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New products

There are 26 products.

Showing 1-15 of 26 item(s)

Variety from Russia
Eagle Heart Siberian Tomato...

Eagle Heart Siberian Tomato...

Price €1.65 (SKU: VT 80)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Eagle Heart Siberian Tomato Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> Eagle Heart Siberian Tomato is a uniquely colored oxheart that is a sight to see.<br>Mid-season, high-yielding, large-fruited grade of amateur selection. 300g tomato fruits of the beautiful extended heart-shaped form, a pink and crimson color, with gentle sweet pulp. This is a very meaty and smooth tomato that is sweet and delicious.&nbsp;<br><br>Dense, not watery, steady against cracking. The plant is powerful, very resistant to diseases and adverse weather conditions. It is suitable for open fields and greenhouses.<br>80 Days.<script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VT 80 (10)
Eagle Heart Siberian Tomato Seeds
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100 Seeds Habanero Yellow

100 Seeds Habanero Yellow

Price €5.95 (SKU: C 19 Y)
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>100 Seeds Habanero Yellow (Capsicum chinense)</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 100 seeds.</span></strong></h2> <div>The habanero is a variety of chili pepper. Unripe habaneros are green, and they color as they mature. The most common color variants are orange and red, but the fruit may also be white, brown, yellow, green, or purple. Typically, a ripe habanero chili is 2–6 cm (0.8–2.4 in) long. Habanero chilis are very hot, rated 100,000–650,000 on the Scoville scale. The habanero's heat, its flavor, and its floral aroma have made it a popular ingredient in hot sauces and spicy foods.<br><br>The name indicates something or someone from La Habana (Havana). In English, it is sometimes spelled and pronounced habañero, the tilde being added as a hyperforeignism patterned after jalapeño.<br><br><strong>Origin and current use</strong><br>The habanero chili comes from the Amazon, from which it was spread, reaching Mexico. A specimen of a domesticated habanero plant, dated at 8,500 years old, was found at an archaeological site in Peru.[citation needed] An intact fruit of a small domesticated habanero, found in pre-ceramic levels in Guitarrero Cave in the Peruvian highlands, was dated to 6500 BC.<br><br>The habanero chili was disseminated by Spanish colonists to other areas of the world, to the point that 18th-century taxonomists mistook China for its place of origin and called it Capsicum chinense ("the Chinese pepper").<br><br>Today, the largest producer is the Yucatán Peninsula, in Mexico. Habaneros are an integral part of Yucatecan food, accompanying most dishes, either in natural form or purée or salsa. Other modern producers include Belize, Panama, Costa Rica, Colombia, Ecuador, and parts of the United States, including Texas, Idaho, and California.<br><br>The Scotch bonnet is often compared to the habanero, since they are two varieties of the same species, but they have different pod types. Both the Scotch bonnet and the habanero have thin, waxy flesh. They have a similar heat level and flavor. Both varieties average around the same level of pungency, but the actual degree varies greatly from one fruit to another according to genetics, growing methods, climate, and plant stress.<br><br>In 1999, the habanero was listed by Guinness World Records as the world's hottest chili, but it has since been displaced by other peppers. The Bhut jolokia (or ghost pepper) and Trinidad moruga scorpion have since been identified as native Capsicum chinense subspecies even hotter than the habanero. Breeders constantly crossbreed subspecies to attempt to create cultivars that will break the record on the Scoville scale. One example is the Carolina Reaper, a cross between a Bhut jolokia pepper with a particularly pungent red habanero.<br><br><strong>Cultivation</strong><br>Habaneros thrive in hot weather. Like all peppers, the habanero does well in an area with good morning sun and in soil with a pH level around 5 to 6 (slightly acidic). Habaneros which are watered daily produce more vegetative growth but the same number of fruit, with lower concentrations of capsaicin, as compared to plants which are watered only when dry (every seven days). Overly moist soil and roots will produce bitter-tasting peppers. Daily watering during flowering and early setting of fruit helps prevent flower and immature fruit from dropping, but flower dropping rates are reported to often reach 90% even in ideal conditions.<br><br>The habanero is a perennial flowering plant, meaning that with proper care and growing conditions, it can produce flowers (and thus fruit) for many years. Habanero bushes are good candidates for a container garden. In temperate climates, though, it is treated as an annual, dying each winter and being replaced the next spring. In tropical and subtropical regions, the habanero, like other chiles, will produce year round. As long as conditions are favorable, the plant will set fruit continuously.<br><br><strong>Cultivars</strong><br>Several growers have attempted to selectively breed habanero plants to produce hotter, heavier, and larger peppers. Most habaneros rate between 200,000 and 300,000 on the Scoville scale. In 2004, researchers in Texas created a mild version of the habanero, but retained the traditional aroma and flavor. The milder version was obtained by crossing the Yucatán habanero pepper with a heatless habanero from Bolivia over several generations.</div> <div></div> <div>Black habanero is an alternative name often used to describe the dark brown variety of habanero chilis (although they are slightly different, being slightly smaller and slightly more sphere-shaped). Some seeds have been found which are thought to be over 7,000 years old. The black habanero has an exotic and unusual taste, and is hotter than a regular habanero with a rating between 400,000 and 450,000 Scoville units. Small slivers used in cooking can have a dramatic effect on the overall dish. Black habaneros take considerably longer to grow than other habanero chili varieties. In a dried form, they can be preserved for long periods of time, and can be reconstituted in water then added to sauce mixes. Previously known as habanero negro, or by their Nahuatl name, their name was translated into English by spice traders in the 19th century as "black habanero". The word "chocolate" was derived from the Nahuatl word, xocolātl [ʃoˈkolaːt͡ɬ], and was used in the description, as well (as "chocolate habanero"), but it proved to be unpronounceable to the British traders, so it was simply named "black habanero".<br><br>A 'Caribbean Red,' a cultivar within the habanero family, has a citrusy and slightly smoky flavor, with a Scoville rating ranging from 300,000 to 445,000 Scoville units.</div> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
C 19 Y (100 S)
100 Seeds Habanero Yellow
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Variety from Italy

Product with time reduced price
Bianca di Maggio Onion Seeds

Bianca di Maggio Onion Seeds

Regular price €1.95 -9% Price €1.77 (SKU: VE 228)
Offer ends in:
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Bianca di Maggio Onion Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;"><strong>Price for Package of 250 (1 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> This antique Italian classic variety has flattened disk-shaped bulbs with a mild sweet flavor. this white onion is very sweet and mild, used in Italy for pickling, roasting, grilling, and salads. It has a storage life of up to three months.&nbsp;<br><br>These delicious, white onions command a high price at specialty markets.<script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 228
Bianca di Maggio Onion Seeds
  • -9%
  • New

This plant has giant fruits
Giant F1 bell pepper seeds

Giant F1 bell pepper seeds

Price €2.05 (SKU: VE 227)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant F1 bell pepper seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> A hybrid type of bell pepper, the fruits are sweet, dark green in color, weighing up to 450 grams. In the mature stage, the fruits are dark red. Peppers are equally suitable for growing in the open field and in greenhouses. It gives extremely high yields and the fruits can be picked well when they are green and red.<br><strong>Extremely disease-resistant!</strong><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 227 (10 S)
Giant F1 bell pepper seeds
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Red poppy Seeds (Papaver...

Red poppy Seeds (Papaver...

Price €2.05 (SKU: MHS 43 PR)
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5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2 class=""><strong>Red poppy Seeds (Papaver rhoeas)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2000 seeds (0,5g).</strong></span></h2> <p>Papaver rhoeas, with common names including common poppy, corn poppy, corn rose, field poppy, Flanders poppy, and red poppy is an annual herbaceous species of flowering plant in the poppy family Papaveraceae. It is notable as an agricultural weed (hence the common names including "corn" and "field"). Especially in the UK, it is used as a symbol of remembrance of the fallen soldiers and another military, during World War I and thereafter.<br><br>Papaver rhoeas is a variable, erect annual, forming a long-lived soil seed bank that can germinate when the soil is disturbed. In the northern hemisphere it generally flowers in late spring (between May and October in the UK) but if the weather is warm enough other flowers frequently appear at the beginning of autumn. It grows up to about 70 cm (28 in) in height. The stems hold single flowers, which are large and showy, 5–10 cm (2–4 in) across, with four petals that are vivid red, most commonly with a black spot at their base. The petals slightly overlap each other. The plant can produce up to 400 flowers in a warm season, that last only one day. The flower stem is usually covered with coarse hairs that are held at right angles to the surface, helping to distinguish it from Papaver dubium in which the hairs are more usually appressed (i.e. held close to the stem). The capsules are hairless, obovoid (egg-shaped), less than twice as tall as they are wide, with a stigma at least as wide as the capsule. Like many other species of Papaver, the plant exudes white to yellowish latex when the tissues are broken.<br><br>Not all corn poppies that are available commercially have red flowers. Selective breeding has resulted in cultivars in yellow, orange, pink, and white. The Shirley poppy is a well known cultivar. A very pale speckled variety, derived from the Shirley, is also available.<br><br>A nearly black-flowering hybrid, known as 'Evelina', was bred in Italy in the late 1990s, with P. dubium, but does not appear to be available commercially.<br><br><strong>Phytochemistry</strong><br><br>Papaver rhoeas contains the alkaloid called rhoeadine, which is a mild sedative. Rhoeadic acid, papaveric acid and rhoeagenine are also found in this plant.<br><br><strong>Uses</strong><br><br>The commonly grown garden decorative Shirley poppy is a cultivar of this plant.<br><br>The black seeds are edible and can be eaten either on their own or as an ingredient in bread. Oil made from the seed is highly regarded in France.<br><br>The petals contain a red dye which is used in some medicines and wines; also the dried petals are occasionally used to give colour to potpourris.<br><br>In traditional folk medicine, it was used for gout, aches, and pains. The petals were used to create a syrup that was fed to children to help them sleep.</p> </div> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 43 PR
Red poppy Seeds (Papaver rhoeas)
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SURURUCA Seeds (Passiflora...

SURURUCA Seeds (Passiflora...

Price €3.00 (SKU: V 18 PCX)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>SURURUCA Seeds (Passiflora setacea)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p class="">Sururuca is a climbing plant with a perennial rootstock. It produces annually to perennial stems that scramble over the ground or clamber into other plants, supporting themselves by means of tendrils<br><br>The edible fruits are greatly appreciated in the plant's native range, where they are gathered from the wild.<br><br>This passion flower from southern central Brazil is found in thickets and riverine forests. It sports lobed leaves and beautiful white flowers followed by juicy, edible fruits 8 cm (orange pulp) with an excellent, mildly acidic taste.<br><br>Native to Bahia, Mato Grosso and surrounding areas of Brazil.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 18 PCX
SURURUCA Seeds (Passiflora setacea)
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Dwarf tomato seeds Evita

Dwarf tomato seeds Evita

Price €2.25 (SKU: VT 37)
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5/ 5
<div> <h2><strong>Dwarf tomato seeds Evita</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> </div> <div></div> <div> <p>The heart tomato Evita (Solanum lycopersicum) produces small fruits that taste sweet, intense and can be harvested as early as July. For the optimal growth of the heart tomato Evita, a sunny location and permeable, nutrient-rich soil are required.</p> <p class="">USE</p> </div> <div> <p>Fresh consumption, cooking, salad, sauce / dip, soup / stew</p> <p>GROWTH</p> </div> <div> <p>Upright. Rapidly growing.</p> <p>FRUIT</p> </div> <div> <p>The bright red, small fruits have a sweet, intense taste. Ripening time from July. The fruits are round, pod-shaped.</p> <p>LOCATION</p> </div> <div> <p>Preferred location in a sunny location.</p> <p>GROUND</p> </div> <div> <p>Preferred soil rich in humus.</p> <p>WATER</p> </div> <div> <p>Water regularly and let the soil dry off in the meantime.</p> <p>MAINTENANCE</p> </div> <div> <p>It is advisable to draw irrigation ditches between the rows, because many types of vegetables should not be watered from above. In addition: Regular weeding prevents weeds from robbing the vegetables of their strength.</p> <p>PLANT PARTNERS</p> </div> <div> <p>Good planting partners: basil, nasturtium, curly parsley, peppermint, marigold, marigold, real woodruff, zinnia.</p> <p>PLANTING TIME</p> </div> <div> <p>Planting: spring to summer.</p> <p>SOWING TIME</p> </div> <div>Sow outdoors in May.</div> <div>Cover seeds 0.5 - 1 cm with soil. Germination takes place within 6-10 days at 15 ° C soil temperature.</div> <div></div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VT 37 (5 S)
Dwarf tomato seeds Evita
  • New

We recommend this plant! We have tested this plant.

This plant has giant fruits
Giant Armenian reticulate...

Giant Armenian reticulate...

Price €2.50 (SKU: VE 225)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant Armenian reticulate Cucumber Melon seeds</strong></h2><h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" data-mce-style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2>Armenian reticulate cucumber is a variety that is very difficult to find. The fruits are up to 50 cm long, dark green with a mesh, and can reach a weight of 3 kg.<br><br>The plant produces good yields of 40-50 cm long thick dark green cucumbers. Best to harvest the fruits when is 30 cm long. This is one of the biggest cucumbers on the market. It is an excellent and perfect cucumber for salads and gourmet dishes. It has a crisp mild flavor and is easy to digest. The fruits are ready for harvest in 50 days.&nbsp;<br><br>Impress your neighbors and grow a giant cucumber in your home garden!<script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js" type="mce-no/type" data-mce-src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 225 (10 S)
Giant Armenian reticulate Cucumber Melon seeds
  • New

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.
Atemoya Seeds (Annona ×...

Atemoya Seeds (Annona ×...

Price €5.95 (SKU: V 10 AAC)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Atemoya Seeds (Annona × cherimoya)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> The atemoya, Annona × cherimoya, or Annona squamosa × Annona cherimola is a hybrid of two fruits – the sugar-apple (Annona squamosa) and the cherimoya (Annona cherimola) – which are both native to the American tropics. This fruit is popular in Taiwan, where it is known as the "pineapple sugar apple" (鳳梨釋迦), so is sometimes wrongly believed to be a cross between the sugar-apple and the pineapple. In Cuba, it is known as anón, and in Venezuela chirimorinon. In Israel and Lebanon, the fruit is called achta, but in Israel, it is more common to call the fruit Annona as Latin. In Tanzania it is called stafeli dogo ("mini soursop"). In Brazil, the atemoya became popular and in 2011, around 1,200 hectares of atemoia were cultivated in Brazil.<br><br>An atemoya is normally heart-shaped or rounded, with pale-green, easily bruised, bumpy skin. Near the stem, the skin is bumpy as it is in the sugar-apple but becomes smoother like the cherimoya on the bottom. The flesh is not segmented like that of the sugar apple, bearing more similarity to that of the cherimoya. It is very juicy and smooth, tasting slightly sweet and a little tart, reminiscent of a piña colada. The taste also resembles vanilla from its sugar-apple parent. Many inedible, toxic, black seeds are found throughout the flesh of the atemoya. When ripe, the fruit can be scooped out of the shell and eaten chilled.<br><br>Atemoya (Annona cherimola × squamosa) was developed by crossing cherimoya (A. cherimola) with sugar-apple (A. squamosa). Natural hybrids have been found in Venezuela and chance hybrids were noted in adjacent sugar apple and cherimoya groves in Israel during the 1930s and 1940s.<br><br>The first cross was made in 1908 by P.J. Wester, a horticulturist at the USDA's Subtropical Laboratory in Miami. The resulting fruits were of superior quality to the sugar-apple and were given the name "atemoya", a combination of ate, an old Mexican name for sugar-apple, and "moya" from cherimoya. Subsequently, in 1917, Edward Simmons at Miami's Plant Introduction Station successfully grew hybrids that survived a drop in temperature to 26.5 °F (−3.1 °C), showing atemoya's hardiness derived from one of its parents, the cherimoya.<br><br>The atemoya, like other Annona trees, bears protogynous, hermaphroditic flowers, and self-pollination is rare. Therefore, artificial, hand pollination almost always guarantees superior quality fruits. One variety, 'Geffner', produces well without hand pollination. 'Bradley' also produces fair crops without hand pollination, but the fruit has a habit of splitting on the tree.[6] Atemoyas are sometimes misshapen, underdeveloped on one side, as the result of inadequate pollination.<br><br><strong>An atemoya flower, in its female stage, opens between 2:00 and 4:00 pm; between 3:00 pm and 5:00 pm on the following afternoon, the flower converts to its male stage.</strong><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 10 AAC (3 S)
Atemoya Seeds (Annona × cherimoya)
  • New
Black mountain beet seeds

Black mountain beet seeds

Price €1.25 (SKU: P 470 BMT)
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Black mountain beet seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Variety with dark brown or black skin and white meat, long and thin, about 20cm. very adapted to cold and dry climates.<br><br>The black mountain turnip is a root, a tuber with black skin and whitish flesh with a pleasant and slightly spicy flavor. It is harvested in winter and consumed until March. It is finer and tastier than the rest of the turnip varieties.<br><br>It is used for creams or soups, but also for garnish and raw in salads, or fried like potatoes.<br><br>Origin: Les Refardes - Spain</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
P 470 BMT (20 S)
Black mountain beet seeds
  • New

This plant is medicinal plant
Marsh-mallow Seeds (Althaea...

Marsh-mallow Seeds (Althaea...

Price €1.35 (SKU: VE 219)
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Marsh-mallow Seeds (Althaea officinalis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 350&nbsp;(1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><i><b>Althaea officinalis</b></i>, or<span>&nbsp;</span><b>marsh-mallow</b>,<sup id="cite_ref-BSBI07_2-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>is a<span>&nbsp;</span>perennial<span>&nbsp;</span>species indigenous to<span>&nbsp;</span>Europe,<span>&nbsp;</span>Western Asia, and<span>&nbsp;</span>North Africa, which is used in<span>&nbsp;</span>herbalism<span>&nbsp;</span>and as an<span>&nbsp;</span>ornamental plant. A confection made from the root since<span>&nbsp;</span>ancient Egyptian<span>&nbsp;</span>times evolved into today's<span>&nbsp;</span>marshmallow<span>&nbsp;</span>treat, <sup id="cite_ref-S&amp;S_3-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup>but most modern marshmallow treats no longer contain any marsh-mallow root.<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <p>The stems, which die down in the autumn, typically grow 90 to 120&nbsp;cm (3 to 4&nbsp;ft), but can reach<span>&nbsp;</span>2.0&nbsp;m (<span class="frac" role="math">6<span class="sr-only">+</span><span class="num" style="font-size: 11.2px;">1</span>⁄<span class="den" style="font-size: 11.2px;">2</span></span>&nbsp;ft) and put out only a few lateral branches.<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[5]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The leaves are shortly<span>&nbsp;</span>petioled, roundish, ovate-cordate, 50 to 75&nbsp;mm (2 to 3&nbsp;in) long, and about<span>&nbsp;</span>30&nbsp;mm (<span class="frac" role="math">1<span class="sr-only">+</span><span class="num" style="font-size: 11.2px;">1</span>⁄<span class="den" style="font-size: 11.2px;">4</span></span>&nbsp;in) broad, entire or three to five lobed, irregularly toothed at the margin, and thick. They are soft and velvety on both sides, due to a dense covering of stellate hairs. The flowers are shaped like those of the<span>&nbsp;</span>common mallow, but are smaller and of a pale colour, and are either<span>&nbsp;</span>axillary, or in<span>&nbsp;</span>panicles, more often the latter.</p> <p>The<span>&nbsp;</span>stamens<span>&nbsp;</span>are united into a tube, the anthers, kidney-shaped and one-celled. The flowers are in bloom during August and September, and are followed, as in other species of this order, by the flat, round fruit which are popularly called "cheeses".</p> <p>The<span>&nbsp;</span>common mallow<span>&nbsp;</span>is frequently called "marsh mallow" in colloquial terms, but the true marsh mallow is distinguished from all the other mallows growing in<span>&nbsp;</span>Great Britain<span>&nbsp;</span>by the numerous divisions of the outer<span>&nbsp;</span>calyx<span>&nbsp;</span>(six to nine cleft), by the hoary down which thickly clothes the stems and foliage, and by the numerous panicles of blush-coloured flowers, paler than the common mallow. The roots are perennial, thick, long and tapering, very tough and pliant, whitish yellow outside, white and fibrous within.</p> <p>The generic name,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Althaea</i>, is derived from the Greek<span>&nbsp;</span><span lang="grc" title="Ancient Greek (to 1453)-language text">ἄλθειν</span><span>&nbsp;</span>(to cure), from its supposed healing properties.<sup id="cite_ref-S&amp;S_3-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[3]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The name of the family,<span>&nbsp;</span>Malvaceae, is derived from the Latin<span>&nbsp;</span><i><i lang="la" title="Latin-language text">malva</i></i>, a generic name for the mallows and the source of the English common name<span>&nbsp;</span><i>mallow</i>.</p> <p>Most of the mallows have been used as food, and are mentioned by early classic writers with this connection. Mallow was an edible vegetable among the Romans; a dish of marsh mallow was one of their delicacies.<span>&nbsp;</span>Prospero Alpini<span>&nbsp;</span>stated in 1592 that a plant of the mallow kind was eaten by the<span>&nbsp;</span>Egyptians. Many of the poorer inhabitants of<span>&nbsp;</span>Syria<span>&nbsp;</span>subsisted for weeks on herbs, of which marshmallow is one of the most common.<sup class="noprint Inline-Template Template-Fact" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[<i><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (April 2019)">citation needed</span></i>]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>When boiled first and fried with<span>&nbsp;</span>onions<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>butter, the roots are said to form a palatable dish,<sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[6]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>and in times of scarcity consequent upon the failure of the crops, this plant, which grows there in great abundance, is collected heavily as a foodstuff.</p> <h3 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.2em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Phytochemicals">Phytochemicals</span></h3> <p>Chemical constituents include<span>&nbsp;</span>altheahexacosanyl lactone<span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>n</i>-hexacos-2-enyl-1,5-olide),<span>&nbsp;</span>2β-hydroxycalamene<span>&nbsp;</span>(altheacalamene) and<span>&nbsp;</span>altheacoumarin glucoside<span>&nbsp;</span>(5,6-dihydroxycoumarin-5-dodecanoate-6β-<small style="font-size: 11.9px;">D</small>-glucopyranoside), along with the known phytoconstituents<span>&nbsp;</span>lauric acid,<span>&nbsp;</span>β-sitosterol<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>lanosterol.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[7]</sup></p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2> <h3 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.2em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Herbal_medicine">Herbal medicine</span></h3> <p>The leaves, flowers and the root of<span>&nbsp;</span><i>A. officinalis</i><span>&nbsp;</span>(marshmallow) have been used in<span>&nbsp;</span>traditional herbal medicine. This use is reflected in the name of the genus, which comes from the<span>&nbsp;</span>Greek<span>&nbsp;</span><span lang="grc" title="Ancient Greek (to 1453)-language text">ἄλθειν</span><span>&nbsp;</span>(<i><i lang="grc-Latn" title="Ancient Greek (to 1453)-language text">althein</i></i>), meaning "to heal."<sup id="cite_ref-S&amp;S_3-2" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <p>Marshmallow was traditionally used as relief for irritation of<span>&nbsp;</span>mucous membranes,<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[8]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>including use as a<span>&nbsp;</span>gargle<span>&nbsp;</span>for mouth and throat<span>&nbsp;</span>ulcers<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>gastric ulcers.<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[9]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>In Russia, the root syrup is sold without a<span>&nbsp;</span>prescription<span>&nbsp;</span>by<span>&nbsp;</span>pharmacies, with intent to treat minor respiratory ailments.<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <h3 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.2em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Culinary">Culinary</span></h3> <p>The young leaves can be cooked. The flower buds can be pickled.<sup id="cite_ref-:0_11-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[11]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The roots can be peeled, sliced, boiled and sweetened to make candy. Water used to boil any part of the plant can be used as an<span>&nbsp;</span>egg white<span>&nbsp;</span>substitute.<sup id="cite_ref-:0_11-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <p>The root extract (halawa extract) is sometimes used as flavoring in the making of a Middle Eastern snack called<span>&nbsp;</span><i>halva</i>. The later French version of the recipe, called<span>&nbsp;</span><i><i lang="fr" title="French-language text">pâte de guimauve</i></i><span>&nbsp;</span>(or<span>&nbsp;</span><i><i lang="fr" title="French-language text">guimauve</i></i><span>&nbsp;</span>for short), included an egg white<span>&nbsp;</span>meringue<span>&nbsp;</span>and was often flavored with<span>&nbsp;</span>rose water.<span>&nbsp;</span><i><i lang="fr" title="French-language text">Pâte de guimauve</i></i><span>&nbsp;</span>more closely resembles contemporary commercially available<span>&nbsp;</span>marshmallows, which no longer contain<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Althaea officinalis</i>.</p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><br><br><br><br></p> <br> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 219 (1g)
Marsh-mallow Seeds (Althaea officinalis)
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This plant is medicinal plant
Ribwort plantain, English...

Ribwort plantain, English...

Price €1.25 (SKU: VE 216)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Ribwort plantain, English plantain Seeds (Plantago lanceolata)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 560 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;" class=""><i><b>Plantago lanceolata</b></i><span>&nbsp;</span>is a species of<span>&nbsp;</span>flowering plant<span>&nbsp;</span>in the plantain family<span>&nbsp;</span>Plantaginaceae. It is known by the common names<span>&nbsp;</span><b>ribwort plantain</b>,<sup id="cite_ref-BSBI07_1-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span><b>narrowleaf plantain</b>,<sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span><b>English plantain</b>,<sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span><b>ribleaf</b>,<span>&nbsp;</span><b>lamb's tongue</b>, and<span>&nbsp;</span><b>buckhorn</b>.<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>It is a common<span>&nbsp;</span>weed<span>&nbsp;</span>on cultivated or disturbed land.<br><br><span>The plant is a&nbsp;</span>rosette<span>-forming&nbsp;</span>perennial<span>&nbsp;</span>herb<span>, with leafless, silky, hairy&nbsp;</span>flower<span>&nbsp;stems (10–40&nbsp;cm or 3.9–15.7&nbsp;in). The basal leaves are&nbsp;</span>lanceolate<span>&nbsp;spreading or erect, scarcely toothed with 3-5 strong parallel veins narrowed to a short&nbsp;</span>petiole<span>. The flower stalk is deeply furrowed, ending in an ovoid inflorescence of many small flowers each with a pointed bract.&nbsp;</span><sup id="cite_ref-Blamey_5-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[5]</sup><sup class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">:<span>248</span></sup><span>&nbsp;Each inflorescence can produce up to two hundred seeds. Flowers are 4 millimetres (0.16&nbsp;in) (</span>calyx<span>&nbsp;green,&nbsp;</span>corolla<span>&nbsp;brownish), 4 bent back lobes with brown midribs and long white stamens. It is native to temperate Eurasia, widespread throughout the&nbsp;</span>British Isles<span>, but scarce on the most acidic soils (</span>pH<span>&nbsp;&lt; 4.5). It is present and widespread in the Americas and Australia as an&nbsp;</span>introduced species<span>.</span></p> <i style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">Plantago lanceolata</i><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>is native to Eurasia, but has been introduced to North America and many other parts of the world with suitable habitats.</span><br><br><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">Considered to be an indicator of agriculture in<span>&nbsp;</span></span>pollen<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>diagrams,<span>&nbsp;</span></span><i style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">P. lanceolata</i><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>has been found in western<span>&nbsp;</span></span>Norway<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>from the Early<span>&nbsp;</span></span>Neolithic<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>onwards, which is considered an indicator of grazing in that area at the time.</span><sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference" style="color: #202122; font-size: 11.2px;">[7]</sup><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>This would make sense, as<span>&nbsp;</span></span><i style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">P. lanceolata</i><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>thrives in open fields where livestock are frequently disturbing the ground.</span><br><br> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><i>Plantago lanceolata</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is used frequently in<span>&nbsp;</span>herbal teas<span>&nbsp;</span>and other<span>&nbsp;</span>herbal remedies.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[8]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>A tea from the leaves is used as a cough medicine. In the traditional Austrian medicine<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Plantago lanceolata</i><span>&nbsp;</span>leaves have been used internally (as syrup or tea) or externally (fresh leaves) for treatment of disorders of the respiratory tract, skin, insect bites, and infections.<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[9]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The leaves can be eaten when very young.<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">Songbirds eat the seeds, and the leaves are eaten by rabbits.<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Chemistry">Chemistry</span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><i>Plantago lanceolata</i><span>&nbsp;</span>contains<span>&nbsp;</span>phenylethanoids<span>&nbsp;</span>such as<span>&nbsp;</span>acteoside<span>&nbsp;</span>(verbascoside), cistanoside F, lavandulifolioside, plantamajoside and isoacteoside.<sup id="cite_ref-12" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[12]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>It also contains the iridoid glycosides<span>&nbsp;</span>aucubin<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>catalpol.<sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[13]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>These iridoid glycosides make the plant inedible to some herbivores, but others are unperturbed by them--for example, the buckeye butterfly<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Junonia coenia</i>, whose larvae eat the leaves of<span>&nbsp;</span><i>P. lanceolata</i><span>&nbsp;</span>and ingest the iridoid glycosides to make themselves unpalatable to predators.</p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Habitat">Habitat</span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><i>Plantago lanceolata</i><span>&nbsp;</span>can live anywhere from very dry meadows to places similar to a rain forest,<sup id="cite_ref-:0_14-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[14]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>but it does best in open, disturbed areas. It is therefore common near roadsides where other plants cannot flourish; it grows tall if it can do so, but in frequently-mowed areas it adopts a flat growth habit instead. Historically, the plant has thrived in areas where ungulates graze and turn up the earth with their hooves.</p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Reproduction">Reproduction</span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">The mode of reproduction can vary among populations of<span>&nbsp;</span><i>P. lanceolata</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-Jousimo,_Jussi_2014_15-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[15]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Reproduction occurs sexually, with the pollen being wind dispersed for the most part, though the plant is occasionally pollinated by bees.<sup id="cite_ref-Jousimo,_Jussi_2014_15-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[15]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span><i>P. lanceolata</i><span>&nbsp;</span>cannot<span>&nbsp;</span>reproduce asexually<span>&nbsp;</span>in the way that many other species of<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Plantago</i><span>&nbsp;</span>can; instead, it is an obligate<span>&nbsp;</span>outcrosser.</p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Enemies">Enemies</span></h2> <h3 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.2em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Insect_predation">Insect predation</span></h3> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><i>Plantago lanceolata</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is host to many different species of the order<span>&nbsp;</span>Lepidoptera. Species such as<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Junonia coenia,<span>&nbsp;</span>Spilosoma congrua,</i><span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Melitaea cinxia</i><span>&nbsp;</span>lay their eggs on<span>&nbsp;</span><i>P. lanceolata</i><span>&nbsp;</span>plants so they can serve as a food source for the larvae when they hatch.<sup id="cite_ref-16" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[16]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-17" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[17]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The iridoid glycosides in the plant leaves accumulate in the caterpillars and make them unpalatable to predators.</p> <h3 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.2em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Infection_by_powdery_mildew">Infection by powdery mildew</span></h3> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><i>Podosphaera plantaginis</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is a powdery mildew fungus that infects<span>&nbsp;</span><i>P. lanceolata</i>. All of the<span>&nbsp;</span><i>P. lanceolata</i><span>&nbsp;</span>populations are infected by several strains of this powdery mildew fungus.<sup id="cite_ref-18" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[18]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Once the populations are infected, the symptoms are minimal at first. Then, after a few weeks or months lesions start to appear covering the entire surface of the leaves and the stem, making it very noticeable.<sup id="cite_ref-:0_14-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[14]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Another species that infects<span>&nbsp;</span><i>P. lanceolata</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Golovinomyces sordidus</i>. Both of these mildews are obligate<span>&nbsp;</span>biotrophs, meaning that they can only infect living tissue. They cover the surface of the leaves and extend<span>&nbsp;</span>hyphae<span>&nbsp;</span>into the cell matrix in order to extract nutrients.</p> <h4 style="color: #000000; font-size: 14px;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Resistance_to_powdery_mildew">Resistance to powdery mildew</span></h4> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">After the populations are infected, they react in different ways. Some populations of<span>&nbsp;</span><i>P. lanceolata</i><span>&nbsp;</span>are more susceptible to different strains of powdery mildew. Also, some populations have multiple resistance phenotypes where on the other hand, others may only have one resistance phenotype.<sup id="cite_ref-:0_14-2" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[14]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Overall, the populations that have the highest variety of resistance phenotypes will have the highest survival rates particularly when rates of infection are high.<sup id="cite_ref-:0_14-3" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="In_popular_culture">In popular culture</span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">In the UK and Ireland the plant is used by children to play various simple games. In Edinburgh, Scotland this game is called ‘The 1 o’clock gun’ after the gun that fires everyday from Edinburgh Castle. Writer Sean Michael Wilson notes that: "When I was a kid in Edinburgh we used it for a cute wee game called ‘The 1 o’clock gun’ - we twisted the stalk around into a kind of noose, quickly pulled it (with the left hand pulling back sharply and the right hand moving forward) and then the head of the stalk would go shooting off. Piitttt!! We used to see how far we could get it to go - great fun." In the West Country of England the same game is called 'cannonballs'. Another game played with the plant in Scotland and Ireland and possibly also in England is called 'Bishops'. This game is a bit like<span>&nbsp;</span>conkers; a child tries to knock off the head of their friend's stalk using their own stalk, via a fast downward thrust.</p> <br> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 216 (1g)
Ribwort plantain, English plantain Seeds (Plantago lanceolata)
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We recommend this plant! We have tested this plant.
Gargamel Tomato Seeds

Gargamel Tomato Seeds

Price €2.25 (SKU: VT 4 G)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Gargamel Tomato Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;"><strong>Price for a Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> A new variety of tomatoes originating from the USA, from growers Phil Seneca (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA). This variety was named after a fictional character from the Smurfs. Gargamel, the evil wizard who is the main antagonist of the Smurfs, wears a black cloak and red shoes, and the black and red colors of the fruit are reminiscent of Gargamel's clothes.<br><br>The plant is strong, grows tall, grows over 180 cm in height.<br><br>It can be grown on two main stems, and pruning is necessary.<br><br>The fruit is oval, and some of them have pointed tips. The weight of the fruit is about 3.5-4.2 oz. (100-120 g). The color of the fruit will not leave you indifferent. They are black near the stem and orange with red and brown stripes at the top. The fruits resemble flame-colored flowers.<br><br>The taste is sweet, fruity, and tomato-like. The walls are solid and sweet.<br><br>This tomato will be the perfect garnish for your dishes. Delicious to eat fresh too.<br><br>It is a good choice for drying in the sun. Also a good choice for canning whole fruits.<script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VT 4 G (10 S)
Gargamel Tomato Seeds
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Variety from Greece
Organic Hand Harvested...

Organic Hand Harvested...

Price €1.15 (SKU: Z 1 OGSS)
,
5/ 5
<div> <h2 class=""><strong>Organic Hand Harvested Mediterranean Greek Sea Salt Flakes Unrefined Fleur De Sel</strong></h2> </div> <div> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;"><strong>Price for pack of 50 grams.</strong></span></h2> </div> <div></div> <div>Bio Hand Harvested at south Crete island Mediterranean Greek Sea Salt Flakes Unrefined (Fleur de Sel )</div> <div></div> <div>It is considered the best salt. It is formed in the natural cavities of the rocks by the waves of the sea, which, after filling these small or large salt marshes, will come to the sun to evaporate seawater and to form salt flakes on top.&nbsp;</div> <div></div> <div>It has a natural shimmering white color, a gaseous salinity that is not comparable to any kind of salt, as it is enriched with trace elements, minerals, and iodine.</div> <div></div> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
Z 1 OGSS (50g)
Organic Hand Harvested Mediterranean Greek Sea Salt
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This plant is medicinal plant

Ayurveda Plant
Orchid tree - mountain...

Orchid tree - mountain...

Price €1.25 (SKU: T 91)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Orchid tree - mountain ebony seeds (Bauhinia variegata)</strong></h2> <h2 style="color: #232323; font-size: 2rem;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><i><b>Bauhinia variegata</b></i><span>&nbsp;</span>is a species of<span>&nbsp;</span>flowering plant<span>&nbsp;</span>in the legume family,<span>&nbsp;</span>Fabaceae. It is native to an area from China through<span>&nbsp;</span>Southeast Asia<span>&nbsp;</span>to the<span>&nbsp;</span>Indian subcontinent.<sup id="cite_ref-GRIN_2-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Common names include<span>&nbsp;</span><b>orchid tree</b><span>&nbsp;</span>(though not belonging to the family<span>&nbsp;</span>Orchidaceae) and<span>&nbsp;</span><b>mountain ebony</b>.</p> <p>It is a small to medium-sized tree growing to 10–12 metres (33–39&nbsp;ft) tall,<span>&nbsp;</span>deciduous<span>&nbsp;</span>in the<span>&nbsp;</span>dry season. The<span>&nbsp;</span>leaves<span>&nbsp;</span>are 10–20 centimetres (3.9–7.9&nbsp;in) obcordate shaped, long and broad, rounded, and bilobed at the base and apex. The<span>&nbsp;</span>flowers<span>&nbsp;</span>are conspicuous, bright pink or white, 8–12 centimetres (3.1–4.7&nbsp;in) diameter, with five petals. Pollens are elongated, approximately 75 microns in length.</p> <p>The<span>&nbsp;</span>fruit<span>&nbsp;</span>is a<span>&nbsp;</span>seedpod<span>&nbsp;</span>15–30 centimetres (5.9–11.8&nbsp;in) long, containing several<span>&nbsp;</span>seeds. The seedpod dries completely on the tree, and when mature begins to twist into a helix or corkscrew shape, (see<span>&nbsp;</span>below), ultimately exploding open—with a very audible "clack"—to deliver its seeds into the environs.</p> <p>The anatomy of the stem was studied by taking transverse section. Periderm and cortex were seen distinctly. Secondary phloem was wide and continuous cylindrical, it consisted of thin and narrow straight rays, three or four cylinders of discontinuous masses of fibres and randomly distributed sieve elements. Secondary xylem was diffuse porous and it included vessels, fibres, xylem rays and xylem parenchyma. Xylem fibres had thick lignified walls or some had gelatinous walls. Xylem parenchyma cells were abundant in the xylem. Xylem rays were one cell wide; they were straight and consisted of radially elongated thick walled lignified walls. Calcium-oxalate crystals are predominantly prismatic crystals and druses type. Powder microscopical examination showed presence of fibres, parenchymatous cells, periderm and vessel elements. Histochemical analysis of stem showed presence of protein, tannin, lignin and cellulose.<sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[3]</sup></p> <p>The anatomy of the root was studied by taking transverse section. Secondary phloem and secondary xylem were seen distinctly. Secondary phloem had fairly wide rays, dense masses of phloem fibers and radial rows of phloem elements. Secondary xylem had much wider, thin-walled vessels which were either solitary or in radial multiples. The xylem fibers constituted gelatinous type and normal type. Calcium oxalate crystals were predominantly prismatic type. Powder microscopical examination showed presence of xylem parenchyma cells, xylem fibers and vessel elements.<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="In_cultivation">In cultivation</span></h2> <p>This is a very popular<span>&nbsp;</span>ornamental tree<span>&nbsp;</span>in subtropical and tropical climates, grown for its scented flowers and also used as a food item in<span>&nbsp;</span>Indian cuisine. In the<span>&nbsp;</span>Neotropics, it can be used to attract<span>&nbsp;</span>hummingbirds—such as<span>&nbsp;</span>sapphire-spangled emerald<span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>Amazilia lactea</i>),<span>&nbsp;</span>glittering-bellied emerald<span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>Chlorostilbon lucidus</i>), or<span>&nbsp;</span>white-throated hummingbird<span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>Leucochloris albicollis</i>)—into gardens and parks.<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>On the other hand, in some areas it has become<span>&nbsp;</span>naturalised<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>invasive.</p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2> <p>Kachnar is a local name in the Indian subcontinent for the edible buds collected from the tree; it is widely used as an ingredient in many subcontinent recipes. Traditional kachnar curry is prepared using kachnar buds, yogurt, onions and native spices. Kachnar buds are also eaten as a stir-fried vegetable and used to make<span>&nbsp;</span>achaar, a pickle in many parts of the Indian sub-continent.<sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>It shows a good antioxidant and anticancer activity.</p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><br><sup id="cite_ref-GRIN_2-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <br><br> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
T 91 (5 S)
Orchid tree - mountain ebony seeds (Bauhinia variegata)
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_ga Google Registers a unique ID that is used to generate statistical data on how the visitor uses the website. 2 years
_gat Google Used by Google Analytics to throttle request rate 1 day
_gd# Google This is a Google Analytics Session cookie used to generate statistical data on how you use the website which is removed when you quit your browser. Session
_gid Google Registers a unique ID that is used to generate statistical data on how the visitor uses the website. 1 day
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