Last customers

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    Thomas, Austria
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    Vuckovic, Austria
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    Milan, Bosnia and Herzegovina
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    geneilton do carmo costa, Brazil
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    Gladys , Chile
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    Michaela , Germany
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Varieties from BiH

There are 10 products.

Showing 1-10 of 10 item(s)

Become our seed supplier Seeds Gallery - 1

Become our seed supplier

Price €0.00 (SKU: )
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Become our seed supplier</strong></h2> <h2><strong>What does it take to become our seed supplier?</strong></h2> <p>In order to become our supplier, you need to have a video and pictures of the fruits of the plants you offer us, with your personal details and a date on paper that will be clearly visible (with your name and email address you use for PayPal).</p> <p>If it is a vegetable (tomato, pepper, cucumber ...) you need to know the exact name of the variety, because if you use any other name and we cannot find the information on the internet, then we are not interested in those seeds.</p> <p>You will need to send us a smaller amount of seed (20) so that we can perform seed germination testing. After that, we can arrange a further purchase of the seed from you.</p> <p>We make payments exclusively through PayPal (there is no other payment option).</p> </body> </html>
Become our seed supplier Seeds Gallery - 1

Bosnia and Herzegovina variety
Wild Fig Seeds (from...

Wild Fig Seeds (from...

Price €1.85 (SKU: V 19 WF)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Wild Fig Seeds (from Herzegovina)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>We brought this fig from Herzegovina and we found it in the mountains in complete wilderness. Its habitat was rocky and dry, which means that it is resistant to poor soil conditions. There are also constant droughts in that part and despite the fact that the plant did not get much water, it did not bother it to grow at all. The fruits are smaller than other varieties of figs and dark purple when ripe. Although the fruits are small they are very tasty and sweet. From reliable sources, we learned that where we took it, the temperature dropped to -15C in winter.</p> <p>Fig flowers are difficult to spot because they grow inside figs and such flowers are pollinated by the so-called. fig wasps, which develop in the fruits of the wild fig. The difference between a tame and a wild fig is that the tame fig blooms only with female flowers while the wild fig has female and male flowers.</p> <p>Wild figs grow at an abnormal rate compared to tame ones.</p> </body> </html>
V 19 WF (20 S)
Wild Fig Seeds (from Herzegovina)

Bosnia and Herzegovina variety
Giant Bosnian Plum Seeds...

Giant Bosnian Plum Seeds...

Price €2.55 (SKU: V 197 BS)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant Bosnian Plum Seeds (Prunus domestica)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 5 (6,5g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This variety is from Bosnia, and very resistant to diseases. We came across this plum by chance at a farmer's yard and were immediately amazed by both the size and taste of this variety.</p> <p>Unfortunately, the owner did not know what the name of the variety was, he only knew how to tell us that this plum variety was planted by his great-grandfather and that since then this plum has been kept and planted regularly so that this variety spreads and preserves as much as possible.</p> <p>We asked him how this plum tolerates winter and low temperatures, and he answered that the temperature in their village drops to minus 24 degrees Celsius, and this was no problem for this plum.</p> <p>The fruits are really huge and weigh an average of 70 to 85 grams per fruit.</p> <p>A plum is a fruit of the subgenus Prunus of the genus Prunus. The subgenus is distinguished from other subgenera (peaches, cherries, bird cherries, etc.) in the shoots having terminal bud and solitary side buds (not clustered), the flowers in groups of one to five together on short stems, and the fruit having a groove running down one side and a smooth stone (or pit).</p> <p>Mature plum fruit may have a dusty-white waxy coating that gives them a glaucous appearance. This is an epicuticular wax coating and is known as "wax bloom". Dried plum fruits are called dried plums or prunes, although, in American English, prunes are a distinct type of plum, and may have pre-dated the fruits now commonly known as plums.</p> <p>Typically it forms a large shrub or a small tree. It may be somewhat thorny, with white blossom, borne in early spring. The oval or spherical fruit varies in size, but can be up to 8 cm across, and is usually sweet (dessert plum), though some varieties are sour and require cooking with sugar to make them palatable. Like all Prunus fruits, it contains a single large seed, usually called a stone, which is discarded when eating.</p> <p>Plums are grown commercially in orchards, but modern rootstocks, together with self-fertile strains, training and pruning methods, allow single plums to be grown in relatively small spaces. Their early flowering and fruiting means that they require a sheltered spot away from frosts and cold winds.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation and uses</strong></p> <p>The taste of the plum fruit ranges from sweet to tart; the skin itself may be particularly tart. It is juicy and can be eaten fresh or used in jam-making or other recipes. Plum juice can be fermented into plum wine. In central England, a cider-like alcoholic beverage known as plum jerkum is made from plums.</p> <p>Dried plums (or prunes) are also sweet and juicy and contain several antioxidants. Plums and prunes are known for their laxative effect. This effect has been attributed to various compounds present in the fruits, such as dietary fiber, sorbitol,[7] and isatin.[8] Prunes and prune juice are often used to help regulate the functioning of the digestive system. Dried prune marketers in the US have, in recent years, begun marketing their product as "dried plums". This is due to "prune" having negative connotations connected with elderly people suffering from constipation.</p> <p>Dried, salted plums are used as a snack, sometimes known as saladito or salao. Various flavors of dried plum are available at Chinese grocers and specialty stores worldwide. They tend to be much drier than the standard prune. Cream, ginseng, spicy, and salty are among the common varieties. Licorice is generally used to intensify the flavor of these plums and is used to make salty plum drinks and toppings for shaved ice or baobing.</p> <p>Pickled plums are another type of preserve available in Asia and international specialty stores. The Japanese variety, called umeboshi, is often used for rice balls, called onigiri or omusubi. The ume, from which umeboshi are made, is more closely related, however, to the apricot than to the plum.</p> <p>As with many other members of the rose family, plum seeds contain cyanogenic glycosides, including amygdalin.[10] These substances are capable of decomposing into a sugar molecule and hydrogen cyanide gas. While plum seeds are not the most toxic within the rose family (the bitter almond is the most toxic[citation needed]), large doses of these chemicals from any source are hazardous to human health. On the other hand, plums are considered a source of phytochemical compounds with beneficial effects on health.</p> <p>Prune kernel oil is made from the fleshy inner part of the pit of the plum.</p> <p>Plums come in a wide variety of colours and sizes. Some are much firmer-fleshed than others, and some have yellow, white, green or red flesh, with equally varying skin colour.</p> <p>Though not available commercially, the wood of plum trees is used by hobbyists and other private woodworkers for musical instruments, knife handles, inlays, and similar small projects.</p> <p>When it flowers in the early spring, a plum tree will be covered in blossoms, and in a good year approximately 50% of the flowers will be pollinated and become plums. Flowering starts after 80 growing degree days.</p> <p>If the weather is too dry, the plums will not develop past a certain stage, but will fall from the tree while still tiny, green buds, and if it is unseasonably wet or if the plums are not harvested as soon as they are ripe, the fruit may develop a fungal condition called brown rot. Brown rot is not toxic, and very small affected areas can be cut out of the fruit, but unless the rot is caught immediately, the fruit will no longer be edible. Plum is used as a food plant by the larvae of some Lepidoptera, including November moth, willow beauty and short-cloaked moth.</p> <p><strong>The Serbian plum (Serbian: шљива / šljiva) is the third most produced in the world. In the Balkans, plum is converted into an alcoholic drink named slivovitz (plum brandy) (Serbian: шљивовица / šljivovica).</strong></p> <p>A large number of plums, of the Damson variety, are also grown in Hungary, where they are called szilva and are used to make lekvar (a plum paste jam), palinka (traditional fruit brandy), plum dumplings, and other foods. The region of Szabolcs-Szatmár, in the northeastern part of the country near the borders with Ukraine and Romania, is a major producer of plums.</p> <p>The plum blossom or meihua (Chinese: 梅花; pinyin: méihuā), along with the peony, are considered traditional floral emblems of China.</p> <p>The plum is commonly used in China, Yunnan area, to produce a local plum wine with a smooth, sweet, fruity taste and approximately 12% alcohol by volume.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 197 BS (6,5g)
Giant Bosnian Plum Seeds (Prunus domestica)

This plant is medicinal plant

Bosnia and Herzegovina variety
Bladder Campion Seeds...

Bladder Campion Seeds...

Price €1.25 (SKU: MHS 120 SV)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Bladder Campion Seeds (Silene vulgaris)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><i><b>Silene vulgaris</b></i><span>, the </span><b>bladder campion</b><sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference"></sup><span> or </span><b>maidenstears</b><span>,</span><sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> is a plant species of the genus </span><i>Silene</i><span> of the family </span><i>Caryophyllaceae</i><span>. It is native to </span>Europe<span>, where in some parts it is eaten but is also widespread in North America, where it is a common wildflower in meadows, open woods, and fields.</span></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Gastronomy">Gastronomy</span></h2> <p><span>The young shoots and the leaves may be used as food in some countries of the Mediterranean region. The tender leaves may be eaten raw in salads. The older leaves are usually eaten boiled or fried, sauteed with garlic as well as in omelets.</span></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Crete_and_Cyprus">Crete and Cyprus</span></h3> <p>In<span> </span>Crete,<span> </span>it is called Agriopapoula (Αγριοπάπουλα) and the locals eat its leaves and tender shoots browned in<span> </span>olive oil.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <p>In<span> </span>Cyprus,<span> </span>it is very widely eaten, so much that it has, in recent years, come back into being cultivated and sold in shops in bunches. Two of the common Cypriot names are<span> </span><i>Tsakrostoukkia</i><span> </span>and<span> </span><i>Strouthouthkia</i><span> </span>(στρουθούθκια).</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Italy">Italy</span></h3> <p>In Italy the leaves of this plant may be used also as an ingredient in<span> </span>risotto. It is commonly known as<span> </span><i>sculpit</i>,<span> </span><i>stridolo</i>, or by the obsolete scientific name<span> </span><i>Silene inflata</i>, as well as<span> </span><i>s-ciopetin</i>, or<span> </span><i>grixol</i><span> </span>in<span> </span>Veneto, and<span> </span><i>nenkuz</i>, or<span> </span><i>sclopit</i><span> </span>in<span> </span>Friuli.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Spain_(La_Mancha)">Spain (La Mancha)</span></h3> <p>Formerly in<span> </span>La Mancha<span> </span>region of<span> </span>Spain, where<span> </span><i>Silene vulgaris</i><span> </span>leaves are valued as a<span> </span>green vegetable, there were people known as<span> </span><i>"collejeros"</i><span> </span>who picked these plants and sold them. Leaves are small and narrow, so it takes many plants to obtain a sizeable amount.</p> <p>In La Mancha the<span> </span><i>Silene vulgaris</i><span> </span>leaves, locally known as<span> </span><i>"collejas"</i>, were mainly used to prepare a dish called<span> </span><i>gazpacho viudo</i><span> </span>(widower gazpacho). The ingredients were<span> </span>flatbread<span> </span>known as<span> </span><i>tortas de gazpacho</i><span> </span>and a<span> </span>stew<span> </span>prepared with<span> </span><i>Silene vulgaris</i><span> </span>leaves.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup><span> </span>Other dishes prepared with these leaves in Spain include<span> </span><i>"potaje de<span> </span>garbanzos<span> </span>y collejas"</i>,<span> </span><i>"huevos revueltos<span> </span>con collejas"</i><span> </span>and<span> </span><i>"arroz<span> </span>con collejas"</i>.</p> <h3>Serbia</h3> <p>In Serbia, dried flowers are used to make tea and treat women's diseases.</p> </body> </html>
MHS 120 SV
Bladder Campion Seeds (Silene vulgaris)

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.

Bosnia and Herzegovina variety
Blackthorn or Sloe Seeds (Prunus spinosa) 1.85 - 2

Blackthorn or Sloe Seeds...

Price €1.95 (SKU: V 156)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Blackthorn or Sloe Seeds (Prunus spinosa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Prunus spinosa (blackthorn, or sloe) is a species of Prunus native to Europe, western Asia, and locally in northwest Africa. It is also locally naturalised in New Zealand and eastern North America.</p> <p>Prunus spinosa is a large deciduous shrub or small tree growing to 5 metres (16 ft) tall, with blackish bark and dense, stiff, spiny branches. The leaves are oval, 2–4.5 centimetres (0.79–1.77 in) long and 1.2–2 centimetres (0.47–0.79 in) broad, with a serrated margin. The flowers are 1.5 centimetres (0.59 in) diameter, with five creamy-white petals; they are produced shortly before the leaves in early spring, and are hermaphroditic and insect-pollinated. The fruit, called a "sloe", is a drupe 10–12 millimetres (0.39–0.47 in) in diameter, black with a purple-blue waxy bloom, ripening in autumn, and harvested—traditionally, at least in the UK, in October or November after the first frosts. Sloes are thin-fleshed, with a very strongly astringent flavour when fresh.</p> <p>Prunus spinosa is frequently confused with the related P. cerasifera (cherry plum), particularly in early spring when the latter starts flowering somewhat earlier than P. spinosa. They can be distinguished by flower colour, creamy white in P. spinosa, pure white in P. cerasifera. They can also be distinguished in winter by the more shrubby habit with stiffer, wider-angled branches of P. spinosa; in summer by the relatively narrower leaves of P. spinosa, more than twice as long as broad  and in autumn by the colour of the fruit skin—purplish-black in P. spinosa and yellow or red in P. cerasifera.</p> <p>The specific name spinosa is a Latin term indicating the pointed and thornlike spur shoots characteristic of this species.</p> <p>The common name "blackthorn" is due to the thorny nature of the shrub, and its very dark bark.</p> <p>The word commonly used for the fruit, "sloe" comes from Old English slāh. The same word is noted in Middle Low German, historically spoken in Lower Saxony, Middle Dutch sleuuwe or, contracted form, slē, from which come Modern Low German words: slē, slī, and Modern Dutch slee, Old High German slēha", "slēwa, from which come Modern German Schlehe and Danish slåen.</p> <p>The names related to 'sloe' come from the Common Germanic root *slaiχwōn. Cf. West Slavic / Polish śliwa; plum of any species, including sloe śliwa tarnina—root present in other Slavic languages, e.g. Croatian/Serbian šljiva / шљива.</p> <p>The expression "sloe-eyed" for a person with dark eyes comes from the fruit, and is first attested in A. J. Wilson's 1867 novel Vashti.</p> <p>The foliage is sometimes eaten by the larvae of Lepidoptera, including emperor moth, willow beauty, white-pinion spotted, common emerald, November moth, pale November moth, mottled pug, green pug, brimstone moth, feathered thorn, brown-tail, yellow-tail, short-cloaked moth, lesser yellow underwing, lesser broad-bordered yellow underwing, double square-spot, black and brown hairstreaks, hawthorn moth (Scythropia crataegella) and the case-bearer moth Coleophora anatipennella. Dead blackthorn wood provides food for the caterpillars of the concealer moth Esperia oliviella.</p> <p>The pocket plum gall is found on the fruit, where it results in an elongated and flattened gall, devoid of a stone.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>The shrub, with its savage thorns, is traditionally used in Northern Europe and Britain in making a hedge against cattle or a "cattle-proof" hedge.</p> <p>The fruit is similar to a small damson or plum, suitable for preserves, but rather tart and astringent for eating, unless it is picked after the first few days of autumn frost. This effect can be reproduced by freezing harvested sloes.</p> <p>The juice is used in the manufacture of spurious port wine, and used as an adulterant to impart roughness to genuine port. In rural Britain, so-called sloe gin is made from the fruit, though this is not a true gin, but an infusion of gin with the fruit and sugar to produce a liqueur. In Navarre, Spain, a popular liqueur called pacharan is made with sloes. In France a similar liqueur called épine or épinette or troussepinette is made from the young shoots in spring. In Italy, the infusion of spirit with the fruits and sugar produces a liqueur called bargnolino (or sometimes prunella) - as well as in France where it is called "prunelle". Wine made from fermented sloes is made in Britain, and in Germany and other central European countries. Sloes can also be made into jam and, used in fruit pies, and if preserved in vinegar are similar in taste to Japanese umeboshi. The juice of the berries dyes linen a reddish color that washes out to a durable pale blue.</p> <p>Blackthorn makes an excellent fire wood that burns slowly with a good heat and little smoke. The wood takes a fine polish and is used for tool handles and canes. Straight blackthorn stems have traditionally been made into walking sticks or clubs (known in Ireland as a shillelagh). In the British Army, blackthorn sticks are carried by commissioned officers of the Royal Irish Regiment; the tradition also occurs in Irish regiments in some Commonwealth countries.</p> <p>The leaves resemble tea leaves, and were used as an adulterant of tea. Shlomo Yitzhaki, a Talmudist and Tanakh commentator of the High Middle Ages, writes that the sap (or gum) of P. spinosa (or what he refers to as the prunellier) was used as an ingredient in the making of some inks used for manuscripts.</p> <p>The fruit stones have been found in Swiss lake dwellings.</p> <p>Evidence of the early use of sloes by man is found in the famous case of a 3,300-year-old human mummy discovered in 1991 in the Ötztal Alps along the Austrian-Italian border (nick-named Ötzi): among the stomach contents were sloes.</p> <p>A "sloe-thorn worm" used as fishing bait is mentioned in the 15th-century work, The Treatyse of Fishing with an Angle, by Juliana Berners.</p> </body> </html>
V 156
Blackthorn or Sloe Seeds (Prunus spinosa) 1.85 - 2

Bosnia and Herzegovina variety
Sweet chestnut - Marron Seeds 2.5 - 2

Sweet chestnut - Marron...

Price €2.50 (SKU: V 13)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Sweet chestnut - Marron Seeds (Castanea sativa) Frost Hardy</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5, 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Castanea sativa is a species of a deciduous tree with an edible seed. It is commonly called sweet chestnut and marron. Originally native to southeastern Europe and Asia Minor, it is now widely dispersed throughout Europe and in some localities in temperate Asia. The tree is hardy, long-lived and well known for its chestnuts, which are used as an ingredient in cooking.</p> <h3><strong>Description</strong></h3> <p>Castanea sativa is a species of the genus Castanea. The Latin sativa means "cultivated by humans". The tree has been cultivated for its edible nuts since ancient times. It is called chestnut, and sometimes "Spanish chestnut"[2] or "Portuguese chestnut". It is not related to the Horse-chestnut tree.</p> <p>C. sativa is a medium-sized to large deciduous tree attaining a height of 20–35 m with a trunk often 2 m in diameter. The oblong-lanceolate, boldly toothed leaves are 16–28 cm long and 5–9 cm broad.</p> <p>The flowers of both sexes are borne in 10–20 cm long, upright catkins, the male flowers in the upper part and female flowers in the lower part. In the northern hemisphere, they appear in late June to July, and by autumn, the female flowers develop into spiny cupules containing 3-7 brownish nuts that are shed during October. The female flowers eventually form a spiky sheath that deters predators from the seed.[3] Some cultivars ('Marron de Lyon', 'Paragon' and some hybrids) produce only one large nut per cupule, rather than the usual two to four nuts of edible, though smaller, size. The bark often has a net-shaped (retiform) pattern with deep furrows or fissures running spirally in both directions up the trunk.</p> <p>The tree requires a mild climate and adequate moisture for good growth and a good nut harvest. Its year-growth (but not the rest of the tree)[4] is sensitive to late spring and early autumn frosts, and is intolerant of lime. Under forest conditions, it will tolerate moderate shade well.</p> <p>See also List of Lepidoptera that feed on chestnut trees</p> <p>The leaves provide food for some animals, including Lepidoptera such as the case-bearer moth Coleophora anatipennella.</p> <p>The species originated in southern Europe, the Balkans and maybe regions nearby. The use as food and an ornamental tree caused it to be introduced throughout western Europe; localised populations and cultivation also occur on other continents.</p> <h3><strong>Uses</strong></h3> <p>The species is widely cultivated for its edible seeds (also called nuts) and for its wood. As early as Roman times, it was introduced into more northerly regions, and later was also cultivated in monastery gardens by monks. Today, centuries-old specimens may be found in Great Britain and the whole of central, western and southern Europe.</p> <p>The tree was a popular choice for landscaping in England, particularly in the 18th and 19th centuries. C. sativa was probably introduced to the region during the Roman occupation, and many ancient examples are recorded.[3] More recently, the tree has been planted as a street tree in England, and examples can be seen particularly in the London Borough of Islington.</p> <p>A tree grown from seed may take 20 years or more before it bears fruits, but a grafted cultivar such as 'Marron de Lyon' or 'Paragon' may start production within five years of being planted. Both cultivars bear fruits with a single large kernel, rather than the usual two to four smaller kernels.[4]</p> <p>The species[5] and the variety C. sativa 'Albomarginata'[6] have both gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.</p> <p>The raw nuts, with their pithy skin around the seed, are somewhat astringent. That skin can be relatively easily removed by quickly blanching the nuts after having made a cross slit at the tufted end.[7] Once cooked, they are delicious and, when roasted, acquire a sweet flavour and a floury texture not unlike sweet potato. The cooked nuts can be used in confections, puddings, desserts and cakes, or eaten roasted. They are used for flour, bread making, a cereal substitute, coffee substitute, a thickener in soups and other cookery uses, as well as for fattening stock. A sugar can be extracted from it.[4] The Corsican variety of polenta (called pulenta) is made with sweet chestnut flour. A local variety of Corsican beer also uses chestnuts. The product is sold as a sweetened paste mixed with vanilla, crème de marron, sweetened or unsweetened as chestnut purée or purée de marron, and candied chestnuts as marron glacés.[8] In Switzerland, it is often served as Vermicelles.</p> <p>Roman soldiers were given chestnut porridge before entering battle.[3]</p> <p>Leaf infusions are used in respiratory diseases and are a popular remedy for whooping cough.[4] A hair shampoo can be made from infusing leaves and fruit husks.[4]</p> <p>This tree responds very well to coppicing, which is still practised in Britain, and produces a good crop of tannin-rich wood every 12 to 30 years, depending on intended use and local growth rate. The tannin renders the young growing wood durable and resistant to outdoor use, thus suitable for posts, fencing or stakes.[9] The timber of the species is marketed as chestnut. The wood is of light colour, hard and strong. It is also used to make furniture, barrels (sometimes used to age balsamic vinegar), and roof beams notably in southern Europe (for example in houses of the Alpujarra, Spain, in southern France and elsewhere). The timber has a density of 560 kg per cubic meter,[10] and due to its durability in ground contact is often used for external purposes such as fencing.[10] It is also a good fuel, though not favoured for open fires as it tends to spit.[4]</p> <p>Tannin is found in the following proportions on a 10% moisture basis: bark (6.8%), wood (13.4%), seed husks (10 - 13%). The leaves also contain tannin.</p> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">                                      all year round                                    </span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">about 20-23 ° C.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Until it Germinates</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds Gallery 05.11.2012.</span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </body> </html>
V 13 5-S
Sweet chestnut - Marron Seeds 2.5 - 2

We recommend this plant! We have tested this plant.

Bosnia and Herzegovina variety
Bosnian garlic cloves Bosanac

Bosnian garlic cloves Bosanac

Price €1.55 (SKU: P 416 BB)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Bosnian garlic cloves "Bosanac"</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for 5 Garlic cloves</strong></span></h2> <p>Bosnian garlic may be small (on average one bulb weighs 10 grams), but it is irreplaceable because of the taste and Pungency. Today, only a few families still know and own this garlic in Bosnia and Herzegovina.</p> <p>From a grower's perspective, it is a tall dark green plant and is a very good survivor, usually grows healthy, and appears to be somewhat resistant to many of the diseases that can affect garlic. It originally from Bosnia and Herzegowina but grows well in all other countries.</p> <p>Those who are lucky enough to own it, replant it every year to maintain this exceptional variety of garlic.</p> <p>It is interesting to say that although it is extremely Pungency and has an extremely strong aroma, it still does not smell bad from breath like other varieties.</p> <p>We wholeheartedly recommend this variety of garlic and we are sure you will be as thrilled as we are!</p> </body> </html>
P 416 BB
Bosnian garlic cloves Bosanac

We recommend this plant! We have tested this plant.

Bosnia and Herzegovina variety

This product cannot be bought and paid with PayPal
Tobacco seeds Hercegovacki...

Tobacco seeds Hercegovacki...

Price €2.45 (SKU: D 1 HR)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Tobacco seeds Hercegovacki Ravnjak (32 leaves)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Skija is a colloquial name for tobacco Ravnjak planted in the wider area of Herzegovina and Dalmatia. Eastern Herzegovina has been the home of this type of tobacco since ancient times, and later the cultivation spread to the western part of this region, as well as to the southern part of Dalmatia known as the Imotski region. Tobacco, which is a real "ski" for smoking, has been produced in the territory of Herzegovina since the 17th century</p> <p>The famous tobacco of the "Herzegovinian plain" variety has been entered in the international register of names of geographical origin, thus obtaining the protection of authenticity kept by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) based in Geneva.</p> <p>During the 1990s, tobacco almost disappeared in the Herzegovina area. With the disappearance of cattle, the natural fertilizer, which was necessary for fertilization, to make tobacco good, also disappeared. Cultivation has remained only in some extremely rural areas.</p>
D 1 HR
Tobacco seeds Hercegovacki Ravnjak (32 leaves)
Babylon Bean Seeds

Babylon Bean Seeds

Price €1.65 (SKU: VE 150 (3,5g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Babylon Bean Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p class="">Recommended for growing outdoors. It has an erect branch position, the stem of which is a well-kept plant that is not subject to lodging. <br>The pods have a regular shape of dark green color, round cross-section, and sweet taste.</p> <p>The length of the pod is 120-140 mm and the diameter is 7-8 mm. Due to the erect position of the branches and the high position of the pods, this variety is easy to pick.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 150 (3,5g)
Babylon Bean Seeds

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.

Bosnia and Herzegovina variety
Wheel Cactus or Camuesa...

Wheel Cactus or Camuesa...

Price €1.65 (SKU: CT 7 OR)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2 id="short_description_content"><strong>Wheel Cactus or Camuesa Seeds (Opuntia robusta)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10, 20, 40 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><i><b>Opuntia robusta</b></i><span>, the </span><b>wheel cactus</b><span>, </span><b>nopal tapon</b><span>, or </span><b>camuesa</b><span>, is a species of </span>cactus<span> in the family </span>Cactaceae<span>.</span><sup id="cite_ref-APNI_1-1" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> It is native and </span>endemic<span> to central and northern </span>Mexico<span> to within 100 miles (160 km) of the </span>Arizona<span> and </span>New Mexico<span> borders where it grows from 5,000 to 10,000 feet (1,500 to 3,000 m) on rocky slopes, open shrublands, woodlands, and mixed with other cactus and succulents.</span></p> <p><b>Fruit;</b><span> The fruit of </span><b><i>Opuntia robusta</i></b><span> is delicious, very juicy too! Fruit ripens around July for the first flush, then you can have a second flush around August/Sept. The fruit is very sweet and is excellent in fruit smoothies or for margaritas. The fruit is sweet/juicy and has a grape-like taste. Fruits or cactus apples are oval in shape and average 1-1/4" to 1-1/2" in diameter by 3-1/2" to 4" long.</span><br /><br /><b>Edible stems;</b><span> Not only is the fruit edible but the stems or nopale pads are also edible in nopales salad. You skin the exterior and boil the stem flesh which is cut into narrow strips. The strips are then added to a fresh salad. High in nutrients and low in calories too, so very healthy!</span></p> <p>Plants are commonly around 1 m (40 in) high, though they may grow to over 3 m (10 ft) high when supported.</p> <p>The flattened stem segments are fleshy, round, and blue-grey in color.<span> </span>These are up to 30 cm (1 ft) in diameter and have the length of sharp spines up to 5 cm (2 in).<sup id="cite_ref-Parsons_2-2" class="reference">[2]</sup><span> </span>Yellow, sessile flowers with a fleshy base are produced on the edges of the upper stem segments.<span> </span>These are followed by barrel-shaped fleshy fruits which are pink or purple and up to 8 cm (3 in) long.</p> <p><strong>Taxonomy</strong></p> <p>The species was first formally described in 1837 in Enumeratio Diagnostica Cactearum hucusque Cognitarum. It has naturalized in the states of South Australia, New South Wales, Queensland, and Victoria in Australia.</p> <p><span style="color: #000000;"><strong>We personally collected this seed, and we guarantee that the mother plant withstood temperatures of -15 degrees Celsius.</strong></span></p> </body> </html>
CT 7 OR 10-S
Wheel Cactus or Camuesa Seeds (Opuntia robusta)

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