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Cabbage family

There are 69 products.

Showing 1-15 of 69 item(s)

Variety from Serbia
4000 seeds Futog Cabbage Heirloom  - 5

4000 seeds Futog Cabbage...

Price €9.95 (SKU: VE 25 (20g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Futog Cabbage Seeds Heirloom 4000 seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of  4000 seeds (20g).</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="font-family:verdana, geneva, sans-serif;">Cabbage is cultivated in Futog from the times of 18 century, from the ages of the crowning of the empress Maria Theresia. From the year of 1760, there exist written documents describing the export of cabbage to Vienna. During the decades of cultivation of cabbage in Futog, a population was created that was different according to their quality properties from the others. Producers have beginned in each harvest year to keep only the specified plants for seeds.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family:verdana, geneva, sans-serif;">The long-duration selection was responsible for the creation of the population called “Futoški kupus” (the Futog cabbage), which was important for the fresh consumption, and for souring,</span></p> <p><span style="font-family:verdana, geneva, sans-serif;">as well.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family:verdana, geneva, sans-serif;">The creation of this population, of course, contributed to the convenient agroecological conditions and geographic location of the district of Futog. The geographic region where the fresh Futog cabbage, as well as the sour Futog cabbage,  are produced is the cadastral community of Futog.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-family:verdana, geneva, sans-serif;"><strong>The geographic region</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:verdana, geneva, sans-serif;">Futog is the settlement located of the most fertile part of Pannonian lowland, on the left coast of </span></p> <p><span style="font-family:verdana, geneva, sans-serif;">The Danube, in Serbia. It is located in the middle of the course of the river of Danube, at its 1270 km. It is located about 10 km upstream, on the west side of Novi Sad, the capital city of the autonomous province of Vojvodina.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family:verdana, geneva, sans-serif;"><strong>Geographic region</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:verdana, geneva, sans-serif;">Owing to the influence of the specific geographic climate and to the traditional approaches which are applied during growing and souring, specific sensorial properties are obtained, which make the Futog cabbage, either fresh of sour, different with respect to the other related samples.</span></p>
VE 25 (20g)
4000 seeds Futog Cabbage Heirloom  - 5

Variety from Japan

This plant has giant fruits
Japanese Giant Cabbage Seeds

Japanese Giant Cabbage Seeds

Price €2.65 (SKU: P 400)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Japanese Giant Cabbage Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>It is a gigantic Japanese cabbage, which grows to an enormous size. Interestingly, he does not need any more time than ordinary cabbage to reach that size.</span></p> <p><span>Surely there will be vegetables in your garden that will attract passersby views.</span></p>
P 400
Japanese Giant Cabbage Seeds
Walking Stick Kale - Jersey Cabbage Seeds (Brassica oleracea longata)

Walking Stick Kale - Jersey...

Price €2.85 (SKU: P 374)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Jersey Cabbage Seeds (Brassica oleracea longata)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The Jersey cabbage (Brassica oleracea longata, also known as Jersey kale or cow cabbage) and by a variety of local names including giant cabbage, long jacks, tree cabbage, and the French chour and chou à vacque. It is a variety of cabbage native to the Channel Islands that grows to a great height and was formerly commonly used there as livestock fodder and for making walking sticks.</p> <p>The 'Jersey cabbage' develops a long stalk, commonly reaching 6 to 10 feet (<strong>1.8 to 3.0 m</strong>) in height, and can grow as tall as 18 to 20 feet (<strong>5.5 to 6.1 m</strong>). Historically the stalks were made into walking sticks, of which 30,000 a year were being sold by the early 20th century, many for export. They were also used for fencing and as rafters. Much of the stalk is bare; the islanders stripped leaves to accentuate this effect and induce it to grow without twisting, varnished the stalk, and created a handle either by heat-treating and bending the root end or by planting at an angle to produce a naturally bent root.</p> <p>The lower leaves were fed to livestock, (one variety in Portugal was grown specifically for the purpose), and were reported of great value: The Farmer's Magazine stated in 1836 that five plants would support 100 sheep or 10 cows, and sheep fed them were rumored to produce silky wool up to 25 inches (64 cm) in length. The open cabbage at the top is comparatively small: "the size of the cabbages at the top was so infinitesimal that one seemed forced to the conviction that nature meant them to be stalked, not cabbages".</p> <p>The plant is now rarely grown in the Channel Islands, except for feeding rabbits. Although, it is still cultivated for walking sticks by Philip and Jacquelyn Johnson, who were shown on the BBC One series Countryfile in January 2010.</p> <p><strong>180 days. Heirloom</strong></p> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Ca_NG3ullE" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span style="font-size: 14pt; color: #ff0000;"><strong>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Ca_NG3ullE</strong></span></a></p> </body> </html>
P 374
Walking Stick Kale - Jersey Cabbage Seeds (Brassica oleracea longata)
Savoy Cabbage Seeds "Iron Head"

Savoy Cabbage Seeds Iron Head

Price €1.40 (SKU: VE 90 (1g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Savoy Cabbage Seeds "Iron Head"</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 300 (1 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Iron Head is an excellent early sort. Savoy "Iron Head" is a proven variety that is ready to harvest after just eight weeks. The early variety with striking light green, delicate leaves is the first harvestable savoy variety in the year. The taste is somewhat milder than that of late varieties. Large, medium green heads average 2,5 kg and are perfect for stuffing, braising and soups as well as winter salad and slaw.</p> <p>This variety of Iron Head Savoy is hardly available anymore, so we are happy to be able to offer you this great variety.</p> <h3><span><strong>Sowing:</strong></span></h3> <p><span>Start seeds in flats very early in Spring for early Summer harvest, or 6+ weeks before first Fall hard frost for Winter harvest. A cabbage, does best in good soil for rapid growth, best with later fertilization. Best to keep evenly moist - use mulch. Shallow cultivate for first few weeks. Savoy varieties are extra cold hardy.</span></p>
VE 90 (1g)
Savoy Cabbage Seeds "Iron Head"
  • On sale!

Variety from Serbia
Futog Cabbage Seeds Heirloom 400 seeds  - 4

Futog Cabbage Seeds Heirloom

Price €1.95 (SKU: VE 25 (1g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Futog Cabbage Seeds Heirloom</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of </strong></span><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>200 (1g) </strong></span><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Cabbage is cultivated in Futog from the times of 18 century, from the ages of the crowning of the empress Maria Theresia. From the year of 1760, there exist written documents describing the export of cabbage to Vienna. During the decades of cultivation of cabbage in Futog, a population was created that was different according to their quality properties from the others. Producers have begun in each harvest year to keep only the specified plants for seeds.</p> <p>The long-duration selection was responsible for the creation of the population called “Futoški kupus” (the Futog cabbage), which was important for the fresh consumption, and for souring, as well.</p> <p>The creation of this population, of course, contributed to the convenient agroecological conditions and geographic location of the district of Futog. The geographic region where the fresh Futog cabbage, as well as the sour Futog cabbage, are produced is the cadastral community of Futog.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>The geographic region</strong></p> <p>Futog is the settlement located of the most fertile part of Pannonian lowland, on the left coast of&nbsp;</p> <p>The Danube, in Serbia. It is located in the middle of the course of the river of Danube, at its 1270 km. It is located about 10 km upstream, on the west side of Novi Sad, the capital city of the autonomous province of Vojvodina.</p> <p><strong>Geographic region</strong></p> <p>Owing to the influence of the specific geographic climate and to the traditional approaches which are applied during growing and souring, specific sensorial properties are obtained, which make the Futog cabbage, either fresh of sour, different with respect to the other related samples.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 25 (1g)
Futog Cabbage Seeds Heirloom 400 seeds  - 4
Red Cabbage Seeds

Red Cabbage Seeds

Price €1.85 (SKU: VE 23 (1g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Red&nbsp;Cabbage&nbsp;Seeds - Brassica oleracea var. capitata</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 200 (1g) seeds. </strong></span></h2> <div>This popular deep red compact variety is a heavy producer of tasty round 6-7 inch solid round heads.&nbsp;The traditional cabbage for pickling but is perfect as a colourful and flavoursome winter vegetable or shred finely and add to salads. They have good holding ability or can be stored for a few months.&nbsp;Cabbages are easy to grow, and can keep the whole family fed all year round. It can be eaten fresh or cooked and has an excellent source of vitamin C.</div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
P 94 (1g)
Red Cabbage Seeds
Savoy Cabbage Seeds Vertus  - 3

Savoy Cabbage Seeds Vertus

Price €1.85 (SKU: VE 89 KV (1g))
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Savoy Cabbage Seeds “Vertus“ (Brassica oleracea var. sabauda)</strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 300+- (1 g) seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Savoy cabbages are the most cold-hardy of all, and many consider their very thin, ruffled and blistered leaves to be more delicate in flavor than ordinary cabbage. Large, medium green heads average 4-6 lbs, and are perfect for stuffing, braising and soups as well as winter salad and slaw. Takes lots of frost and snow; not as tolerant of extreme wet as others. Protect from slugs in wet weather - patrol often, use bait or edge beds with copper.</p> <h3><strong>Sowing:</strong></h3> <p>Start seeds in flats very early in Spring for early Summer harvest, or 6+ weeks before first Fall hard frost for Winter harvest. A cabbage, does best in good soil for rapid growth, best with later fertilization. Best to keep evenly moist - use mulch. Shallow cultivate for first few weeks. Savoy varieties are extra cold hardy.</p>
VE 89 KV (1g)
Savoy Cabbage Seeds Vertus  - 3

This plant is medicinal plant

Bosnia and Herzegovina variety
SEA KALE Seeds, Seakale

Sea kale, Sea cole Seeds...

Price €1.95 (SKU: P 235)
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong>Sea kale, Sea cole, Seakale Seeds (Crambe maritima)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p class="">Crambe maritima (common name sea kale, seakale or crambe) is a species of halophytic flowering plant in the genus Crambe of the family Brassicaceae (Cruciferae), that grows wild along the coasts of Europe, from the North Atlantic to the Black Sea.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>Growing to 75 cm (30 in) tall by 60 cm (24 in) wide, it is a mound-forming, spreading perennial. It has large fleshy glaucous collard-like leaves and abundant white flowers. The seeds come one each in globular pods.</p> <p><strong>Distribution</strong></p> <p>Very rare in Northern Ireland, recorded from Counties Down and Antrim and from a number of seaside counties of Ireland.</p> <p><strong>Culinary use</strong></p> <p>The plant is cultivated as a vegetable, related to the cabbage.</p> <p>Along the coast of England, where it is commonly found above high tide mark on shingle beaches, local people heaped loose shingle around the naturally occurring root crowns in springtime, thus blanching the emerging shoots. By the early eighteenth century, it had become established as a garden vegetable, but its height of popularity was the early nineteenth century when sea kale appeared in Thomas Jefferson's Garden Book of 1809. It was also served at the Royal Pavilion in Brighton, when Prince Regent George IV of the United Kingdom (1762–1830) used it as a seaside retreat.</p> <p>The shoots are served like asparagus: steamed, with either a béchamel sauce or melted butter, salt and pepper. It is apt to get bruised or damaged in transport and should be eaten very soon after cutting, this may explain its subsequent decline in popularity. However, given a rich, deep and sandy soil, it is easy to propagate and grow on from root cuttings available from specialist nurseries. Blanching may be achieved by covering it with opaque material or using a deep, loose and dry mulch.</p> <p><strong>As an ornamental plant</strong></p> <p>As an ornamental garden plant, C. maritima has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.</p> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
P 235
SEA KALE Seeds, Seakale
Chinese Cabbage Seeds Michihilli 1.95 - 1

Chinese Cabbage Seeds...

Price €1.55 (SKU: VE 15 (1g))
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Chinese Cabbage&nbsp;Seeds&nbsp;(Brassica pekinensis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 200 seeds (1g).</strong></span></h2> <p>Michihili Chinese Cabbage is tender, crisp and sweet, with a pleasant spicy flavor with early medium maturity. &nbsp;Chinese Cabbage is used like lettuce in salads, cooked like spinach, shredded for slaw, steamed or stir-fried. &nbsp;Plants are 16 to 20 inches tall and 6 inches across at base weighing up to 5lb. Thick green leaves blanch creamy white inside. &nbsp;Michihili Chinese Cabbage is a sure header and keeps well. &nbsp;The variety grows best in warmer weather and matures 70-75 days after sowing.</p> <p>Sow thinly from the last frost through to early autumn in rows 2 ft apart covering with 1/4in of soil.</p> <p>Germination takes 5 to 10 days depending on soil and temperature conditions.</p> <p>When plants are 2 to 3 inches tall, thin or a transplant, spacing plants 18 inches apart. &nbsp;Alternatively, space at 9-12 inches and harvest alternate plants when young.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 15 (1g)
Chinese Cabbage Seeds Michihilli 1.95 - 1

Variety from Italy
Broccoli Ramoso Calabrese Seeds 1.95 - 1

Broccoli Ramoso Calabrese...

Price €1.95 (SKU: P 422)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><strong><em>Broccoli Ramoso Calabrese Seeds</em></strong></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#f40202;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p><span>Old reliable heirloom variety, light green plants, 10 cm green central head, lots of medium sized side shoots, non-uniform in maturity, more productive than many hybrids, excellent quality and flavour.</span></p> <p><span>Sowing instructions: Plant seeds 0.5 inches deep indoors from March-April or directly outdoors from May-June. Transplant seedlings from May-July spacing them 18 inches apart in rows spaced 36 inches apart. Harvest from July-September.</span></p> <p><span>Maturity: 60-70 days Open-pollinated Heirloom</span></p> <h2><strong><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broccoli" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">WIKIPEDIA:</a><br /></strong></h2> <p><b>Broccoli</b> is an edible green plant in the cabbage family whose large flowering head is eaten as a vegetable.</p> <p>The word <i>broccoli</i> comes from the Italian plural of <i><span lang="it" xml:lang="it">broccolo</span></i>, which means "the flowering crest of a cabbage", and is the diminutive form of <i>brocco</i>, meaning "small nail" or "sprout".<sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference">[3]</sup> Broccoli is often boiled or steamed but may be eaten raw.<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup></p> <p>Broccoli is classified in the Italica cultivar group of the species <i>Brassica oleracea</i>. Broccoli has large flower heads, usually green in color, arranged in a tree-like structure branching out from a thick, edible stalk. The mass of flower heads is surrounded by leaves. Broccoli resembles cauliflower, which is a different cultivar group of the same species.</p> <p>Broccoli is a result of careful breeding of cultivated <i>Brassica</i> crops in the northern Mediterranean starting in about the 6th century BC.<sup id="cite_ref-VB_5-0" class="reference">[5]</sup> Since the time of the Roman Empire, broccoli has been considered a uniquely valuable food among Italians.<sup id="cite_ref-NI_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup> Broccoli was brought to England from Antwerp in the mid-18th century by Peter Scheemakers.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[7]</sup>Broccoli was first introduced to the United States by Southern Italian immigrants, but did not become widely popular until the 1920s.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Varieties">Varieties</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/34/Broccoli_plants_growing_in_New_Jersey_in_April.jpg/220px-Broccoli_plants_growing_in_New_Jersey_in_April.jpg" width="220" height="161" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Broccoli plants in a nursery</div> </div> </div> <p>There are three commonly grown types of broccoli. The most familiar is <b>Calabrese broccoli</b>, often referred to simply as "broccoli", named after Calabria in Italy. It has large (10 to 20 cm) green heads and thick stalks. It is a cool season annual crop. <b>Sprouting broccoli</b> has a larger number of heads with many thin stalks. <b>Purple cauliflower</b> is a type of broccoli grown in Europe and North America. It has a head shaped like cauliflower, but consisting of tiny flower buds. It sometimes, but not always, has a purple cast to the tips of the flower buds.</p> <p>Other cultivar groups of <i>Brassica oleracea</i> include cabbage (Capitata Group), cauliflower and Romanesco broccoli (Botrytis Group), kale and collard greens (Acephala Group), kohlrabi (Gongylodes Group), Brussels sprouts (Gemmifera Group), and kai-lan (Alboglabra Group).<sup id="cite_ref-Dixon2007_9-0" class="reference">[9]</sup> Rapini, sometimes called "broccoli raab" among other names, forms similar but smaller heads, and is actually a type of turnip (<i>Brassica rapa</i>). Broccolini or "Tenderstem broccoli" is a cross between broccoli and Chinese broccoli. Beneforté is a variety of broccoli containing 2–3 times more glucoraphanin that was produced by crossing broccoli with a wild Brassica variety, <i>Brassica oleracea</i> var <i>villosa</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference">[10]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Production">Production</span></h2> <table class="wikitable"><tbody><tr><th colspan="2">Broccoli production—2014<br /><small>includes cauliflower,<sup id="cite_ref-fao14_11-0" class="reference">[11]</sup> millions of tonnes</small></th> </tr><tr><th>Country</th> <th>Production</th> </tr><tr><td align="left"><span class="flagicon"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fa/Flag_of_the_People%27s_Republic_of_China.svg/23px-Flag_of_the_People%27s_Republic_of_China.svg.png" width="23" height="15" class="thumbborder" /> </span>People's Republic of China</td> <td><center>9.3</center></td> </tr><tr><td align="left"><span class="flagicon"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/4/41/Flag_of_India.svg/23px-Flag_of_India.svg.png" width="23" height="15" class="thumbborder" /> </span>India</td> <td><center>8.6</center></td> </tr><tr><td align="left"><span class="flagicon"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/a/a4/Flag_of_the_United_States.svg/23px-Flag_of_the_United_States.svg.png" width="23" height="12" class="thumbborder" /> </span>United States</td> <td><center>1.2</center></td> </tr><tr><td align="left"><span class="flagicon"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/9/9a/Flag_of_Spain.svg/23px-Flag_of_Spain.svg.png" width="23" height="15" class="thumbborder" /> </span>Spain</td> <td><center>0.6</center></td> </tr><tr><td align="left"><span class="flagicon"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fc/Flag_of_Mexico.svg/23px-Flag_of_Mexico.svg.png" width="23" height="13" class="thumbborder" /> </span>Mexico</td> <td><center>0.5</center></td> </tr><tr><td align="left"><span class="flagicon"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/0/03/Flag_of_Italy.svg/23px-Flag_of_Italy.svg.png" width="23" height="15" class="thumbborder" /> </span>Italy</td> <td><center>0.4</center></td> </tr><tr><td align="left"><b>World</b></td> <td><center><b>24.2</b></center></td> </tr></tbody></table><p>In 2014, global production of broccoli (combined for production reports with cauliflowers) was 24.2 million tonnes, with China and India together accounting for 74% of the total (table).<sup id="cite_ref-fao14_11-1" class="reference">[11]</sup> Secondary producers, each having one million tonnes or less annually, were the United States, Spain, Mexico and Italy (table).<sup id="cite_ref-fao14_11-2" class="reference">[11]</sup> The US Department of Agriculture reported that national production just of broccoli in 2014 was 0.95 million tonnes, nearly all of which was grown in California.<sup id="cite_ref-12" class="reference">[12]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h3> <p>Broccoli is a cool-weather crop that does poorly in hot summer weather. Broccoli grows best when exposed to an average daily temperature between 18 and 23 °C (64 and 73 °F).<sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference">[13]</sup> When the cluster of flowers, also referred to as a "head" of broccoli, appear in the center of the plant, the cluster is green. Garden pruners or shears are used to cut the head about an inch from the tip. Broccoli should be harvested before the flowers on the head bloom bright yellow.<sup id="cite_ref-14" class="reference">[14]</sup></p> <p>While the heading broccoli variety performs poorly in hot weather, mainly due to insect infestation, the sprouting variety is more resistant, though attention must be paid to sucking insects (such as aphids), caterpillars and whiteflies. Spraying of <i>bacillus thuringiensis</i> can control caterpillar attacks, while a citronella vase may ward off whiteflies.<sup id="cite_ref-15" class="reference">[15]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Pests">Pests</span></h3> <p>Mostly introduced by accident to North America, Australia and New Zealand, "cabbage worms", the larvae of <i>Pieris rapae</i>, the small white butterfly are a common pest in broccoli.<sup id="cite_ref-16" class="reference">[16]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Nutrition">Nutrition</span></h2> <table class="infobox nowrap"><caption>Broccoli, raw (edible parts)</caption> <tbody><tr><th colspan="2">Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)</th> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Energy</th> <td>141 kJ (34 kcal)</td> </tr><tr><td colspan="2"></td> </tr><tr><th scope="row"> <div><b>Carbohydrates</b></div> </th> <td> <div>6.64 g</div> </td> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Sugars</th> <td>1.7 g</td> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Dietary fiber</th> <td>2.6 g</td> </tr><tr><td colspan="2"></td> </tr><tr><th scope="row"> <div><b>Fat</b></div> </th> <td> <div>0.37 g</div> </td> </tr><tr><td colspan="2"></td> </tr><tr><th scope="row"> <div><b>Protein</b></div> </th> <td> <div>2.82 g</div> </td> </tr><tr><td colspan="2"></td> </tr><tr><th colspan="2">Vitamins</th> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Vitamin A equiv. <div>beta-Carotene</div> <div>lutein zeaxanthin</div> </th> <td> <div>(4%)</div> 31 μg <div> <div>(3%)</div> 361 μg</div> <div>1403 μg</div> </td> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Thiamine <span>(B<span><span>1</span></span>)</span></th> <td> <div>(6%)</div> 0.071 mg</td> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Riboflavin <span>(B<span><span>2</span></span>)</span></th> <td> <div>(10%)</div> 0.117 mg</td> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Niacin <span>(B<span><span>3</span></span>)</span></th> <td> <div>(4%)</div> 0.639 mg</td> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Pantothenic acid <span>(B<span><span>5</span></span>)</span></th> <td> <div>(11%)</div> 0.573 mg</td> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Vitamin B<span><span>6</span></span></th> <td> <div>(13%)</div> 0.175 mg</td> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Folate <span>(B<span><span>9</span></span>)</span></th> <td> <div>(16%)</div> 63 μg</td> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Vitamin C</th> <td> <div>(107%)</div> 89.2 mg</td> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Vitamin E</th> <td> <div>(5%)</div> 0.78 mg</td> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Vitamin K</th> <td> <div>(97%)</div> 101.6 μg</td> </tr><tr><td colspan="2"></td> </tr><tr><th colspan="2">Minerals</th> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Calcium</th> <td> <div>(5%)</div> 47 mg</td> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Iron</th> <td> <div>(6%)</div> 0.73 mg</td> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Magnesium</th> <td> <div>(6%)</div> 21 mg</td> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Manganese</th> <td> <div>(10%)</div> 0.21 mg</td> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Phosphorus</th> <td> <div>(9%)</div> 66 mg</td> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Potassium</th> <td> <div>(7%)</div> 316 mg</td> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Sodium</th> <td> <div>(2%)</div> 33 mg</td> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Zinc</th> <td> <div>(4%)</div> 0.41 mg</td> </tr><tr><td colspan="2"></td> </tr><tr><th colspan="2">Other constituents</th> </tr><tr><th scope="row">Water</th> <td>89.3 g</td> </tr><tr><td colspan="2"><hr /><div class="wrap">Link to USDA Database entry</div> </td> </tr><tr><td colspan="2"> <div class="plainlist"> <ul><li>Units</li> <li>μg = micrograms • mg = milligrams</li> <li>IU = International units</li> </ul></div> </td> </tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="wrap">Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.<br /><span class="nowrap"><span>Source: USDA Nutrient Database</span></span></td> </tr></tbody></table><p>As shown on the table, a 100 gram serving of raw broccoli provides 34 kcal and is an excellent source (20% or higher of the Daily Value, DV) of vitamin C and vitamin K. Raw broccoli also contains moderate amounts (10–19% DV) of several B vitamins and the dietary mineral manganese, whereas other essential nutrients are in low content. Broccoli has low content of carbohydrates, protein, fat, and dietary fiber.</p> <p>Boiling broccoli reduces the levels of sulforaphane, with losses of 20–30% after five minutes, 40–50% after ten minutes, and 77% after thirty minutes.<sup id="cite_ref-boil_17-0" class="reference">[17]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-ReferenceA_18-0" class="reference">[18]</sup> However, other preparation methods such as steaming,<sup id="cite_ref-ReferenceA_18-1" class="reference">[18]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-maximize_19-0" class="reference">[19]</sup> microwaving, and stir frying had no significant effect on the compounds.<sup id="cite_ref-boil_17-1" class="reference">[17]</sup></p> <p>Broccoli also contains the carotenoid compounds lutein and zeaxanthin in amounts about 6 times lower than in kale.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Taste">Taste</span></h2> <p>The perceived bitterness of cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli varies from person to person, but the functional underpinnings of this variation are not known. Some research reports that the gene TAS2R38 may be responsible for bitter taste perception in broccoli.<sup id="cite_ref-20" class="reference">[20]</sup> Other factors, such as isothiocyanates and polyphenols, are also likely involved in bitterness perception.<sup id="cite_ref-21" class="reference">[21]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Gallery">Gallery</span></h2> <table><tbody><tr><td> <table><tbody><tr><td> <div class="center"> <div class="floatnone"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sa_broccoli_florets.jpg" class="image" title="Close-ups of broccoli florets"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1c/Sa_broccoli_florets.jpg/500px-Sa_broccoli_florets.jpg" width="500" height="109" class="thumbborder" /></a></div> </div> </td> </tr><tr><td> <div class="gallerytext">Close-ups of broccoli florets </div> </td> </tr></tbody></table><table><tbody><tr><td> <div class="center"> <div class="floatnone"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cavolfiore_Violetto_di_Sicilia.jpg" class="image" title="Sicilian purple broccoli"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/85/Cavolfiore_Violetto_di_Sicilia.jpg/180px-Cavolfiore_Violetto_di_Sicilia.jpg" width="180" height="159" class="thumbborder" /></a></div> </div> </td> </tr><tr><td> <div class="gallerytext">Sicilian purple broccoli </div> </td> </tr></tbody></table><table><tbody><tr><td> <div class="center"> <div class="floatnone"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Fractal_Broccoli.jpg" class="image" title="Romanesco broccoli (actually a cauliflower cultivar), showing fractal forms"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4f/Fractal_Broccoli.jpg/180px-Fractal_Broccoli.jpg" width="180" height="135" class="thumbborder" /></a></div> </div> </td> </tr><tr><td> <div class="gallerytext"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanesco_broccoli" title="Romanesco broccoli">Romanesco broccoli</a> (actually a cauliflower cultivar), showing <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fractal" title="Fractal">fractal</a> forms </div> </td> </tr></tbody></table></td> </tr></tbody></table>
P 422
Broccoli Ramoso Calabrese Seeds 1.95 - 1
Broccoli Corvet Seeds

Broccoli Corvet Seeds

Price €1.65 (SKU: VE 32 (2g))
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Broccoli Corvet Seeds (Brassicaceae Brassica oleracea)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 200 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Delicious, 18 to 28", bluish-green close-beaded heads are 3 to 6". Bears until frost, with many side shoots. Brought with Italian immigrants in the late 1880s. Good for home or market, freezing and canning. Corvet which matures in about 60 days after transplanting. It gives you the best of both worlds – the primary head is large and firm, but after its removal there is a succession of secondary spears.</p> <p>Seed Saving</p> <p>Broccoli usually self-incompatible and must be cross-pollinated by insects. This means there must be a number of plants flowering at the same time. All of the Brassica oleracea crops are the same species and will cross with each other. To maintain purity you have to ensure that only one type flowers at once. The alternative is to isolate them, either by distance (1000 yards for different varieties, 1500 yards for different crops), or by caging them (don't forget they need insects for pollination). Save the seed from at least 5 plants to maintain some genetic diversity.</p> <p>Seed is produced in long pods and should be gathered when the older bottom pods first start to split open. Watch them carefully as they shatter easily when they are fully ripe. Cut the seedpod bearing stems and dry them in a warm place (I put small quantities in a paper grocery bag so I don't lose any seeds). The large seeds are easily handled and cleaned. Of course, it is essential that they are thoroughly dry before storage.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Seed Viability in Years: 3-4 years</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 32 (2g)
Broccoli Corvet Seeds

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.
Ornamental cabbage Seeds

Ornamental cabbage Seeds

Price €2.45 (SKU: P 74)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Flowering Kale Seeds Brassica Oleracea</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 150 seeds (0,5g).</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Ornamental cabbage and kale (also known as “flowering” cabbage and kale) are in the same species (</span><em>Brassica oleracea</em><span>) as edible cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower.  While ornamental cabbage and kale are edible, they tend to have a bitter flavor and are often used in a culinary setting as garnishes.  Ornamental cabbage and kale are prized primarily as colorful additions to home gardens where they are grown for their large rosettes of white, pink, purple, or red leaves.  </span></p> <p><span>Technically, ornamental cabbage and kale are all kales (kales produce leaves in a tight rosette; cabbages produce heads).  But in the horticultural trade, ornamental kale is the term used for types with deeply-cut, curly, frilly, or ruffled leaves.  Ornamental cabbage is the term used for types with broad, flat leaves that are edged in a contrasting color.  </span></p> <p><span>Ornamental cabbage and kale grow approximately one foot wide and 15 inches tall.  There are many cultivars that are commercially available. </span></p> <p></p> </body> </html>
P 74
Ornamental cabbage Seeds
Chinese Mustard Seeds

Chinese Mustard Seeds...

Price €1.35 (SKU: VE 115 (1g))
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Chinese Mustard - Leaf Mustard Seeds (Brassica juncea)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 180 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>Brassica juncea, mustard greens, Indian mustard, Chinese mustard, or leaf mustard is a species of mustard plant. Subvarieties include southern giant curled mustard, which resembles a headless cabbage such as kale, but with a distinct horseradish-mustard flavor. It is also known as green mustard cabbage.</div> <p><strong>Uses </strong></p> <p><strong>Food </strong></p> <p>The leaves, the seeds, and the stem of this mustard variety are edible. The plant appears in some form in African, Italian, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and soul food cuisine. Cultivars of B. juncea are grown as greens, and for the production of oilseed. In Russia, this is the main variety grown for production of mustard oil, which after refining is considered[according to whom?] one of the best vegetable oils around and is widely used in canning, baking and margarine production; and the majority of table mustard there is also made from this species of mustard plant.</p> <p>The leaves are used in African cooking, and leaves, seeds, and stems are used in Indian cuisine, particularly in mountain regions of Nepal, as well as in the Punjab cuisine of India and Pakistan, where a famous dish called sarson da saag (mustard greens) is prepared. B. juncea subsp. tatsai, which has a particularly thick stem, is used to make the Indian pickle called achar, and the Chinese pickle zha cai. The mustard made from the seeds of the B. juncea is called brown mustard. The leaves (raai in Gujarati) are used in many Indian dishes.</p> <p>The Gorkhas of Darjeeling and Sikkim prepare pork with mustard greens (also called rayo in Nepali). It is usually eaten with relish with steamed rice, but could also be eaten with chapati (griddle breads).</p> <p>Brassica juncea is more pungent than the closely related Brassica oleracea greens (kale, cabbage, collard greens, et cetera), and is frequently mixed with these milder greens in a dish of "mixed greens", which may include wild greens such as dandelion. As with other greens in soul food cooking, mustard greens are generally flavored by being cooked for a long period with ham hocks or other smoked pork products. Mustard greens are high in vitamin A and vitamin K.</p> <p>Chinese and Japanese cuisines also make use of mustard greens. In Japanese cuisine it is known as Takana and is often pickled and used as filling in onigiri or as a condiment. A large variety of B. juncea cultivars are used, including zha cai, mizuna, takana (var. integlofolia), juk gai choy, and xuelihong (雪里红 or 雪里蕻; var. crispifolia). Asian mustard greens are most often stir-fried or pickled. A Southeast Asian dish called asam gai choy or kiam chai boey is often made with leftovers from a large meal. It involves stewing mustard greens with tamarind, dried chillies and leftover meat on the bone.</p> <p><strong>Food supplement </strong></p> <p>B. juncea can hyperaccumulate cadmium and many other soil trace elements. Specially cultured, it can be used as a selenium, chromium, iron and zinc food supplement.</p> <p><strong>Green manure</strong></p> <p>Vegetable growers sometimes grow mustard as a green manure. Its main purpose is to act as a mulch, covering the soil to suppress weeds between crops. If grown as a green manure, the mustard plants are cut down at the base when sufficiently grown, and left to wither on the surface, continuing to act as a mulch until the next crop is due for sowing, when the mustard is dug in. In the UK, summer and autumn-sown mustard is cut down from October. April sowings can be cut down in June, keeping the ground clear for summer-sown crops.[citation needed] One of the disadvantages of mustard as a green manure is its propensity to harbor club root.</p> <p><strong>Phytoremediation </strong></p> <p>This plant is used in phytoremediation to remove heavy metals, such as lead, from the soil in hazardous waste sites because it has a higher tolerance for these substances and stores the heavy metals in its cells. The plant is then harvested and disposed of properly. This method is easier and less expensive than traditional methods for the removal of heavy metals. It also prevents erosion of soil from these sites preventing further contamination.</p> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1 - 1,5 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">18-20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1-4 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;</em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 115 (1g)
Chinese Mustard Seeds
Black Mustard Seeds (Brassica Nigra) 1.45 - 1

Black Mustard Seeds...

Price €1.45 (SKU: VE 116 (1g))
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Black Mustard Seeds (Brassica Nigra)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 180 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This annual culinary herb is well-known as the old-fashioned mustard that gave the condiment its start. Quickly grown from Mustard seeds, the Mustard plant produces herb seeds that are ground and used to spice many different foods. The mustard seeds are small, hard and vary in color from dark brown to black. Black Mustard is more powerful in flavor than yellow mustard, but it is not grown commercially due to the difficulty of harvesting with equipment because of the irregularity of plant size. The plant size can vary from 24 inches to 72 inches in height, depending on the conditions where it is growing.</p> <p>The Black Mustard herb plant has a sturdy stalk with wrinkled, lobed, and dark green leaves. Yellow, 4-petaled flowers appear on spikes in early summer. Both the seed and the greens of this herb plant are used. The greens can be cooked or steamed, but as the summer gets hotter, the greens get stronger with a bitter taste. Black Mustard plants are often grown in two crops during the season to keep a supply of the young greens. Black Mustard herb seed comes in the summer heat as the plant bolts. Black Mustard is a prolific self-sower. Harvest the seed to prevent the herb seeds from falling on the ground and producing too much growth for next season.</p> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0,5 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">18-20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1-4 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;</em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 116 (1g)
Black Mustard Seeds (Brassica Nigra) 1.45 - 1

Variety from Italy
2000 Seeds Cauliflower  Romanesco 11 - 4

2000 Seeds Cauliflower...

Price €11.00 (SKU: P 58)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>2000 Seeds Cauliflower Romanesco</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2000 (10g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>Romanesco cauliflowers are a fantastic variety from Italy, producing stunning yellow green heads of spiral rosettes with an excellent flavour visually that resemble a pine cone.  Many Romanesco cauliflowers are spring maturing but this rare one that comes ready in the autumn (Oct-Nov), thus avoiding the need to overwinter it.</div> <div>Start indoors in a warm, well-lighted area from early March through June for the earliest of crops. Sow seeds ¼" deep in good compost. Keep evenly moist. Seedlings emerge in 5-8 days at 70º F.  They do best covered lightly with soil. Alternatively sow directly outside from early April.</div> <div>Transplant seedlings by at least Mid summer. They grow best at 55º to 65º F.  Do not let seedling become more that 5 weeks old because older seedlings do not mature well transplanted.</div> <div>Set plants 18" apart in rows 24" apart.  Transplant seedlings in late June  for Oct - Nov head harvest.</div> <div>Water deeply once a week in dry weather. Cultivate or mulch to control weeds. High fertility and abundant supply of water throughout the growing season are important.</div> <div> </div>
P 58
2000 Seeds Cauliflower  Romanesco 11 - 4

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