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Ennek a növénynek óriási gyümölcsei vannak
Chinese Green Luobo Radish Seeds

Chinese Green Luobo Radish...

Ár 2,45 € (SKU: P 406)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Chinese Green Luobo Radish Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#f40707;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Green Meat radishes are easily distinguished by their shape and color. The swollen and elongated taproot is two-toned like several radish varieties, yet it is unique in its coloring. Its upper half near the stem end is lime green colored, and its tapered lower half is cream colored. It can be harvested when as small as five inches or as large as ten inches. Its thick skin covers a green to creamy white flesh which offers a crisp texture and a radish flavor that can vary from mild to hot depending upon growing conditions and maturity.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Current Facts</span></strong></p> <p><span>The Green Meat radish (Raphanus sativus) is an heirloom variety radish and a member of the Brassicaceae or Cruciferae family along with arugula, broccoli, and turnips. The entire plant is edible, roots and leaves. Green radishes such as the Green Meat can be found sold under a variety of different names including green skinned, tsingato green, Japanese minowase, and Chinense green luobo.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Seasons/Availability</span></strong></p> <p><span>The Green Meat radish is available in the spring and fall months.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Nutritional Value</span></strong></p> <p><span>Similar to red radishes, green radishes such as the Green Meat radish contain a significant amount of vitamin C, though less than their red relatives. Green type radishes are higher in carotenoids, proanthocyanidins, and chlorophylls than red varieties. The greens of the Green Meat radish additionally are high in nutrients, even more so than the radish root itself.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Applications</span></strong></p> <p><span>The spicy flavor and crisp texture of the Green Meat radish shines in fresh preparations. Slice thin and add to sandwiches, salads or wraps. Use to add a spicy accent to tacos, nachos, and Mexican soups. Slice lengthwise and pair with cream based dips or soft cheeses. Grate and serve as a condiment with sushi or sashimi or add to slaws to give them a spicy kick. In China Green Meat radishes are popularly pickled along with Sichuan peppers. Green Meat radish greens can be added to soups and stir-fries. To store, keep Green Meat radishes refrigerated and used within one to two weeks.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Ethnic/Cultural Info</span></strong></p> <p><span>In China, many radishes such as the Green Meat radish are used in traditional Chinese medicine, believed to promote health and wellness particularly related to the respiratory system. This is reflected in the ancient Chinese proverb which states, "Eating pungent radish and drinking hot tea, let the starved doctors beg on their knees." Radishes have long held such a high place of esteem in Chinese culture, the Quingdao Radish Festival dates back to the Ming Dynasty nearly 600 years ago and is an annual celebration of the radish and Chinese folklore which encourages eating radish on the ninth day of the lunar new year for good health.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Geography/History</span></strong></p> <p><span>The Green Meat radish is believed to be a relative of a traditional green Chinese radish native to northern China. Originally known by the name Chinese Green Luobo or Qingluobo these green radishes like many other Asian radishes such as the daikon are harvested at a larger size than European radishes. Green radishes are a popular variety in Asian countries and have just in recent years begun to gain in popularity in the United States. Like most radish varieties the Green Meat grows best in mild climates and is not heat tolerant.</span></p>
P 406
Chinese Green Luobo Radish Seeds
Native Korean Radish YEOL MOO Seeds

Native Korean Radish YEOL...

Ár 2,45 € (SKU: P 405)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Native Korean Radish YEOL MOO Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#fb0101;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Korean radish are larger than most common radishes. They have a crisp, firm flesh that offers a relatively mild radish flavor and spice. Its thick, smooth skin is creamy white and capped with pale green shoulders. Though commonly sold with the greens removed both the root and the greens of this radish are edible. Its flesh is white with a texture and taste similar to that of the daikon radish. Unlike the carrot shaped daikon however, the Korean radish is rounded and plump with an oblong shape.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Seasons/Availability</span></strong></p> <p><span>Korean radishes are available year-round with fall and winter harvests offering the most flavorful radishes.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Current Facts</span></strong></p> <p><span>The Korean radish (Raphanus sativus), is an annual, cool season root vegetable and a member of the Brassicaceae or mustard family. Related to the daikon radish, the Korean radish is also known as Lo Bok, Mu and Moo. A hybrid variety known as tae baek was developed for a late summer to early winter growing season as the plants aren't normally productive in warm weather conditions.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Nutritional Value</span></strong></p> <p><span>The Korean radish provides dietary fiber, vitamin C, and carotene. Both the raw Korean radish and the kimchee are popularly used in Korean cuisine and are believed to be beneficial in supporting digestive health.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Applications</span></strong></p> <p><span>The Korean radish is most commonly used as an ingredient in kimchee. They are also popularly sliced thin, pickled and served as an appetizer or accompaniment to grilled meats. Its flesh is dense and crisp and stands up well to cooking. Add to soups, stews and stir-fries or slice thick and braise with pork or beef. Raw Korean radish can be thinly sliced and added to salads or bahn mi sandwiches. To store, wrap tightly in plastic and refrigerate. Best used within two weeks.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Ethnic/Cultural Info</span></strong></p> <p><span>In Korea, this radish is favored as a major ingredient in hot Korean kimchee. This variety is also commonly used for pickling in the Far East.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Geography/History</span></strong></p> <p><span>Most popular in Korean and Japanese cuisine, Korean radishes are grown year round throughout Asia. The Korean radish thrives in cool climates and is typically ready to harvest in fifty to seventy days.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Featured Restaurants</span></strong></p> <p><span>Restaurants currently purchasing this product as an ingredient for their menu.</span></p> <p><span>The Bellows       San Marcos CA                 619-395-6325</span></p> <p><span>Happy Pantry    Carlsbad CA       858-449-4666</span></p> <p><span>Izakaya Pacific Beach     San Diego CA     858-274-2742</span></p> <p><span>Saiko Sushi-North Park San Diego CA     619-886-6656</span></p> <p><span>Gold Mine Natural Food Company         Poway CA           858-537-9830</span></p> <p><span>Knotty Barrel     San Diego CA     619-269-7156</span></p> <p><span>Sushi Tadokoro                San Diego CA     619-347-2792</span></p> <p><span>Davanti Enoteca India St.             San Diego CA     619-237-9606</span></p> <p><span>Harney Sushi Old Town                San Diego CA     619-295-3272</span></p> <p><span>Stella Public House         San Diego CA     512-799-6462</span></p> <p><span>Gyu-Kaku San Diego      San Diego CA     858-693-3790</span></p> <p><span>Fish Pit San Diego CA     619-546-9369</span></p> <p><span>Belmont Park Cannonball            San Diego CA     858-228-9283</span></p> <p><span>Fishbone Kitchen            San Diego CA     619-643-2261</span></p> <p><strong><span>Recipe Ideas</span></strong></p> <p><strong><span>Recipes that include Korean Radish. One  is easiest, three is harder.</span></strong></p> <p><span>Korean Bapsang                              Korean Radish Soup (Muguk)</span></p> <p><span>Beyond Kimchee                             Radish Pancake</span></p> <p><span>Maangchi                           Cooked Radish Side Dish</span></p> <p><span>Eating and Living                             Korean Radish Soup (Mu Guk/Moo Guk)</span></p> <p><span>No Recipes                        Radish Kimchi</span></p> <p><span>The Kitchn                          Vegetarian Dduk Gook (Korean Rice Cake Soup)</span></p> <p><span>Umami Holiday                Korean Pickled Radishes and Jalapenos</span></p> <p><span>Korean Bapsang                              Musaengchae (Spicy Korean Radish Salad)</span></p> <p><span> </span></p>
P 405
Native Korean Radish YEOL MOO Seeds
Purple Plum Radish Seed

Purple Plum Radish Seed

Ár 2,25 € (SKU: P 403 P)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Purple Plum Radish Seed</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0505;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>The bright flesh of the Purple Plum radish is sweet and tender. The shoots can also be used in dishes or to a salad. Their small globe shape make them perfect for slicing thin and pickling. Purple Plum will stay crisp while other Radishes may soften with time.</span></p> <p><span>When planting Radishes, year after year, be sure to rotate the planting site as it will deplete the soil. Avoid planting near cabbage and broccoli. Till the soil up to four inches down and lightly cover each seed with the aerated soil.</span></p>
P 403 P
Purple Plum Radish Seed
ZLATA Yellow Radish Seeds (Raphanus sativus)

ZLATA Yellow Radish Seeds...

Ár 2,50 € (SKU: P 403 Y)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>ZLATA Yellow Radish Seeds (Raphanus sativus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#f90909;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>30 days. The name means “gold’ in Czech, and the silky, russeted yellow roots look like orbs of pale gold. This variety is fairly spicy—Europeans love it! Resists splitting and bolting; excellent bunching type, and the young leaves are especially nice for greens.</span></p>
P 403 Y
ZLATA Yellow Radish Seeds (Raphanus sativus)
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Radish Watermelon (Raphanus sativus) 1.95 - 5

Retek görögdinnye magjai...

Ár 1,95 € (SKU: P 69)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Retek görögdinnye magjai (Raphanus sativus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>20 magos csomag ára.</strong></span></h2> <p>A görögdinnye retek, más néven Rooseheart vagy Red Meat, örökös kínai Daikon retek. A Brassica (mustár) család tagja, sült saláta kitûnõ, brokkoli és fehérrépa.</p> <p>A görögdinnye retek ehető gömbölyű gyökér, amely vékony szárakhoz és hullámos zöld levelekhez kapcsolódik. Külső részük krémes-fehér, halványzöld vállakkal, ez a klorofill jele, amelyet a napsugárzás hatására kapott. A görögdinnye retekhús fehérje áll legközelebb a külsejéhez, és világos, körkörös rózsaszínű és bíbor színű csíkokká válik a közepe felé. Ezért a görögdinnye referencia.</p> <p>A hús gyengéden ropogós, zamatos és szilárd. Íze enyhe, csak kissé borsos, némi édes hanggal. A betakarítástól függően a görögdinnye retek nagysága a golflabdától a softballig terjedhet. A görögdinnye retek frissen vagy főzve, melegen vagy hidegen is tálalható. Jól párosulnak édesköménypel, almával, sajtokkal, például fetával és chèvre-kel, vajjal, tejszínes alapú öntetekkel, vinaigrettel, szalonnával, fehér halakkal, uborkákkal, enyhe salátaleletekkel, főtt tojással, tésztával, például soba és udon, citrusfélék, koriander, menta, és tárkonyt.</p> <p>A görögdinnye retek leggyakrabban tavasszal és késő ősszel érhető el, mivel hűvös évszakban termesztenek, és a talaj hőmérsékletét kedvelik 68 fok alatt. A túl meleg talajhőmérséklet befolyásolja a retek ízét, az enyhe bors ízt keserű csípéssé változtatja.</p> </body> </html>
P 69
Radish Watermelon (Raphanus sativus) 1.95 - 5
Radish Seeds - Black Spanish Round

3.000 Black Radish Seeds -...

Ár 8,00 € (SKU: VE 18 (20g))
,
5/ 5
<div class="rte"> <h2><strong>Radish Seeds - Black Spanish Round</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 3.000 (20g) seeds.</span><br /></strong></h2> <div>A unique, black-skinned radish with globe-shaped roots up to 2-1/2 inches in diameter, crisp hot white flesh which last well after picking.  The variety can be sown from early spring, but crop well into the winter if sown in Jul-Aug.   Ideal for salads, stir fry and cooking. 50 days.</div> <div>Sow sparingly often and little from the last frost until winter for a continuous crop all summer.</div> <div>These will harvest well into winter from a late autumn sowing.</div> </div>
VE 18 (20g)
Radish Seeds - Black Spanish Round

YEOLMU Korean Young Summer Radish Seeds 2.049999 - 1

YEOLMU Korean Young Summer...

Ár 2,05 € (SKU: P 446)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>YEOLMU Korean Young Summer Radish Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 25 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Yeolmu (열무) or young summer radish is a type of leafy radish cultivated in Korea. Its taproots and greens are harvested when they are still soft and tender.</p> <p>It can be harvested between 40 and 50 days after sowing and is easy to maintain. It is strong against viruses, nosocomial disease.</p> <p>These spicy and beautiful vegetables grow incredibly quickly from seed. They don’t grow very deep, so you can grow them in a relatively shallow container (4 inches deep is the minimum for most radishes). Yeolmu mul kimchi (which the main ingredient is young radish) is usually eaten in summer in Korea. Making Bibimbap with barley rice, doenjang jjigae, yeolmu kimchi, hot pepper paste and sesame oil is one of the most popular and delicious dinners in hot summer where the stem of the young radish is used.</p>
P 446
YEOLMU Korean Young Summer Radish Seeds 2.049999 - 1
Ice Candle Radish Seeds 1.55 - 1

Ice Candle White Long...

Ár 1,35 € (SKU: VE 28 (1g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Ice Candle White Long Radish Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 seeds (1g).</strong></span></h2> <p>Radish ICE CANDLE Raphanus sativus var. sativus A long early variety with white, tasty and juicy roots. For outdoor or greenhouse production. Use fresh with beer, bread, cheese or in salads. A really nice crop between main crops or to sow between lettuce or carrot plants.</p> <p>Radishes is perhaps the easiest and fastest vegetable there is. Radishes grow best during the cool weather of spring and early summer or in the autumn and winter (subtropical areas). When radishes are grown in high heat with little water, they will become spicy and tough.</p> <div> </div> <div>Radishes prefer cool moist soil. Don't let the soil dry out during the growing season. The method I use for growing Radishes is as follows:</div> <div> </div> <div>Pour your carrot seeds into a 5 gallon bucket along withCarrot seeds for the area you're going to plant.</div> <div>Mix in soil or sand. Make sure you mix well.</div> <div>Broadcast over the area you're planting.</div> <div>Water well and never let the area dry out.</div> <div>This is intercropping.</div> <div> </div> <div>Within a week your Radishes will germinate first and by the time your carrots begin to germinate and grow you will be harvesting your Radishes making room for your Carrots.</div> <div> </div> <div>Planting</div> <div>In garden spacing (inches): 2</div> <div>In flat spacing (inches): -  </div> <div>Planting depth (inches): Broadcast</div> <div>Maxiumum number of plants per square foot: 58</div> <div>Nutrient relationship:: Light Feeder</div> <div>   </div> <div>Harvest</div> <div>Days to maturity: 21-63</div> <div>Harvesting period (days): 7</div> <div>Minimum yields in pounds /square foot: 1</div>
VE 28 (1g)
Ice Candle Radish Seeds 1.55 - 1


Ennek a növénynek óriási gyümölcsei vannak
“Daikon” Giant Long Japanese Radish Seeds

Daikon Giant Long Japanese...

Ár 2,35 € (SKU: P 415)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em>“Daikon” Giant Long White Japanese Radish Seeds</em></strong></span></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ed0404;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p><span>Daikon radishes are used for pickles, cooking and grated raw in salads. Very easy to grow this asian radish. They grow very large (50 cm and 4 kg) but taste better picked young. Produces long white tapered roots with a mild mustard flavour. Used in Japanese Taku-An pickles. Becoming very popular due to its mild mustard flavours.</span></p> <p><span>Widespread in ancient times, said to originate from China and Japan. Matures quickly. Likes rich soil. Keep well watered. Grow fresh crisp radish any time, will withstand light frost.</span></p> </body> </html>
P 415
“Daikon” Giant Long Japanese Radish Seeds

Horseradish Seeds (Armoracia rusticana) Seeds Gallery - 9

Horseradish Seeds...

Ár 3,95 € (SKU: P 412)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Horseradish Seeds (Armoracia rusticana)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0101;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana, syn. Cochlearia armoracia) is a perennial plant of the Brassicaceae family (which also includes mustard, wasabi, broccoli, and cabbage). It is a root vegetable used as a spice.</span></p> <p><span>The plant is probably native to southeastern Europe and western Asia. It is popular worldwide. It grows up to 1.5 meters (4.9 feet) tall, and is cultivated primarily for its large, white, tapered root. </span></p> <p><span>The intact horseradish root has hardly any aroma. When cut or grated enzymes from the now-broken plant cells break down sinigrin (a glucosinolate) to produce allyl isothiocyanate (mustard oil), which irritates the mucous membranes of the sinuses and eyes. Grated mash should be used immediately or preserved in vinegar for best flavor. Once exposed to air or heat it will begin to lose its pungency, darken in color, and become unpleasantly bitter tasting over time.</span></p> <h3><strong><span>History</span></strong></h3> <p><span>Horseradish is probably indigenous to temperate Eastern Europe, where its Slavic name chren seemed to Augustin Pyramus de Candolle more primitive than any Western synonym. Horseradish has been cultivated since antiquity.[6] According to Greek mythology, the Delphic Oracle told Apollo that the horseradish was worth its weight in gold. Dioscorides listed horseradish equally as Persicon sinapi (Diosc. 2.186) or Sinapi persicum (Diosc. 2.168),[8] which Pliny's Natural History reported as Persicon napy;[9] Cato discusses the plant in his treatises on agriculture, and a mural in Pompeii shows the plant. Horseradish is probably the plant mentioned by Pliny the Elder in his Natural History under the name of Amoracia, and recommended by him for its medicinal qualities, and possibly the wild radish, or raphanos agrios of the Greeks. The early Renaissance herbalists Pietro Andrea Mattioli and John Gerard showed it under Raphanus.[10] Its modern Linnaean genus Armoracia was first applied to it by Heinrich Bernhard Ruppius, in his Flora Jenensis, 1745, but Linnaeus himself called it Coclearia armoracia.</span></p> <p><span>Both root and leaves were used as a medicine during the Middle Ages. The root was used as a condiment on meats in Germany, Scandinavia, and Britain. It was introduced to North America during European colonialization;[11] both George Washington and Thomas Jefferson mention horseradish in garden accounts.</span></p> <p><span>William Turner mentions horseradish as Red Cole in his "Herbal" (1551–1568), but not as a condiment. In The Herball, or Generall Historie of Plantes (1597), John Gerard describes it under the name of raphanus rusticanus, stating that it occurs wild in several parts of England. After referring to its medicinal uses, he says:</span></p> <p><span>The Horse Radish stamped with a little vinegar put thereto, is commonly used among the Germans for sauce to eat fish with and such like meats as we do mustard.</span></p> <p><span>The word horseradish is attested in English from the 1590s. It combines the word horse (formerly used in a figurative sense to mean strong or coarse) and the word radish.</span></p> <h2><strong><span>Cultivation</span></strong></h2> <p><span>Horseradish is perennial in hardiness zones 2–9 and can be grown as an annual in other zones, although not as successfully as in zones with both a long growing season and winter temperatures cold enough to ensure plant dormancy. After the first frost in autumn kills the leaves, the root is dug and divided. The main root is harvested and one or more large offshoots of the main root are replanted to produce next year's crop. Horseradish left undisturbed in the garden spreads via underground shoots and can become invasive. Older roots left in the ground become woody, after which they are no longer culinarily useful, although older plants can be dug and re-divided to start new plants.[11][15] The early season leaves can be distinctively different, asymmetric spiky, before the mature typical flat broad leaves start to be developed.</span></p> <h2><strong><span>Culinary uses</span></strong></h2> <p><span>The distinctive pungent taste of horseradish is from the compound allyl isothiocyanate. Upon crushing the flesh of horseradish, the enzyme myrosinase is released and acts on the glucosinolates sinigrin and gluconasturtiin, which are precursors to the allyl isothiocyanate. The allyl isothiocyanate serves the plant as a natural defense against herbivores. Since allyl isothiocyanate is harmful to the plant itself, it is stored in the harmless form of the glucosinolate, separate from the myrosinase enzyme. When an animal chews the plant, the allyl isothiocyanate is released, repelling the animal. Allyl isothiocyanate is an unstable compound, degrading over the course of days at 37 °C (99 °F). Because of this instability, horseradish sauces lack the pungency of the freshly crushed roots.</span></p> <p><span>Cooks use the terms "horseradish" or "prepared horseradish" to refer to the grated root of the horseradish plant mixed with vinegar. Prepared horseradish is white to creamy-beige in color. It can be stored for months under refrigeration, but eventually will darken, indicating it is losing flavour and should be replaced. The leaves of the plant, while edible, are not commonly eaten, and are referred to as "horseradish greens", which have a flavor similar to that of the roots.</span></p> <h2><strong><span>Horseradish sauce</span></strong></h2> <p><span>Horseradish sauce made from grated horseradish root and vinegar is a popular condiment in the United Kingdom and in Poland.[19] In the UK, it is usually served with roast beef, often as part of a traditional Sunday roast; but can be used in a number of other dishes also, including sandwiches or salads. A variation of horseradish sauce, which in some cases may substitute the vinegar with other products like lemon juice or citric acid, is known in Germany as Tafelmeerrettich. Also popular in the UK is Tewkesbury mustard, a blend of mustard and grated horseradish originating in medieval times and mentioned by Shakespeare (Falstaff says: "his wit's as thick as Tewkesbury Mustard" in Henry IV Part II[20]). A very similar mustard, called Krensenf or Meerrettichsenf, is popular in Austria and parts of Eastern Germany.[citation needed] In France, sauce au raifort is popular in Alsatian cuisine.[citation needed] In Russia horseradish root is usually mixed with grated garlic and small amount of tomatoes for color.</span></p> <p><span>In the US the term "horseradish sauce" refers to grated horseradish combined with mayonnaise or salad dressing. Prepared horseradish is a common ingredient in Bloody Mary cocktails and in cocktail sauce, and is used as a sauce or sandwich spread. Horseradish cream is a mixture of horseradish and sour cream and is served alongside au jus for a prime rib dinner.</span></p> <h3><strong><span>Vegetable</span></strong></h3> <p><span>In Central and Eastern Europe horseradish is called khren (in various spellings like kren) in many Slavic languages, in Austria, in parts of Germany (where the other German name Meerrettich isn't used), in North-East Italy, and in Yiddish (</span><span>כריין</span><span> transliterated as khreyn).</span></p> <p><span>There are two varieties of khreyn. "Red" khreyn is mixed with red beetroot and "white" khreyn contains no beetroot. It is popular in Ukraine (under the name of хрін, khrin), in Belarus (under the name of хрэн, chren), in Poland (under the name of chrzan), in the Czech Republic (křen), in Russia (хрен, khren), in Hungary (torma), in Romania (hrean), in Lithuania (krienai), in Bulgaria (хрян, khryan), and in Slovakia (under the name of chren). Having this on the table is a part of Christian Easter and Jewish Passover tradition in Eastern and Central Europe.</span></p> <p><span>In parts of Southern Germany like Franconia, "Kren" is an essential component of the traditional wedding dinner. It is served with cooked beef and a dip made from lingonberry to balance the slight hotness of the Kren.</span></p> <p><span>In Poland, a variety with red beetroot is called ćwikła z chrzanem or simply ćwikła.</span></p> <p><span>In Ashkenazi European Jewish cooking beetroot horseradish is commonly served with gefilte fish.</span></p> <p><span>In Transylvania and other Romanian regions, Red beetroot with horseradish is also used as a salad served with lamb dishes at Easter called sfecla cu hrean.</span></p> <p><span>In Serbia, ren is an essential condiment with cooked meat and freshly roasted suckling pig.</span></p> <p><span>In Croatia, freshly grated horseradish (Croatian: Hren) is often eaten with boiled ham or beef.</span></p> <p><span>In Slovenia, and in the adjacent Italian regions of Friuli Venezia Giulia and nearby Italian region of Veneto, horseradish (often grated and mixed with sour cream, vinegar, hard-boiled eggs, or apples) is also a traditional Easter dish.</span></p> <p><span>Further west in the Italian regions of Lombardy, Emilia-Romagna, and Piedmont, it is called "barbaforte (strong beard)" and is a traditional accompaniment to bollito misto; while in north-eastern regions like Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol, Veneto and Friuli-Venezia Giulia, it is still called "kren" or "cren". In the southern region of Basilicata it is known as "rafano" and used for the preparation of the so-called "rafanata", a main course made of horseradish, eggs, cheese and sausage.</span></p> <p><span>Horseradish is also used as a main ingredient for soups. In the Polish region of Silesia, horseradish soup is a common Easter Day dish.</span></p> <h3><strong><span>Relation to wasabi</span></strong></h3> <p><span>The Japanese condiment wasabi, although traditionally prepared from the wasabi plant, is now usually made with horseradish due to the scarcity of the wasabi plant.[27] The Japanese botanical name for horseradish is seiyōwasabi (</span><span>セイヨウワサビ</span><span>, </span><span>西洋山葵</span><span>), or "Western wasabi". Both plants are members of the family Brassicaceae.</span></p> <h3><strong><span>Nutritional content</span></strong></h3> <p><span>In a 100 gram amount, prepared horseradish provides 48 calories and has high content of vitamin C with moderate content of sodium, folate and dietary fiber, while other essential nutrients are negligible in content. In a typical serving of one tablespoon (15 grams), horseradish supplies no significant nutrient content.</span></p> <p><span>Horseradish contains volatile oils, notably mustard oil, and allyl isothiocyanate.</span></p> <h3><strong><span>Biomedical uses</span></strong></h3> <p><span>The enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP), found in the plant, is used extensively in molecular biology and biochemistry primarily for its ability to amplify a weak signal and increase detectability of a target molecule. HRP has been used in decades of research to visualize under microscopy and assess non-quantitatively the permeability of capillaries, particularly those of the brain.</span></p> <h2><em><strong>How to Grow Horseradish from Seed</strong></em></h2> <h3><strong>Timing</strong></h3> <p>For first season harvests, start the seeds indoors in January to February and transplant out in April. The goal is to achieve large, fully established roots that can be divided and/or replanted. If time is not pressing, direct sow any time from March into summer. Optimal soil temperature: 7-23°C (45-75°F).</p> <h3><strong>Starting</strong></h3> <p>Sow seeds 5mm-1cm (¼-½”) deep in well cultivated, deep soiil. Seeds will sprout in 7-25 days, depending on conditions. Thin or transplant to 20cm (8″) apart in rows 40-50cm (16-20″) apart.</p> <h3><strong>Growing</strong></h3> <p>Ideal pH: 6.0-6.8. Well drained, warm soil in full sun is best. Raised beds help with both drainage and warmth. Use 1 cup of complete organic fertilizer for every 3m (10′) of row. Newly emerged leaves are edible, or should be left to mature if growing for the roots. The flower petals are also edible — flowers should be removed before they set seeds, as they will self-sow with enthusiasm.</p> <h3><strong>Harvest</strong></h3> <p>For the leaves, harvest as needed, shortly after they emerge, before they become woody. For the roots, harvest November through March. The roots can also be lifted and stored for spring planting to keep the crop going from season to season.</p> <h3><strong>Diseases &amp; Pests</strong></h3> <p>In our experience, insects do not cause problems for horseradish.</p> <h3><strong>Companion Planting</strong></h3> <p>Horseradish is thought to repel aphids and whiteflies, blister beetles, potato beetles, and some varieties of caterpillar. Its flowers attract beneficial predatory hoverflies.</p> <h2><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/wasabi-seeds-wasabia-japonica-eutrema-japonicum.html" target="_blank" title="Wasabi Seeds you can buy here" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Wasabi Seeds you can buy here</strong></span></a></h2>
P 412
Horseradish Seeds (Armoracia rusticana) Seeds Gallery - 9


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SAKURAJIMA DAIKON Giant Radish Seeds – Largest Radish in the World

SAKURAJIMA DAIKON Giant...

Ár 2,45 € (SKU: P 385)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>SAKURAJIMA DAIKON Radish Seeds – Largest Radish in the World</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The Sakurajima Radish is known as the “Largest Radish in the World.” It has produced radishes at a standard weight of 13 pounds and is capable of reaching 100 pounds! This traditional variety of daikon radish has a round basketball-like shape, unlike its longer and skinnier daikon relatives. Daikon radishes were introduced to Japan over 1,300 years ago, and there are over 120 varieties with unique characteristics cultivated regionally. During the Edo Period (1603-1868), daikons became extremely popular, and today 90% of daikons are produced and consumed in Japan. However, the regional varieties have slowly been replaced by the F1 hybrid variety called Aokubi. Aokubi and other F1 hybrids now account for the majority of the daikon production.</p> <p>The Sakurajima Radish represents one of the few regionally cultivated varieties of daikon still being grown in Japan. Named after its place of cultivation, the former island of Sakurajima in Japan's Kagoshima Prefecture, the radish is thought to have been grown since at least 1804 and most likely before this date. Sakurajima was the southernmost island in the Kagoshima Prefecture with volcanic soils where rice would not thrive. In place of rice, the mammoth white radish was grown in mass amounts as a commercial crop and hauled to Kagoshima City to trade for straw. At the height of its production, as much as 500 acres would be planted each year. </p> <p>Although the region has a long history of volcanic activity that began to impact the production of this magnificent radish. Sakurajima is a composite of mountains with three peaks that express volcanic activity. The first recorded volcanic eruption occurred in 963 A.D. Smaller eruptions occur constantly. Sometimes 1,000 eruptions can occur in a year, although larger eruptions have been recorded in the 1400s, 1700s and more recently in 1914.</p> <p>The 1914 eruption instigated lava flows that lasted for months. The lava connected Sakurajima Island to the Osumi Penninsula by a thin isthmus, attaching it to the mainland and taking away its island status. The enormity of the 1914 eruption significantly decreased the land available to grow the staple crop. Since 1955, ash has been dropping consistently and has created challenging growing conditions. As a result, the growing area was decreased to as little as 3.5 acres by 2001. In August of 2015, the Japanese Meteorological Agency gave the volcano a Level 3 (Orange Alert), warning people that the volcano is active and should not be approached.</p> <p>As a traditional crop, it continues to have a key role in Japanese cuisine. Sakurajima Radish can be pickled in a salt brine and used as a tsukemono, or “pickled things.” The large radish is known for having a sweeter and firmer flesh than other daikon varieties. It also stores well in potato-like storage conditions. Therefore, it is well suited for simmering and for being used in soups, as it will keep its structure and firm texture. While the Sakurajima Radish is no longer a key commercial crop of the region, it remains a beloved traditional crop. Recently the growing area has begun to expand again for its production.</p>
P 385
SAKURAJIMA DAIKON Giant Radish Seeds – Largest Radish in the World
Cylindrical Radish Seeds Flamboyant 3 1.55 - 1

Cylindrical Radish Seeds...

Ár 1,55 € (SKU: P 229)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Cylindrical Radish Seeds Flamboyant 3</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 seeds.<br /></strong></span></h3> <div>High quality half-long, cylindrical radishes is tasty and tender.  When you bite into Radish Flamboyant Sabina, the first reaction is WOW. The flavour really is refreshingly strong, crisp and clean. It's just what the summer salads needs. Not spicy. 28-32 days. Direct seed in early spring and again in fall. The radish (Raphanus sativus) is an edible root vegetable of the Brassicaceae family that was domesticated in Europe, in pre-Roman times. They are grown and consumed throughout the world. Radishes have numerous varieties, varying in size, color and duration of required cultivation time. There are some radishes that are grown for their seeds; oilseed radishes are grown, as the name implies, for oil production. Radish can sprout from seed to small plant in as little as 3 days.</div> <div> </div> <div><strong>History</strong></div> <div>The descriptive Greek name of the genus Raphanus means "quickly appearing" and refers to the rapid germination of these plants. Raphanistrum, from the same Greek root, is an old name once used for this genus. The common name "radish" is derived from Latin radix (root). The radish has been used over many centuries.</div> <div>Although the radish was a well-established crop in Hellenistic and Roman times, which leads to the assumption that it was brought into cultivation at an earlier time, Zohary and Hopf note that "there are almost no archeological records available" to help determine its earlier history and domestication. Wild forms of the radish and its relatives, the mustards and turnip, can be found over west Asia and Europe, suggesting that their domestication took place somewhere in that area. However Zohary and Hopf conclude, "Suggestions as to the origins of these plants are necessarily based on linguistic considerations."</div> <h3><strong>Cultivation</strong></h3> <h3><strong>Growing radish plants</strong></h3> <div>Radishes grow best in full sun and light, sandy loams with pH 6.5–7.0. They are in season from April to June and from October to January in most parts of North America; in Europe and Japan they are available year-round due to the plurality of varieties grown.</div> <div>Summer radishes mature rapidly, with many varieties germinating in 3–7 days, and reaching maturity in three to four weeks. Harvesting periods can be extended through repeated plantings, spaced a week or two apart.</div> <div>As with other root crops, tilling the soil to loosen it up and remove rocks helps the roots grow. However, radishes are used in no-till farming to help reverse compaction.</div> <div>Most soil types will work, though sandy loams are particularly good for winter and spring crops, while soils that form a hard crust can impair growth. The depth at which seeds are planted affects the size of the root, from 1 cm (0.4 in) deep recommended for small radishes to 4 cm (1.6 in) for large radishes.</div> <div>Radishes are a common garden crop in the U.S., and the fast harvest cycle makes them a popular choice for children's gardens.</div> <div>In temperate climates, it's customary to plant radishes every two weeks from early spring until a few weeks before the first frost, except during periods of hot weather. In warm-weather climates, they are normally planted in the fall.</div> <h3><strong>Companion plant</strong></h3> <div>Radishes serve as companion plants for many other species, because of their ability to function as a trap crop against pests like flea beetles. These pests will attack the leaves, but the root remains healthy and can be harvested later.</div> <div><strong>Spring or summer radishes</strong></div> <div>European radishes (Raphanus Sativus)</div> <div>Sometimes referred to as European radishes or spring radishes if they're planted in cooler weather, summer radishes are generally small and have a relatively short 3–4 week cultivation time.</div> <div>The April Cross is a giant white radish hybrid that bolts very slowly.</div> <div>Bunny Tail is an heirloom variety from Italy, where it is known as 'Rosso Tondo A Piccola Punta Bianca'. It is slightly oblong, mostly red, with a white tip.</div> <div>Cherry Belle is a bright red-skinned round variety with a white interior. It is familiar in North American supermarkets.</div> <div>Champion is round and red-skinned like the Cherry Belle, but with slightly larger roots, up to about 5 cm (2 in), and a milder flavor.</div> <div>Red King has a mild flavor, with good resistance to club root, a problem that can arise from poor drainage.</div> <div>Sicily Giant is a large heirloom variety from Sicily. It can reach up to two inches in diameter.</div> <div>Snow Belle is an all-white variety of radish, similar in shape to the Cherry Belle.</div> <div>White Icicle or just Icicle is a white carrot-shaped variety, around 10–12 cm (4–5 in) long, dating back to the 16th century. It slices easily, and has better than average resistance to pithiness.</div> <div>French Breakfast is an elongated red-skinned radish with a white splash at the root end. It is typically slightly milder than other summer varieties, but is among the quickest to turn pithy.</div> <div>Plum Purple a purple-fuchsia radish that tends to stay crisp longer than average.</div> <div>Gala and Roodbol are two varieties popular in the Netherlands in a breakfast dish, thinly sliced on buttered bread.</div> <div>Easter Egg is not an actual variety, but a mix of varieties with different skin colors,[6] typically including white, pink, red, and purple radishes. Sold in markets or seed packets under the name, the seed mixes can extend harvesting duration from a single planting, as different varieties may mature at different times.</div> <div>Winter varieties</div> <div>Daikon</div> <div>Black Spanish or Black Spanish Round occur in both round and elongated forms, and are sometimes simply called the black radish or known by the French name Gros Noir d'Hiver. It dates in Europe to 1548, and was a common garden variety in England and France during the early 19th century. It has a rough black skin with hot-flavored white flesh, is round or irregularly pear shaped, and grows to around 10 cm (4 in) in diameter.</div> <div>Daikon refers to a wide variety of winter radishes from Asia. While the Japanese name daikon has been adopted in English, it is also sometimes called the Japanese radish, Chinese radish, Oriental radish or mooli (in India and South Asia). Daikon commonly have elongated white roots, although many varieties of daikon exist. One well known variety is April Cross, with smooth white roots. The New York Times describes Masato Red and Masato Green varieties as extremely long, well suited for fall planting and winter storage. The Sakurajima daikon is a hot-flavored variety which is typically grown to around 10 kg (22 lb), but which can grow to 30 kg (66 lb) when left in the ground.</div> <div>Seed pod varieties</div> <div>Radish fruits, also called pods</div> <div>Radish seeds</div> <div>The seeds of radishes grow in siliques (widely referred to as "pods"), following flowering that happens when left to grow past their normal harvesting period. The seeds are edible, and are sometimes used as a crunchy, spicy addition to salads. Some varieties are grown specifically for their seeds or seed pods, rather than their roots. The Rat-tailed radish, an old European variety thought to have come from East Asia centuries ago, has long, thin, curly pods which can exceed 20 cm (8 in) in length. In the 17th century, the pods were often pickled and served with meat. The München Bier variety supplies spicy seed pods that are sometimes served raw as an accompaniment to beer in Germany.</div> <div>Nutritional value</div> <div>Radish, raw, root only</div> <div>Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)</div> <div>Energy 66 kJ (16 kcal)</div> <div>Carbohydrates 3.40 g</div> <div>- Sugars 1.86 g</div> <div>- Dietary fiber 1.6 g</div> <div>Fat 0.10 g</div> <div>Protein 0.68 g</div> <div>Thiamine (vit. B1) 0.012 mg (1%)</div> <div>Riboflavin (vit. B2) 0.039 mg (3%)</div> <div>Niacin (vit. B3) 0.254 mg (2%)</div> <div>Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.165 mg (3%)</div> <div>Vitamin B6 0.071 mg (5%)</div> <div>Folate (vit. B9) 25 μg (6%)</div> <div>Vitamin C 14.8 mg (18%)</div> <div>Calcium 25 mg (3%)</div> <div>Iron 0.34 mg (3%)</div> <div>Magnesium 10 mg (3%)</div> <div>Phosphorus 20 mg (3%)</div> <div>Potassium 233 mg (5%)</div> <div>Zinc 0.28 mg (3%)</div> <div>Percentages are relative to</div> <div>US recommendations for adults.</div> <div>Source: USDA Nutrient Database</div> <div>Radishes are rich in ascorbic acid, folic acid, and potassium. They are a good source of vitamin B6, riboflavin, magnesium, copper, and calcium. One cup of sliced red radish bulbs provides approximately 20 cal, largely from carbohydrates.</div> <div>Uses</div> <div>Cooking</div> <div>The most commonly eaten portion is the napiform taproot, although the entire plant is edible and the tops can be used as a leaf vegetable. It can also be eaten as a sprout.</div> <div>The bulb of the radish is usually eaten raw, although tougher specimens can be steamed. The raw flesh has a crisp texture and a pungent, peppery flavor, caused by glucosinolates and the enzyme myrosinase which combine when chewed to form allyl isothiocyanates, also present in mustard, horseradish, and wasabi.</div> <div>Radish leaves are sometimes used in recipes, like potato soup or as a sauteed side dish. They are also found to benefit homemade juices; some recipes even calling for them in fruit based mixutres.</div> <div>Radishes may be used in salads, as well as in many European dishes.</div> <div>Industry</div> <div>The seeds of the Raphanus sativus species can be pressed to extract seed oil. Wild radish seeds contain up to 48% oil content, and while not suitable for human consumption the oil is a potential source of biofuel. The oilseed radish grows well in cool climates.</div> <div>Culture</div> <div>Citizens of Oaxaca, Mexico, celebrate the radish in a festival called Noche de los Rábanos (Night of the Radishes) on December 23 as a part of Christmas celebrations. Locals carve religious and popular figures out of radishes and display them in the town square.</div>
P 229
Cylindrical Radish Seeds Flamboyant 3 1.55 - 1

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Giant Radish Seeds “ROSSO GIGANTE“ 1.95 - 2

Giant Radish Seeds “ROSSO...

Ár 1,95 € (SKU: P 156 RG)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Giant Radish Seeds “ROSSO GIGANTE“</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Solid white flesh is firm, crisp and mild.  Globe-shaped roots have deep crimson skin, and reach 10cm in diameter, without becoming hollow or pithy. Solid white flesh is firm, crisp and mild. Ready to harvest 29 days after seeding.</p> <p>GARDEN HINTS: Thrives in cool weather. Make successive plantings every 2 weeks until late spring, then again a month before frost.</p> <p> </p> <p>Sun: Full Sun</p> <p>Spread: 3  inches</p> <p>Height: 4-6  inches</p> <p>Thinning: 3 inches</p> <p>Days to Maturity: 30  days</p> <p>Sowing Method: Direct Sow</p> </div> </body> </html>
P 156 RG
Giant Radish Seeds “ROSSO GIGANTE“ 1.95 - 2
Radish Seeds NON PLUS ULTRA

Radish Seeds NON PLUS ULTRA

Ár 1,75 € (SKU: VE 109 (1g))
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong>Radish Seeds “Non plus ultra”</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Radish NON PLUS ULTRA Raphanus sativus var. sativus An early variety, Tarsty and juicy tubers are big and dark red. Use fresh with beer, bread, cheese or in salads. A really nice crop between main crops or to sow between lettuce or carrot plants. The seed needs 8-10 days to germinate.</p> <p>Very tender and fine grained, rarely becoming hollow or pithy. Medium size and vivid scarlet colour. Fine forcing variety. Round. Forcing.</p> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 109 (1g)
Radish Seeds NON PLUS ULTRA
White Round Winter Radish Seeds  - 3

White Round Winter Radish...

Ár 1,75 € (SKU: VE 88 (1g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>White Round Winter Radish Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 (1 g) seeds.</strong><strong><br /></strong></span></h2> <p>This winter radish was introduced to Europe by Jesuit missionaries in 1850. Radish with pure white skin and crisp pungent flesh are produced from Mid-summer through to early winter with any remaining radish storing well in sand late into winter.  Seeds are excellent for sprouting.  It can be planted in October. The young leaves can also be used in salads or for stir-frying.  Keeps well.  60 days from germination.</p> <p>Sow sparingly as these are larger than standard Radishes, often and little from the last frost until winter for a continuous crop all summer.</p> <div>These will harvest well into winter from a late autumn sowing.</div>
VE 88 (1g)
White Round Winter Radish Seeds  - 3

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