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Shallot Long French Bulbs

Shallot Long French Bulbs

Pret 2,50 € (SKU: P 404)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><strong><em>Shallot Long French Bulbs</em></strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color:#d0121a;"><strong>Price for package with 5 Bulbs</strong></span></h2> <p>An excellent, slightly elongated shallot, with copper-coloured skins and great tasting pink-tinged flesh. Each bulb yields 8-20 bulbs at harvest. Plant from mid January onwards. RHS Award of Garden Merit winner.</p> <p>Grown in Brittany, in the heart of France’s main shallot growing region, these superb certified varieties are of superior quality and will produce an outstanding crop for you.</p> <p><span><span>Hardiness:</span></span><span><span>-5 degrees</span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Bulbs:</span></span><span><span>True</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Height:</span></span><span><span>31-40cm</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Spread:</span></span><span><span>11-20cm</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>RHS Award of Garden Merit:</span></span><span><span>True</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Beds &amp; Borders:</span></span><span><span>True</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Prefers Full Sun:</span></span><span><span>True</span></span></span></p> <h1 class="title style-scope ytd-video-primary-info-renderer"><a href="https://youtu.be/GGEb4C2bb9s" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Harvesting Shallots &amp; Potatoes &amp; Leeks</a></h1> <h2><strong>WIKIPEDIA:</strong></h2> <p>The <b>shallot</b> is a type of onion, specifically a botanical variety of the species <i>Allium cepa</i>.</p> <p>The shallot was formerly classified as a separate species, <i>A. ascalonicum</i>, a name now considered a synonym of the currently accepted name.</p> <p>Its close relatives include the garlic, leek, chive, and Chinese onion.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Names">Names</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"> <div class="thumbcaption">Shallots are called "small onions" in South India and are used extensively in cooking there.</div> </div> </div> <p>Shallots probably originated in Central or Southwest Asia, travelling from there to India and the eastern Mediterranean. The name "shallot" comes from Ashkelon, an ancient Canaanite city,<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference">[5]</sup> where people in classical Greek times believed shallots originated.<sup id="cite_ref-Field_Guide_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup></p> <p>The name <i>shallot</i> is also used for the Persian shallot <i>(A. stipitatum)</i>, from the Zagros Mountains in Iran and Iraq. The term <i>shallot</i> is further used for the French red shallot (<i>Allium cepa</i> var. <i>aggregatum</i>, or the <i>A. cepa</i> Aggregatum Group) and the French gray shallot or griselle (<i>Allium oschaninii</i>), a species referred to as "true shallot";<sup id="cite_ref-Field_Guide_6-1" class="reference">[6]</sup> it grows wild from Central to Southwest Asia. The name <i>shallot</i> is also used for a scallion in New Orleans and among English-speaking people in Quebec while the term <i>French shallot</i> refers to the plant referred to on this page.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[7]</sup> Anglophone Quebecers and British English speakers stress the second syllable of <i>shallot</i>.</p> <p>The term <i>eschalot</i>, derived from the French word <i>échalote</i>, can also be used to refer to the shallot.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description_and_cultivation">Description and cultivation</span></h2> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/A._cepa_var._aggregatum_conreu.JPG/150px-A._cepa_var._aggregatum_conreu.JPG" width="150" height="113" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Shallot plant (<i>A. cepa var. aggregatum</i>) growing in Castelltallat, Spain</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9c/2005onion_and_shallot.PNG/150px-2005onion_and_shallot.PNG" width="150" height="66" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Onion and shallot output in 2005</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e2/Shallot_whole_plant.jpg/220px-Shallot_whole_plant.jpg" width="220" height="60" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Whole shallot plants, consist of roots, bulbs, leaves, stalks, and flowers</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/06/Shallot_seeds.png/150px-Shallot_seeds.png" width="150" height="113" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Shallot seeds</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fe/Shallot_%28Sambar_Onion%29_%281%29.JPG/150px-Shallot_%28Sambar_Onion%29_%281%29.JPG" width="150" height="113" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Shallots on sale in India</div> </div> </div> <p>Like garlic, shallots are formed in clusters of offsets with a head composed of multiple cloves. The skin colour of shallots can vary from golden brown to gray to rose red, and their off-white flesh is usually tinged with green or magenta.</p> <p>Shallots are extensively cultivated for culinary uses, propagated by offsets. In some regions ("long-season areas"), the offsets are usually planted in autumn (September or October in the Northern Hemisphere).<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference">[9]</sup> In some other regions, the suggested planting time for the principal crop is early spring (typically in February or the beginning of March in the Northern Hemisphere).</p> <p>In planting, the tops of the bulbs should be kept a little above ground, and the soil surrounding the bulbs is often drawn away when the roots have taken hold. They come to maturity in summer, although fresh shallots can now be found year-round in supermarkets. Shallots should not be planted on ground recently manured.</p> <p>In Africa, shallots are grown in the area around Anloga in southeastern Ghana.</p> <p>Shallots suffer damage from leek moth larvae, which mine into the leaves or bulbs of the plant.</p> <p></p>
P 404
Shallot Long French Bulbs
Welsh Onion Seeds (Allium fistulosum)

Welsh Onion Seeds (Allium...

Pret 1,55 € (SKU: P 413)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Welsh Onion Seeds (Allium fistulosum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#f80101;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 (0,13 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Long-term Welsh onion – one of ancient useful plants who can provide with valuable vitamin greens in the early spring. Its bright shoots are shown when even not all snow melted on a country site. In the people to it thought up many names: dudchaty, Chinese, sand, Tatar. Gentle, not really sharp "plumelets" are suitable for salads, garnishes, okroshka.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Description and characteristic of Welsh onion</span></strong></p> <p><span>Externally these onions are similar on everything the known napiform. But here the bulb underground at it is not formed. The basis of escape has only a small expansion called by botanists a false bulb. It is formed because the bases of sheet vaginas are thickened. The underground part of Welsh onion lives in the earth some years, and here the land part presented by leaves and tsvetonosa annually dies off during the autumn period. For Welsh onion strong branching, existence of a set of modified dudchaty leaves, hollow is characteristic inside. They accrue gradually, gaining the power. Depending on a grade, height of Welsh onion can be from 40 to 60 cm. For the second year of life Welsh onion throws out flower shooters, which length about 45 cm. Growing on one place, these onions well give greens for seven years. But it is best of all it does in the first four years. Then productivity considerably falls, it is connected with strong growth of underground part. Therefore in four years it should be seated in other places of a site. Surprisingly, but shoots of Welsh onion are capable to transfer spring frosts when stem of thermometer falls lower than zero by eight degrees. And here adult plants normally winter even if temperature will be-45 degrees. Therefore it is sowed often by Siberian summer residents. For normal development these onions need long light day. Optimum temperature for fast development from 18 to 22 degrees. Vitamin C in Welsh onion is approximately twice more, than in a turnip. There are in it phytoncides, essential oils, vitamins: carotene, B1, V2, PP, mineral salts of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, iron, potassium.</span></p> <p><span>The Chinese and Tibetan Aesculapians actively use Welsh onion as the antiseptic, all-strengthening means at treatment of gastrointestinal diseases, feverish states, skin illnesses. It is recommended to eat to hypertensive persons, it improves elastic properties of walls of capillaries.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Site for Welsh onion</span></strong></p> <p><span>This perennial cannot be placed on low, flooded places. A bed it is better for it to do the high. The excellent crop can be received on the structural, generously flavored with organic chemistry light loams or sandy loams. Boggy or heavy clay soil does not suit Welsh onion at all. It is also necessary to consider that on sandy and peaty soil which tend to drying, the strelkovaniye occurs much quicker. Sour soils before landing by all means should be izvestkovat or changed, adding a dolomitic flour when redigging. Well sites where grew cabbage, pumpkin, vegetable marrows, potatoes earlier are suitable for Welsh onion. If soils at you poor, on square meter it is necessary to bring about 5 kg of humus, 25 grams of ammonium nitrate, 15 grams of chloride potassium, 25 grams of superphosphate. It is better to prepare a site for Welsh onion even in the fall.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Landing</span></strong></p> <p><span>It is possible to sow Welsh onion from the last days of April to the last decade of July – here such long period. But that the earth was not empty if you decided to sow Welsh onion in the summer, in the spring on this place can put salad, fennel, the Beijing cabbage or a radish so far, and then after their cleaning to place Welsh onion there. At first it is desirable to wet seeds in water or solution of microfertilizers (one tablet on water liter undertakes). Only watch that seeds did not give long boring, such seeds will complicate landing process. We at first for 20 minutes presoak seeds in potassium permanganate solution (warm), and then in usual warm water which constantly we change. In advance before landing humidify the bed, and then already do grooves. On square meter about two grams of seeds leave. Depth of seal fluctuates from 1 to 2 cm (everything depends on your soil). Between plants there has to be a distance not less than 6 cm, and between ryadochka – on 18 cm. If carry out landing in the early spring (April), it is better to cover a gryadochka with a film or other ukryvny material. It will be necessary to remove it when boring seems.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Recommendations about further leaving</span></strong></p> <p><span>And everything is farther it will be simpler – acquaintances to us loosening, timely watering, weedings, top dressing if necessary. InfoAdvisor.net will notice that loosening it is desirable to carry out after each rain (or watering). Then the soil crust will not be formed, air will be better to get into the earth, it will more long keep moisture. When Welsh onion does not have moisture, it "becomes angry" - tastes bitter and grows coarse. If seeds from these onions are not required for you, tear off flower arrows. Now about podkormka. Do the first of them in 30 days after shoots get out, using an azofoska or a nitrofoska (on square meter take them 10 grams). Also the divorced dung water is good. That onions wintered better, in October carry out top dressing with potash fertilizers (their number of 10 grams on square meter). The next year in the spring as soon as from a gryadochka snow leaves, clean the remains of plants, cover it with ukryvny material. If build a parnichok, for example, by means of arches, receive green material for about fifteen days earlier. If to carry out having watered with warm water, it too will accelerate receiving greens.</span></p> <p><span>If you wish to grow up Welsh onion as an odnoletnik then it is better to resort to a rassadny way of cultivation. At first sow seeds in the spring in glasses on some pieces, keep them in the greenhouse. And then already send to an open ground when at plants is on four leaves. Usually such occurs in the middle of May. Then in the middle of July you receive a good harvest of sound Welsh onion.</span></p> <p><span>If contain Welsh onion as part of affiliated plants dig out perennial, each three or four years with the earth and replace in other place. Such way of reproduction, simple division of a big bush, is very convenient. Still such expanded bushes can be dug out with an earth lump over time and then to use for a vygonka to receive vitamin greens. It works well even on a window sill in the container.</span></p> <p><span>Sometimes Welsh onion gets sick peronosporozy, the pale green specks blurring on a stalk and a gray-violet raid testify to it. Here it is necessary to do processing by specifics. If in plumelets you noticed a white worm, this is the wrecker called by the onions miner. Can lead its defeat to rotting of a false bulb onions flies (their larvae). Transparent, whitish stripes on a stalk of Welsh onion is a sign of that in a stalk the onions weevil was brought.</span></p> <p><span>It is a little about harvesting. During the season it is possible to carry out some cuts (at ground level) of the accruing green material – gentle "plumelets". Manage to make the last cut to the middle of August that onions could be prepared for wintering.</span></p>
P 413
Welsh Onion Seeds (Allium fistulosum)

Seeds - Tree Onions, Egyptian Walking Onions, Topsetting Onions

Seeds - Tree Onions,...

Pret 7,95 € (SKU: P 353)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Seeds - Tree Onions, Egyptian Walking Onions, Topsetting Onions</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 bulbs.</strong></span></h2> <p>As their scientific name "Allium proliferum" states, these hardy little onions are very "prolific." After planting them in your garden you will have onions every year for years to come! Egyptian Walking Onions are also called "Tree Onions, Egyptian Tree Onions, Top Onions, Winter Onions, or Perennial Onions."</p> <p>Egyptian Walking Onions are one of the first plants to emerge in the spring. The leaves poke up through the soil like little green spikes and shoot towards the sky despite the frost or snow. The blue-green leaves are round and hollow and will grow up to 3 feet in height. At the the end of a leaf stalk, at the top of the plant, a cluster of bulblets will begin to grow. These bulblets are also known as "bulbils" or "sets." We will refer to them as "topsets" throughout this website. Every Egyptian Walking Onion plant will produce a cluster of sets at the top, hence the name, "Top Onion," meaning they are top-setting onions.</p> <p>In early spring topsets first appear encased in a protective papery tunic. As they grow, this papery capsule will tear open and eventually fall off.</p> <p>The topsets reach maturity in late summer. Many of them have little green sprouts and mini root nodules. They look like mini versions of the parent plant. When the topsets become heavy enough, they will pull the plant over to the ground. If the soil conditions are right, the fallen topsets will take root and grow into new Egyptian Walking Onion plants, hence the name, "Walking Onion." They will literally walk across your garden!</p> <p>Although the Egyptian Walking Onion is a top-setting onion, it will occasionally produce miniature flowers among its topsets. The flowers are about 1/4" wide. They have 6 white petals and 6 stamens. Each petal has a vertical pea-green stripe. Most of the flowers dry up and wither as the topsets compete with them for energy. So an Egyptian Walking Onion seed is a rarity - at least I've never seen a mature and viable one.</p> <p>An Egyptian Walking Onion topset looks like, and essentially is, a miniature onion. Topsets produced by these plants are generally smaller than the ordinary annual garden variety onion sets. They range in size from 1/4 inch to 1 inch in diameter. Each cluster can have as few as 1 or 2 topsets, or as many as 30 or more topsets. Sometimes a new leaf stalk will emerge from a cluster of topsets like a little branch, and a second cluster will grow from it, hence the name, "Tree Onion."</p> <p>In the ground, the Egyptian Walking Onion plant produces a small shallot-like onion which can be harvested. Once harvested, however, the plant will obviously not grow back. If left in the ground, the onion will divide and form a cluster of onion bulbs. New leaves and topsets will grow from the onions each year. The bulbs in the photo on the right grew from one mature Egyptian Walking Onion bulb in one growing season - 1 plant became 6 plants!</p> <p>There is a lot of variation in Egyptian Walking Onion plants. Some plants form long, twisting branches and very few topsets, while others produce large clusters of topsets and no branches. Some plants grow only 2 topsets and others will grow 30! Every plant is so unique and beautiful. They can be grown for both food and ornamental purposes.</p> <p>Egyptian Walking Onions are perennial plants and will grow back each year and yield new and bigger clusters of sets on the top and new onion bulbs in the soil - they will divide. During their first year of growth they will not produce topsets (although there are some exceptions depending on your growing conditions). You might see only greens the first year. But don't be disappointed, your Egyptian Walking Onion plants will grow back the following year in full force and produce their first clusters of topsets. Once established, plants may be propagated by division or by planting the topsets. Egyptian Walking Onions are extremely hardy plants. Our plants have endured harsh winters with temperatures plummeting down to -24° below zero! Hence the name, "Winter Onion." They grow well in zones 3-9.</p> <h2>How and when to plant your Egyptian Walking Onion sets:</h2> <p>Plant each "topset" in the soil about 2 inches deep. Soil should be slightly moist and well drained. Egyptian Walking Onions hate wet feet! Plant in rows about 1 foot apart. The sets should be spaced approximately 6-10 inches apart in each row. Plant in full sunlight. Partial shade is ok too, but full sun is the best for optimal growth. Egyptian Walking Onion sets can also be planted in clusters. When planted this way they make a great addition to your herb garden. They can even be planted in pots to be kept outside or indoors. They can be planted any time of the year even in the winter as long as the ground isn't frozen or covered with snow. However, fall is the optimal time to plant them so they can develop a strong root system and be ready for good growth the following spring. NOTE: Egyptian Walking Onions topsets will not produce topsets during their first year of growth (although I have seen the "jumbo" topsets produce tiny topsets during their first year of growth). Topsets will grow during the plant's second year and every year thereafter. The following is a list of what to expect when planting your sets at different times of the year:</p> <p><strong>Planting in the spring</strong>: This is a good time to plant your Egyptian Walking onion topsets. The topsets will grow throughout the spring and summer and develop tall green leaves and bulb/root growth in the ground. Since it is the plant's first growing season, it will probably not produce topsets, unless it is a huge (jumbo) topset.</p> <p><strong>Planting in the summer</strong>: Topsets planted at this time will grow roots and leafstalks, and have some onion bulb development in the ground, but they will not produce topsets.</p> <p><strong>Planting in the fall</strong>: This is the optimum time to plant your Egyptian Walking Onion topsets. Topsets planted at this time will grow roots and leafstalks only. The leafstalk will die back for the winter. The topset will develop into a small onion bulb in the ground and store enough energy to carry itslef through the winter. A leafstalk will reemerge in the spring and the plant will grow throughout the spring and summer to maturity. More than likely, there will be no topset growth the first summer, but some plants have produced topsets their first summer after planting in the fall.</p> <p><strong>Planting in the winter</strong>: Yes! You can plant Egyptian Walking Onion topsets in the winter as long as the soil is not frozen. If you can dig a 2" deep hole in the soil, then you can plant your sets. The topsets will not grow much at all - maybe a little bit of root growth only, unless you live where the winters are mild. If this is the case, you might also get a leafstalk. When planting in the winter, mulching is a good idea. In fact, mulching is good practice at any time of the year. Mulching keeps the weeds down, prevents unnecessary water evaporation and erosion, and fertilizes your plants.</p> <p><strong>Planting by Nature</strong>: unharvested topsets that are left to lie on the ground will self-sew. No planting necessary, they will grown on their own.</p> <h2>How to Harvest Your Egyptian Walking Onions:</h2> <p><strong>Harvesting the topsets</strong>: In mid to late summer and autumn the topsets may be harvested. The optimal time to pluck off the topsets is when the stalk has dried and turned brown. More than likely, it has fallen over by this time. Be sure to remove any topsets that have fallen to the ground if you do not want them to self-sow in their new locations. Despite their name, these plants are very easy to control and keep from spreading just by harvesting the topsets. You can eat, plant, or store your Egyptian Walking Onion topsets.</p> <p><strong>Harvesting the greens</strong>: The greens (leaves) may be cut and harvested at any time of the year. Just harvest one or two leaves from each plant. Be careful not to cut the stalk that has the topsets. Soon after you have harvested the leaves from an Egyptian Walking Onion plant, new leaves will start to grow in their place which can be harvested again. If you live in a mild climate, your Egyptian Walking Onion plant may produce greens all year round. In the fall after the topsets have matured and fallen to the ground, or after they have been harvested, new greens will start to grow - yummy!</p> <p><strong>Harvesting the onion bulbs in the ground</strong>: The onions at the base of the plant that are growing in the ground can be harvested in late summer and fall. Be sure to leave some onions in the ground for next year's crop. An Egyptian Walking Onion bulb is about the same size and shape as a shallot. Bigger bulbs may be obtained by cutting off the topsets before they develop. That way the plant can put its energy into the onion bulb in the ground instead of into the topsets. Note: if you harvest the onion bulb in the ground, you will destroy the plant - it will not grow back next year. So, if you want to eat the onion bulbs in the ground, make sure to replace them by planting topsets, or offsets from the bulb (divisions).</p> <h2>How to eat your Egyptian Walking Onions:</h2> <p>Egyptian Walking Onions taste just like a regular onion, only with a bit more pizzazz! The entire plant can be eaten. Shallot-like onions form at the base in the soil. They can be eaten and prepared just like any other onion. The hollow greens may be chopped to eat like chives or green onions. They are excellent when fried, cooked in soups, or raw in salads (my favorite). The topsets are excellent when peeled and fried. You can even pickle them. Or just pop them in your mouth like popcorn! Watch out, they're a little spicy!</p> <h2>Names of the Egyptian Walking Onion:</h2> <p><strong>Common names:</strong></p> <p>"Egyptian Walking Onion" or "Walking Onion": The name "Egyptian" is very mysterious. The ancient Egyptians worshipped onions. They believed that its spherical shape and concentric rings symbolized eternal life. Onions were even used in Egyptian burials for the pharaohs. Small onions were found in the eye sockets of Ramesses IV. It is not known whether the Egyptian Walking Onion came from the Egyptians or not. The "Egyptian" part of the name remains a mystery. Maybe the name refers to the way they walk.....do they "walk like an Egyptian?"</p> <p>The name "Walking Onion" was given to this plant because it literally walks to new locations. When the cluster of topsets becomes heavy enough, it will pull the plant over to the ground. Depending on how tall the plant is and where the bend occurs, the topsets may fall up to 3 feet away from the base of the plant. Here, if the conditions are right, they will take root and grow new plants. When these new plants mature, their topsets will eventually fall to the ground and start the process all over again. Egyptian Walking Onion plants can walk between 1 and 3 feet per year!</p> <p>"Tree Onion": Egyptian Walking Onions are known for their ability to grow a twisting stalk from the cluster of sets at the top of the plant. Another cluster of sets will grow at the end of this second stalk giving the plant a branching, tree-like appearance.</p> <p>"Top Onion", "Topset Onion", or "Top Setting Onion": Egyptian Walking Onions grow a cluster of sets at the top of the plant instead of seeds.</p> <p>"Winter Onion": These Onions can survive freezing cold winters with temperatures plummeting well below 24°F! They are hardy to zone 3.</p> <p><strong>Taxonomic names:</strong></p> <p>The following three scientific names refer to the Egyptian Walking Onion plant:</p> <p>Allium cepa var. proliferum</p> <p>Egyptian Walking Onions are proliferous. A proliferous plant produces new individuals by budding. This type of plant also produces offshoots, especially from unusual places. In the case of the Egyptian Walking Onion, an offshoot will grow out form cluster of sets. Proliferous plants produce an organ or shoot from an organ that is itself normally the last, as a shoot or a new flower from the midst of a flower. In the case of the Egyptian Walking Onion, a cluster of topsets grows from a cluster of topsets forming a multi-tiered plant.</p> <p>Allium cepa var. bulbiferous</p> <p>Egyptian Walking Onions are bulbiferous. They produce bulbs!</p> <p>Allium cepa var. viviparum</p> <p>Eyptian Walking Onions are viviparous. They produce bulbils or new plants rather than seed. Egyptian Walking Onion sets germinate while still attached to the parent plant. They can be seen growing leaves and roots before they ever touch the ground.</p> <p>Kingdom:            Plantae (plants)</p> <p>Subkingdom:     Viridaeplantae (green plants)</p> <p>Infrakingdom:   Streptophyta (land plants)</p> <p>Division:              Tracheophyta (vascular plants)</p> <p>Subdivision:       Spermatophytina (seed plants)</p> <p>Infradivision:     Angiospermae (flowering plants)</p> <p>Class:                  Magnoliopsida</p> <p>Superorder:       Lilianae (monocotyledon - having one seed leaf)</p> <p>Order:                Asparagales</p> <p>Family:               Amaryllidaceae</p> <p>Subfamily:          Allioideae</p> <p>Genus:              Allium (onion)</p> <p>Species:               cepa</p> <p>Variations:         </p> <p>proliferum</p> <p>bulbiferum</p> <p>viviparum</p> <p>multiplicans</p> <p> </p> </body> </html>
P 353
Seeds - Tree Onions, Egyptian Walking Onions, Topsetting Onions
Onion Seeds Paris...

Onion Seeds Paris...

Pret 1,45 € (SKU: P 157)
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"><h2><strong>Onion Seeds Paris Silverskin (dual-purpose onion)</strong></h2><h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of about 200 (1g) or 4000 (20g) seeds.</strong></span></h2><p>Paris Silverskin is a tasty onion that's excellent for salads or pickling. Easy to grow, there's no thinking required.<br />Paris Silverskin is an easy to grow, dual-purpose onion. If you like a good size bulb on "spring" onions pull them young or leave to mature and crop as small onions for pickling. This way they can be pickled for use in summer salads or added whole to winter stews. Delicious!<br /><br />One of the most popular crops for the gardener, onions are a huge must for any allotment holder or for the gardener who has their own little vegetable garden at home, as they are so versatile and can be used for a variety of different things.</p><p><strong>Plot Type: </strong>Outdoor plot</p><p><strong>Class: </strong>Salad or Pickling Onion</p><p><strong>Where To Sow:</strong><strong> </strong>In growing site, 1cm deep in rows 20cm apart.</p><p><strong>What To Do Next:</strong><strong> </strong>Provided you have not sown too thickly, no thinning is required. Keep weed-free, and water regularly.</p><p><strong>Handy Tip:</strong><strong> </strong>Can be cooked whole with Peas or used in casseroles and stews. Flavor not too harsh.</p><p><strong>Nutritional Value:</strong> A good source of antioxidants such as beta-carotene, lutein and vitamin C as well as vitamin K.</p><p><strong>Companion Plants:</strong> Beetroot, Carrot, Lettuce, Cabbage Family. Avoid Beans, Peas</p></div><div> </div><div> </div><div> </div>
P 157
Onion Seeds Paris Silverskin (dual-purpose onion)

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White Lisbon Bunching Onion Seeds (Allium cepa)  - 2

White Lisbon Bunching Onion...

Pret 1,25 € (SKU: P 192)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Onion Seed White Lisbon (Allium cepa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 250 (1 g) seeds.</span></h2> <p>The White Lisbon is an old favourite and ever-popular very quick growing salad spring onion. It is a hardy and reliable variety which features long white stems with bright green tops. It is quick and easy to grow, cropping in 60 days. Although, traditionally the most popular Spring Onion for successional sowings from March to September, it can also be sown in autumn and overwintered for early spring harvests. They are perfect for container growing and can be tucked into mixed containers or beds</p> <p>White Lisbon is Indispensable for a decent salad, with silvery skin and crisp, succulent stems that have a mild onion flavour with that characteristic 'bite'. Delicious when young, they take on a more pungent flavour as the bulbs swell. Sow little and often, fortnightly from March onwards, will give a good supply through the summer.</p> <p><strong>Preparation: <br /></strong>An ideal position would be an open, sunny site with good drainage which has been dug and manured in the previous autumn. Do not plant or sow on the freshly manured bed. <br />Avoid planting in an area where the previous crop was of the onion family. Many exhibitors grow their show onions in a permanent bed in order to build up fertility, but in the kitchen plot, it is a much better idea to change the site annually.<br />Onions prefer a neutral to slightly alkaline soil so lime if the soil is acid. Apply a general fertiliser if needed and rake the surface when the soil is reasonably dry. Tread over the area and then rake again to produce a fine, even tilth.</p> <p><strong>Sowing:</strong></p> <p>Sow in autumn or sow successionally from late winter to late summer. <br />In cold areas and for exhibition bulbs sow under glass in January,<br />Sow thinly 12mm (½in) deep in either narrow or broad drills allowing 15 to 23cm (6 to 9in) between drills. No thinning is necessary. <br />The seed germinates over a wide range of temperatures and is faster at higher temperatures. Sow every 3 weeks for continuous crops.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation: <br /></strong>Keep well watered for best quality crops, especially during spells of dry weather. It will stand well for long periods if kept well watered. Hoe carefully or weed by hand – dense weed growth will seriously affect yield.</p> <p><strong>Harvesting:</strong></p> <p>60 days<br />Harvest as required from May to October, later sowings may remain through to December if the weather remains mild. Best when used immediately though they will keep in the fridge for a few days.</p> <p><strong>Culinary Use: <br /></strong>Spring onions can be used for so much more than just adding to your Peking Duck pancakes. When raw or very lightly cooked they impart a wonderfully vibrant yet mild flavour where normal onions would be overpowering. Make some champ by folding chopped spring onions into creamy mashed potatoes - add some grated cheddar if you like - and marvel at how such a simple dish can taste so fantastic. Or combine with ginger to form the soul of a number of classic Chinese and Japanese dishes. <br />Trim off the root and about a centimetre from the green tops. The bulb area can be eaten raw or cooked but the tops are best when chopped and added to a dish just before serving.<br />Store in the fridge for up to four days.</p> <p><strong>Nutrition: <br /></strong>For years onions have been used as one of the oldest medicines for their anti-bacterial, antiseptic and anti-asthmatic properties. They have also shown to lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels.</p> <p><strong>Pest Repellent: As<br /></strong> a member of the allium family, they will help to deter most insects, including aphids, mosquitoes, carrot flies and tomato pests. They are also useful in the fight against, moles, mice slugs and weevils!</p> <p><strong>Rotation considerations: <br /></strong>Avoid following onions, shallots, garlic or chives.</p> <p><strong>Good Companions: <br /></strong>Beet, carrot, celery, parsley and tomato.</p> <p><strong>Bad Companions: <br /></strong>Alfalfa, beans, peas - Onions inhibit the growth of legumes.</p> <p><strong>History: <br /></strong>Eaten and cultivated since prehistoric times, onions were mentioned in the first dynasty of ancient Egypt, circa 3200 BC, and have appeared in tomb paintings, inscriptions and documents from that time on. Some paintings depict onions heaped onto banquet tables, both the robust bulb onions as well as scallions. <br />The spring onion is believed to have originated in the Far East. Chives and spring onion are recorded in Chinese history from 2000 BC. <br />They were grown in Ancient Egypt, and eventually arrived in Rome and became known as the word onion from the Latin word <em>Unio </em>, which means 'large pearl'. In Middle English, it became unyon, as time passed the word developed into the onion.</p>
P 192
White Lisbon Bunching Onion Seeds (Allium cepa)  - 2
Giant Onion Seeds - Globemaster (Allium Giganteum)  - 4

Giant Onion Seeds -...

Pret 1,95 € (SKU: MHS 31)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant Onion Seeds - Globemaster (Allium Giganteum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong> Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>These flowers are absolutely huge! They measure a whopping 6 - 8" wide! This variety of Allium makes an excellent dried flower. They are also a favorite of bees.</p> <p><strong>Wikipedia:</strong></p> <p>Allium giganteum, also known as Giant Onion, is a perennial bulbous plant of the onion genus, used as a flowering garden plant, and growing to 2 metres. It is the tallest ornamental Allium in common cultivation. In early to midsummer, small globes of intense purple flower heads (umbels) appear, followed by attractive seed heads. A popular cultivar, 'Globemaster', is shorter (80 centimetres (31 in)) but produces much bigger, deep violet, flower heads (15–20 centimetres (5.9–7.9 in)). Both varieties have been granted the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.</p> <p>NAME: Giant Allium ‘Globemaster’</p> <p>SCIENTIFIC NAME: Allium Giganteum</p> <p>COLOR: Purple 6 - 8” round flower heads</p> <p>PLANT SEEDS: Outdoors after frost / Indoors weeks before last frost</p> <p>BLOOM TIME: Late Spring - Mid Summer</p> <p>HARDINESS ZONE: 4 - 9</p> <p>PLANT HEIGHT: 36 - 48”</p> <p>PLANT SPACING: 12 - 15”</p> <p>LIGHT REQUIREMENTS: Sun</p> <p>SOIL &amp; WATER PREFERENCES: Average</p> <p><strong>Propagation:</strong></p> <p>Always use sterilized planting soil.</p> <p>Moisten planting media, place the fine seeds on the soil and cover them lightly.</p> <p>Stratify the seeds by placing the pot in a plastic bag at approx. 5°C.</p> <p>After 3-4 weeks place the pot to germination temperature, approx. 15°C.</p> <p>Within 1-? months the seeds will germinate, germination can be very slow.</p>
MHS 31
Giant Onion Seeds - Globemaster (Allium Giganteum)  - 4
Red Brunswick Onion Seeds  - 2

Red Brunswick Onion Seeds

Pret 1,35 € (SKU: P 117 RB)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Red Brunswick Onion Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 250 (1 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Red Brunswick is late maturing semi-flat bulbs of dark red. They are overall, medium to large in size with excellent mild but pungent flavor. They are very decorative when sliced across the bulb to reveal which and red rings, so are ideal fresh in salads or cooked with pasta.</p> <p>One of the most popular crops for the gardener, onions are a huge must for any allotment holder or for the gardener who has their own little vegetable garden at home, as they are so versatile and can be used for a variety of different things.</p>
P 117 RB
Red Brunswick Onion Seeds  - 2
Dutch Yellow Onion Seeds  - 1

Dutch Yellow Onion Seeds

Pret 1,20 € (SKU: P 93)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Dutch Yellow Onion Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 250 (1 g) seeds.</span></h2> <p>Well-known Dutch onion variety that is considered particularly tasty and is one of the oldest Dutch onion types. High flavored onion for cooking. The fruits get firm flesh and have a mild taste with good spiciness. The yellow onion has good storage qualities. Whether the cooking is Oriental, African or Dutch: the Dutch yellow onion is indispensable in every cuisine. Hardy bulbs easy to grow.</p> <p>The onion has good moisture tolerance and can, therefore, survive cool and wet summers without any problems.</p> <p>Plant 15 cm apart, 2 cm below surface Harvest when tops die off. The crop can be stored in a cool dry place, or diced and frozen. Perennial zones 3-9. </p>
P 93
Dutch Yellow Onion Seeds  - 1
The Kelsae Giant Onion Seeds 2 - 6

The Kelsae Giant Onion Seeds

Pret 2,00 € (SKU: P 65 K)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>The Kelsae Giant Onion Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 8 or 15 seeds.</span><br /></strong></span></h2> <div>110 days. Allium cepa. Plant produces giant 4kg sweet white onion. The Kelsae Sweet Giant Onion holds the Guinness World Record for the Largest Onion in the World at at nearly 15 lb 5.5 oz and 33 inches diameter! It has a unique mild sweet flavor. Impress your neighbors and try growing a World Record size onion. Long day variety suitable for Northern regions.</div> </body> </html>
P 65 K
The Kelsae Giant Onion Seeds 2 - 6
Giant Onion Seeds Robinsons Mammoth 2 - 2

Giant Onion Seeds Robinsons...

Pret 2,00 € (SKU: P 65 RM)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Robinsons Mammoth Giant Onion Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 8 or 15 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>We are delighted to offer this seed packed by Robinsons. These seeds are of the highest quality and are ideal for shows and exhibitions. This onion has high standards of vigour and uniformity and can be grown to over 2kg in weight and 22 inches in circumference. Robinsons grow for flavour and this onion has a very sweet flavour.</div> </body> </html>
P 65 RM
Giant Onion Seeds Robinsons Mammoth 2 - 2

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Asian chives, Chinese chives Seed

Asian chives, Chinese...

Pret 1,95 € (SKU: MHS 67)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Asian chives, Chinese chives Seed (Allium tuberosum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 (0,2 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Allium tuberosum (garlic chives, oriental garlic, Asian chives, Chinese chives, Chinese leek[4]) is an Asian species of onion native to the Himalayas (Nepal, Bhutan, India) and to the Chinese Province of Shanxi. It is cultivated in many places and naturalized in scattered locations around the world.</p> <h3><strong>Description</strong></h3> <p>Allium tuberosum is a perennial bulbous plant with a distinctive growth habit with strap-shaped leaves unlike either onion or garlic, and straight thin white-flowering stalks that are much taller than the leaves. The flavor is more like garlic than chives. It grows in slowly expanding perennial clumps, but also readily sprouts from seed. In warmer areas (USDA Zones 8 and warmer), garlic chives may remain green all year round. In cold areas (USDA Zones 7 to 4b), leaves and stalks will completely die back to the ground, and re-sprout from roots or rhizomes in the spring. The elongated bulb is small (about 10 mm diameter), tough and fibrous, originating from the stout rhizome.</p> <h3><strong>Taxonomy</strong></h3> <p>Originally described by Johan Peter Rottler, the species name was validly published by Curt Polycarp Joachim Sprengel in 1825.[2] Allium tuberosum is classified within Allium in subgenus Butomissa (Salisb.) N. Friesen, section Butomissa (Salisb.) Kamelin, a very small group consisting of only A. tuberosum and A. ramosum L.,[10][11] which have been variously regarded as either one or two genetic entities.</p> <h3><span style="color: #000000;"><strong>Distribution and habitat</strong></span></h3> <p>Originating in the Siberian–Mongolian–North Chinese steppes,[10] but widely cultivated and naturalized. Allium tuberosum is currently reported to be found growing wild in scattered locations in the United States. (Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, Nebraska, Alabama, Iowa, Arkansas, Nebraska and Wisconsin)  However, it is believed to be more widespread in North America because of the availability of seeds and seedlings of this species as an exotic herb and because of its high aggressiveness. This species is also widespread across much of mainland Europe[16] and invasive in other areas of the world.</p> <h3><strong>Ecology</strong></h3> <p>A late summer to autumnal blooming plant,[4] Allium tuberosum is one of several Allium species known as wild onion and/or wild garlic that in various parts of the world, such as Australia, are listed as noxious weeds[13] or as invasive "serious high impact environmental and / or agricultural weeds that spread rapidly and often create monocultures".</p> <h3><strong>Cultivation</strong></h3> <p>Often grown as an ornamental plant in gardens, several cultivars are available. A. tuberosum is distinctive by blooming later than most native or naturalised species of Allium.[14] It is hardy (USDA) to zones 4–10.</p> <p>A number of varieties have been developed for either improved leaf (e.g. 'Shiva') or flower stem (e.g. 'Nien Hua') production.[18] While the emphasis in Asia the emphasis has been primarily culinary, in North America the interest has been more as an ornamental.[19] 'Monstrosum' is a giant ornamental cultivar.</p> <h3><strong>Uses</strong></h3> <p>Uses have included ornamental plants, including cut and dried flowers, culinary herb, and traditional medicine. Garlic chives have been widely cultivated for centuries for its culinary value. The flat leaves, the stalks, and immature, unopened flower buds are used as a flavouring. Another form is "blanched" by regrowing after cutting undercover to produce white-yellow leaves and a subtler flavor.</p> <p>In East Asia (as Nira, Japanese 韮, or "green nira grass") and Central Asia (as Djusai) A. tuberosum is used for both garlic and sweet flavours, in soups and salads and traditional Japanese and Chinese dishes. Chinese names for A. tuberosum (韭菜) vary depending on the plant part as well as between Mandarin Chinese and Cantonese, as well as varying romanizations.[12][21] For instance the green leaves are Jiu cai, the flower stem Jiu cai hua and blanched leaves Jiu huang in Mandarin, but Gau tsoi (Kow choi), Gau tsoi fa and Gau wong in Cantonese respectively.[23] Other renderings include cuchay, kucai, kuchay, or kutsay.</p> <p>The leaves are used as a flavoring in a similar way to chives, scallions or garlic and are included as a stir fry ingredient. In China, they are often used to make dumplings with a combination of egg, shrimp and pork. They are a common ingredient in Chinese jiaozi dumplings and the Japanese and Korean equivalents. Garlic chives are widely used in Korean cuisine, where it is known as buchu ( Korean 부추), most notably in dishes such as buchukimchi (부추김치, garlic chive kimchi), buchujeon (부추전, garlic chive pancakes), or jaecheopguk (a guk, or clear soup, made with garlic chives and Asian clams).[24] A Chinese flatbread similar to the scallion pancake may be made with garlic chives instead of scallions; such a pancake is called a jiucai bing (韭菜饼) or jiucai you bing (韭菜油饼). Garlic chives are also one of the main ingredients used with Yi mein (E-Fu) dishes.[25] In Nepal, cooks fry a curried vegetable dish of potatoes and A. tuberosum known as dunduko sag.[26] In Vietnam, the leaves of garlic chives (Hẹ) are cut up into short pieces and used as the only vegetable in a broth with sliced pork kidneys.[27] In Manipur and other northeastern states of India, it is grown and used as a substitute to garlic and onion in cooking and is known as maroi nakupi.</p> <h3><strong>Seed Propagation </strong></h3> <p>Seed - sow spring in a cold frame. The seed has a fairly short viability and should not be used when more than 1 year old[206]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle - if you want to produce clumps more quickly then put three plants in each pot. Plant out in late summer if the plants have developed sufficiently, otherwise plant them out the following spring. Division in early spring. Very easy, the plants divide successfully at almost any time of the year. The divisions can be planted straight out into their permanent positions if required.</p> </body> </html>
MHS 67
Asian chives, Chinese chives Seed
Semințe Arpagic (Allium...

Semințe Arpagic (Allium...

Pret 2,35 € (SKU: MHS 11)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Semințe Arpagic (Allium Schoenoprasum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Preț pentru pachetul de semințe de 1500 (2g), 7500 (10g).</strong></span></h2> <p><b>Arpagicul</b><span> </span>(<i>Allium schoenoprasum</i>) este o<span> </span>plantă<span> </span>perenă, mică și robustă, din familia<span> </span>Liliaceae, înrudită cu<span> </span>ceapa.<span> </span>Bulbii<span> </span>săi mici, albi și alungiți, și frunzele subțiri și tubulare se dezvoltă grupat la baza<span> </span>tulpinii. Deasupra<span> </span>frunzelor<span> </span>cresc niște inflorescențe albăstrui sau liliachii, cu o formă sferică, dense și atrăgătoare. Frunzele de arpagic pot fi tăiate la nivelul solului pentru a fi folosite la condimentarea mâncărurilor.</p> <p>Cunoscută sub denumirea populară de ”arpagic”, ”ceapă pitică”, ”cepşoară”, ”civetă”, Allium Schoenoprasum este o plantă nativă din Europa, Asia şi America de Nord.</p> <p>Este o plantă erbacee perenă, mică şi robustă care formează bulbi asemeni cepei, cu care este înrudită.</p> <p>Înălţimea variază între 20-30 cm.</p> <p>Bulbii săi mici, uşor conici, albi şi frunzele subţiri şi tubulare, de culoare verde-închis se dezvoltă grupate la baza tulpinii formând tufe foarte dense.</p> <p>Bulbii sunt atât de apropiaţi unii de alţii în cadrul tufei, încât rădăcinile lor se întrepătrund formând o masă compactă.</p> <p>Frunzele sunt foarte subţiri când răsar, dar se îngroaşă odată cu îmbătrânirea plantei.</p> <p>Deasupra frunzelor cresc nişte inflorescenţe albăstrui sau liliachii, de o formă sferică.</p> <p>Planta înfloreşte în iunie.</p> <p>Allium Schoenoprasum are aroma vie şi gustul picant caracteristic cepei obişnuite, dar cu nuanţe mult mai fine.</p> <p>Odată cu îmbătrânirea plantei, gustul devine mai accentuat, rămânând a fi totuşi cel mai delicat dintre rudele sale<span> </span><em>Allium</em><span> </span>(usturoi, ceapă, praz, haşmă).</p> <p>Planta are numeroase întrebuinţări culinare în întreaga lume.</p> <p>Se consumă doar frunzele plantei, astfel că se recoltează frunzele de la nivelul solului atunci când au 5-13cm înălţime.</p> <p>Frunzele cresc cu atât mai viguros, cu cât sunt tunse mai des.</p> <p>Pentru a stimula planta să producă frunze noi, florile trebuie rupte.</p> <p>Preferă solurile bogate nutritiv, drenate şi locurile însorite.</p> <p>Este bine ca solul să fie menţinut umed, dar va rezista şi la uscăciune, cantitatea şi calitatea frunzelor desigur suferind.</p> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;">all year round </span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;">1 cm, Cover lightly with substrate</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;">18-25 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;">3-6 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> <div></div> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </body> </html>
MHS 11 (2g)
Semințe Arpagic (Allium Schoenoprasum)
German Extra Hardy Garlic cloves 2.95 - 3

German Extra Hardy Garlic...

Pret 2,95 € (SKU: P 416 GEH)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>German Extra Hardy Garlic cloves</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for 10 Garlic cloves</strong></span></h2> <p>German Extra Hardy, is also known as German White, Northern White and German Stiffneck is a large, beautiful and well-formed porcelain garlic. These are all the same garlic but grown in different places under different names. Its flavor is very strong and robust and sticks around for a long time.</p> <p>The average weight of garlic cloves 5-6 g.</p> <p>From a grower's perspective, it is a tall dark green plant and is a very good survivor, usually grows healthy and appears to be somewhat resistant to many of the diseases that can affect garlic. It originally came from Germany but grows well in all but the most southerly states, where it is marginal.</p> <p>Being a Porcelain, German Extra Hardy stores a long time at cool room temp for around 9-10 months or longer.</p> </body> </html>
P 416 GEH
German Extra Hardy Garlic cloves 2.95 - 3
Black Garlic Cloves - Black Gold (Allium roseum)

Black Garlic Cloves (Allium...

Pret 2,25 € (SKU: P 416)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Black Garlic Cloves - Black Gold (Allium roseum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 Cloves.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Just like each tomato is not suitable for making sauces, so each of the garlic is not suitable for fermenting and making a Black Garlic. We offer you a variety that came directly from Japan and the only variety (Pink Garlic Allium roseum) from which a real Black Garlic is made.</span></p> <p><span>Black garlic is a type of "caramelized" garlic (in reality, browned by the Maillard reaction rather than truly caramelized) first used as a food ingredient in Asian cuisine. It is made by heating whole bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum) over the course of several weeks, a process that results in black cloves. The taste is sweet and syrupy with hints of balsamic vinegar[1] or tamarind.[2] Black garlic's popularity has spread to the United States as it has become a sought-after ingredient used in high-end cuisine.</span></p> <p><span>The process of producing black garlic is sometimes incorrectly referred to as fermentation, but it does not in fact involve microbial action.[3] Black garlic is made when heads of garlic are aged under specialized conditions of heat and humidity. Bulbs are kept in a humidity-controlled environment at temperatures that range from 60 - 77ºC (140 to 170 degrees Fahrenheit) for 60 to 90 days. There are no additives, preservatives, or burning of any kind. The enzymes that give fresh garlic its sharpness break down. Those conditions also facilitate the Maillard reaction, the chemical process that produces new flavour compounds responsible for the deep taste of seared meat and fried onions, the cloves turn black and develop a sticky date-like texture.</span></p> <p><strong><span>History</span></strong></p> <p><span>In Taoist mythology, black garlic was rumored to grant immortality.[citation needed] In Korea, black garlic was developed as a health product and it is still perceived as health supplementary food. </span></p> <p><span>Black garlic is prized as a food rich in antioxidants and added to energy drinks, and in Thailand is claimed to increase the consumer's longevity. It is also used to make black garlic chocolate.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Culinary uses</span></strong></p> <p><span>In black garlic, the garlic flavour is softened such that it almost or entirely disappears depending on the length of time it was heated. Additionally, its flavour is dependent on that of the fresh garlic that was used to make it. Garlic with a higher sugar content produces a milder, more caramel-like flavour, whereas garlic with a low sugar content produces a sharper, somewhat more acidic flavour, similar in character to tomato paste. Burnt flavours may also be present if the garlic was heated for too long at too high a temperature or not long enough: during heating, the garlic turns black in colour well before the full extent of its sweetness is able to develop.</span></p> <p><span>Black garlic can be eaten alone, on bread, or used in soups, sauces, crushed into a mayonnaise or simply tossed into a vegetable dish. A vinaigrette can be made with black garlic, sherry vinegar, soy, a neutral oil, and Dijon mustard. Its softness increases with water content.</span></p> <p><span>Unlike the vegetable from which it is made, white garlic, black garlic has a very subtle and muted flavour that is easily overpowered.</span></p> <p><span>Because of its delicate and muted flavours, a considerably larger amount of black garlic must be used in comparison to white garlic in order to achieve a similar level of intensity. Additionally, black garlic cannot be used in place of white garlic. If a garlic flavour is desired in addition to the flavour of black garlic, then fresh garlic must be added.</span></p> <p><span>One method to release the subtle flavours of black garlic is to knead a peeled clove between the fingers until its structure is thoroughly broken down and then to dissolve the resulting paste in a small amount of hot water. This produces a dark brown, coffee-coloured suspension of the fibrous black garlic particles in a solution that carries most of its flavour, acidity, and sugar content. This liquid may then be added to foods that are otherwise neutral in flavour (like, for example, mashed potatoes) to better showcase the flavour of the black garlic.</span></p> <p><span>Likely owing to its harsh and concentrated colour, the potent reputation of fresh garlic, and the association of Maillard reactions with the browning of meat, it is a common misconception that black garlic has a "meaty" flavour. It does not. It is commonly eaten out of hand by enthusiasts, who sometimes liken the flavour to a savoury, slightly acidic caramel candy or to sweet tamarind fruit. The most prominent flavour it imparts is sweetness when used in high concentrations and when used in low concentrations, provided that there are no other flavours to compete with that of the black garlic, the flavour and aroma are somewhat similar to those of instant coffee, though without any bitterness.</span></p> <p><strong><span>In popular culture</span></strong></p> <p><span>It garnered television attention when it was used in battle redfish on Iron Chef America, episode 11 of season 7 (on Food Network), and in an episode of Top Chef New York (on Bravo),[8] where it was added to a sauce accompanying monkfish.</span></p> <p><span>In the United Kingdom,[6] where it made its TV debut on the BBC's Something for the Weekend cooking and lifestyle program in February 2009,[10] farmer Mark Botwright, owner of the South West Garlic Farm, explained that he developed a process for preserving garlic after finding a 4000-year-old Korean recipe for "black garlic."</span></p> <p><span>In 2011, it was used on an episode of Food Network's Chopped Champions. In September 2011, it was a mandatory ingredient in the final round of the second episode of Ron Ben-Israel's Sweet Genius.</span></p> <p><span>It also was mentioned in the animated series Bob's Burgers in episode "Best Burger", in which Bob enters a best burger contest, but quickly realizes his main ingredient - black garlic - is missing and sends his kids back to the restaurant to retrieve it in time for its preparation and inclusion in the burger.</span></p> <p><strong><span>AFTER YOU BUY THIS PRODUCT WE WILL SEND YOU LINK WITH VIDEO HOW YOU CAN MAKE BLACK GARLIC EASY AT HOME FOR ONLY 10 DAYS!</span></strong></p> </body> </html>
P 416
Black Garlic Cloves - Black Gold (Allium roseum)

المنتج الأكثر مبيعا
Semințe de usturoi din...

Semințe de usturoi din...

Pret 2,85 € (SKU: P 387)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span><strong>Semințe de usturoi din Kashmiri (Allium schoenoprasum)</strong> </span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Prețul este pentru un pachet de 3 usturoi.</strong> </span></h2> <p>Usturoiul Kashmiri are o coajă tare, maro-aurie și arată ca un cățel de usturoi individual. Are o formă rotunjită, bulbată, cu o porțiune rigidă, turtită pe o parte, care ajunge într-un punct de la capătul cozii cuișoarei. Cuișoarele mici, simple măsoară 1,5 până la 4 centimetri în diametru. Straturile exterioare întărite formează o coajă de protecție a bulbului în timp ce se dezvoltă la temperaturi sub zero grade. Cuișorul de dedesubt este de culoare alb strălucitor până la alb-cremos și oferă o aromă puternică, usturoi, fără aciditatea prezentă în alte soiuri.</p> <p>Usturoiul Kashmiri, cunoscut și în India sub numele de usturoi Himalaya sau Jammu, este o varietate rară, cu un cuișoare, de Allium sativum. Cunoscut sub numele de usturoi Snow Mountain și Ek Pothi Lahsun în hindi, este recoltat doar o dată pe an de la înălțimile mari din Himalaya și este bine-cunoscut în toată India pentru beneficiile sale pentru sănătate. Cercetările au arătat că usturoiul din Kashmiri este de șapte ori mai puternic decât usturoiul comercial, în ceea ce privește compușii și proprietățile benefice.</p> <p>Usturoiul Kashmiri este originar din munții Himalaya, în ceea ce este astăzi Jammu și Kashmir. Regiunea se află între țările din Pakistan la vest și Tibet și China la est și este cel mai nordic stat din India. Usturoiul din Kashmiri este cultivat la 1.800 de metri deasupra nivelului mării într-un climat cu niveluri extrem de scăzute de oxigen și condiții dure, cu zăpadă. Este una dintre puținele plante care va supraviețui mediului rece, la înălțime mare. Usturoiul își are originea nu prea departe de această regiune, în ceea ce este astăzi Kârgâzstan, Tadjikistan, Turkmenistan și Uzbekistan. Se spune că usturoiul Kashmiri este unul dintre cele mai pure soiuri datorită regiunii în care este cultivat și lipsei de poluanți industriali din sol.</p> </body> </html>
P 387
Semințe de usturoi din Kashmiri (Allium schoenoprasum)

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