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Sunflower family

There are 46 products.

Showing 1-15 of 46 item(s)

Variety from Japan
Burdock – Takinogawa Seeds Japanese Variety

Burdock – Takinogawa Seeds...

Price €1.65 (SKU: MHS 47)
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Burdock – Takinogawa Seeds Japanese Variety</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Burdock is native to temperate Europe and Asia and a most popular variety root vegetable in Japan. “Takinogawa” is a special, late-variety burdock that is rich in flavour. This important Japanese vegetable is essential to many classic Japanese dishes including "kimpira," made with sautéed burdock and carrots. The tap root can be as long as a metre long (36in), they have a texture similar to parsnips and when cooked quickly, retain their crispiness; the outer skin is very thin, similar to carrots.</p> <p>In England, Burdock is best known as an ingredient in the beverage Dandelion and Burdock, the English equivalent of American root beer. The key flavour profile is anise, perhaps a touch of ginger and spice, but generally a feel of summer, hedgerows and fun!</p> <p>Burdock is a biennial, producing a rosette of leaves in the first year, then completing its life cycle by flowering and seeding in the second year. Mature plant can reach 3 feet in height. It is easily grown from seed it prefers a deep and sandy garden soil in partial shade or full sun. It may be sown directly from early spring on into summer, with plenty of time left to get a good harvest of roots.<br /><br />Burdock is the hardiest root vegetable and winters in the garden easily for spring digging. Work the soil deeply for best crop and cook like carrots. Seeds can be sprouted like bean sprouts; nothing goes to waste with this plant.</p> <p><strong>Sowing:</strong> Sow from early spring on into summer <br />Soak seeds for 2 to 4 hours in warm water then sow the burdock seeds about 7mm (¼ in) deep and pat down the row. Burdock seeds germinate in 1 to 2 weeks. Keep weeded and thin to about 10cm (4in) apart. The plant prefers regular watering. The reason for keeping the plants so close together is that it makes the roots grow long and thin, which is desirable, and it lessens the labour involved in digging, as more roots are dug out of a smaller space.</p> <p><strong>Harvesting Burdock: <br /></strong>Moderate harvest of the leaves throughout the season will not deter root development. The burdock roots are ready to harvest after two to four months. You don’t have to wait until the tops are dormant, but of course to obtain the largest possible roots (which can weigh up to two pounds), then harvest after the tops die back in the autumn.</p> <p>Digging the roots can be difficult, unless the soil is a deep sandy loam. The best technique is to trench down the side of the row with a spade, then push the spade in behind the roots and lever them into the trench, being careful not to break them. Also be careful not to break the spade. (This is the part where you are glad you planted them closely together.) Dig and wash the roots and then split them down the length. A large root should be split into at least 4 pieces. Dry the burdock root pieces on screens in a dark, airy location or use a vegetable/fruit dehydrator. When the pieces snap and are internally dry, they may be ground up to make a tincture or stored in plastic bags or glass jars for later use.</p> <p><strong>Culinary Uses: <br /></strong>Very young roots can be eaten raw, but older roots are usually cooked. Cut root into slivers and stir-fry. Young leaves and stalks are eaten raw or cooked. Seeds can be sprouted like bean sprouts; nothing goes to waste with this plant.</p> <p><strong>Medicinal Uses: <br /></strong>Fresh burdock root or the tincture of dried root is taken internally as a treatment for skin complaints. Often combined with dandelion or yellow dock, burdock root is an effective blood purifier used to treat psoriasis, eczema, oily skin, acne, boils, and gout. The leaf may be picked as needed for tea as soon as it reaches sufficient size. For more information on the use of burdock root in home herbal medicine, see the book “Making Plant Medicine.” by Richard A. Cech ISBN: 9780970031204</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>WIKIPEDIA:</strong></p> <p>Arctium is a genus of biennial plants commonly known as burdock, family Asteraceae.[3] Native to the Old World, several species have been widely introduced worldwide.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>Plants of the genus Arctium have dark green leaves that can grow up to 28" (71 cm) long. They are generally large, coarse and ovate, with the lower ones being heart-shaped. They are woolly underneath. The leafstalks are generally hollow. Arctium species generally flower from July through to October.</p> <p>The prickly heads of these plants (burrs) are noted for easily catching on to fur and clothing (being the inspiration for Velcro®[5]), thus providing an excellent mechanism for seed dispersal.[4] Burrs cause local irritation and can possibly cause intestinal hairballs in pets. However, most animals avoid ingesting these plants.</p> <p>Birds are especially prone to becoming entangled with their feathers in the burrs leading to a slow death, as they are unable to free themselves.</p> <p>A large number of species have been placed in genus Arctium at one time or another, but most of them are now classified in the related genus Cousinia. The precise limits between Arctium and Cousinia are hard to define; there is an exact correlation between their molecular phylogeny. The burdocks are sometimes confused with the cockleburs (genus Xanthium) and rhubarb (genus Rheum).</p> <p>The roots of burdock, among other plants, are eaten by the larva of the Ghost Moth (Hepialus humuli). The plant is used as a food plant by other Lepidoptera including Brown-tail, Coleophora paripennella, Coleophora peribenanderi, the Gothic, Lime-speck Pug and Scalloped Hazel.</p> <p>The green, above-ground portions may cause contact dermatitis in humans due to the lactones the plant produces.</p> <p><strong><em>Uses</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Food and drink</strong></p> <p>The taproot of young burdock plants can be harvested and eaten as a root vegetable. While generally out of favour in modern European cuisine, it remains popular in Asia. Arctium lappa is called (牛蒡), pronounced "gobō" (ごぼう) in Japanese or "niúbàng" in Chinese, in Korea burdock root is called "u-eong" (우엉) and sold as "tong u-eong" (통우엉), or "whole burdock". Plants are cultivated for their slender roots, which can grow about one metre long and two centimetres across. Burdock root is very crisp and has a sweet, mild, and pungent flavour with a little muddy harshness that can be reduced by soaking julienned or shredded roots in water for five to ten minutes.</p> <p>Immature flower stalks may also be harvested in late spring, before flowers appear; their taste resembles that of artichoke, to which the burdock is related. The stalks are thoroughly peeled, and either eaten raw, or boiled in salt water.[7] Leaves are also eaten in spring in Japan when a plant is young and leaves are soft. Some A. lappa cultivars are specialized for this purpose. A popular Japanese dish is kinpira gobō (金平牛蒡), julienned or shredded burdock root and carrot, braised with soy sauce, sugar, mirin and/or sake, and sesame oil. Another is burdock makizushi (sushi filled with pickled burdock root; the burdock root is often artificially coloured orange to resemble a carrot).</p> <p>In the second half of the 20th century, burdock achieved international recognition for its culinary use due to the increasing popularity of the macrobiotic diet, which advocates its consumption. It contains a fair amount of dietary fiber (GDF, 6g per 100g), calcium, potassium, amino acids,[8] and is low in calories. It contains a polyphenol oxidase,[9] which causes its darkened surface and muddy harshness by forming tannin-iron complexes. Burdock root's harshness harmonizes well with pork in miso soup (tonjiru) and with Japanese-style pilaf (takikomi gohan).</p> <p>Dandelion and burdock is today a soft drink that has long been popular in the United Kingdom, which has its origins in hedgerow mead commonly drunk in the mediæval period.[10] Burdock is believed to be a galactagogue, a substance that increases lactation, but it is sometimes recommended to be avoided during pregnancy based on animal studies that show components of burdock to cause uterus stimulation.</p> <p>In Europe, burdock root was used as a bittering agent in beer before the widespread adoption of hops for this purpose.</p> <p>The American composer Christian Wolff composed a work for variable performers entitled "Burdocks" in 1970-71.</p> <p><strong>Traditional medicine</strong></p> <p>Folk herbalists considered dried burdock to be a diuretic, diaphoretic, and a blood purifying agent[citation needed]. The seeds of A. lappa are used in traditional Chinese medicine,[citation needed] under the name niubangzi (Chinese: 牛蒡子; pinyin: niúbángzi; Some dictionaries list the Chinese as just 牛蒡 niúbàng.)</p> <p>Burdock is a traditional medicinal herb that is used for many ailments. Burdock root oil extract, also called Bur oil, is currently used in Europe in the belief that it is a useful scalp treatment.[citation needed] Modern studies indicate that burdock root oil extract is rich in phytosterols and essential fatty acids (including rare long-chain EFAs).</p> <p><strong>Burdock and Velcro</strong></p> <p>After taking his dog for a walk one day in the early 1940s, George de Mestral, a Swiss inventor, became curious about the seeds of the burdock plant that had attached themselves to his clothes and to the dog's fur. Under a microscope, he looked closely at the hook system that the seeds use to hitchhike on passing animals aiding seed dispersal, and he realized that the same approach could be used to join other things together. The result of his studies was Velcro.</p> </div>
MHS 47
Burdock – Takinogawa Seeds Japanese Variety
Cardoon artichoke seeds Gigante di romagna (Cynara cardunculus) 1.65 - 1

Cardoon artichoke seeds...

Price €1.65 (SKU: P 383)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Cardoon <span>artichoke </span>seeds Gigante di romagna (Cynara cardunculus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The cardoon (Cynara cardunculus), also called the artichoke thistle is a thistle-like plant in the sunflower family. It is a naturally occurring species that includes the globe artichoke and has many cultivated forms. It is native to the western and central Mediterranean region, where it was domesticated in ancient times.</p> <p>The wild cardoon is a stout herbaceous perennial plant growing 0.8 to 1.5 m (31 to 59 in) tall, with deeply lobed and heavily spined green to grey-green tomentose (hairy or downy) leaves up to 50 cm (20 in) long, with yellow spines up to 3.5 cm long. The flowers are violet-purple, produced in a large, globose, massively spined capitulum up to 6 cm (2 in) in diameter. It is adapted to dry climates, native across an area from Morocco and Portugal east to Libya and Greece and north to France and Croatia; it may also be native to Cyprus, the Canary Islands, and Madeira. In France, it only occurs wild in the Mediterranean south (Gard, Hérault, Aude, Pyrénées-Orientales, Corsica). It has become an invasive weed in the pampas of Argentina and is also considered a weed in Australia and California.</p> <p>In cultivation in the United Kingdom, this plant has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.</p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt;"><strong>Cultivation</strong></span></p> <p>The two main cultivar groups are the cardoon (Cynara cardunculus Cardoon Group, syn. C. cardunculus var. altilis DC), selected for edible leaf stems, and the artichoke (Cynara cardunculus Scolymus Group, sometimes distinguished as Cynara scolymus or C. cardunculus var. scolymus (L.) Fiori), selected for larger edible flower buds. They differ from the wild plant in being larger (up to 2 m tall), much less spiny, and with thicker leaf stems and larger flowers, all characteristics selected by humans for greater crop yield and easier harvest and processing. Wild and cultivated cardoons and artichokes are very similar genetically, and are fully interfertile, but only have very limited ability to form hybrids with other species in the genus Cynara.</p> <p>The earliest description of the cardoon may come from the fourth-century BC Greek writer Theophrastus, under the name κάκτος (Latin: cactus), although the exact identity of this plant is uncertain. The cardoon was popular in Greek, Roman, and Persian cuisine, and remained popular in medieval and early modern Europe. It also became common in the vegetable gardens of colonial America, but fell from fashion in the late 19th century and is now very uncommon.</p> <p>In Europe, cardoon is still cultivated in France (Provence, Savoie, Lyonnais), Spain, and Italy. In the Geneva region, where Huguenot refugees introduced it about 1685, the local cultivar Argenté de Genève ("Cardy")  is considered a culinary specialty. "Before cardoons are sent to table, the stalks or ribs are blanched tying them together and wrapping them round with straw, which is also tied up with cord, and left so for about three weeks". Cardoons also are common vegetables in northern Africa, often used in Algerian or Tunisian couscous.</p> <p>Cardoon stalks can be covered with small, nearly invisible spines that can cause substantial pain if they become lodged in the skin. Several spineless cultivars have been developed to overcome this.</p> <p>Cardoon requires a long, cool growing season (about five months), but it is frost-sensitive. It also typically requires substantial growing space per plant, so is not much grown except where it is regionally popular.</p>
P 383
Cardoon artichoke seeds Gigante di romagna (Cynara cardunculus) 1.65 - 1

Variety from Italy
Rossa di Treviso Chicory Seeds 1.85 - 1

Rossa di Treviso Chicory Seeds

Price €1.85 (SKU: P 168)
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Rossa di Treviso Chicory Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Treviso is a mild variety of radicchio that ranges in size from a small Belgian endive to a large head of Romaine lettuce. Its elongated leaves are deep purple to red with white ribs and overlap one another tightly to form a compact bunch that is similar in shape to Belgian endive. Treviso's crisp, sturdy leaves offer an earthy, bitter edge much milder in flavor than the more mature Treviso Tardivo. Cooking will also further mellow the bitter flavor of Treviso.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Seasons/Availability</strong></p> <p>Treviso is available in the fall and throughout the early spring months.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Current Facts</strong></p> <p>Treviso, botanically a member of Cichorium intybus, is a subspecies of chicory. Also known as radicchio Rosso de Treviso it is a member of the Composite or Asteraceae family. There are two types of radicchio from the Treviso region, a late harvest known as Tardivo and early harvest known as Precoce. Both varieties are protected by the IGP (indicazione geografica protetta) or Protected Geographical Indication certification. The high quality and characteristics of IGP products can be traced back to a specific geographical region.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Nutritional Value</strong></p> <p>The bitter flavor of radicchios such as Treviso is a result of its intybin content, a compound which has been shown to aid in digestion, appetite stimulation and as a purifying agent for the liver and blood.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Applications</strong></p> <p>Treviso, like other bitter chicory greens, can be served fresh or cooked. It can be sautéed, grilled, blanched or slow coked into soups, sauces and risottos. Its leaves are sturdy enough to hold up to heat and can be used as an edible serving cup or as part of a bed for grilled vegetables and meats. Its flavor pairs well with cream based sauces and dressings, parmesan cheese, lemon, orange, olive oil, sausage, prosciutto and anchovies. Treviso will keep, refrigerated, for one to two weeks.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Ethnic/Cultural Info</strong></p> <p>Radicchio Rosso de Treviso has its very own consortium of 140 members known as Consorzio Radicchio di Treviso in Italy whose goal is to educate the public about Treviso as well as protect and uphold its quality and market it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Geography/History</strong></p> <p>Like other varieties of chicory such as Chioggia, Verona and Castelfranco radicchio Treviso is native to the northern Italian region of Veneto, specifically it is from the town it owes its namesake to, Treviso. A registered IGP product, all true radicchio Rosso de Treviso marketed under that name must be grown within the region of Veneto in Treviso, Venice or Padua. Unlike radicchio Treviso di Tardivo which undergoes a second forced growth and lengthy manufacturing process Treviso Precoce is harvested young, cleaned and sent directly to the market. Authentic Treviso can be found in Italy as well as in Europe and in the United States at specialty markets.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
P 168 (0,07g)
Rossa di Treviso Chicory Seeds 1.85 - 1
Chicory - Endive Yellow Heart Curly Seeds (Cichorium endivia)

Chicory - Endive Yellow...

Price €1.85 (SKU: P 417)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Chicory - Endive Yellow Heart Curly Seeds (Cichorium endivia)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 seeds. </strong></span></h2> <p><span>Early maturing variety chicory. Plants form a loose rosette, up to 30 cm in diameter, weighing 300-400 g toothed leaves are medium sized, green exterior color, in the middle of the yellow-green. Grow sowing seeds in the soil or seedling. 2-3 weeks before harvesting is carried out "whitening" of leaves, so they do not taste bitter. Remove spicy bitterness will also help delay in salt water for 10-20 minutes.</span></p> </body> </html>
P 417
Chicory - Endive Yellow Heart Curly Seeds (Cichorium endivia)
Chicory Seeds “Pan di Zucchero”

Chicory Seeds “Pan di...

Price €1.85 (SKU: P 151)
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5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong>Chicory Seeds “Pan di Zucchero”<br /></strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 seeds </strong></span></h2> <p>Sugar Loaf leave chicory.  Upright light green variety with large long and very tight head. Reliable. Our special selections are varieties selected primarily for taste and consistency. Best for fall, but will work in the spring from transplants. Easy to grow and easy to head up. Use cooked or in salads.</p> </div>
P 151
Chicory Seeds “Pan di Zucchero”

Variety from Italy
Radicchio - Chicory Seeds ‘‘Red Verona‘‘  - 2

Radicchio - Chicory Seeds...

Price €1.65 (SKU: VE 34 (1g))
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Radicchio - Chicory Seeds ‘‘Red Verona‘‘</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 500 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>Small, red, cabbage-like heads ready to pick in fall. Leaves are sharp-flavored, use sparingly in green salads. May also be sautéed, steamed or grilled with meats. Garden Hints: Do not plant too early in spring or plants may bolt (go to seed). In early fall, cut off all leaves above the crown. New growth in cool weather produces the small, red, cabbage-like heads.</div> <div>Sun: Full Sun&nbsp;</div> <div>Spread: 4 &nbsp;inches</div> <div>Height: 6 &nbsp;inches</div> <div>Days to Maturity: 90 &nbsp;days</div> <div>Sowing Method: Direct Sow</div>
VE 34 (1g)
Radicchio - Chicory Seeds ‘‘Red Verona‘‘  - 2
Endive Giant Seeds

Endive Giant Seeds

Price €1.65 (SKU: P 269)
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5/ 5
<h2><span><em><strong><span style="text-decoration:underline;color:#000000;">ENDIVE GIANT SEEDS</span><br /></strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Package of 100 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <div>Beware! Once you acquire a taste for this interesting and attractive-looking salad plant, you will find salads based on the ubiquitous Lettuce insipid and dull. Although grown like Lettuce, it has the advantage that it will withstand without complaint both heat and a few degrees of frost. Best if blanched a few days before harvesting and - a personal opinion - tastes better with a home-made French dressing rather than salad cream out of a bottle. If you´ve never grown Endives, do give them a trial.</div>
P 269
Endive Giant Seeds
Endive 'De Ruffec' Salad Seeds

Endive 'De Ruffec' Salad Seeds

Price €1.65 (SKU: P 115 DR)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Endive<strong> 'De Ruffec'</strong> Salad Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Package of 100 seeds. </strong></span></h2> <div>Beware! Once you acquire a taste for this interesting and attractive-looking salad plant, you will find salads based on the ubiquitous Lettuce insipid and dull. Although grown like Lettuce, it has the advantage that it will withstand without complaint both heat and a few degrees of frost. Best if blanched a few days before harvesting and - a personal opinion - tastes better with a home-made French dressing rather than salad cream out of a bottle. If you´ve never grown Endives, do give them a trial.</div> </body> </html>
P 115 DR
Endive 'De Ruffec' Salad Seeds

Jerusalem Artichoke Tubers (Helianthus tuberosus)

Jerusalem Artichoke Tubers...

Price €7.95 (SKU: P 421)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Jerusalem Artichoke Tubers (Helianthus tuberosus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 Tubers.</strong></span></h2> <p><i>Helianthus tuberosus</i> is a herbaceous perennial plant growing to 1.5–3 m (4 ft 11 in–9 ft 10 in) tall with opposite leaves on the upper part of the stem but alternate below.<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup> The leaves have a rough, hairy texture. Larger leaves on the lower stem are broad ovoid-acute and can be up to 30 cm (12 in) long. Leaves higher on the stem are smaller and narrower.</p> <p>The flowers are yellow and produced in capitate flowerheads, which are 5–10 cm (2.0–3.9 in) in diameter, with 10–20 ray florets and 60 or more small disc florets.<sup id="cite_ref-lilly_5-1" class="reference">[5]</sup></p> <p>The tubers are elongated and uneven, typically 7.5–10 cm (3.0–3.9 in) long and 3–5 cm (1.2–2.0 in) thick, and vaguely resembling ginger root in appearance, with a crisp texture when raw. They vary in colour from pale brown to white, red, or purple.<sup id="cite_ref-purdue_3-1" class="reference">[3]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-rhs_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Food_use">Food use</span></h2> <p>Before the arrival of Europeans, Native Americans cultivated <i>H. tuberosus</i> as a food source. The tubers persist for years after being planted, so that the species expanded its range from central North America to the eastern and western regions.<sup class="noprint Inline-Template Template-Fact">[<i><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (September 2017)">citation needed</span></i>]</sup> Early European colonists learned of this, and sent tubers back to Europe, where it became a popular crop and naturalized there. It later gradually fell into obscurity in North America, but attempts to market it commercially have been successful in the late 1900s and early 2000s.<sup id="cite_ref-lilly_5-2" class="reference">[5]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-LevetinEstelle_7-0" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <p>The sunchoke contains about 2% protein, no oil, and little starch. It is rich in the carbohydrate inulin (76%), which is a polymer of the monosaccharide fructose. Tubers stored for any length of time convert their inulin into its component fructose. Jerusalem artichokes have an underlying sweet taste because of the fructose, which is about one and a half times as sweet as sucrose.<sup id="cite_ref-LevetinEstelle_7-1" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <p>It has also been reported as a folk remedy for diabetes.<sup id="cite_ref-LevetinEstelle_7-2" class="reference">[7]</sup> Temperature variances have been shown to affect the amount of inulin the Jerusalem artichoke can produce. When not in tropical regions, it makes less inulin than when it is in a warmer region.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Etymology">Etymology</span></h2> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c2/Sunroot_flowers.jpg/220px-Sunroot_flowers.jpg" class="thumbimage" width="220" height="165" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Jerusalem artichoke flowers</div> </div> </div> <p>Despite one of its names, the Jerusalem artichoke has no relationship to Jerusalem, and it is not a type of artichoke, though the two are distantly related as members of the daisy family. The origin of the "Jerusalem" part of the name is uncertain. Italian settlers in the United States called the plant <i>girasole</i>, the Italian word for sunflower, because of its familial relationship to the garden sunflower (both plants are members of the genus <i>Helianthus</i>). Over time, the name <i>girasole</i> (pronounced closer to <span title="Representation in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)" class="IPA">[d͡ʒiraˈzu:l]</span> in southern Italian dialects) may have been changed to Jerusalem.<sup id="cite_ref-Smith_1807_9-0" class="reference">[9]</sup> In other words, English speakers would have corrupted "girasole artichoke" (meaning, "sunflower artichoke") to Jerusalem artichoke. Another explanation for the name is that the Puritans, when they came to the New World, named the plant with regard to the "New Jerusalem" they believed they were creating in the wilderness.<sup id="cite_ref-LevetinEstelle_7-3" class="reference">[7]</sup> Also, various other names have been applied to the plant, such as the French or Canada potato, <i>topinambour</i>, and lambchoke. Sunchoke, a name by which it is still known today, was invented in the 1960s by Frieda Caplan, a produce wholesaler who was trying to revive the plant's appeal.<sup id="cite_ref-LevetinEstelle_7-4" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <p>The artichoke part of the Jerusalem artichoke's name comes from the taste of its edible tuber. Samuel de Champlain, the French explorer, sent the first samples of the plant to France, noting its taste was similar to that of an artichoke.<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference">[10]</sup> <sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference">[11]</sup></p> <p>The name <i>topinambur</i>, in one account, dates from 1615, when a member of the Brazilian coastal tribe called the Tupinambá visited the Vatican at the same time that a sample of the tuber from Canada was on display there, presented as a critical food source that helped French Canadian settlers survive the winter. The New World connection resulted in the name <i>topinambur</i> being applied to the tuber, the word now used in French, German, Italian, Romanian, Russian, and Spanish.<sup id="cite_ref-12" class="reference">[12]</sup> <sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference">[13]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="History">History</span></h2> <p>Jerusalem artichokes were first cultivated by the Native Americans long before the arrival of the Europeans; this extensive cultivation obscures the exact native range of the species.<sup id="cite_ref-grin_2-1" class="reference">[2]</sup> The French explorer Samuel de Champlain discovered that the Native people of Nauset Harbor in Massachusetts had cultivated roots that tasted like artichoke. The following year, Champlain returned to the same area to discover that the roots had a flavour similar to chard<sup id="cite_ref-NathalieCooke_14-0" class="reference">[14]</sup> and was responsible for bringing the plant back to France. Some time later, Petrus Hondius, a Dutch botanist planted a shrivelled Jerusalem artichoke tuber in his garden at Terneuzen and was surprised to see the plant proliferate.<sup id="cite_ref-NathalieCooke_14-1" class="reference">[14]</sup> Jerusalem artichokes are so well suited for the European climate and soil that the plant multiplies quickly. By the mid-1600s, the Jerusalem artichoke had become a very common vegetable for human consumption in Europe and the Americas and was also used for livestock feed in Europe and colonial America.<sup id="cite_ref-LevetinEstelle_7-5" class="reference">[7]</sup> The French in particular were especially fond of the vegetable, which reached its peak popularity at the turn of the 19th century.<sup id="cite_ref-LevetinEstelle_7-6" class="reference">[7]</sup> The Jerusalem artichoke was titled 'best soup vegetable' in the 2002 Nice Festival for the Heritage of the French Cuisine.</p> <p>The French explorer and Acadia’s first historian, Marc Lescarbot, described Jerusalem artichokes as being “as big as turnips or truffles”, suitable for eating and taste "like chards, but more pleasant.” In 1629, English herbalist and botanist, John Parkinson, wrote that the widely grown Jerusalem artichoke had become very common and cheap in London, so much so “that even the most vulgar begin to despise them.” In contrast, when Jerusalem artichokes first arrived in England, the tubers were "dainties for the Queen".<sup id="cite_ref-NathalieCooke_14-2" class="reference">[14]</sup></p> <p>They have also been called the "Canadian truffle". In France, they are associated, along with rutabagas, with the deprivations of the years of Nazi occupation during World War II, where the rationing and scarcity of traditional foods made them a regular part of the French diet until at the end of the war, they returned to their customary role as animal feed.<sup id="cite_ref-15" class="reference">[15]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation_and_use">Cultivation and use</span></h2> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/45/Sunroot_growing.jpg/220px-Sunroot_growing.jpg" class="thumbimage" width="220" height="244" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Young plants in a garden</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e5/Topinambur_H2ase1.jpg/220px-Topinambur_H2ase1.jpg" class="thumbimage" width="220" height="165" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Sunroot tubers</div> </div> </div> <p>Unlike most tubers, but in common with many other members of the Asteraceae (including the artichoke), the tubers store their carbohydrate as inulin (not to be confused with insulin) rather than as starch. So, Jerusalem artichoke tubers are an important source of inulin used as a dietary fiber in food manufacturing.<sup id="cite_ref-16" class="reference">[16]</sup></p> <p>Crop yields are high, typically 16–20 tonnes/ha for tubers, and 18–28 tonnes/ha green weight for foliage. Jerusalem artichoke also has potential for production of ethanol fuel, using inulin-adapted strains of yeast for fermentation.<sup id="cite_ref-purdue_3-2" class="reference">[3]</sup></p> <p>Jerusalem artichokes are easy to cultivate, which tempts gardeners to simply leave them completely alone to grow. The quality of the edible tubers degrades, however, unless the plants are dug up and replanted in fertile soil. Because even a small piece of tuber will grow if left in the ground, the plant can ruin gardens by smothering or overshadowing nearby plants and can take over huge areas. Farmers growing Jerusalem artichokes who then rotate the crop may have to treat the field with a weedkiller (such as glyphosate) to stop their spread. Each root can make an additional 75 to 200 tubers during a year.</p> <p>The tubers are sometimes used as a substitute for potatoes:<sup id="cite_ref-17" class="reference">[17]</sup> they have a similar consistency, and in their raw form have a similar texture, but a sweeter, nuttier flavor; raw and sliced thinly, they are fit for a salad. Their inulin form of carbohydrates give the tubers a tendency to become soft and mushy if boiled, but they retain their texture better when steamed. The inulin cannot be broken down by the human digestive system<sup id="cite_ref-18" class="reference">[18]</sup> but it is metabolized by bacteria in the colon. This can cause flatulence and, in some cases, gastric pain. <i>Gerard's Herbal</i>, printed in 1621, quotes the English botanist John Goodyer on Jerusalem artichokes:<sup id="cite_ref-19" class="reference">[19]</sup></p> <blockquote class="templatequote"> <p>which way soever they be dressed and eaten, they stir and cause a filthy loathsome stinking wind within the body, thereby causing the belly to be pained and tormented, and are a meat more fit for swine than men.</p> </blockquote> <p>Jerusalem artichokes have 650 mg potassium per 1 cup (150g) serving. They are also high in iron, and contain 10-12% of the US RDA of fiber, niacin, thiamine, phosphorus, and copper.<sup id="cite_ref-20" class="reference">[20]</sup></p> <p>Jerusalem artichokes can be used as animal feed, but they must be washed before being fed to most animals. Pigs can forage, however, and safely eat them directly from the ground. The stalks and leaves can be harvested and used for silage, though cutting the tops greatly reduces the harvest of the roots.</p> <table class="infobox nowrap"><caption>Jerusalem-artichokes, raw</caption> <tbody> <tr> <th colspan="2">Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)</th> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Energy</th> <td>304 kJ (73 kcal)</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Carbohydrates</b></div> </th> <td> <div>17.44 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Sugars</th> <td>9.6 g</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Dietary fiber</th> <td>1.6 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Fat</b></div> </th> <td> <div>0.01 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Protein</b></div> </th> <td> <div>2 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th colspan="2">Vitamins</th> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Thiamine <span>(B<span><span>1</span></span>)</span></th> <td> <div>(17%)</div> 0.2 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Riboflavin <span>(B<span><span>2</span></span>)</span></th> <td> <div>(5%)</div> 0.06 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Niacin <span>(B<span><span>3</span></span>)</span></th> <td> <div>(9%)</div> 1.3 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Pantothenic acid <span>(B<span><span>5</span></span>)</span></th> <td> <div>(8%)</div> 0.397 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin B<span><span>6</span></span></th> <td> <div>(6%)</div> 0.077 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Folate <span>(B<span><span>9</span></span>)</span></th> <td> <div>(3%)</div> 13 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin C</th> <td> <div>(5%)</div> 4 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th colspan="2">Minerals</th> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Calcium</th> <td> <div>(1%)</div> 14 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Iron</th> <td> <div>(26%)</div> 3.4 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Magnesium</th> <td> <div>(5%)</div> 17 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Phosphorus</th> <td> <div>(11%)</div> 78 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Potassium</th> <td> <div>(9%)</div> 429 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"><hr /> <div class="wrap">Link to USDA Database entry</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <div class="plainlist"> <ul> <li>Units</li> <li>μg = micrograms • mg = milligrams</li> <li>IU = International units</li> </ul> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" class="wrap">Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.<br /><span class="nowrap"><span>Source: USDA Nutrient Database</span></span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Fermented_products">Fermented products</span></h3> <p>In Baden-Württemberg, Germany, over 90% of the Jerusalem artichoke crop is used to produce a spirit called "Topinambur<span class="noprint"> (de)</span>", "Topi" or "Rossler".<sup id="cite_ref-21" class="reference">[21]</sup> By the end of the 19th-century, Jerusalem artichokes were being used in Baden to make a spirit called "Jerusalem Artichoke Brandy", "Jerusalem Artichoke", "Topi", "Erdäpfler", "Rossler", or "Borbel".</p> <p>Jerusalem artichoke brandy smells fruity and has a slight nutty-sweet flavour. It is characterised by an intense, pleasing, earthy note. The tubers are washed and dried in an oven before being fermented and distilled. It can be further refined to make "Red Rossler" by adding common tormentil, and other ingredients such as currants, to produce a somewhat bitter and astringent decoction. It is used as digestif, as well as a remedy for diarrhoea or abdominal pain.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Marketing_scheme">Marketing scheme</span></h2> <p>In the 1980s, the Jerusalem artichoke also gained some notoriety when its seeds were planted by Midwestern US farmers at the prodding of an agricultural attempt to save the family farm. This effort was an attempt to teach independent farmers to raise their own food, feed, and fuel. Little market existed for the tuber in that part of the US at the time, but contacts were made with sugar producers, oil and gas companies, and the fresh food market for markets to be developed. Fructose had not yet been established as a mainstay, nor was ethanol used as a main fuel additive as it is today. The only real profits then in this effort were realized by a few first-year growers (who sold some of their seed to other farmers individually as well as with the help of the company attempting this venture). As a result, many of the farmers who had planted large quantities of the crop lost money.</p> </body> </html>
P 421
Jerusalem Artichoke Tubers (Helianthus tuberosus)

Variety from Italy
Artichoke Seeds VIOLET DE PROVENCE

Artichoke Seeds VIOLET DE...

Price €1.95 (SKU: VE 218)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Artichoke Seeds VIOLET DE PROVENCE</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of +-20 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Artichoke ‘Violet de Provence’ is one of the most traditional of Italian vegetables. It is known by a variety of names including Violetta di Provenza, and Poivrade. This delicious medium-sized artichoke develops rich violet-purple headed globes on thistle like plants. <br>Sow from March to August and harvest between May and July. The plants remain productive for at least three years.<br><br>Few dishes are as satisfying to eat as the globe artichoke. Dip the leaves into warm balsamic-bacon dressing and fall in love with a little thistle!</p> <p><strong>Sowing: </strong></p> <p>Sow under glass February to March or sow outdoors once the soil has warmed for cropping the following year. Sow the seeds at a depth of 6mm (¼in), they should germinate in 10 to14 days. <br>Transplant in June to crop in autumn and the following May. They need a position that receives eight hours or more sun per day. <br>Seed sown outdoors flowers the year after sowing. Sow direct when the soil has warmed up in mid spring for cropping the following year. Sow in free draining soil, 2 to 3 seeds in stations 30cm (12in) apart. Thin out so that there is one good plant every 60cm (24in). The thinnings can be transplanted. <br>Artichokes need constant moisture: water well. They thrive in moderate climates near the sea where the soil has a high salt content. Seaweed is said to be the best fertiliser possible for these plants.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation: <br></strong>Keep the plants well watered until established. Apply a mulch around the stems in May. During the summer months hoe regularly and apply a liquid fertiliser at fortnightly intervals. Water thoroughly when the weather is dry. In late autumn cut down the stems and cover the crowns with bracken, leaves or straw. Remove this protective covering in April.</p> <p><strong>Harvesting: <br></strong>Artichokes come in different sizes: baby, medium, and jumbo. All three sizes grow on the same plant. The jumbo grows on the centre stalk, the medium grow on the sides, and the babies at the base. They are not merely immature globes. The globes are harvested before the blossoms open to ensure the best flavour. <br>The size of a mature artichoke is dependent upon its placement on the plant. Those at the top can be enormous while those at the base, shaded by dense leaves, may grow no larger than a ping-pong ball. <br>As soon as the petals begin to open, they are overripe, no matter the size. After harvesting the main head, secondary heads will appear and these too can be used. <br>Expected yield per mature plant: 10 to 12 heads. Productive life: 4 years</p> <p><strong>Storing: <br></strong>Artichokes can be stored briefly in plastic bags to preserve their moisture content.</p> <p><strong>Rotation considerations: <br></strong>Avoid following Jerusalem artichoke or sunflower.</p> <p><strong>Companion Planting: <br></strong>Good companions: Sunflower and Tarragon. <br>Bad companions: None</p> <p><strong>Other Uses: <br></strong>Artichokes provide wonderful shades of green when used as a natural dye.<br>Used in the garden they add structure and height to flower beds. In late summer they have beautiful violet-blue flowers.</p> <p><strong>Origin: <br></strong>The origin of artichokes is unknown, though they are said to have come from the Maghreb (North Africa), where they are still found in the wild state; the seeds of artichokes, probably cultivated, were found during the excavation of Mons Claudianus in Egypt during the Roman period. Globe artichokes are known to have been cultivated at Naples around the middle of the 9th century. <br>The Dutch introduced artichokes to England, where they grew in Henry VIII's garden at Newhall in 1530.</p> <p><strong>Nomenclature: <br></strong>The various names of the artichoke in European languages all ultimately come from Arabic al-kharshuf, through a Northern Italian dialect word, articiocco.<br>The Arabic term Ardi-Shoki which means "ground thorny" is a folk etymology of the English name.</p> <p><strong>The word Artichoke may also refer to: <br></strong>The Cardoon, a related species. <br>Jerusalem artichoke, a species of sunflower<br>Chinese artichoke, a species of woundwort<br>Project Artichoke, a CIA operation</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 218 (1g)
Artichoke Seeds VIOLET DE PROVENCE
Artichoke Seeds Green Globe

Artichoke Seeds Green Globe

Price €1.95 (SKU: VE 217)
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Artichoke&nbsp;Seeds ''Green Globe'' Hardy</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of +-20 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>A perennial vegetable with large edible flower heads. Its ferny thistle-like foliage is also useful in the landscape. The standard green-headed variety, reaching up to 170cm in height. Attractive large blue thistle-like flower heads if allowed to flower. Steamed artichokes are great for dipping in butter or sauces. Under ideal conditions artichokes can be harvested the second season. Consistent quality globe-shaped heads. Height: 120-180cm (4-6ft).</div> <div>Sowing Instructions</div> <div>Site &amp; Soil</div> <div>Sow seeds outdoors in free draining soil in mid spring when the soil has warmed up. Sow 2-3 seeds in stations 30cm (12in) apart. Seed sown outdoors usually flowers the year after sowing.</div> <div>When to Sow</div> <div>Sowing can start as early as late February under cloche and run through to August. Maincrop varieties that are sown in July and August</div> <div>How to</div> <div>Thin out so that there is one good plant every 6cm (4in). The thinnings can be transplanted. After harvesting the main head, secondary heads will appear and these too can be used. In cold areas, cover the plant with a mulch of straw, compost or bracken to protect it through the winter.</div> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 217 (1g)
Artichoke Seeds Green Globe
Corn Salad Lettuce Seeds

Corn Salad Lettuce 2000 Seeds

Price €6.00 (SKU: VE 37)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;" class=""><strong>Corn Salad (Mache) Lettuce 2000 Seeds Heirloom&nbsp;(Valerianella locusta)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong><span style="font-size: 14pt;">Package of 2000 seeds (8g).</span></strong></span><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong><span style="font-size: 14pt;"></span> </strong></span></h2> <div> <div>These miniature salad greens have been popular in central and northern Europe for centuries, and was first popularized by Henry XIV during the 1590's. The dark green leaves are delightfully minty-sweet and productive. Best if grown during cool weather. Very cold hardy.&nbsp;<span style="font-size: 11px; line-height: 1.5em;">45 Days</span></div> </div> <div>Corn Salad is a wonderfully tasty salad crop for early spring and late fall.Harvest the small heads of oval, dark green leaves when 4" across.</div> <div><strong>Wikipedia:</strong></div> <div>Valerianella locusta is a small dicot annual plant of the family Valerianaceae. It is an edible salad green with a characteristic nutty flavor, dark green color, and soft texture. Common names include corn salad (or cornsalad), lamb's lettuce, mâche, fetticus, feldsalat, nut lettuce, field salad and rapunzel. In restaurants that feature French cooking, this salad green may be called doucette or raiponce, as an alternative to mâche, by which it is best known.</div> <div>Description</div> <div>Corn salad, also known as mâche or lamb's lettuce, grows in a low rosette with spatulate leaves up to 15.2 cm long. It is a hardy plant that grows to zone 5, and in mild climates it is grown as a winter green. In warm conditions it tends to bolt to seed.</div> <div>Corn salad grows wild in parts of Europe, northern Africa and western Asia. In Europe and Asia it is a common weed in cultivated land and waste spaces. In North America it has escaped cultivation and become naturalized on both the eastern and western seaboards.</div> <div>As a cultivated crop, it is a specialty of the region around Nantes, France, which is the primary source for mâche in Europe.</div> <div>History</div> <div>Corn salad was originally foraged by European peasants until Jean-Baptiste de La Quintinie, royal gardener of King Louis XIV, introduced it to the world. It has been eaten in Britain for centuries and appears in John Gerard's Herbal of 1597. It was grown commercially in London from the late 18th or early 19th century and appeared on markets as a winter vegetable, however, it only became commercially available there in the 1980s. American president Thomas Jefferson cultivated mâche at his home, Monticello, in Virginia in the early 1800's.</div> <div>The common name corn salad refers to the fact that it often grows as a weed in wheat fields. (The European term for staple grain is "corn".) The Brothers Grimm's tale Rapunzel may have taken its name from this plant.</div> <div>Nutrition</div> <div>Like other formerly foraged greens, corn salad has many nutrients, including three times as much vitamin C as lettuce, beta-carotene, B6, B9, vitamin E, and omega-3 fatty acids. It is best if gathered before flowers appear.</div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 37 (8g)
Corn Salad Lettuce Seeds
Brune D'Hiver Lettuce Seeds

Brune D'Hiver Lettuce Seeds

Price €1.45 (SKU: P 377)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;" class="">Brune D'Hiver Lettuce Seeds</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Compact, hardy, French butterhead-type lettuce that was introduced in 1855. Crunchy green leaves are blushed in reddish- brown color. Plants require little space when growing, and are perfect for fall plantings. Hard to find.</p> <p>Winter Lettuce.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
P 377 (0,05g)
Brune D'Hiver Lettuce Seeds
Winter Purslane, Indian Lettuce Seeds (Claytonia perfoliata)

Winter Purslane, Indian...

Price €1.95 (SKU: P 371)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Winter Purslane, Indian Lettuce Seeds (Claytonia perfoliata)</span></em></strong><strong><em></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Claytonia perfoliata (Indian lettuce, spring beauty, winter purslane, or miner's lettuce ; syn. Montia perfoliata) is a fleshy annual plant native to the western mountain and coastal regions of North America from southernmost Alaska and central British Columbia south to Central America, but most common in California in the Sacramento and northern San Joaquin valleys.</p> <p>Claytonia perfoliata is a rosette-forming plant, growing to a maximum of 40 cm in height, but mature plants can be as small as 1 cm. The cotyledons are usually bright green (rarely purplish or brownish-green), succulent, long and narrow. The first true leaves form a rosette at the base of the plant, and are 0.5–4 cm long, with an often long petiole (exceptionally up to 20 cm long).</p> <p>The small pink or white flowers have five petals 2–6 mm long; they appear from February to May or June, and are grouped 5–40 together above a pair of leaves that are united together around the stem to appear as one circular leaf. Mature plants have numerous erect to spreading stems that branch from the base.</p> <p>It is common in the spring, and it prefers cool, damp conditions. It first appears in sunlit areas after the first heavy rains. Though, the best stands are found in shaded areas, especially in the uplands, into the early summer. As the days get hotter, the leaves turn a deep red color as they dry out.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>The common name miner's lettuce refers to its use by California Gold Rush miners who ate it to get their vitamin C to prevent scurvy. It can be eaten as a leaf vegetable. Most commonly it is eaten raw in salads, but it is not quite as delicate as other lettuce. Sometimes it is boiled like spinach, which it resembles in taste.</p> <p>It is widely naturalized in western Europe. It was introduced there in the eighteenth century, possibly by the naturalist Archibald Menzies, who brought it to Kew Gardens in 1794.</p> </body> </html>
P 371
Winter Purslane, Indian Lettuce Seeds (Claytonia perfoliata)
Mixture of Best Lettuce Seeds  - 2

Mixture of Best Lettuce Seeds

Price €1.85 (SKU: P 361)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Mixture of Best Lettuce Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 550 seeds (0,5g).</strong></span></h2> <p>A mixture of several kinds of the best lettuce. It can be collected (cut) several times over a period of growth. It can be grown outdoors or green house even in bigger flower pot on the balcony.</p> <p>Lettuce plants does not need much care except water.</p>
P 361
Mixture of Best Lettuce Seeds  - 2

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