first because it was misidentified. It was later mistaken for Musa itinerans, but then turned out to be a new species, officially described by Markku Hakkinen in 2007 as Musa yunnanensis. We also had plants for a while as Musa sp. 'Yangtze' in culture.<br><br>Although M. yunnanesis grows in the montane tropical forest, it is both shade and frost tolerant, sensitive to direct sunlight and therefore essentially an underplant. Individuals typically reach a height of about 5 to 5.25 meters as they mature. Bark on pseudo-trunks is coated with wax, which is white with a bluish tinge. The top of the leaves is also bluish, although their undersides are colored red.<br><br>Musa yunnanensis has value to local wildlife, its summer fruits are consumed by birds, bats and possibly elephants.&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"></p>
V 125 MY
Wild forest banana seeds (Musa yunnanensis)
  • New

Variety from Peru
Wild tomato seeds (Solanum...

Wild tomato seeds (Solanum...

Price €1.85 (SKU: P 256 R)
,
5/ 5
<h2 style="font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; color: #333333;"><strong>Wild tomato seeds (Solanum pimpinellifolium)</strong></h2> <h2 style="font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; color: #333333;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><strong>Petite, delicious red tomatoes that grow in abundance.</strong></p> <p>Red Currant tomatoes are the smallest edible tomato, each fruit weighing an average of just three grams and measuring just over a centimeter in diameter. The round, yellow fruits are notable for their intense sweet-tart flavor and firm, juicy texture. They have thin glossy skin with two inner cells that tend to be seedy but pack an exceptionally sweet, true tomato flavor due to their high levels of sugar and acid. The strong, sprawling indeterminate plants are disease resistant and high yielding, producing copious amounts of the tiny fruit throughout the season. The plants have small, delicate leaves with a more acrid odor than other varieties, and the stems of the plants are petite and lanky.</p> <p><strong>Seasons/Availability</strong></p> <p>Yellow Currant tomatoes are available in the summer and fall.</p> <p><strong>Current Facts</strong></p> <p>Red Currant tomatoes are members of the large and diverse Solanaceae family, also known as the Nightshade family, which includes more than three thousand known species. Currant tomatoes are botanically named Solanum Pimpinellifolium, an independent species of tomato, and one of two edible species alongside the common tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum. The miniature fruit hangs in clusters resembling currants, hence their name. There are numerous cultivars of Currant tomatoes, both Red and Yellow types, including Sweet Pea, Sugar Plum, and Hawaiian, which are considered to be among the sweetest varieties. Currant tomatoes have proven to be scientifically very valuable as they are closely related to one of the original wild species, which grows near the coasts of northern Peru, and their DNA has been the starting point for comparing gene evolution within the Solanaceae family. Although Currant tomatoes are a different species, they will readily cross with garden tomatoes, and because of their disease resistance and their habit of producing fruit in long trusses, Currant tomatoes have been cross­bred with other tomato types to create many of the modern cherry tomato cultivars.</p> <p>Days To Maturity: 60 days</p> <p>Fruit Weight: 1 ounce</p> <p>Sun: Full Sun</p> <p>Spread: 18 inches</p> <p>Height: 36-40 inches</p> <p>Sow Method: Indoor Sow</p> <p>Planting Time: Spring</p> <p>Sow Time: 6-8 weeks BLF</p> <p>Thin: 18 inches</p> <p>Life Cycle: Annual</p>
P 256 R
Wild tomato seeds (Solanum pimpinellifolium)
  • New
Rare Papaya Carica...

Rare Papaya Carica...

Price €18.00 (SKU: V 22 CW)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Rare Papaya Carica weberbaueri Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div><span style="color: #333333; font-size: 17px;">A rare and little known, sparsely<span>&nbsp;</span></span><a href="https://www.rarepalmseeds.com/" class="title" title="branched|Split into two or more parts." style="color: #333333; font-size: 17px;">branched</a><span style="color: #333333; font-size: 17px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>shrub or small tree rarely more than 7 m tall with thick branches, large, deeply lobed, palmate leaves and pointed, ridged, orange to red fruits. <br>It is native to montane forests of the Andes in Peru to 3000 m and is cultivated there for its edible, very tasty, aromatic, and refreshing fruits that are eaten fresh, dried, or canned. <br>A liqueur called Cacique is also made from the fruit. Carica weberhaueri tolerates some drought and cold and is best adapted to cultivation in warm<span>&nbsp;</span></span><a href="https://www.rarepalmseeds.com/" class="title" title="temperate|Roughly, a climate where the yearly amplitudes of temperature are greater than the daily amplitudes." style="color: #333333; font-size: 17px;">temperate</a><span style="color: #333333; font-size: 17px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>climates.<br></span></div> <div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.5 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">about 25-28 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2-4 Weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">regular watering during the growth period + dry between waterings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div>
V 22 CW
Rare Papaya Carica weberbaueri Seeds
  • New

Variety from America
Heinz 1350 Tomato Seeds  - 2

1500 Seeds Heinz 1350 Tomato

Price €9.95 (SKU: P 190)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>1500 Seeds Heinz 1350 Tomato</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1500 (5g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Savor classic tomato flavor by adding this heirloom to your garden roster. One of the first Heinz-bred tomato seed varieties that was used to make Heinz ketchup, the Heinz Classic Heirloom tomato (also known as Heinz 1370) offers rich tomato flavor in large (approx 170g), juicy fruits ideal for slicing onto sandwiches or cooking into sauces or stews.</p> <p>Plants (120-150 centimeters high) thrive in many regions and adapt well to growing in large containers. Heinz Classic Heirloom plants bear fruit all season long but ripen the heaviest portion of the crop in summer. Stake these vigorous plants for the best results and easiest harvesting.</p> <p><strong>Nutritional Information</strong></p> <p>The red tomato is listed on most nutritional lists as a superfood. It is packed with the antioxidant vitamins A and C, potassium and the B vitamins for heart health, and above all a powerful carotenoid called lycopene. This phytonutrient, which is responsible for the bright red color of tomatoes, has been studied for its role in fighting various cancers, and its ability to lower cholesterol. When tomatoes are cooked, even more lycopene is made available. Lycopene has been shown to be especially effective when eaten with fat-rich foods such as avocado, olive oil, or nuts. There are the ingredients for a powerhouse salad!</p> <p>1 cup sliced raw red tomatoes:</p> <ul> <li>Calories: 32</li> <li>Carbohydrates: 7g</li> <li>Dietary fiber: 2g</li> <li>Sugars: 5g</li> <li>Protein: 2g</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Vitamin A: 30% DV</li> <li>Vitamin C: 38%</li> <li>Vitamin K: 18%</li> <li>Vitamin B6: 7%</li> <li>Folate: 7%</li> <li>Potassium: 12%</li> <li>Manganese: 10%</li> </ul> <p><strong>Light requirements:</strong> Full sun.</p> <p><strong>Planting:</strong> Space 18 to 36 inches apart, depending on type. (Read the stick tag that comes with the plant for specific spacing recommendations.) Plant deeply, burying 2/3 of the stem.</p> <p><strong>Soil requirements:</strong> Tomatoes need well-drained, nutrient-rich soil. Amend soil with compost or other organic matter prior to planting. Soil pH should be 6.2 to 6.8.</p> <p><strong>Water requirements:</strong> Keep soil consistently moist throughout the growing season. Moisture is critical to prevent cracked fruits and blossom end rot. Mulch soil to reduce water evaporation.</p> <p><strong>Frost-fighting plan:</strong> Tomato is a warm-weather crop—even a light frost will damage plants (28º F to 32º F). Protect newly planted seedlings by covering plants with a frost blanket.</p> <p><strong>Common issues:</strong> Pest-wise, watch out for tomato hornworms (big green caterpillars), slugs, pill bugs, rodents. In addition, humid weather invites fungal diseases like early blight and late blight. Plants may stop setting fruit when temperatures dip below 55˚ F or climb above 90˚ F. Blossom end rot can be a problem, as can misshapen fruit.</p> <p><strong>Harvesting:</strong> In general, perfectly ripe tomatoes show deep color but still feel firm when gently squeezed. Look up your specific variety for more details. Tomatoes do continue to ripen after being picked. Gently grab and twist until the tomato pulls free from the stem, or use a pair of clippers. Cut stems close to fruits.</p> <p><strong>Storage:</strong> Store picked tomatoes at room temperature indoors, or in a shady place outside. Never refrigerate tomatoes, because temperatures below 55° F cause flavor compounds to break down. Tomatoes will store longer if you allow stems and caps to remain in place until you’re ready to eat them. For peak flavor and nutrition, use within a week, although keeping time depends on how ripe fruit is when you pick it.</p> </body> </html>
P 190 (5g)
Heinz 1350 Tomato Seeds  - 2
  • New

This plant is medicinal plant
Baikal skullcap, Chinese...

Baikal skullcap, Chinese...

Price €2.35 (SKU: MHS 64)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Baikal skullcap, Chinese skullcap Seeds (Scutellaria baicalensis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for a Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><i><b>Scutellaria baicalensis</b></i>, with the common name<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Baikal skullcap</b><span>&nbsp;</span>or<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Chinese skullcap</b>, is a species of<span>&nbsp;</span>flowering plant<span>&nbsp;</span>in the family<span>&nbsp;</span>Lamiaceae. The plant is native to<span>&nbsp;</span>China,<span>&nbsp;</span>Korea,<span>&nbsp;</span>Mongolia, and Russia in the<span>&nbsp;</span>Russian Far East<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>Siberia.<sup id="cite_ref-grin_1-2" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Medicinal_plant">Medicinal plant</span></h2> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Traditional_Chinese_medicine">Traditional Chinese medicine</span></h3> <p>It is one of the<span>&nbsp;</span>50 fundamental herbs<span>&nbsp;</span>used in<span>&nbsp;</span>traditional Chinese medicine, where it has the name<span>&nbsp;</span><i>huángqín</i><span>&nbsp;</span>(Chinese:<span>&nbsp;</span><span lang="zh">黄芩</span>).<sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>As a Chinese traditional medicine,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>huang qin</i><span>&nbsp;</span>usually refers to the dried root of<span>&nbsp;</span><i>S. baicalensis</i><span>&nbsp;</span>Georgi,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>S. viscidula</i><span>&nbsp;</span>Bge.,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>S. amoena</i><span>&nbsp;</span>C.H. Wright, and<span>&nbsp;</span><i>S. ikoninkovii</i><span>&nbsp;</span>Ju.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Pharmacology">Pharmacology</span></h3> <div role="note" class="hatnote navigation-not-searchable">Main article:<span>&nbsp;</span>Scutellaria §&nbsp;Constituents and pharmacology</div> <p>Several chemical compounds have been isolated from the root;<span>&nbsp;</span>baicalein,<span>&nbsp;</span>baicalin,<span>&nbsp;</span>wogonin,<span>&nbsp;</span>norwogonin,<span>&nbsp;</span>oroxylin A<span> , </span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>β-sitosterol<span>&nbsp;</span>are the major ones.<sup id="cite_ref-pmid12774393_4-0" class="reference"></sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Names">Names</span></h3> <p>It is important to use the Latin name, as the term 'skullcap' is used for over 200 varieties. Sometimes,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Scutellaria lateriflora</i><span>&nbsp;</span>(North American skullcap) is mistaken for<span>&nbsp;</span><i>S. baicalensis</i>. This confusion can result in the intake of the<span>&nbsp;</span><i>S. lateriflora</i><span>&nbsp;</span>variety which can be processed and contaminated with other plants at high enough levels to be of concern</p>
MHS 64 SB
Baikal skullcap, Chinese skullcap Seeds (Scutellaria baicalensis)
  • New

Cookies are Necessary and help make a website usable by enabling basic functions like page navigation and access to secure areas of the website. The website cannot function properly without these cookies.

Necessary cookies
Necessary cookies help make a website usable by enabling basic functions like page navigation and access to secure areas of the website. The website cannot function properly without these cookies.
Cookie name Provider Purpose Expiry
seeds-gallery.shop www.seeds-gallery.shop This cookie helps keep user sessions open while they are visiting a website, and help them make orders and many more operations such as: cookie add date, selected language, used currency, last product category visited, last seen products, client identification, name, first name, encrypted password, email linked to the account, shopping cart identification. 480 hours
Statistic cookies
Statistic cookies help website owners to understand how visitors interact with websites by collecting and reporting information anonymously.
Cookie name Provider Purpose Expiry
collect Google It is used to send data to Google Analytics about the visitor's device and its behavior. Track the visitor across devices and marketing channels. Session
r/collect Google It is used to send data to Google Analytics about the visitor's device and its behavior. Track the visitor across devices and marketing channels. Session
_ga Google Registers a unique ID that is used to generate statistical data on how the visitor uses the website. 2 years
_gat Google Used by Google Analytics to throttle request rate 1 day
_gd# Google This is a Google Analytics Session cookie used to generate statistical data on how you use the website which is removed when you quit your browser. Session
_gid Google Registers a unique ID that is used to generate statistical data on how the visitor uses the website. 1 day
Content not available