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Corn Salad Lettuce Seeds

Corn Salad Lettuce 2000 Seeds

Pret 6,00 € (SKU: VE 37)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;" class=""><strong>Corn Salad (Mache) Lettuce 2000 Seeds Heirloom&nbsp;(Valerianella locusta)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong><span style="font-size: 14pt;">Package of 2000 seeds (8g).</span></strong></span><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong><span style="font-size: 14pt;"></span> </strong></span></h2> <div> <div>These miniature salad greens have been popular in central and northern Europe for centuries, and was first popularized by Henry XIV during the 1590's. The dark green leaves are delightfully minty-sweet and productive. Best if grown during cool weather. Very cold hardy.&nbsp;<span style="font-size: 11px; line-height: 1.5em;">45 Days</span></div> </div> <div>Corn Salad is a wonderfully tasty salad crop for early spring and late fall.Harvest the small heads of oval, dark green leaves when 4" across.</div> <div><strong>Wikipedia:</strong></div> <div>Valerianella locusta is a small dicot annual plant of the family Valerianaceae. It is an edible salad green with a characteristic nutty flavor, dark green color, and soft texture. Common names include corn salad (or cornsalad), lamb's lettuce, mâche, fetticus, feldsalat, nut lettuce, field salad and rapunzel. In restaurants that feature French cooking, this salad green may be called doucette or raiponce, as an alternative to mâche, by which it is best known.</div> <div>Description</div> <div>Corn salad, also known as mâche or lamb's lettuce, grows in a low rosette with spatulate leaves up to 15.2 cm long. It is a hardy plant that grows to zone 5, and in mild climates it is grown as a winter green. In warm conditions it tends to bolt to seed.</div> <div>Corn salad grows wild in parts of Europe, northern Africa and western Asia. In Europe and Asia it is a common weed in cultivated land and waste spaces. In North America it has escaped cultivation and become naturalized on both the eastern and western seaboards.</div> <div>As a cultivated crop, it is a specialty of the region around Nantes, France, which is the primary source for mâche in Europe.</div> <div>History</div> <div>Corn salad was originally foraged by European peasants until Jean-Baptiste de La Quintinie, royal gardener of King Louis XIV, introduced it to the world. It has been eaten in Britain for centuries and appears in John Gerard's Herbal of 1597. It was grown commercially in London from the late 18th or early 19th century and appeared on markets as a winter vegetable, however, it only became commercially available there in the 1980s. American president Thomas Jefferson cultivated mâche at his home, Monticello, in Virginia in the early 1800's.</div> <div>The common name corn salad refers to the fact that it often grows as a weed in wheat fields. (The European term for staple grain is "corn".) The Brothers Grimm's tale Rapunzel may have taken its name from this plant.</div> <div>Nutrition</div> <div>Like other formerly foraged greens, corn salad has many nutrients, including three times as much vitamin C as lettuce, beta-carotene, B6, B9, vitamin E, and omega-3 fatty acids. It is best if gathered before flowers appear.</div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 37 (8g)
Corn Salad Lettuce Seeds
Brune D'Hiver Lettuce Seeds

Brune D'Hiver Lettuce Seeds

Pret 1,45 € (SKU: P 377)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;" class="">Brune D'Hiver Lettuce Seeds</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Compact, hardy, French butterhead-type lettuce that was introduced in 1855. Crunchy green leaves are blushed in reddish- brown color. Plants require little space when growing, and are perfect for fall plantings. Hard to find.</p> <p>Winter Lettuce.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
P 377 (0,05g)
Brune D'Hiver Lettuce Seeds
Winter Purslane, Indian Lettuce Seeds (Claytonia perfoliata)

Winter Purslane, Indian...

Pret 1,95 € (SKU: P 371)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Winter Purslane, Indian Lettuce Seeds (Claytonia perfoliata)</span></em></strong><strong><em></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Claytonia perfoliata (Indian lettuce, spring beauty, winter purslane, or miner's lettuce ; syn. Montia perfoliata) is a fleshy annual plant native to the western mountain and coastal regions of North America from southernmost Alaska and central British Columbia south to Central America, but most common in California in the Sacramento and northern San Joaquin valleys.</p> <p>Claytonia perfoliata is a rosette-forming plant, growing to a maximum of 40 cm in height, but mature plants can be as small as 1 cm. The cotyledons are usually bright green (rarely purplish or brownish-green), succulent, long and narrow. The first true leaves form a rosette at the base of the plant, and are 0.5–4 cm long, with an often long petiole (exceptionally up to 20 cm long).</p> <p>The small pink or white flowers have five petals 2–6 mm long; they appear from February to May or June, and are grouped 5–40 together above a pair of leaves that are united together around the stem to appear as one circular leaf. Mature plants have numerous erect to spreading stems that branch from the base.</p> <p>It is common in the spring, and it prefers cool, damp conditions. It first appears in sunlit areas after the first heavy rains. Though, the best stands are found in shaded areas, especially in the uplands, into the early summer. As the days get hotter, the leaves turn a deep red color as they dry out.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>The common name miner's lettuce refers to its use by California Gold Rush miners who ate it to get their vitamin C to prevent scurvy. It can be eaten as a leaf vegetable. Most commonly it is eaten raw in salads, but it is not quite as delicate as other lettuce. Sometimes it is boiled like spinach, which it resembles in taste.</p> <p>It is widely naturalized in western Europe. It was introduced there in the eighteenth century, possibly by the naturalist Archibald Menzies, who brought it to Kew Gardens in 1794.</p> </body> </html>
P 371
Winter Purslane, Indian Lettuce Seeds (Claytonia perfoliata)
Mixture of Best Lettuce Seeds  - 2

Mixture of Best Lettuce Seeds

Pret 1,85 € (SKU: P 361)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Mixture of Best Lettuce Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 550 seeds (0,5g).</strong></span></h2> <p>A mixture of several kinds of the best lettuce. It can be collected (cut) several times over a period of growth. It can be grown outdoors or green house even in bigger flower pot on the balcony.</p> <p>Lettuce plants does not need much care except water.</p>
P 361
Mixture of Best Lettuce Seeds  - 2

مجموعة متنوعة من بريطانيا العظمى
Lettuce Seeds May Queen

Lettuce Seeds May Queen

Pret 1,95 € (SKU: VE 134 (1g))
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Lettuce Seeds May Queen (Lactuca sativa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for package of 1000 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>MAY QUEEN LETTUCE (Lactuca sativa), more modernly called May King, is a 19th English heirloom butterhead was grown in the great glasshouses of the Victorian era. Early maturing, tender, with a sweet flavor, it is still a favorite across the Pond for growing in greenhouses and cold frames and in the garden as it can withstand ground frosts. The leaves are lime green with a reddish tinge and the small firm creamy hearts have a pink tinge. Very fetching on the salad plate! 50 days. 50 seeds.</p> <p>GROWING TIPS: Lettuces are my absolute favorite - I dedicate a lot of space to them in my garden because I like variety and they can be really beautiful kissed by the sun. Direct sow in early spring and late summer. The more space each lettuce has to grow the larger it becomes. If you are sowing for quick greens, don't bother to thin - just use your scissors to clips what you need for dinner as it will continue to grow.</p> <p>Lettuces love cool (not cold) weather and respond to well-prepared soil and regular weeding and watering. Relatively pest-free, with the exception of slugs (easily combatted with a barrier of ashes or copper wire) and furry invaders (chicken ware cloches work best there).</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 134 (1g)
Lettuce Seeds May Queen

مجموعة متنوعة من إيطاليا
Lettuce Seeds BATAVIA BIONDA DI PARIGI

Lettuce Seeds BATAVIA...

Pret 1,85 € (SKU: VE 170 (1g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Lettuce Seeds BATAVIA BIONDA DI PARIGI</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 1000 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Italian Heirloom Batavia Bionda Di Parigi is a medium-early variety that produces a large, and heavy head, which is crisp and golden.&nbsp; A large tightly wrapped round head with light green tender leaves and pronounced crunchy ribs.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3><strong>When to Plant</strong></h3> <p>In spring, sow lettuce in cold frames or tunnels six weeks before your last frost date. Start more seeds indoors under lights at about the same time, and set them out when they are three weeks old. Direct seed more lettuce two weeks before your average last spring frost date. Lettuce seeds typically sprout in two to eight days when soil temperatures range between 55 and 75 degrees.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In fall, sow all types of lettuce at two-week intervals starting eight weeks before your first fall frost. One month before your first frost, sow only cold-tolerant butterheads and romaines.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3><strong>How to Plant</strong></h3> <p>Prepare your planting bed by loosening the soil to at least 10 inches deep. Mix in an inch or so of good compost or well-rotted manure. Sow lettuce seeds a quarter of an inch deep and 1 inch apart in rows or squares, or simply broadcast them over the bed.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Indoors, sow lettuce seeds in flats or small containers kept under fluorescent lights. Harden off three-week-old seedlings for at least two or three days before transplanting. Use shade covers, such as pails or flowerpots, to protect transplants from sun and wind during their first few days in the garden.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3><strong>Harvesting and Storage</strong></h3> <p>Harvest lettuce in the morning, after the plants have had all night to plump up with water. Wilted lettuce picked on a hot day seldom revives, even when rushed to the refrigerator. Pull (and eat) young plants until you get the spacing you want. Gather individual leaves or use scissors to harvest handfuls of baby lettuce. Rinse lettuce thoroughly with cool water, shake or spin off excess moisture, and store it in plastic bags in the refrigerator. Lettuce often needs a second cleaning as it is prepared for the table.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 170 (1g)
Lettuce Seeds BATAVIA BIONDA DI PARIGI
LETTUCE BRASILIANA Seeds

LETTUCE BRASILIANA Seeds

Pret 1,85 € (SKU: P 263)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>LETTUCE BRASILIANA Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Brasiliana: Similar in nature to an Iceberg lettuce. Large, tightly wrapped head with crunchy leaves.</p> <p>Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is an annual plant of the daisy family Asteraceae. It is most often grown as a leaf vegetable, but sometimes for its stem and seeds. Lettuce was first cultivated by the ancient Egyptians who turned it from a weed, whose seeds were used to produce oil, into a food plant grown for its succulent leaves, in addition to its oil-rich seeds. Lettuce spread to the Greeks and Romans, the latter of whom gave it the name lactuca, from which the English lettuce is ultimately derived. By 50 AD, multiple types were described, and lettuce appeared often in medieval writings, including several herbals. The 16th through 18th centuries saw the development of many varieties in Europe, and by the mid-18th century cultivars were described that can still be found in gardens. Europe and North America originally dominated the market for lettuce, but by the late 20th century the consumption of lettuce had spread throughout the world.</p> <p>Generally grown as a hardy annual, lettuce is easily cultivated, although it requires relatively low temperatures to prevent it from flowering quickly. It can be plagued with numerous nutrient deficiencies, as well as insect and mammal pests and fungal and bacterial diseases. L. sativa crosses easily within the species and with some other species within the Lactuca genus; although this trait can be a problem to home gardeners who attempt to save seeds, biologists have used it to broaden the gene pool of cultivated lettuce varieties. World production of lettuce and chicory for calendar year 2010 stood at 23 620 000/23,620,000 tonnes, half of which came from China.</p> <p>Lettuce is most often used for salads, although it is also seen in other kinds of food, such as soups, sandwiches and wraps; it can also be grilled.[3] One variety, the woju (莴苣), or asparagus lettuce, is grown for its stems, which are eaten either raw or cooked. Lettuce is a rich source of vitamin K and vitamin A, and is a moderate source of folate and iron. Contaminated lettuce is often a source of bacterial, viral and parasitic outbreaks in humans, including E. coli and Salmonella. In addition to its main use as a leafy green, it has also gathered religious and medicinal significance over centuries of human consumption.</p> <p><strong>Taxonomy and etymology</strong></p> <p>Lactuca sativa is a member of the Lactuca (lettuce) genus and the Asteraceae (sunflower or aster) family.[4] The species was first described in 1753 by Carl Linnaeus in the second volume of his Species Plantarum.[5] Synonyms for L. sativa include Lactuca scariola var. sativa,[1] L. scariola var. integrata and L. scariola var. integrifolia.[6] L. scariola is itself a synonym for L. serriola, the common wild or prickly lettuce.[2] L. sativa also has many identified taxonomic groups, subspecies and varieties, which delineate the various cultivar groups of domesticated lettuce.[7] Lettuce is closely related to several Lactuca species from southwest Asia; the closest relationship is to L. serriola, an aggressive weed common in temperate and subtropical zones in much of the world.</p> <p>The Romans referred to lettuce as lactuca (lac meaning milk in Latin), an allusion to the white substance, now called latex, exuded by cut stems.[9] This word has become the genus name, while sativa (meaning "sown" or "cultivated") was added to create the species name.[10] The current word lettuce, originally from Middle English, came from the Old French letues or laitues, which derived from the Roman name.[11] The name romaine came from that type's use in the Roman papal gardens, while cos, another term for romaine lettuce, came from the earliest European seeds of the type from the Greek island of Cos, a center of lettuce farming in the Byzantine period.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>Lettuce's native range spreads from the Mediterranean to Siberia, although it has been transported to almost all areas of the world. Plants generally have a height and spread of 6 to 12 inches (15 to 30 cm). The leaves are colorful, mainly in the green and red color spectrums, with some variegated varieties. There are also a few varieties with yellow, gold or blue-teal leaves. Lettuces have a wide range of shapes and textures, from the dense heads of the iceberg type to the notched, scalloped, frilly or ruffly leaves of leaf varieties.[14] Lettuce plants have a root system that includes a main taproot and smaller secondary roots. Some varieties, especially those found in the United States and Western Europe, have long, narrow taproots and a small set of secondary roots. Longer taproots and more extensive secondary systems are found in varieties from Asia.</p> <p>Depending on the variety and time of year, lettuce generally lives 65–130 days from planting to harvesting. Because lettuce that flowers (through the process known as "bolting") becomes bitter and unsaleable, plants grown for consumption are rarely allowed to grow to maturity. Lettuce flowers more quickly in hot temperatures, while freezing temperatures cause slower growth and sometimes damage to outer leaves.[16] Once plants move past the edible stage, they develop flower stalks up to 3 feet (0.9 m) high with small yellow blossoms.[17] Like other members of the tribe Cichorieae, lettuce inflorescences (also known as flower heads or capitula) are composed of multiple florets, each with a modified calyx called a pappus (which becomes the feathery "parachute" of the fruit), a corolla of five petals fused into a ligule or strap, and the reproductive parts. These include fused anthers that form a tube which surrounds a style and bipartite stigma. As the anthers shed pollen, the style elongates to allow the stigmas, now coated with pollen, to emerge from the tube.[15][18] The ovaries form compressed, obovate (teardrop-shaped) dry fruits that do not open at maturity, measuring 3 to 4 mm long. The fruits have 5–7 ribs on each side and are tipped by two rows of small white hairs. The pappus remains at the top of each fruit as a dispersal structure. Each fruit contains one seed, which can be white, yellow, gray or brown depending on the variety of lettuce.</p> <p>The domestication of lettuce over the centuries has resulted in several changes through selective breeding: delayed bolting, larger seeds, larger leaves and heads, better taste and texture, a lower latex content, and different leaf shapes and colors. Work in these areas continues through the present day.[19] Scientific research into the genetic modification of lettuce is ongoing, with over 85 field trials taking place between 1992 and 2005 in the European Union and United States to test modifications allowing greater herbicide tolerance, greater resistance to insects and fungi and slower bolting patterns. However, genetically modified lettuce is not currently used in commercial agriculture.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Lettuce was first cultivated in ancient Egypt for the production of oil from its seeds. This plant was probably selectively bred by the Egyptians into a plant grown for its edible leaves,[21] with evidence of its cultivation appearing as early as 2680 BC.[9] Lettuce was considered a sacred plant of the reproduction god Min, and it was carried during his festivals and placed near his images. The plant was thought to help the god "perform the sexual act untiringly."[22] Its use in religious ceremonies resulted in the creation of many images in tombs and wall paintings. The cultivated variety appears to have been about 30 inches (76 cm) tall and resembled a large version of the modern romaine lettuce. These upright lettuces were developed by the Egyptians and passed to the Greeks, who in turn shared them with the Romans. Circa 50 AD, Roman agriculturalist Columella described several lettuce varieties – some of which may have been ancestors of today's lettuces.</p> <p>Lettuce appears in many medieval writings, especially as a medicinal herb. Hildegard of Bingen mentioned it in her writings on medicinal herbs between 1098 and 1179, and many early herbals also describe its uses. In 1586, Joachim Camerarius provided descriptions of the three basic modern lettuces – head lettuce, loose-leaf lettuce, and romaine (or cos) lettuce.[12] Lettuce was first brought to the Americas from Europe by Christopher Columbus in the late 15th century.[23][24] Between the late 16th century and the early 18th century, many varieties were developed in Europe, particularly Holland. Books published in the mid-18th and early 19th centuries describe several varieties found in gardens today.</p> <p>Due to its short lifespan after harvest, lettuce was originally sold relatively close to where it was grown. The early 20th century saw the development of new packing, storage and shipping technologies that improved the lifespan and transportability of lettuce and resulted in a significant increase in availability.[26] During the 1950s, lettuce production was revolutionized with the development of vacuum cooling, which allowed field cooling and packing of lettuce, replacing the previously used method of ice-cooling in packing houses outside the fields.</p> <p>Lettuce is very easy to grow, and as such has been a significant source of sales for many seed companies. Tracing the history of many varieties is complicated by the practice of many companies, particularly in the US, of changing a variety's name from year to year. This was done for several reasons, the most prominent being to boost sales by promoting a "new" variety or to prevent customers from knowing that the variety had been developed by a competing seed company. Documentation from the late 19th century shows between 65 and 140 distinct varieties of lettuce, depending on the amount of variation allowed between types – a distinct difference from the 1,100 named lettuce varieties on the market at the time. Names also often changed significantly from country to country.[28] Although most lettuce grown today is used as a vegetable, a minor amount is used in the production of tobacco-free cigarettes; however, domestic lettuce's wild relatives produce a leaf that visually more closely resembles tobacco.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>A hardy annual, some varieties of lettuce can be overwintered even in relatively cold climates under a layer of straw, and older, heirloom varieties are often grown in cold frames.[25] Lettuces meant for the cutting of individual leaves are generally planted straight into the garden in thick rows. Heading varieties of lettuces are commonly started in flats, then transplanted to individual spots, usually 8 to 14 inches (20 to 36 cm) apart, in the garden after developing several leaves. Lettuce spaced further apart receives more sunlight, which improves color and nutrient quantities in the leaves. Pale to white lettuce, such as the centers in some iceberg lettuce, contain few nutrients.</p> <p>Lettuce grows best in full sun in loose, nitrogen-rich soils with a pH of between 6.0 and 6.8. Heat generally prompts lettuce to bolt, with most varieties growing poorly above 75 °F (24 °C); cool temperatures prompt better performance, with 60 to 65 °F (16 to 18 °C) being preferred and as low as 45 °F (7 °C) being tolerated.[30] Plants in hot areas that are provided partial shade during the hottest part of the day will bolt more slowly. Temperatures above 80 °F (27 °C) will generally result in poor or non-existent germination of lettuce seeds.[30] After harvest, lettuce lasts the longest when kept at 32 °F (0 °C) and 96 percent humidity. Lettuce quickly degrades when stored with fruit such as apples, pears and bananas that release the ripening agent ethylene gas. The high water content of lettuce (94.9 percent) creates problems when attempting to preserve the plant – it cannot be successfully frozen, canned or dried and must be eaten fresh.</p> <p>Lettuce varieties will cross with each other, making spacing of 5 to 20 feet (1.5 to 6.1 m) between varieties necessary to prevent contamination when saving seeds. Lettuce will also cross with Lactuca serriola (wild lettuce), with the resulting seeds often producing a plant with tough, bitter leaves. Celtuce, a lettuce variety grown primarily in Asia for its stems, crosses easily with lettuces grown for their leaves.[17] This propensity for crossing, however, has led to breeding programs using closely related species in Lactuca, such as L. serriola, L. saligna, and L. virosa, to broaden the available gene pool. Starting in the 1990s, such programs began to include more distantly related species such as L. tatarica.[32] Seeds keep best when stored in cool conditions, and, unless stored cryogenically, remain viable the longest when stored at −4 °F (−20 °C); they are relatively short lived in storage.</p> <p>At room temperature, lettuce seeds remain viable for only a few months. However, when newly harvested lettuce seed is stored cryogenically, this life increases to a half-life of 500 years for vaporized nitrogen and 3,400 years for liquid nitrogen; this advantage is lost if seeds are not frozen promptly after harvesting.</p> <p><strong>Culinary use</strong></p> <p>As described around 50 AD, lettuce leaves were often cooked and served by the Romans with an oil-and-vinegar dressing; however, smaller leaves were sometimes eaten raw. During the 81–96 AD reign of Domitian, the tradition of serving a lettuce salad before a meal began. Post-Roman Europe continued the tradition of poaching lettuce, mainly with large romaine types, as well as the method of pouring a hot oil and vinegar mixture over the leaves.[9] Today, the majority of lettuce is grown for its leaves, although one type is grown for its stem and one for its seeds, which are made into an oil.[21] Most lettuce is used in salads, either alone or with other greens, vegetables, meats and cheeses. Romaine lettuce is often used for Caesar salads, with a dressing that includes anchovies and eggs. Lettuce leaves can also be found in soups, sandwiches and wraps, while the stems are eaten both raw and cooked.[10] The consumption of lettuce in China developed differently from in Western countries, due to health risks and cultural aversion to eating raw leaves. In that country, "salads" were created from cooked vegetables and served hot or cold. Lettuce was also used in a larger variety of dishes than in Western countries, contributing to a range of dishes including bean curd and meat dishes, soups and stir-frys plain or with other vegetables. Stem lettuce, widely consumed in China, is eaten either raw or cooked, the latter primarily in soups and stir-frys.[44] Lettuce is also used as a primary ingredient in the preparation of lettuce soup.</p> <p><strong>Nutritional content</strong></p> <p>Depending on the variety, lettuce is an excellent source (20% of the Daily Value, DV, or higher) of vitamin K (97% DV) and vitamin A (21% DV) (table), with higher concentrations of the provitamin A compound, beta-carotene, found in darker green lettuces, such as Romaine.[31] With the exception of the iceberg variety, lettuce is also a good source (10-19% DV) of folate and iron (table).</p> <p><strong>Religious and medicinal lore</strong></p> <p>In addition to its usual purpose as an edible leafy vegetable, lettuce has had a number of uses in ancient (and even some more modern) times as a medicinal herb and religious symbol. For example, ancient Egyptians thought lettuce to be a symbol of sexual prowess[43] and a promoter of love and childbearing in women. The Romans likewise claimed that it increased sexual potency.[52] In contrast, the ancient Greeks connected the plant with male impotency,[9] and served it during funerals (probably due to its role in the myth of Adonis's death), and British women in the 19th century believed it would cause infertility and sterility. Lettuce has mild narcotic properties; it was called "sleepwort" by the Anglo-Saxons because of this attribute, although the cultivated L. sativa has lower levels of the narcotic than its wild cousins.[52] This narcotic effect is a property of two sesquiterpene lactones which are found in the white liquid (latex) in the stems of lettuce,[29] called lactucarium or "lettuce opium".</p> <p>Lettuce is also eaten as part of the Jewish Passover Seder, where it is considered the optimal choice for use as the bitter herb, which is eaten together with the matzah.</p> <p>Some American settlers claimed that smallpox could be prevented through the ingestion of lettuce,[52] and an Iranian belief suggested consumption of the seeds when afflicted with typhoid.[53] Folk medicine has also claimed it as a treatment for pain, rheumatism, tension and nervousness, coughs and insanity; scientific evidence of these benefits in humans has not been found. The religious ties of lettuce continue into the present day among the Yazidi people of northern Iraq, who have a religious prohibition against eating the plant.</p>
P 263
LETTUCE BRASILIANA Seeds
Great Lakes 118 Lettuce Seed

Great Lakes 118 Lettuce Seed

Pret 2,25 € (SKU: P 142)
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Great Lakes</strong><strong> 118</strong><strong> Lettuce Seed</strong></span></h2> <h2 class="rte align_justify"><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong><span style="font-size:14pt;">Price for Package of 2000 seeds (2g).</span></strong></span><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong><span style="font-size:14pt;"></span></strong></span></h2> <p>Great Lakes lettuce produces large crisp heads of lettuce that have been a farming standard for over 60 years.</p> <p>Fantastic flavor and created for salads and sandwiches.</p> <p>The standard for commercial growers for decades.  Now forgotten, but not by the backyard gardeners and farmers' market growers!</p> <p>Excellent early spring and late fall lettuce.</p> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div>
P 142
Great Lakes 118 Lettuce Seed

مجموعة متنوعة من صربيا
Butterhead Lettuce Seed...

Butterhead Lettuce Seed...

Pret 1,85 € (SKU: P 178)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Butterhead Lettuce</strong> <strong>Seed ATTRACTION</strong></span></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 500 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>An early butterhead variety. The Butterhead Lettuce Attraction: Variety with large, firm heads,round slightly flatened of smooth leaves of an green intense color. A great classic in our kitchens and gardens.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Seed sowing:</strong><strong> </strong>March to July<br /><strong>Harvest salads:</strong> Beginning be<br /><strong>Height:</strong> The lettuce attraction reaches on average 20 to 25cm<br /><strong>Exposure:</strong> Halfshade</p> <p><strong>Sowing instructions:</strong> Seed sowing August to September directly in place after any danger of frost is past, sow 1 cm from depth, water ground even in the event of rain. You can also start earlier in a shelter. Transplant after approximately 20 to 30 days. To help the formation of apple water young lettuces on the leaves in full sun. Cut lettuce ten weeks after sowing.</p> <p><strong>Sowing distance:</strong> 25 x 30 cm between plants<br /><strong>Minimum seed sowing temperature:</strong> 10°C<br /><strong>Seed germination:</strong> 6 to 8 days<br /><strong>Nutritional value:</strong> 15 Kcal for 100 gr.</p> <p><strong>Net weight of seeds:</strong> 4 gr. = +/- 3200 seeds</p> <p><strong>Companion Plants:</strong> Carrot, Radish, Strawberry, Cucumber.</p> </div> </body> </html>
P 178
Butterhead Lettuce Seed ATTRACTION
Garden Cress Lettuce Seeds 1.45 - 3

Garden Cress Lettuce Seeds...

Pret 1,35 € (SKU: VE 19 (1g))
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Garden Cress Lettuce Seeds (Lepidium sativum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 500 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>Cress (Lepidium sativum) , sometimes referred to as garden cress to distinguish it from similar plants also referred to as cress. Garden Cress is a rather fast-growing, edible herb. Garden cress is genetically related to watercress and mustard, sharing their peppery, tangy flavor and aroma. In some regions, garden cress is known as mustard and cress, garden pepper cress, pepper grass, pepperwort or poor person's pepper.</div> <div>This annual plant can reach a height of 60 cm (~24 inches), with many branches on the upper part. The white to pinkish flowers are only 2 mm (1/12 of an inch) across, clustered in branched racemes.</div> <div> <div><strong>Garden cress in agriculture</strong></div> <div>Garden cress is commercially grown in England, France, the Netherlands and Scandinavia.[5]</div> <div>Cultivation of garden cress is practical on both mass scales and on the individual scale. Garden cress is suitable for hydroponic cultivation and thrives in slightly alkaline water. In many local markets, the demand for hydroponically grown cress can exceed available supply, partially because cress leaves are not suitable for distribution in dried form, so can be only partially preserved. Consumers commonly acquire cress as seeds or (in Europe) from markets as boxes of young live shoots.</div> <div>Edible shoots are typically harvested in one to two weeks after planting, when they are 5–13 cm (2 - 5 inches) tall.</div> <div><strong>Cress in cookery</strong></div> <div>Garden cress is added to soups, sandwiches and salads for its tangy flavor. It is also eaten as sprouts, and the fresh or dried seed pods can be used as a peppery seasoning (haloon). In England, cut cress shoots are commonly used in sandwiches with boiled eggs, mayonnaise and salt.</div> <div><strong>Other uses</strong></div> <div> <div>Garden cress, known as chandrashoor, and the seeds, known as halloon in India, are commonly used in the system of ayurveda to prevent postnatal complications.</div> <div>Cress may be given to pet birds, such as budgerigars.</div> <div>Lepidium sativum seeds are used medicinally for indigestion and constipation.</div> </div> </div> <div><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em>Medicinal uses of Lepidium sativum (Pepper grass)</em></strong></span></div> <div>Lepidium sativum seeds are used in treatment of dysentery, leprosy, skin and eye diseases, leucorrhoea, scurvy, diarrhea, dyspepsia, asthma, cough, cold and seminal weakness. They are considred bitter, diuretic, tonic, abortifacient, aphrodisiac, thermogenic, galactagogue, emmenagogue, depurative, ophthalmic and contain a large amount of oil.</div> <div>The root is acrid and bitter in taste. It is used for treating tenesmus and secondary syphilis.</div> <div>The leaf possesses diuretic, stimulant and antibacterial activities. It is recommended for hepatopathy, scurvy, etc.</div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 19 (1g)
Garden Cress Lettuce Seeds 1.45 - 3
Corn Salad Lettuce Seeds  - 2

Corn Salad Lettuce Seeds

Pret 1,35 € (SKU: VE 37)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Corn Salad (Mache) Lettuce Seeds Heirloom (Valerianella locusta)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 330 (1 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>These miniature salad greens have been popular in central and northern Europe for centuries and was first popularized by Henry XIV during the 1590s. The dark green leaves are delightfully minty-sweet and productive. Best if grown during cool weather. Very cold hardy. 45 Days</p> <p>Corn Salad is a wonderfully tasty salad crop for early spring and late fall. Harvest the small heads of oval, dark green leaves when 4" across.</p> <p><strong>Wikipedia:</strong></p> <p>Valerianella locusta is a small dicot annual plant of the family Valerianaceae. It is an edible salad green with a characteristic nutty flavor, dark green color, and soft texture. Common names include corn salad (or cornsalad), lamb's lettuce, mâche, fetticus, feldsalat, nut lettuce, field salad and rapunzel. In restaurants that feature French cooking, this salad green may be called doucette or raiponce, as an alternative to mâche, by which it is best known.</p> <div>Description</div> <div>Corn salad, also known as mâche or lamb's lettuce, grows in a low rosette with spatulate leaves up to 15.2 cm long. It is a hardy plant that grows to zone 5, and in mild climates it is grown as a winter green. In warm conditions it tends to bolt to seed.</div> <div>Corn salad grows wild in parts of Europe, northern Africa and western Asia. In Europe and Asia it is a common weed in cultivated land and waste spaces. In North America it has escaped cultivation and become naturalized on both the eastern and western seaboards.</div> <div>As a cultivated crop, it is a specialty of the region around Nantes, France, which is the primary source for mâche in Europe.</div> <div>History</div> <div>Corn salad was originally foraged by European peasants until Jean-Baptiste de La Quintinie, royal gardener of King Louis XIV, introduced it to the world. It has been eaten in Britain for centuries and appears in John Gerard's Herbal of 1597. It was grown commercially in London from the late 18th or early 19th century and appeared on markets as a winter vegetable, however, it only became commercially available there in the 1980s. American president Thomas Jefferson cultivated mâche at his home, Monticello, in Virginia in the early 1800's.</div> <div>The common name corn salad refers to the fact that it often grows as a weed in wheat fields. (The European term for staple grain is "corn".) The Brothers Grimm's tale Rapunzel may have taken its name from this plant.</div> <div>Nutrition</div> <div>Like other formerly foraged greens, corn salad has many nutrients, including three times as much vitamin C as lettuce, beta-carotene, B6, B9, vitamin E, and omega-3 fatty acids. It is best if gathered before flowers appear.</div>
VE 37 (1g)
Corn Salad Lettuce Seeds  - 2
Lettuce Seeds 'Green Mignonette' Butterhead

Lettuce Seeds 'Green...

Pret 1,50 € (SKU: P 98)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Lettuce&nbsp;Seeds&nbsp;'Green Mignonette' Butterhead</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #f80000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 (0,09g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>Green Mignonette' is a butterhead lettuce type. It is an excellent home garden variety as it is easy to grow with exceptional eating qualities and is slow to bolt. It has soft, deep green, ruffled leaves, a loose heart and is very tender and sweet. It is suitable for planting for most of the year. Days to harvest: 25 days salad mix; 46 days full size.</div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
P 98 (0,09g)
Lettuce Seeds 'Green Mignonette' Butterhead
Lettuce Seeds Lollo Rossa...

Lettuce Seeds Lollo Rossa...

Pret 1,10 € (SKU: P 77)
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Lettuce Seeds Lollo Rossa</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 (0.09g) or 3000 (2.7g) seeds.</strong></span><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 10pt;"><strong><br></strong></span></h2> <p>Non-hearting type, red-tinged leaves with waved and serrated edges. This variety also looks great in bedding schemes!<br>Cultivation<br>Sow seeds thinly from spring to mid-summer ¼in deep in drills 15in apart. <br>They can also be sown indoors from mid-spring in cooler areas for setting outdoors once the soil has warmed up. A moist well-drained soil which has had plenty of compost during the previous autumn is best. In very hot weather it is best to water the soil before sowing and to make sowings during the early afternoon. To lengthen the cropping period sow only a few seeds at a time at 2 - 3-week intervals&nbsp;</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
P 77 (0,09g)
Lettuce Seeds Lollo Rossa Concorde

مجموعة متنوعة من إيطاليا
Rossa di Treviso Chicory Seeds 1.85 - 1

Rossa di Treviso Chicory Seeds

Pret 1,85 € (SKU: P 168)
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Rossa di Treviso Chicory Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Treviso is a mild variety of radicchio that ranges in size from a small Belgian endive to a large head of Romaine lettuce. Its elongated leaves are deep purple to red with white ribs and overlap one another tightly to form a compact bunch that is similar in shape to Belgian endive. Treviso's crisp, sturdy leaves offer an earthy, bitter edge much milder in flavor than the more mature Treviso Tardivo. Cooking will also further mellow the bitter flavor of Treviso.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Seasons/Availability</strong></p> <p>Treviso is available in the fall and throughout the early spring months.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Current Facts</strong></p> <p>Treviso, botanically a member of Cichorium intybus, is a subspecies of chicory. Also known as radicchio Rosso de Treviso it is a member of the Composite or Asteraceae family. There are two types of radicchio from the Treviso region, a late harvest known as Tardivo and early harvest known as Precoce. Both varieties are protected by the IGP (indicazione geografica protetta) or Protected Geographical Indication certification. The high quality and characteristics of IGP products can be traced back to a specific geographical region.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Nutritional Value</strong></p> <p>The bitter flavor of radicchios such as Treviso is a result of its intybin content, a compound which has been shown to aid in digestion, appetite stimulation and as a purifying agent for the liver and blood.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Applications</strong></p> <p>Treviso, like other bitter chicory greens, can be served fresh or cooked. It can be sautéed, grilled, blanched or slow coked into soups, sauces and risottos. Its leaves are sturdy enough to hold up to heat and can be used as an edible serving cup or as part of a bed for grilled vegetables and meats. Its flavor pairs well with cream based sauces and dressings, parmesan cheese, lemon, orange, olive oil, sausage, prosciutto and anchovies. Treviso will keep, refrigerated, for one to two weeks.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Ethnic/Cultural Info</strong></p> <p>Radicchio Rosso de Treviso has its very own consortium of 140 members known as Consorzio Radicchio di Treviso in Italy whose goal is to educate the public about Treviso as well as protect and uphold its quality and market it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Geography/History</strong></p> <p>Like other varieties of chicory such as Chioggia, Verona and Castelfranco radicchio Treviso is native to the northern Italian region of Veneto, specifically it is from the town it owes its namesake to, Treviso. A registered IGP product, all true radicchio Rosso de Treviso marketed under that name must be grown within the region of Veneto in Treviso, Venice or Padua. Unlike radicchio Treviso di Tardivo which undergoes a second forced growth and lengthy manufacturing process Treviso Precoce is harvested young, cleaned and sent directly to the market. Authentic Treviso can be found in Italy as well as in Europe and in the United States at specialty markets.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
P 168 (0,07g)
Rossa di Treviso Chicory Seeds 1.85 - 1
Chicory - Endive Yellow Heart Curly Seeds (Cichorium endivia)

Chicory - Endive Yellow...

Pret 1,85 € (SKU: P 417)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em>Chicory - Endive Yellow Heart Curly Seeds (Cichorium endivia)</em></strong></span></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ef0303;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 seeds. </strong></span></h3> <p><span>Early maturing variety chicory. Plants form a loose rosette, up to 30 cm in diameter, weighing 300-400 g toothed leaves are medium sized, green exterior color, in the middle of the yellow-green. Grow sowing seeds in the soil or seedling. 2-3 weeks before harvesting is carried out "whitening" of leaves, so they do not taste bitter. Remove spicy bitterness will also help delay in salt water for 10-20 minutes.</span></p> </body> </html>
P 417
Chicory - Endive Yellow Heart Curly Seeds (Cichorium endivia)

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