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Good quality product
By Petar Petar on 10/05/2021
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Good quality product
By Petar Petar on 10/05/2021
 Verified Purchase
Good quality product
By Petar Petar on 10/05/2021
 Verified Purchase

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Saffron Seeds (Saffron crocus)

Saffron Bulbs (Saffron crocus)

Fiyat €3,75 (SKU: MHS 105 B)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Saffron Bulbs (Saffron crocus)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f60303; font-size: 14pt; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 bulb.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Crocus sativus, commonly known as saffron crocus, or autumn crocus,[2] is a species of flowering plant of the Crocus genus in the Iridaceae family. It is best known for producing the spice saffron from the filaments that grow inside the flower. The term "autumn crocus" is also mistakenly used for flowers in the Colchicum species. However, crocuses have 3 stamens and 1 style, while colchicum have 6 stamens and 3 styles and are toxic.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">This cormous autumn-flowering perennial plant species is unknown in the wild.[2] Human cultivation of saffron crocus and use of saffron have taken place for more than 3,500 years and spans different cultures, continents, and civilizations, see history of saffron. Crocus sativus is currently known to grow in the Mediterranean, East Asia, and Irano-Turanian Region.[4] Saffron may be the triploid form of a species found in Eastern Greece, Crocus cartwrightianus; it probably appeared first in Crete. An origin in Western or Central Asia, although often suspected, is not supported by botanical research.[5] Other sources suggest some genetic input from Crocus pallasii.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Morphology</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Crocus sativus has a corm, which holds leaves, bracts, bracteole, and the flowering stalk.[4] These are protected by the corm underground. C. sativus generally blooms with purple flowers in the autumn. The plant grows about 10 to 30 cm high.[7] C. sativus is a triploid with 24 chromosomes, which means it has three times the haploid number of chromosomes. This makes the plant sterile due to its inability to pair chromosomes during meiosis.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Cultivation</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Crocus sativus is unknown in the wild, and its ancestor is unknown. The species Crocus cartwrightianus is the most probable ancestor,[9][6] but C. thomassi and C. pallasii are still being considered as potential predecessors.[10] Manual vegetative multiplication is necessary to produce offspring for this species as the plant itself is a triploid that is self-incompatible and male sterile, therefore rendering it incapable of sexual reproduction. This inability to reproduce on its own supports the hypothesis that C. sativus is a mutant descending from C. carthwrightianus as a result of selective breeding.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Corms of Crocus sativus should be planted 4 inches apart and in a trough 4 inches deep. The flower grows best in areas of full sun in well-drained soil with moderate levels of organic content.[11] The corms will multiply after each year, and will last 3–5 years.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Use</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Saffron is considered to be the most valuable spice by weight.  <strong>See spice</strong>. Depending on the size of harvested stigmas, 50,000–75,000 Crocus sativus plants are needed to produce about 1 pound of saffron;[13] each flower only produces three stigmas. Stigmas should be harvested mid-morning when the flowers are fully opened.[12] The saffron crocus (Crocus sativus) should not be confused with "meadow" saffron or autumn crocus (Colchicum autumnale) which is poisonous.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Spice</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Saffron (pronounced /ˈsæfrən/ or /ˈsæfrɒn/)[1] is a spice derived from the flower of Crocus sativus, commonly known as the "saffron crocus". The vivid crimson stigmas and styles, called threads, are collected and dried to be used mainly as a seasoning and colouring agent in food. Saffron, long among the world's most costly spices by weight,[2][3][4] was probably first cultivated in or near Greece.[5] C. sativus is probably a form of C. cartwrightianus, that emerged by human cultivators selectively breeding plants for unusually long stigmas in late Bronze Age Crete.[6] It slowly propagated throughout much of Eurasia and was later brought to parts of North Africa, North America, and Oceania.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Saffron's taste and iodoform or hay-like fragrance result from the chemicals picrocrocin and safranal.[7][8] It also contains a carotenoid pigment, crocin, which imparts a rich golden-yellow hue to dishes and textiles. Its recorded history is attested in a 7th-century BC Assyrian botanical treatise compiled under Ashurbanipal,[9] and it has been traded and used for over four millennia. Iran now accounts for approximately 90% of the world production of saffron.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">The domesticated saffron crocus, Crocus sativus, is an autumn-flowering perennial plant unknown in the wild. It probably descends from the eastern Mediterranean autumn-flowering Crocus cartwrightianus,[12][13] which is also known as "wild saffron"[14] and originated in Crete[15] or mainland Greece.[8] An origin in Southwest Asia,[3][16] although often suspected, has been disapproved by botanical research.[17] The saffron crocus probably resulted when C. cartwrightianus was subjected to extensive artificial selection by growers seeking longer stigmas. C. thomasii and C. pallasii are other possible sources.[13][18] As a genetically monomorphic clone,[15] it slowly propagated throughout much of Eurasia.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">It is a sterile triploid form, which means that three homologous sets of chromosomes compose each specimen's genetic complement; C. sativus bears eight chromosomal bodies per set, making for 24 in total.[19] Being sterile, the purple flowers of C. sativus fail to produce viable seeds; reproduction hinges on human assistance: clusters of corms, underground, bulb-like, starch-storing organs, must be dug up, divided, and replanted. A corm survives for one season, producing via this vegetative division up to ten "cormlets" that can grow into new plants in the next season.[12] The compact corms are small, brown globules that can measure as large as 5 cm (2 in) in diameter, have a flat base, and are shrouded in a dense mat of parallel fibres; this coat is referred to as the "corm tunic". Corms also bear vertical fibres, thin and net-like, that grow up to 5 cm (2 in) above the plant's neck.[19]</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">The plant sprouts 5–11 white and non-photosynthetic leaves known as cataphylls. These membrane-like structures cover and protect the crocus's 5 to 11 true leaves as they bud and develop. The latter are thin, straight, and blade-like green foliage leaves, which are 1–3 mm (0.04–0.12 in), in diameter, which either expand after the flowers have opened ("hysteranthous") or do so simultaneously with their blooming ("synanthous"). C. sativus cataphylls are suspected by some to manifest prior to blooming when the plant is irrigated relatively early in the growing season. Its floral axes, or flower-bearing structures, bear bracteoles, or specialised leaves, that sprout from the flower stems; the latter are known as pedicels.[19] After aestivating in spring, the plant sends up its true leaves, each up to 40 cm (16 in) in length. Only in October, after most other flowering plants have released their seeds, do its brilliantly hued flowers develop; they range from a light pastel shade of lilac to a darker and more striated mauve.[20] The flowers possess a sweet, honey-like fragrance. Upon flowering, the plants are 20–30 cm (8–12 in) in height and bear up to four flowers. A three-pronged style 25–30 mm (1.0–1.2 in) in length, emerges from each flower. Each prong terminates with a vivid crimson stigma, which are the distal end of a carpel.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Cultivation</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">The saffron crocus, unknown in the wild, probably descends from Crocus cartwrightianus. It is a triploid that is "self-incompatible" and male sterile; it undergoes aberrant meiosis and is hence incapable of independent sexual reproduction—all propagation is by vegetative multiplication via manual "divide-and-set" of a starter clone or by interspecific hybridisation.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Crocus sativus thrives in the Mediterranean maquis, an ecotype superficially resembling the North American chaparral, and similar climates where hot and dry summer breezes sweep semi-arid lands. It can nonetheless survive cold winters, tolerating frosts as low as −10 °C (14 °F) and short periods of snow cover.[12][22] Irrigation is required if grown outside of moist environments such as Kashmir, where annual rainfall averages 1,000–1,500 mm (39–59 in); saffron-growing regions in Greece (500 mm or 20 in annually) and Spain (400 mm or 16 in) are far drier than the main cultivating Iranian regions. What makes this possible is the timing of the local wet seasons; generous spring rains and drier summers are optimal. Rain immediately preceding flowering boosts saffron yields; rainy or cold weather during flowering promotes disease and reduces yields. Persistently damp and hot conditions harm the crops,[23] and rabbits, rats, and birds cause damage by digging up corms. Nematodes, leaf rusts, and corm rot pose other threats. Yet Bacillus subtilis inoculation may provide some benefit to growers by speeding corm growth and increasing stigma biomass yield.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">The plants fare poorly in shady conditions; they grow best in full sunlight. Fields that slope towards the sunlight are optimal (i.e., south-sloping in the Northern Hemisphere). Planting is mostly done in June in the Northern Hemisphere, where corms are lodged 7–15 cm (3–6 in) deep; its roots, stems, and leaves can develop between October and February.[19] Planting depth and corm spacing, in concert with climate, are critical factors in determining yields. Mother corms planted deeper yield higher-quality saffron, though form fewer flower buds and daughter corms. Italian growers optimise thread yield by planting 15 cm (6 in) deep and in rows 2–3 cm (0.8–1.2 in) apart; depths of 8–10 cm (3–4 in) optimise flower and corm production. Greek, Moroccan, and Spanish growers employ distinct depths and spacings that suit their locales.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">C. sativus prefers friable, loose, low-density, well-watered, and well-drained clay-calcareous soils with high organic content. Traditional raised beds promote good drainage. Soil organic content was historically boosted via application of some 20–30 tonnes (20–30 long tons; 22–33 short tons) of manure per hectare. Afterwards, and with no further manure application, corms were planted.[25] After a period of dormancy through the summer, the corms send up their narrow leaves and begin to bud in early autumn. Only in mid-autumn do they flower. Harvests are by necessity a speedy affair: after blossoming at dawn, flowers quickly wilt as the day passes.[26] All plants bloom within a window of one or two weeks.[27] Stigmas are dried quickly upon extraction and (preferably) sealed in airtight containers.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">One freshly picked flower yields an average 30 mg (0.0011 oz) of fresh saffron or 7 mg (0.00025 oz) dried; roughly 150 flowers yield 1 g (0.035 oz) of dry saffron threads; to produce 12 g (0.42 oz) of dried saffron, 1 kg (2.2 lb) of flowers are needed; 1 lb (0.45 kg) yields 0.2 oz (5.7 g) of dried saffron.[25] To glean 1 lb (450 g) of dry saffron requires the harvest of 50,000–75,000 flowers; a kilogram requires 110,000–170,000 flowers.[29][30] Forty hours of labour are needed to pick 150,000 flowers.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Chemistry</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Saffron contains more than 150 volatile and aroma-yielding compounds. It also has many nonvolatile active components,[33] many of which are carotenoids, including zeaxanthin, lycopene, and various α- and β-carotenes. However, saffron's golden yellow-orange colour is primarily the result of α-crocin. This crocin is trans-crocetin di-(β-D-gentiobiosyl) ester; it bears the systematic (IUPAC) name 8,8-diapo-8,8-carotenoic acid. This means that the crocin underlying saffron's aroma is a digentiobiose ester of the carotenoid crocetin.[33] Crocins themselves are a series of hydrophilic carotenoids that are either monoglycosyl or diglycosyl polyene esters of crocetin.[33] Crocetin is a conjugated polyene dicarboxylic acid that is hydrophobic, and thus oil-soluble. When crocetin is esterified with two water-soluble gentiobioses, which are sugars, a product results that is itself water-soluble. The resultant α-crocin is a carotenoid pigment that may comprise more than 10% of dry saffron's mass. The two esterified gentiobioses make α-crocin ideal for colouring water-based and non-fatty foods such as rice dishes.[5]</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">The bitter glucoside picrocrocin is responsible for saffron's flavour. Picrocrocin (chemical formula: C</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">16H</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">26O</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">7; systematic name: 4-(β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-1-ene-1-carboxaldehyde) is a union of an aldehyde sub-molecule known as safranal (systematic name: 2,6,6-trimethylcyclohexa-1,3-diene-1-carboxaldehyde) and a carbohydrate. It has insecticidal and pesticidal properties, and may comprise up to 4% of dry saffron. Picrocrocin is a truncated version of the carotenoid zeaxanthin that is produced via oxidative cleavage, and is the glycoside of the terpene aldehyde safranal.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">When saffron is dried after its harvest, the heat, combined with enzymatic action, splits picrocrocin to yield D–glucose and a free safranal molecule.[32] Safranal, a volatile oil, gives saffron much of its distinctive aroma.[7][35] Safranal is less bitter than picrocrocin and may comprise up to 70% of dry saffron's volatile fraction in some samples.[34] A second molecule underlying saffron's aroma is 2-hydroxy-4,4,6-trimethyl-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-one, which produces a scent described as saffron, dried hay-like.[36] Chemists find this is the most powerful contributor to saffron's fragrance, despite its presence in a lesser quantity than safranal.[36] Dry saffron is highly sensitive to fluctuating pH levels, and rapidly breaks down chemically in the presence of light and oxidising agents. It must, therefore, be stored away in air-tight containers to minimise contact with atmospheric oxygen. Saffron is somewhat more resistant to heat.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Grades and ISO 3632 categories</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Saffron is not all of the same quality and strength. Strength is related to several factors including the amount of style picked along with the red stigma. Age of the saffron is also a factor. More style included means the saffron is less strong gram for gram, because the colour and flavour are concentrated in the red stigmas. Saffron from Iran, Spain and Kashmir is classified into various grades according to the relative amounts of red stigma and yellow styles it contains. Grades of Iranian saffron are: "sargol" (red stigma tips only, strongest grade), "pushal" or "pushali" (red stigmas plus some yellow style, lower strength), "bunch" saffron (red stigmas plus large amount of yellow style, presented in a tiny bundle like a miniature wheatsheaf) and "konge" (yellow style only, claimed to have aroma but with very little, if any, colouring potential). Grades of Spanish saffron are "coupé" (the strongest grade, like Iranian sargol), "mancha" (like Iranian pushal), and in order of further decreasing strength "rio", "standard" and "sierra" saffron. The word "mancha" in the Spanish classification can have two meanings: a general grade of saffron or a very high quality Spanish-grown saffron from a specific geographical origin. Real Spanish-grown La Mancha saffron has PDO protected status and this is displayed on the product packaging. Spanish growers fought hard for Protected Status because they felt that imports of Iranian saffron re-packaged in Spain and sold as "Spanish Mancha saffron" were undermining the genuine La Mancha brand. Similar was the case in Kashmir where Imported Iranian saffron is mixed with local saffron and sold as ‘Kashmir brand’ at a higher price[37]. In Kashmir, saffron is mostly classified into two main categories called 'Mongra' (stigma alone) or 'Laccha' (stigmas attached with parts of the style)[38]. Countries producing less saffron do not have specialised words for different grades and may only produce one grade. Artisan producers in Europe and New Zealand have offset their higher labour charges for saffron harvesting by targeting quality, only offering extremely high grade saffron.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">In addition to descriptions based on how the saffron is picked, saffron may be categorised under the international standard ISO 3632 after laboratory measurement of crocin (responsible for saffron's colour), picrocrocin (taste), and safranal (fragrance or aroma) content.[39] However, often there is no clear grading information on the product packaging and little of the saffron readily available in UK is labelled with ISO category. This lack of information makes it hard for customers to make informed choices when comparing prices and buying saffron.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Under ISO 3632, determination of non-stigma content ("floral waste content") and other extraneous matter such as inorganic material ("ash") are also key. Grading standards are set by the International Organization for Standardization, a federation of national standards bodies. ISO 3632 deals exclusively with saffron and establishes three categories: III (poorest quality), II, and I (finest quality). Formerly there was also category IV, which was below category III. Samples are assigned categories by gauging the spice's crocin and picrocrocin content, revealed by measurements of specific spectrophotometric absorbance. Safranal is treated slightly differently and rather than there being threshold levels for each category, samples must give a reading of 20–50 for all categories.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">These data are measured through spectrophotometry reports at certified testing laboratories worldwide. Higher absorbances imply greater levels of crocin, picrocrocin and safranal, and thus a greater colouring potential and therefore strength per gram. The absorbance reading of crocin is known as the "colouring strength" of that saffron. Saffron's colouring strength can range from lower than 80 (for all category IV saffron) up to 200 or greater (for category I). The world's finest samples (the selected, most red-maroon, tips of stigmas picked from the finest flowers) receive colouring strengths in excess of 250, making such saffron over three times more powerful than category IV saffron. Market prices for saffron types follow directly from these ISO categories. Sargol and coupé saffron would typically fall into ISO 3632 category I. Pushal and mancha would probably be assigned to category II. On many saffron packaging labels, neither the ISO 3632 category nor the colouring strength (the measurement of crocin content) is displayed.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">However, many growers, traders, and consumers reject such lab test numbers. Some people prefer a more holistic method of sampling batches of threads for taste, aroma, pliability, and other traits in a fashion similar to that practised by experienced wine tasters.[40] However, ISO 3632 grade and colouring strength information allow consumers to make instant comparisons between the quality of different saffron brands, without needing to purchase and sample the saffron. In particular, consumers can work out value for money based on price per unit of colouring strength rather than price per gram, given the wide possible range of colouring strengths that different kinds of saffron can have.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Adulteration</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Despite attempts at quality control and standardisation, an extensive history of saffron adulteration, particularly among the cheapest grades, continues into modern times. Adulteration was first documented in Europe's Middle Ages, when those found selling adulterated saffron were executed under the Safranschou code.[41] Typical methods include mixing in extraneous substances like beetroot, pomegranate fibres, red-dyed silk fibres, or the saffron crocus's tasteless and odourless yellow stamens. Other methods included dousing saffron fibres with viscid substances like honey or vegetable oil to increase their weight. Powdered saffron is more prone to adulteration, with turmeric, paprika, and other powders used as diluting fillers. Adulteration can also consist of selling mislabelled mixes of different saffron grades. Thus, in India, high-grade Kashmiri saffron is often sold and mixed with cheaper Iranian imports; these mixes are then marketed as pure Kashmiri saffron, a development that has cost Kashmiri growers much of their income.[42][43] Safflower is a common substitute sometimes sold as saffron. The spice is reportedly counterfeited with horse hair, corn silk, or shredded paper. Tartrazine or sunset yellow have been used to colour counterfeit powdered saffron.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Types</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">The various saffron crocus cultivars give rise to thread types that are often regionally distributed and characteristically distinct. Varieties (not varieties in the botanical sense) from Spain, including the tradenames "Spanish Superior" and "Creme", are generally mellower in colour, flavour, and aroma; they are graded by government-imposed standards. Italian varieties are slightly more potent than Spanish. The most intense varieties tend to be Iranian. Various "boutique" crops are available from New Zealand, France, Switzerland, England, the United States, and other countries—some of them organically grown. In the US, Pennsylvania Dutch saffron—known for its "earthy" notes—is marketed in small quantities.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Consumers may regard certain cultivars as "premium" quality. The "Aquila" saffron, or zafferano dell'Aquila, is defined by high safranal and crocin content, distinctive thread shape, unusually pungent aroma, and intense colour; it is grown exclusively on eight hectares in the Navelli Valley of Italy's Abruzzo region, near L'Aquila. It was first introduced to Italy by a Dominican monk from Inquisition-era Spain[when?]. But the biggest saffron cultivation in Italy is in San Gavino Monreale, Sardinia, where it is grown on 40 hectares, representing 60% of Italian production; it too has unusually high crocin, picrocrocin, and safranal content. Another is the "Mongra" or "Lacha" saffron of Kashmir (Crocus sativus 'Cashmirianus'), which is among the most difficult for consumers to obtain. Repeated droughts, blights, and crop failures in Kashmir combine with an Indian export ban, contribute to its prohibitive overseas prices. Kashmiri saffron is recognisable by its dark maroon-purple hue; it is among the world's darkest, which hints at strong flavour, aroma, and colouring effect.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Trade</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Almost all saffron grows in a belt from Spain in the west to India in the east. The other continents, except Antarctica, produce smaller amounts. In 2014, 250 t (250,000 kg) were produced worldwide.[47] Iran is responsible for around 90–93% of global production, and much of their produce is exported.[10] A few of Iran's drier eastern and southeastern provinces, including Fars, Kerman, and those in the Khorasan region, glean the bulk of modern global production. In 2005, the second-ranked Greece produced 5.7 t (5,700 kg), while Morocco (the Berber region of Taliouine), and India (Kashmir), tied for third rank, each producing 2.3 t (2,300 kg).</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">In recent years, Afghan cultivation has risen. Azerbaijan, Morocco, and Italy are, in decreasing order, lesser producers. Prohibitively high labour costs and abundant Iranian imports mean that only select locales continue the tedious harvest in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland—among them the Swiss village of Mund, whose annual output is a few kilograms.[8] Microscale production of saffron can be found in Australia (mainly the state of Tasmania),[48] China, Egypt, parts of England[49] France, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Sweden (Gotland), Turkey (mainly around the town of Safranbolu), the United States (California and Pennsylvania), and Central Africa.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Saffron prices at wholesale and retail rates range from US$500 to US$5,000 per pound, or US$1,100–11,000/kg. In Western countries, the average retail price in 1974 was $1,000 per pound, or US$2,200 per kilogram.[3] In February 2013, a retail bottle containing 0.06 ounces could be purchased for $16.26 or the equivalent of $4,336 per pound or as little as about $2,000/pound in larger quantities. A pound contains between 70,000 and 200,000 threads. Vivid crimson colouring, slight moistness, elasticity, and lack of broken-off thread debris are all traits of fresh saffron.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Uses</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Saffron's aroma is often described by connoisseurs as reminiscent of metallic honey with grassy or hay-like notes, while its taste has also been noted as hay-like and sweet. Saffron also contributes a luminous yellow-orange colouring to foods. Saffron is widely used in Persian,[50] Indian, European, and Arab cuisines. Confectioneries and liquors also often include saffron. Saffron is used in dishes ranging from the jewelled rice and khoresh of Iran, [51][52] the Milanese risotto of Italy, the paella of Spain, the bouillabaisse of France, to the biryani with various meat accompaniments in South Asia. One of the most esteemed use for saffron is in the preparation of the Golden Ham, a precious dry-cured ham made with saffron from San Gimignano. Common saffron substitutes include safflower (Carthamus tinctorius, which is often sold as "Portuguese saffron" or "açafrão"), annatto, and turmeric (Curcuma longa).</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Saffron has a long history of use in traditional medicine.[53][54] Saffron has also been used as a fabric dye, particularly in China and India, and in perfumery.[55] It is used for religious purposes in India.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Nutrition</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Dried saffron is composed of 12% water, 65% carbohydrates, 6% fat and 11% protein (table).</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">In comparison to other spices or dried foods, the nutrient content of dried saffron shows richness of nutritional value across B vitamins and dietary minerals (table). In a serving of one tablespoon (2 grams), manganese is present as 28% of the Daily Value while other nutrients are negligible (table).</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Research</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">One limited meta-analysis concluded that saffron supplementation improved symptoms in patients with major depressive disorders[56] and a review indicated that it helped with mild to moderate depression.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>History</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">The documented history of saffron cultivation spans more than three millennia.[12] The wild precursor of domesticated saffron crocus is probably Crocus cartwrightianus. If C. sativus is a mutant form of C. cartwrightianus, then it may have emerged by human cultivators selectively breeding specimens for unusually long stigmas in late Bronze Age Crete.[6] It slowly propagated throughout much of Eurasia and was later brought to parts of North Africa, North America, and Oceania.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Eastern</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Saffron was detailed in a 7th-century BC Assyrian botanical reference compiled under Ashurbanipal.[9] Documentation of saffron's use over the span of 3,500 years has been uncovered.[58] Saffron-based pigments have indeed been found in 50,000-year-old depictions of prehistoric places in northwest Iran.[59][60] The Sumerians later used wild-growing saffron in their remedies and magical potions.[61] Saffron was an article of long-distance trade before the Minoan palace culture's 2nd millennium BC peak. Ancient Persians cultivated Persian saffron (Crocus sativus 'Hausknechtii') in Derbena, Isfahan, and Khorasan by the 10th century BC. At such sites, saffron threads were woven into textiles,[59] ritually offered to divinities, and used in dyes, perfumes, medicines, and body washes.[62] Saffron threads would thus be scattered across beds and mixed into hot teas as a curative for bouts of melancholy. Non-Persians also feared the Persians' usage of saffron as a drugging agent and aphrodisiac.[63] During his Asian campaigns, Alexander the Great used Persian saffron in his infusions, rice, and baths as a curative for battle wounds. Alexander's troops imitated the practice from the Persians and brought saffron-bathing to Greece.[64]</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Conflicting theories explain saffron's arrival in South Asia. Kashmiri and Chinese accounts date its arrival anywhere between 2500–900 years ago.[65][66][67] Historians studying ancient Persian records date the arrival to sometime prior to 500 BC,[5] attributing it to a Persian transplantation of saffron corms to stock new gardens and parks. Phoenicians then marketed Kashmiri saffron as a dye and a treatment for melancholy. Its use in foods and dyes subsequently spread throughout South Asia. Buddhist monks wear saffron-coloured robes; however, the robes are not dyed with costly saffron but turmeric, a less expensive dye, or jackfruit.[69] Monks' robes are dyed the same colour to show equality with each other, and turmeric or ochre were the cheapest, most readily available dyes. Gamboge is now used to dye the robes.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Some historians believe that saffron came to China with Mongol invaders from Persia.[71] Yet saffron is mentioned in ancient Chinese medical texts, including the forty-volume pharmacopoeia titled Shennong Bencaojing (神農本草經: "Shennong's Great Herbal", also known as Pen Ts'ao or Pun Tsao), a tome dating from 300–200 BC. Traditionally credited to the fabled Yan ("Fire") Emperor (炎帝) Shennong, it discusses 252 phytochemical-based medical treatments for various disorders.[72] Nevertheless, around the 3rd century AD, the Chinese were referring to saffron as having a Kashmiri provenance. According to Chinese herbalist Wan Zhen, "[t]he habitat of saffron is in Kashmir, where people grow it principally to offer it to the Buddha." Wan also reflected on how it was used in his time: "The flower withers after a few days, and then the saffron is obtained. It is valued for its uniform yellow colour. It can be used to aromatise wine."</span></p> </body> </html>
MHS 105 B
Saffron Seeds (Saffron crocus)
Black Garlic Cloves - Black Gold (Allium roseum)

Black Garlic Cloves (Allium...

Fiyat €2,25 (SKU: P 416)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Black Garlic Cloves - Black Gold (Allium roseum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 Cloves.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Just like each tomato is not suitable for making sauces, so each of the garlic is not suitable for fermenting and making a Black Garlic. We offer you a variety that came directly from Japan and the only variety (Pink Garlic Allium roseum) from which a real Black Garlic is made.</span></p> <p><span>Black garlic is a type of "caramelized" garlic (in reality, browned by the Maillard reaction rather than truly caramelized) first used as a food ingredient in Asian cuisine. It is made by heating whole bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum) over the course of several weeks, a process that results in black cloves. The taste is sweet and syrupy with hints of balsamic vinegar[1] or tamarind.[2] Black garlic's popularity has spread to the United States as it has become a sought-after ingredient used in high-end cuisine.</span></p> <p><span>The process of producing black garlic is sometimes incorrectly referred to as fermentation, but it does not in fact involve microbial action.[3] Black garlic is made when heads of garlic are aged under specialized conditions of heat and humidity. Bulbs are kept in a humidity-controlled environment at temperatures that range from 60 - 77ºC (140 to 170 degrees Fahrenheit) for 60 to 90 days. There are no additives, preservatives, or burning of any kind. The enzymes that give fresh garlic its sharpness break down. Those conditions also facilitate the Maillard reaction, the chemical process that produces new flavour compounds responsible for the deep taste of seared meat and fried onions, the cloves turn black and develop a sticky date-like texture.</span></p> <p><strong><span>History</span></strong></p> <p><span>In Taoist mythology, black garlic was rumored to grant immortality.[citation needed] In Korea, black garlic was developed as a health product and it is still perceived as health supplementary food. </span></p> <p><span>Black garlic is prized as a food rich in antioxidants and added to energy drinks, and in Thailand is claimed to increase the consumer's longevity. It is also used to make black garlic chocolate.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Culinary uses</span></strong></p> <p><span>In black garlic, the garlic flavour is softened such that it almost or entirely disappears depending on the length of time it was heated. Additionally, its flavour is dependent on that of the fresh garlic that was used to make it. Garlic with a higher sugar content produces a milder, more caramel-like flavour, whereas garlic with a low sugar content produces a sharper, somewhat more acidic flavour, similar in character to tomato paste. Burnt flavours may also be present if the garlic was heated for too long at too high a temperature or not long enough: during heating, the garlic turns black in colour well before the full extent of its sweetness is able to develop.</span></p> <p><span>Black garlic can be eaten alone, on bread, or used in soups, sauces, crushed into a mayonnaise or simply tossed into a vegetable dish. A vinaigrette can be made with black garlic, sherry vinegar, soy, a neutral oil, and Dijon mustard. Its softness increases with water content.</span></p> <p><span>Unlike the vegetable from which it is made, white garlic, black garlic has a very subtle and muted flavour that is easily overpowered.</span></p> <p><span>Because of its delicate and muted flavours, a considerably larger amount of black garlic must be used in comparison to white garlic in order to achieve a similar level of intensity. Additionally, black garlic cannot be used in place of white garlic. If a garlic flavour is desired in addition to the flavour of black garlic, then fresh garlic must be added.</span></p> <p><span>One method to release the subtle flavours of black garlic is to knead a peeled clove between the fingers until its structure is thoroughly broken down and then to dissolve the resulting paste in a small amount of hot water. This produces a dark brown, coffee-coloured suspension of the fibrous black garlic particles in a solution that carries most of its flavour, acidity, and sugar content. This liquid may then be added to foods that are otherwise neutral in flavour (like, for example, mashed potatoes) to better showcase the flavour of the black garlic.</span></p> <p><span>Likely owing to its harsh and concentrated colour, the potent reputation of fresh garlic, and the association of Maillard reactions with the browning of meat, it is a common misconception that black garlic has a "meaty" flavour. It does not. It is commonly eaten out of hand by enthusiasts, who sometimes liken the flavour to a savoury, slightly acidic caramel candy or to sweet tamarind fruit. The most prominent flavour it imparts is sweetness when used in high concentrations and when used in low concentrations, provided that there are no other flavours to compete with that of the black garlic, the flavour and aroma are somewhat similar to those of instant coffee, though without any bitterness.</span></p> <p><strong><span>In popular culture</span></strong></p> <p><span>It garnered television attention when it was used in battle redfish on Iron Chef America, episode 11 of season 7 (on Food Network), and in an episode of Top Chef New York (on Bravo),[8] where it was added to a sauce accompanying monkfish.</span></p> <p><span>In the United Kingdom,[6] where it made its TV debut on the BBC's Something for the Weekend cooking and lifestyle program in February 2009,[10] farmer Mark Botwright, owner of the South West Garlic Farm, explained that he developed a process for preserving garlic after finding a 4000-year-old Korean recipe for "black garlic."</span></p> <p><span>In 2011, it was used on an episode of Food Network's Chopped Champions. In September 2011, it was a mandatory ingredient in the final round of the second episode of Ron Ben-Israel's Sweet Genius.</span></p> <p><span>It also was mentioned in the animated series Bob's Burgers in episode "Best Burger", in which Bob enters a best burger contest, but quickly realizes his main ingredient - black garlic - is missing and sends his kids back to the restaurant to retrieve it in time for its preparation and inclusion in the burger.</span></p> <p><strong><span>AFTER YOU BUY THIS PRODUCT WE WILL SEND YOU LINK WITH VIDEO HOW YOU CAN MAKE BLACK GARLIC EASY AT HOME FOR ONLY 10 DAYS!</span></strong></p> </body> </html>
P 416
Black Garlic Cloves - Black Gold (Allium roseum)

Jerusalem Artichoke Tubers (Helianthus tuberosus)

Yerelması Yumrular...

Fiyat €7,95 (SKU: P 421)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Yerelması Yumrular (Helianthus tuberosus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>5 Yumru Paket Fiyatıdır.</strong></span></h2> <p><b>Yerelması</b><span> (</span><i>Helianthus tuberosus</i><span>), </span>papatyagiller<span> ailesinden, </span>ayçiçeğigiller<span> (</span><i>Helianthus</i><span>) cinsinden, yenilebilir köksapları yumru durumunda olan bir bitki. Köksaplarının yemeği ve salatası yapılabildiği gibi meyve olarak da tüketilebilir. </span>Turpa<span> benzer bir dokusu ve tatlımsı bir tadı vardır. Yerelmasını ve </span>patatesi<span> diğer </span>sebzelerden<span> ayıran en büyük özelliği tohum ile üreme yerine </span>vejetatif üreme<span> yapmasıdır. Yani yerelması ile geri dönüşüm kullanılarak elde edilmesidir. Örneğin: bir yerelması parçasını toprağın altına koyduğunuzda bu önce kendiliğinden yerelması bitkisi olur sonra Yerelması toprağın altında çoğalır.</span></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Tarihçe">Tarihçe</span></h2> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Yerelması Yumrular (Helianthus tuberosus)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ae/Sunroot_top.jpg/200px-Sunroot_top.jpg" decoding="async" width="200" height="267" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ae/Sunroot_top.jpg/300px-Sunroot_top.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ae/Sunroot_top.jpg/400px-Sunroot_top.jpg 2x" data-file-width="1536" data-file-height="2048" title="Yerelması Yumrular (Helianthus tuberosus)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Çiçekler ve gövde</div> </div> </div> <p>Yerelmaları Amerikan yerlileri tarafından, Avrupalıların gelişinden çok daha önce yetiştirilmeye başlandı. Uzun tarım geçmişi bu bitki türünün doğal yayılım alanını gizlemektedir.<sup id="cite_ref-grin_1-0" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>Fransız<span> </span>kâşif<span> </span>Samuel de Champlain<span> </span>Massachusetts'te yaşayan Nauset limanı yerli halkının<span> </span>enginar<span> </span>tadında yumrular yetiştirdiğini tespit etti. Bir sonraki yıl,<span> </span>Champlain<span> </span>aynı bölgeye döndü ve yumruların<span> </span>pazıya<span> </span>benzer bir tada sahip olduğunu keşfetti<sup id="cite_ref-NathalieCooke_2-0" class="reference">[2]</sup><span> </span>ve bitkiyi Fransaya getirme sorumluluğunu aldı. Bir süre sonra, Petrus Hondius,<span> </span>Hollandalı<span> </span>bir<span> </span>botanist, pörsümüş bir yerelması yumrusunu<span> </span>Terneuzen'deki bahçesine ekti ve bitkinin çoğaldığını gözlemledi<sup id="cite_ref-NathalieCooke_2-1" class="reference">[2]</sup><span> </span>Yerelmaları Avrupa iklimine ve toprağına çok iyi uyum sağladı ve hızlıca türedi. 1600'lerin ortasında, yerelması Avrupa ve Amerikada yaygın olarak tüketilen bir sebze haline geldi ve hatta hayvanların beslenmesinde kullanıldı.<sup id="cite_ref-LevetinEstelle_3-0" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>Özellikle fransızlar bu sebzeyi beğendiler, 19. yüzyılın başlarında popülerliğinin zirvesine ulaştı.<sup id="cite_ref-LevetinEstelle_3-1" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>Yerelması, 2002'de Niş Fransız Yemek Festivalinde 'en iyi çorba sebzesi' unvanını aldı.</p> </body> </html>
P 421
Jerusalem Artichoke Tubers (Helianthus tuberosus)
Ginger Tubers - Rhizomes (Zingiber officinale) 8.55 - 1

Ginger Tubers - Rhizomes...

Fiyat €8,55 (SKU: MHS 76)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="color:#000000;"><strong>Ginger </strong><strong>Tubers - </strong><strong>Rhizomes (Zingiber officinale)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 Tubers.</strong></span></h2> <p>Ginger is a well-known spice produced from the rhizome (underground stem) of the tropical herbaceous plant, Zingiber officinale.</p> <p>Zingiber officinale is best known as the source of the pungent, aromatic spice called ginger. This spice is produced from the rhizome (underground stem) of the plant.</p> <p>Obtained by the Greeks and Romans from Arab traders, it was one of the first oriental spices to arrive in Europe. Other spices in the ginger family (Zingiberaceae) include cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum) and turmeric (Curcuma longa).</p> <p>Ginger has many medicinal uses. The fresh or dried rhizome is used in oral or topical preparations to treat a variety of ailments, while the essential oil is applied topically as an analgesic. Evidence suggests ginger is most effective against nausea and vomiting associated with surgery, vertigo, travel sickness and morning sickness. However, the safe use of ginger during pregnancy is questionable and pregnant women should exercise caution before taking it. The topical use of ginger may cause allergic reactions.</p> <p><strong>Synonym: </strong></p> <p>Amomum zingiber L., Zingiber missionis Wall. (for full list see the World Checklist of Selected Plant Families)</p> <p><strong>Genus: </strong></p> <p>Zingiber</p> <p><strong>Geography and distribution</strong></p> <p>Zingiber officinale is possibly native to India. It is widely grown as a commercial crop in south and southeast Asia, tropical Africa (especially Sierra Leone and Nigeria), Latin America, the Caribbean (especially Jamaica) and Australia.</p> <p><strong>Underground parts: </strong></p> <p>Ginger has a distinctive thickened, branched rhizome (underground stem) which sometimes looks somewhat like a swollen hand. The rhizome has a brown corky outer layer (usually removed before use) and a pale yellow centre with a spicy lemon-like scent.</p> <p><strong>Leaves: </strong></p> <p>Shoots (pseudostems), up to 1.2 m tall, arise annually from buds on the rhizome. These pseudostems are formed from a series of leaf bases (sheaths) wrapped tightly around one another with the long (up to 7 cm), narrow (up to 1.9 cm wide), mid-green leaf blades arranged alternately.</p> <p><strong>Flowers: </strong></p> <p>The flowering heads, borne on separate shorter stems, are cone-shaped spikes and composed of a series of greenish to yellowish leaf-like bracts. Protruding just beyond the outer edge of the bracts, the flowers are pale yellow in color with a purplish lip that has yellowish dots and striations. Flowering stems are rarely if ever, produced in cultivated plants.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>The aromatic rhizome of Zingiber officinale is the source of ginger, a spice used for centuries to add flavour in cooking. In Asia, the fresh stem is an essential ingredient of many dishes, whereas the dried, powdered spice is more popular in European cooking. Gingerbread, one of the most popular uses for ginger in Britain, dates to Anglo-Saxon times when preserved ginger (produced by boiling the rhizome in sugar syrup) was used, often medicinally.</p> <p>Crystallised ginger, a sweetmeat traditionally eaten as a delicacy at Christmas, is prepared by coating dried, preserved ginger with sugar. Ginger oil, the oleoresin, is used to flavor ginger beer and ginger ale and is commonly used as an ingredient in perfumery, cosmetics, and medicines.</p> <p>The pungent principles in ginger are the non-volatile phenolic compounds gingerol, gingeridioneandshogaol.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Ginger probably originated as part of the ground flora of tropical lowland forests, where many of its wild relatives can still be found. In cultivation it requires hot, humid, shady conditions and grows best in a fertile loam as it needs large quantities of nutrients.</p> <p>Zingiber officinale has been successfully propagated at Kew using internodal cuttings. The cuttings are placed in a shallow pot in a mixture of coir and perlite. The pot is placed in a misting unit (or, if not available, in a closed glass case), which is heated at the base to 20 ˚C. It takes time for any activity to become visible, but eventually, new roots and shoots are produced. It has been noted that this method produces vigorous plants. The traditional technique for propagation of ginger is by division.</p> <p>Mature plants are grown in the behind-the-scenes Tropical Nursery at Kew, in a zone that is kept at a temperature of 18-25 ˚C and at high humidity (70-90 % RH). The plants are watered daily throughout most of the year. In the winter they can be watered less often, as long as they are kept moist. They are fed fortnightly with nitrogen, phosphorus &amp; potassium mix and calcium nitrate.</p> <p>In winter the older pseudostems are removed from the plants, and the new ones allowed to grow up. At this stage, the new pseudostems may need staking, but usually, they are strong enough to support themselves. Occasionally mealy bug and red spider mite cause problems. Where possible these pests are removed by hand.</p> <p><strong>This species at Kew</strong></p> <p>Zingiber officinale can be seen in Kew's Palm House, alongside other plants from Southeast Asia.</p> <p>Various members of the ginger family are grown in the hot moist section of the Princess of Wales Conservatory.</p> <p>Pressed and dried specimens of Zingiber officinale are held in Kew’s Herbarium where they are available to researchers by appointment. The details of one of these specimens can be seen online in Kew’s Herbarium Catalogue.</p> <p>Specimens of ginger are held in Kew’s Economic Botany Collection in the Sir Joseph Banks Building, where they are available to researchers by appointment.</p>
MHS 76
Ginger Tubers - Rhizomes (Zingiber officinale) 8.55 - 1

Giant leek Allium Sensation Mix - bulbs 4.5 - 8

Giant leek Allium Sensation...

Fiyat €4,50 (SKU: F 83 GAB)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Giant leek Allium Sensation Mix - bulbs</strong></span><br /><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:14pt;"><strong>The price is for package of 3 bulbs.</strong></span></h2> <div><span style="font-size:11pt;">These flowers are absolutely huge! They measure a whopping 6 - 8" wide! This variety of Allium makes an excellent dried flower. They are also a favorite of bees.</span></div> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;"><strong>Wikipedia:</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Allium giganteum, also known as Giant Onion, is a perennial bulbous plant of the onion genus, used as a flowering garden plant, and growing to 2 metres. It is the tallest ornamental Allium in common cultivation. In early to midsummer, small globes of intense purple flower heads (umbels) appear, followed by attractive seed heads. A popular cultivar, 'Globemaster', is shorter (80 centimetres (31 in)) but produces much bigger, deep violet, flower heads (15–20 centimetres (5.9–7.9 in)). Both varieties have been granted the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">NAME: Giant Allium ‘Globemaster’</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">SCIENTIFIC NAME: Allium Giganteum</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">COLOR: Purple 6 - 8” round flower heads</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">PLANT SEEDS: Outdoors after frost / Indoors weeks before last frost</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">BLOOM TIME: Late Spring - Mid Summer</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">HARDINESS ZONE: 4 - 9</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">PLANT HEIGHT: 36 - 48”</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">PLANT SPACING: 12 - 15”</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">LIGHT REQUIREMENTS: Sun</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">SOIL &amp; WATER PREFERENCES: Average</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Always use sterilized planting soil.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Moisten planting media, place the fine seeds on the soil and cover them lightly.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Stratify the seeds by placing the pot in a plastic bag at approx. 5°C.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">After 3-4 weeks place the pot to germination temperature, approx. 15°C.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Within 1-? months the seeds will germinate, germination can be very slow.</span></p>
F 83 GAB
Giant leek Allium Sensation Mix - bulbs 4.5 - 8

Hyacinthus orientalis bulbs (different types) 2 - 6

Hyacinthus orientalis bulbs...

Fiyat €2,00 (SKU: F 82)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Hyacinthus orientalis bulbs (different types)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt;color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 bulb.</strong></span></h2> <p>Hyacinth 'Pink Pearl', Dutch Hyacinth, Hyacinthus orientalis, Common Hyacinth, Spring Bulbs, Spring Flowers</p> <p>Highly fragrant, award winning Hyacinth 'Pink Pearl' features dense spikes of fuchsia-purple  owers edged pale pink. Floating atop erect, lance-shaped bright green leaves, this beauty blooms for 3-4 weeks in mid spring. Plant it where you will be able to enjoy its perfume daily: near a doorway, along a path, near your patio or deck!</p> <p>Hyacinths are extremely popular garden plants. One reason is the genus' wide assortment of ower colors. Another reason is their scent, described as rich or heavy, that is so highly praised by ower and plant enthusiasts. Completing the picture of the perfect bulbous plant, is the fact that hyacinths are very easy to bring into ower. The number of orets on the ower stalk depends on the size of the bulb. Large bulbs can produce</p> <p>60 to 70 orets. For garden planting, however, such bulbs are less suitable because the ower stalks become top-heavy and fall over easily. Sizes 15-16 and 16-17 are best for garden planting. The large sizes, though, are eagerly sought for indoor forcing. Even though hyacinth bulbs are usually used only once, sometimes it is worthwhile to leave them in the ground for a year or two. When they bloom again, their ower clusters may be a bit smaller than in the rst blooming season. To allow for good growing conditions, the plants must be given the opportunity to wither back completely.</p> <p>★  Won the prestigious Award of Garden Merit of the Royal Horticultural Society.</p> <p>★  Rising up to 6-10 inches tall (15-25 cm), this hyacinth will naturalize in the right spot. But it should be noted that owering might decrease in quality over time.</p> <p>★  Thrives in average, medium moisture, well-drained  soils in full sun or part shade. Keep the soil moist during the growing season.</p> <p>★  Easy to grow, this Hyacinth is a welcomed addition to beds, borders, containers, rock gardens or along walks. For best visual impact, plant in groups (at least 5 bulbs) or mixed with any other owering bulbs. Great for forcing!</p> <p>★  Deer and rabbit resistant!</p>
Purple Sensation
Hyacinthus orientalis bulbs (different types) 2 - 6
Crocus botanical mix -bulbs

Crocus botanical mix - bulbs

Fiyat €4,50 (SKU: F 81)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-family: helvetica;"><strong><span style="font-size: 14pt;">Crocus botanical mix - bulbs</span></strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="font-family: helvetica;"><strong><span style="font-size: 14pt; color: #ff0000;">The price is for package of 3 bulbs.</span></strong></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size: 11pt; color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><i><b><strong><span style="font-size: 12pt;">This variety is famous for its delightful fragrance. There's nothing like closing your eyes and breathing in the sweet scent of Spring! </span></strong></b></i></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 11pt; color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><i><b>Crocus</b></i> (English plural: crocuses or croci) is a genus of flowering plants in the iris family comprising 90 species of perennials growing from corms. Many are cultivated for their flowers appearing in autumn, winter, or spring. The spice saffron is obtained from the stigmas of <i>Crocus sativus</i>, an autumn-blooming species. Crocuses are native to woodland, scrub, and meadows from sea level to alpine tundra in central and southern Europe, in particular Krokos, Greece<sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference"></sup>, on the islands of the Aegean, North Africa and the Middle East, and across Central Asia to Xinjiang Province in western China.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;">The cup-shaped, solitary, salverform flower tapers off into a narrow tube. Their colors vary enormously, although lilac, mauve, yellow, and white are predominant. The grass-like, ensiform leaf<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference"></sup> shows generally a white central stripe along the leaf axis. The leaf margin is entire.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;">A crocus has three stamens, while a similar-looking toxic plant, <i>colchicum</i>, sometimes popularly referred to as "autumn crocus", has six stamens. In addition, crocus have one style, while <i>colchicum</i> have three.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;">About 30 of the species are cultivated, including <i>Crocus sativus</i> for saffron production. The varieties cultivated for decoration mainly represent five species: <i>C. vernus</i>, <i>C. chrysanthus</i>, <i>C. flavus</i>, <i>C. sieberi</i>, and <i>C. tommasinianus</i>. Among the first flowers to bloom in spring, crocuses are popular with gardeners. Their flowering time varies from the late winter <i>C. tommasinianus</i> to the later large hybridized and selected Giant "Dutch crocuses" (<i>C. vernus</i>). Crocus flowers and leaves are protected from frost by a waxy cuticle; in areas where snow and frost occasionally occur in the early spring, it is not uncommon to see early flowering crocuses blooming through a light late snowfall.</span></p> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 13pt; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/saffron-bulbs-saffron-crocus.html" target="_blank" title="Saffron Bulbs can be purchased here" style="color: #ff0000;" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>Saffron Bulbs can be purchased here</strong></a></span></h2> </body> </html>
F 81
Crocus botanical mix -bulbs

Horseradish Root / Seedlings Ready For Planting 3.25 - 6

Horseradish Root /...

Fiyat €3,25 (SKU: P 412 R)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Horseradish Root / Seedlings Ready For Planting (Armoracia Rusticana)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price is for package with 2, 3, 5 roots / Seedlings.</strong></span></h2> <p>Grow your own horseradish from your own garden (they are also known as thongs).</p> <p>This is an easy plant to grow with a lovely hot tasty reward!</p> <p>Photo is an example of what you will receive, those you do receive will differ in size and shape.</p> <p>Two, Three or Five fresh root sections, ready for planting out - similar but not identical to those pictured.</p> <p>Use Drop Down List To Choose the Quantity YOU Require</p> <p>Our planting roots are approx. a minimum of 8-10cm, they may signs of growth, which may need removing before you plant them as this may have suffered from lifting and postage.</p> <p><strong>Item Supplied</strong>: Fresh root sections ready for planting out - similar but not identical to those pictured - as all roots differ in shape and size.</p> <p>Will grow well in most soil types, if you can't plant straight away it is advisable to place into a pot of compost until you are ready.</p> <p>These will grow equally well when planting in the ground or large container.</p> <p>Our horseradish plantation is grown entirely organically, without any need for herbicides, pesticides or fertilizers of any kind.</p> <p>To ensure top quality stock is sent, we only lift our plants the day of dispatch.</p> <p>These packages usually fit through your letter box.</p> <p>Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana, syn. Cochlearia armoracia) is a perennial plant of the Brassicaceae family (which also includes mustard, wasabi, broccoli, and cabbage). It is a root vegetable used as a spice.</p> <p>The plant is probably native to southeastern Europe and western Asia. It is popular worldwide. It grows up to 1.5 meters (4.9 feet) tall, and is cultivated primarily for its large, white, tapered root.</p> <p>The intact horseradish root has hardly any aroma. When cut or grated enzymes from the now-broken plant cells break down sinigrin (a glucosinolate) to produce allyl isothiocyanate (mustard oil), which irritates the mucous membranes of the sinuses and eyes. Grated mash should be used immediately or preserved in vinegar for best flavor. Once exposed to air or heat it will begin to lose its pungency, darken in color, and become unpleasantly bitter tasting over time.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Horseradish is probably indigenous to temperate Eastern Europe, where its Slavic name chren seemed to Augustin Pyramus de Candolle more primitive than any Western synonym. Horseradish has been cultivated since antiquity.[6] According to Greek mythology, the Delphic Oracle told Apollo that the horseradish was worth its weight in gold. Dioscorides listed horseradish equally as Persicon sinapi (Diosc. 2.186) or Sinapi persicum (Diosc. 2.168),[8] which Pliny's Natural History reported as Persicon napy;[9] Cato discusses the plant in his treatises on agriculture, and a mural in Pompeii shows the plant. Horseradish is probably the plant mentioned by Pliny the Elder in his Natural History under the name of Amoracia, and recommended by him for its medicinal qualities, and possibly the wild radish, or raphanos agrios of the Greeks. The early Renaissance herbalists Pietro Andrea Mattioli and John Gerard showed it under Raphanus.[10] Its modern Linnaean genus Armoracia was first applied to it by Heinrich Bernhard Ruppius, in his Flora Jenensis, 1745, but Linnaeus himself called it Coclearia armoracia.</p> <p>Both root and leaves were used as a medicine during the Middle Ages. The root was used as a condiment on meats in Germany, Scandinavia, and Britain. It was introduced to North America during European colonialization both George Washington and Thomas Jefferson mention horseradish in garden accounts.</p> <p>William Turner mentions horseradish as Red Cole in his "Herbal" (1551–1568), but not as a condiment. In The Herball, or Generall Historie of Plantes (1597), John Gerard describes it under the name of raphanus rusticanus, stating that it occurs wild in several parts of England. After referring to its medicinal uses, he says:</p> <p>The Horse Radish stamped with a little vinegar put thereto, is commonly used among the Germans for sauce to eat fish with and such like meats as we do mustard.</p> <p>The word horseradish is attested in English from the 1590s. It combines the word horse (formerly used in a figurative sense to mean strong or coarse) and the word radish.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Horseradish is perennial in hardiness zones 2–9 and can be grown as an annual in other zones, although not as successfully as in zones with both a long growing season and winter temperatures cold enough to ensure plant dormancy. After the first frost in autumn kills the leaves, the root is dug and divided. The main root is harvested and one or more large offshoots of the main root are replanted to produce next year's crop. Horseradish left undisturbed in the garden spreads via underground shoots and can become invasive. Older roots left in the ground become woody, after which they are no longer culinarily useful, although older plants can be dug and re-divided to start new plants.[11][15] The early season leaves can be distinctively different, asymmetric spiky, before the mature typical flat broad leaves start to be developed.</p> <p><strong>Culinary uses</strong></p> <p>The distinctive pungent taste of horseradish is from the compound allyl isothiocyanate. Upon crushing the flesh of horseradish, the enzyme myrosinase is released and acts on the glucosinolates sinigrin and gluconasturtiin, which are precursors to the allyl isothiocyanate. The allyl isothiocyanate serves the plant as a natural defense against herbivores. Since allyl isothiocyanate is harmful to the plant itself, it is stored in the harmless form of the glucosinolate, separate from the myrosinase enzyme. When an animal chews the plant, the allyl isothiocyanate is released, repelling the animal. Allyl isothiocyanate is an unstable compound, degrading over the course of days at 37 °C (99 °F). Because of this instability, horseradish sauces lack the pungency of the freshly crushed roots.</p> <p>Cooks use the terms "horseradish" or "prepared horseradish" to refer to the grated root of the horseradish plant mixed with vinegar. Prepared horseradish is white to creamy-beige in color. It can be stored for months under refrigeration, but eventually will darken, indicating it is losing flavour and should be replaced. The leaves of the plant, while edible, are not commonly eaten, and are referred to as "horseradish greens", which have a flavor similar to that of the roots.</p> <p><strong>Horseradish sauce</strong></p> <p>Horseradish sauce made from grated horseradish root and vinegar is a popular condiment in the United Kingdom and in Poland.[19] In the UK, it is usually served with roast beef, often as part of a traditional Sunday roast; but can be used in a number of other dishes also, including sandwiches or salads. A variation of horseradish sauce, which in some cases may substitute the vinegar with other products like lemon juice or citric acid, is known in Germany as Tafelmeerrettich. Also popular in the UK is Tewkesbury mustard, a blend of mustard and grated horseradish originating in medieval times and mentioned by Shakespeare (Falstaff says: "his wit's as thick as Tewkesbury Mustard" in Henry IV Part II[20]). A very similar mustard, called Krensenf or Meerrettichsenf, is popular in Austria and parts of Eastern Germany.[citation needed] In France, sauce au raifort is popular in Alsatian cuisine.[citation needed] In Russia horseradish root is usually mixed with grated garlic and small amount of tomatoes for color.</p> <p>In the US the term "horseradish sauce" refers to grated horseradish combined with mayonnaise or salad dressing. Prepared horseradish is a common ingredient in Bloody Mary cocktails and in cocktail sauce, and is used as a sauce or sandwich spread. Horseradish cream is a mixture of horseradish and sour cream and is served alongside au jus for a prime rib dinner.</p> <p><strong>Vegetable</strong></p> <p>In Central and Eastern Europe horseradish is called khren (in various spellings like kren) in many Slavic languages, in Austria, in parts of Germany (where the other German name Meerrettich isn't used), in North-East Italy, and in Yiddish (כריין transliterated as khreyn).</p> <p>There are two varieties of khreyn. "Red" khreyn is mixed with red beetroot and "white" khreyn contains no beetroot. It is popular in Ukraine (under the name of хрін, khrin), in Belarus (under the name of хрэн, chren), in Poland (under the name of chrzan), in the Czech Republic (křen), in Russia (хрен, khren), in Hungary (torma), in Romania (hrean), in Lithuania (krienai), in Bulgaria (хрян, khryan), and in Slovakia (under the name of chren). Having this on the table is a part of Christian Easter and Jewish Passover tradition in Eastern and Central Europe.</p> <p>In parts of Southern Germany like Franconia, "Kren" is an essential component of the traditional wedding dinner. It is served with cooked beef and a dip made from lingonberry to balance the slight hotness of the Kren.</p> <p>In Poland, a variety with red beetroot is called ćwikła z chrzanem or simply ćwikła.</p> <p>In Ashkenazi European Jewish cooking beetroot horseradish is commonly served with gefilte fish.</p> <p>In Transylvania and other Romanian regions, Red beetroot with horseradish is also used as a salad served with lamb dishes at Easter called sfecla cu hrean.</p> <p>In Serbia, ren is an essential condiment with cooked meat and freshly roasted suckling pig.</p> <p>In Croatia, freshly grated horseradish (Croatian: Hren) is often eaten with boiled ham or beef.</p> <p>In Slovenia, and in the adjacent Italian regions of Friuli Venezia Giulia and nearby Italian region of Veneto, horseradish (often grated and mixed with sour cream, vinegar, hard-boiled eggs, or apples) is also a traditional Easter dish.</p> <p>Further west in the Italian regions of Lombardy, Emilia-Romagna, and Piedmont, it is called "barbaforte (strong beard)" and is a traditional accompaniment to bollito misto; while in north-eastern regions like Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol, Veneto and Friuli-Venezia Giulia, it is still called "kren" or "cren". In the southern region of Basilicata it is known as "rafano" and used for the preparation of the so-called "rafanata", a main course made of horseradish, eggs, cheese and sausage.</p> <p>Horseradish is also used as a main ingredient for soups. In the Polish region of Silesia, horseradish soup is a common Easter Day dish.</p> <p><strong>Relation to wasabi</strong></p> <p>The Japanese condiment wasabi, although traditionally prepared from the wasabi plant, is now usually made with horseradish due to the scarcity of the wasabi plant.[27] The Japanese botanical name for horseradish is seiyōwasabi (セイヨウワサビ, 西洋山葵), or "Western wasabi". Both plants are members of the family Brassicaceae.</p> <p><strong>Nutritional content</strong></p> <p>In a 100 gram amount, prepared horseradish provides 48 calories and has high content of vitamin C with moderate content of sodium, folate and dietary fiber, while other essential nutrients are negligible in content. In a typical serving of one tablespoon (15 grams), horseradish supplies no significant nutrient content.</p> <p>Horseradish contains volatile oils, notably mustard oil, and allyl isothiocyanate.</p> <p><strong>Biomedical uses</strong></p> <p>The enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP), found in the plant, is used extensively in molecular biology and biochemistry primarily for its ability to amplify a weak signal and increase detectability of a target molecule. HRP has been used in decades of research to visualize under microscopy and assess non-quantitatively the permeability of capillaries, particularly those of the brain.</p> <p><strong><em>How to Grow Horseradish from Seed</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Timing</strong></p> <p>For first season harvests, start the seeds indoors in January to February and transplant out in April. The goal is to achieve large, fully established roots that can be divided and/or replanted. If time is not pressing, direct sow any time from March into summer. Optimal soil temperature: 7-23°C (45-75°F).</p> <p><strong>Starting</strong></p> <p>Sow seeds 5mm-1cm (¼-½”) deep in well cultivated, deep soiil. Seeds will sprout in 7-25 days, depending on conditions. Thin or transplant to 20cm (8″) apart in rows 40-50cm (16-20″) apart.</p> <p><strong>Growing</strong></p> <p>Ideal pH: 6.0-6.8. Well drained, warm soil in full sun is best. Raised beds help with both drainage and warmth. Use 1 cup of complete organic fertilizer for every 3m (10′) of row. Newly emerged leaves are edible, or should be left to mature if growing for the roots. The flower petals are also edible — flowers should be removed before they set seeds, as they will self-sow with enthusiasm.</p> <p><strong>Harvest</strong></p> <p>For the leaves, harvest as needed, shortly after they emerge, before they become woody. For the roots, harvest November through March. The roots can also be lifted and stored for spring planting to keep the crop going from season to season.</p> <p><strong>Diseases &amp; Pests</strong></p> <p>In our experience, insects do not cause problems for horseradish.</p> <p><strong>Companion Planting</strong></p> <p>Horseradish is thought to repel aphids and whiteflies, blister beetles, potato beetles, and some varieties of caterpillar. Its flowers attract beneficial predatory hoverflies.</p> <h2><strong>How to plant Horseradish seedlings:</strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="font-family:georgia, palatino, serif;">When you get seedlings, plant at a depth of 5-6 cm, planting seedlings horizontally, spacing between seedlings should be 25 cm.</span></strong></span><br /><span style="color:#000000;font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="font-family:georgia, palatino, serif;">Distance from row to row 70 cm.</span></strong></span></p>
P 412 R
Horseradish Root / Seedlings Ready For Planting 3.25 - 6
German Extra Hardy Garlic cloves 2.95 - 3

German Extra Hardy Garlic...

Fiyat €2,95 (SKU: P 416 GEH)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>German Extra Hardy Garlic cloves</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for 10 Garlic cloves</strong></span></h2> <p>German Extra Hardy, is also known as German White, Northern White and German Stiffneck is a large, beautiful and well-formed porcelain garlic. These are all the same garlic but grown in different places under different names. Its flavor is very strong and robust and sticks around for a long time.</p> <p>The average weight of garlic cloves 5-6 g.</p> <p>From a grower's perspective, it is a tall dark green plant and is a very good survivor, usually grows healthy and appears to be somewhat resistant to many of the diseases that can affect garlic. It originally came from Germany but grows well in all but the most southerly states, where it is marginal.</p> <p>Being a Porcelain, German Extra Hardy stores a long time at cool room temp for around 9-10 months or longer.</p> </body> </html>
P 416 GEH
German Extra Hardy Garlic cloves 2.95 - 3

Shallot Long French Bulbs

Shallot Long French Bulbs

Fiyat €2,50 (SKU: P 404)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><strong><em>Shallot Long French Bulbs</em></strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color:#d0121a;"><strong>Price for package with 5 Bulbs</strong></span></h2> <p>An excellent, slightly elongated shallot, with copper-coloured skins and great tasting pink-tinged flesh. Each bulb yields 8-20 bulbs at harvest. Plant from mid January onwards. RHS Award of Garden Merit winner.</p> <p>Grown in Brittany, in the heart of France’s main shallot growing region, these superb certified varieties are of superior quality and will produce an outstanding crop for you.</p> <p><span><span>Hardiness:</span></span><span><span>-5 degrees</span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Bulbs:</span></span><span><span>True</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Height:</span></span><span><span>31-40cm</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Spread:</span></span><span><span>11-20cm</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>RHS Award of Garden Merit:</span></span><span><span>True</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Beds &amp; Borders:</span></span><span><span>True</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Prefers Full Sun:</span></span><span><span>True</span></span></span></p> <h1 class="title style-scope ytd-video-primary-info-renderer"><a href="https://youtu.be/GGEb4C2bb9s" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Harvesting Shallots &amp; Potatoes &amp; Leeks</a></h1> <h2><strong>WIKIPEDIA:</strong></h2> <p>The <b>shallot</b> is a type of onion, specifically a botanical variety of the species <i>Allium cepa</i>.</p> <p>The shallot was formerly classified as a separate species, <i>A. ascalonicum</i>, a name now considered a synonym of the currently accepted name.</p> <p>Its close relatives include the garlic, leek, chive, and Chinese onion.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Names">Names</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"> <div class="thumbcaption">Shallots are called "small onions" in South India and are used extensively in cooking there.</div> </div> </div> <p>Shallots probably originated in Central or Southwest Asia, travelling from there to India and the eastern Mediterranean. The name "shallot" comes from Ashkelon, an ancient Canaanite city,<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference">[5]</sup> where people in classical Greek times believed shallots originated.<sup id="cite_ref-Field_Guide_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup></p> <p>The name <i>shallot</i> is also used for the Persian shallot <i>(A. stipitatum)</i>, from the Zagros Mountains in Iran and Iraq. The term <i>shallot</i> is further used for the French red shallot (<i>Allium cepa</i> var. <i>aggregatum</i>, or the <i>A. cepa</i> Aggregatum Group) and the French gray shallot or griselle (<i>Allium oschaninii</i>), a species referred to as "true shallot";<sup id="cite_ref-Field_Guide_6-1" class="reference">[6]</sup> it grows wild from Central to Southwest Asia. The name <i>shallot</i> is also used for a scallion in New Orleans and among English-speaking people in Quebec while the term <i>French shallot</i> refers to the plant referred to on this page.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[7]</sup> Anglophone Quebecers and British English speakers stress the second syllable of <i>shallot</i>.</p> <p>The term <i>eschalot</i>, derived from the French word <i>échalote</i>, can also be used to refer to the shallot.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description_and_cultivation">Description and cultivation</span></h2> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/A._cepa_var._aggregatum_conreu.JPG/150px-A._cepa_var._aggregatum_conreu.JPG" width="150" height="113" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Shallot plant (<i>A. cepa var. aggregatum</i>) growing in Castelltallat, Spain</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9c/2005onion_and_shallot.PNG/150px-2005onion_and_shallot.PNG" width="150" height="66" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Onion and shallot output in 2005</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e2/Shallot_whole_plant.jpg/220px-Shallot_whole_plant.jpg" width="220" height="60" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Whole shallot plants, consist of roots, bulbs, leaves, stalks, and flowers</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/06/Shallot_seeds.png/150px-Shallot_seeds.png" width="150" height="113" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Shallot seeds</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fe/Shallot_%28Sambar_Onion%29_%281%29.JPG/150px-Shallot_%28Sambar_Onion%29_%281%29.JPG" width="150" height="113" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Shallots on sale in India</div> </div> </div> <p>Like garlic, shallots are formed in clusters of offsets with a head composed of multiple cloves. The skin colour of shallots can vary from golden brown to gray to rose red, and their off-white flesh is usually tinged with green or magenta.</p> <p>Shallots are extensively cultivated for culinary uses, propagated by offsets. In some regions ("long-season areas"), the offsets are usually planted in autumn (September or October in the Northern Hemisphere).<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference">[9]</sup> In some other regions, the suggested planting time for the principal crop is early spring (typically in February or the beginning of March in the Northern Hemisphere).</p> <p>In planting, the tops of the bulbs should be kept a little above ground, and the soil surrounding the bulbs is often drawn away when the roots have taken hold. They come to maturity in summer, although fresh shallots can now be found year-round in supermarkets. Shallots should not be planted on ground recently manured.</p> <p>In Africa, shallots are grown in the area around Anloga in southeastern Ghana.</p> <p>Shallots suffer damage from leek moth larvae, which mine into the leaves or bulbs of the plant.</p> <p></p>
P 404
Shallot Long French Bulbs


Peruvian Purple Potato Seeds 3.05 - 6

Peru Mor Patates Tohumları

Fiyat €2,95 (SKU: P 441)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Peru Mor Patates Tohumları</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Fiyat 5 veya 10 mor tohumluk patates içindir.</strong></span></h2> <p>Küçük ve küçük gibi gönderiyoruz, böylece herhangi bir Posta Kutusuna teslim edilebilir. Sıradan bir çeşidin tadı ve dokusuna sahiptir, ancak pişirme sırasında rengini koruyan canlı mor ete sahiptir. Yüksek antosiyanin antioksidanları, sizin için de daha iyidir. Ezme, pişirme, kızartma ve mikrodalgada pişirmenin yanı sıra muhteşem cips ve Pommes Frites yapmak için ideal!</p> <p>If you’re a spud lover but stopped eating potatoes due to their reputation of causing weight gain, you may be in luck. Studies show it could be the potato you choose in addition to how the potato is prepared that make a difference. What about french fries? Well, those fries are six times more likely to cause weight gain if enjoyed too often, and besides, the super high temperatures they’re cooked at cause the loss of any possible nutrients, so why bother? And if you think adding all those delicious fatty toppings is the way to go, think again. Instead, opt for purple potatoes.</p> <p>Purple potatoes are <strong>high-antioxidant foods</strong> that are eye-catching since the skin and the flesh are both purple, making them a beautiful adornment to any plate. But it’s not just the color that’s appealing. Purple potatoes offer a host of awesome benefits from working as a healthy food-coloring agent to helping regulate blood pressure to aiding athletic performance and more.</p> <p><strong>Benefits of Purple Potatoes</strong></p> <ol> <li><strong> Healthy Food-Coloring Alternative</strong></li> </ol> <p>Potatoes, carrots and other <strong>root vegetables</strong> are used for coloring foods and grown specifically for the natural colors industry. This is great news since they’re completely natural versus the numerous chemical <strong>food dyes linked to cancer</strong> that have been used for years.</p> <p>The American Chemical Society documents the research that has been done regarding this food use, noting that the purple sweet potato is chock-full of anthocyanins, which provide health benefits not found in artificial food colors. Purple sweet potato anthocyanins are great for food and beverage coloring and are used in food products, such as fruit drinks, vitamin waters, ice cream and yogurt. What makes them unique goes beyond their color. They’re more stable options because they do not break down easily, making them consistent in providing color while giving little to no taste. (2)</p> <p>Though it’s difficult to extract, it’s still a better choice given the traditional synthetic versions of colorings and the process of extraction from cochineal insects. In fact, cochineal insects feed on a certain type of cactus native to South America and Mexico, and it takes about 2,500 bugs to produce just one ounce of cochineal extract, which is often used in ice creams, yogurts, candy, beverages and the like.</p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong> Help Lower and Regulate Blood Pressure</strong></li> </ol> <p>A small study presented by the American Chemical Society found that eating purple potatoes may lower blood pressure. This could be because of their effect on the capillaries and blood vessels, along with the high concentration of a phytochemical called chlorogenic acid, which has been linked to lower blood pressure found in some studies. (3) This research shows that plain purple potatoes, baked or cooked in the microwave, lowered the blood pressure of subjects that were reviewed by 3 percent to 4 percent, with no weight gain, and was likely due to the antioxidant behavior and phytonutrient density that these colorful gems exude.</p> <p>The health benefits are similar to what the popular nutrient-rich providers <strong>broccoli</strong>, spinach and Brussels sprouts provide. And let’s not forget about the potassium they contain, which offers the regulation of blood pressure. (4) This makes purple potatoes and other similar foods excellent additions to any <strong>high blood pressure diet</strong> treatment plan.</p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong> May Prevent Blood Clots</strong></li> </ol> <p><strong>Thrombosis</strong>, a formal name for blood clotting, is a leading cause of death throughout the world but can be prevented, possibly by adding a little purple potato into your diet. As noted previously, the purple potato contains chlorogenic acid. This acid has been shown to break down blood clots and inhibit the enzymatic activity of procoagulant proteins and peptides.</p> <p>Research published in the <em>Journal of Biochemical and Molecular Toxicology</em>found that chlorogenic acid delayed the development of blood clots in mice, demonstrating the anti-thrombotic effect and making it a potential agent for the treatment of blood clots, including possible prevention.</p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong> Jam-Packed with Antioxidants and Phytonutrients</strong></li> </ol> <p>The purple potato is loaded with antioxidants and disease-fighting <strong>phytonutrients</strong> that work together to offer amazing health benefits, such as reducing inflammation. One of the elements within this powerful cocktail is the anthocyanin, which is what gives the potato its brilliant purple color. But it’s the <strong>free-radical scavenging</strong> and antioxidant capabilities of the anthocyanin pigments that gives the desired health benefits.</p> <p>Anthocyanin pigments as medicine have been a part of folk medicine for ages and used as remedies for liver dysfunction and hypertension, and much like the <strong>bilberry</strong>, anthocyanins have been linked to helping reduce the risks of eye diseases and infections. (6) </p> <ol start="5"> <li><strong> Provides Fiber</strong></li> </ol> <p>Most people don’t eat enough fiber, according to numerous reports. Maybe a little purple potato can help with that problem since it’s a healthier <strong>high-fiber food</strong>. Why is fiber so important? One of the biggest reasons is it helps keep things moving along smoothly through your digestive system, which can help eliminate constipation, irregularity and discomfort.</p> <p>Fiber is classified as soluble, which means it dissolves in water, or insoluble, which doesn’t. Potatoes contain the insoluble form as well as whole-wheat flour, wheat bran, nuts, beans, and vegetables, like cauliflower and green beans. Including both soluble and insoluble fiber promotes the best health, and purple potatoes offer a good dose of the insoluble kind to help reach the proper amount of fiber needs. (7) </p> <ol start="6"> <li><strong> Great for Endurance Athletes and Ultra Runners</strong></li> </ol> <p>Another reason that insoluble fiber is so helpful is that it can provide a sort of time-released effect that helps endurance athletes sustain high energy levels for long periods of time. In fact, it’s not unusual to find potatoes at an aid station during a long-distance race.</p> <p><em>Runner’s World</em> reports that while the ever-so famous carb-loader pasta seems to take front stage, the potato may do a better job, not only the night before but also the day of an event by providing more energy-delivering complex carbohydrates. Not only are they super easy to prepare, but they’re easy to digest — a common concern with most athletes. As well, potassium is useful for athletes of all types, in particular, due to the electrolytes it contains. The purple potato contains 341 milligrams of potassium per half cup serving, which is 10 percent of the daily recommended value. This may make the potato the perfect carb for athletes — and to help prevent <strong>low potassium</strong>. (8)</p> <p><strong>Purple Potatoes Nutrition</strong></p> <p>A half cup of diced, raw purple potatoes contains about: (9)</p> <ul> <li>52 calories</li> <li>12 grams carbohydrates</li> <li>1.4 grams protein</li> <li>0.1 gram fat</li> <li>1.3 grams fiber</li> <li>6.5 milligrams vitamin C (11 percent DV)</li> <li>341 milligrams potassium (10 percent DV)</li> <li>0.1 milligrams vitamin B6 (6 percent DV)</li> <li>45.7 milligrams phosphorus (5 percent DV)</li> <li>0.1 milligrams copper (5 percent DV)</li> <li>0.1 milligram manganese (5 percent DV)</li> <li>0.1 milligram thiamine (4 percent DV)</li> <li>0.9 milligram niacin (4 percent DV)</li> <li>16.5 milligrams magnesium (4 percent DV)</li> </ul> <p><strong>How to Use Purple Potatoes</strong></p> <p>Purple potatoes are versatile but can become a little mushy if overcooked. Even though they have a rich, vibrant violet color, their flavor is more subtle than some other potato varieties. Because of this, unlike the <strong>sweet potato</strong> that’s delicious all by itself, the purple potato is usually prepared by adding seasonings. Keep in mind that boiling or baking is the best method versus deep frying, which kills any useful nutrients. Use a little coconut or olive oil with some salt and pepper for a delightful addition to any meal.</p> <p><strong>Purple Potato Recipes</strong></p> <p>There are many ways to utilize purple potatoes in recipes. Try this one to start:</p> <p><strong>Roasted Rosemary Garlic and Turmeric Purple Potatoes with Leeks</strong></p> <p>INGREDIENTS:</p> <ul> <li>2 sprigs fresh rosemary (save one for garnish)</li> <li>10 small purple potatoes</li> <li>1 teaspoon sea salt</li> <li>1 teaspoon pepper</li> <li>1 teaspoon turmeric</li> <li>1/4 cup leeks, sliced</li> <li>2 cloves garlic, minced</li> <li>2.5 tablespoons coconut oil</li> </ul> <p>DIRECTIONS:</p> <ol> <li>Preheat oven to 375 degrees.</li> <li>Slice the leeks and garlic and set aside.</li> <li>Rinse potatoes and cut in small pieces about a quarter inch thick.</li> <li>In a bowl, mix the leeks, garlic, turmeric and potatoes with the coconut oil. It may help to melt the coconut oil first.</li> <li>Add the sea salt, pepper and chopped rosemary, and mix well.</li> <li>Now place the potatoes to a baking sheet lined with foil.</li> <li>Roast for 35–45 minutes or until potatoes are soft and begin to brown.</li> <li>Place a half cup serving as a side dish on a plate, and garnish with a small sprig of rosemary.</li> </ol> <p>You can also try Purple Potato Salad with Avocado-Chia Dressing recipe and use purple potatoes in most side dishes that utilize potatoes.</p> <p><strong>History of Purple Potatoes</strong></p> <p>The history of the purple potato goes back to what’s known as the purple Peruvian, which is an heirloom fingerling potato. Potatoes, in addition to tomatoes, peppers and eggplants, are part of the <em>Solanaceae</em> or <strong>nightshade vegetables</strong> family. The purple or blue violet potato fits into what has been called vitelotte, though not necessarily violet in color. This violet or purple potato may have been noted as early as 1817, listed as available at the market of Les Halles.</p> <p>Information published in 1863 listed five possible colors for the vitelotte, which were white, yellow, pink, red and violet. In 1873, Alexandre Dumas, a French author, wrote in his Grand dictionnaire de cuisine that “… the best of all are unquestionably the violet [ones], preferable even to the red [ones], [and] known in Paris by the name of <em>Vitelottes.” </em>(10, 11) </p> <p>The purple potato comes with special names, such as purple majesty, purple viking and purple Peruvian, and is usually available all year long. These golf ball-sized potatoes are popular in South America, originating in Peru and Bolivia, and they can reach a slightly larger size if allowed to reach full maturity. They have a nutty, earthy flavor and are perfect as a side dish for most anything. (12)</p> <p>While all potatoes, including the purple potato, blue potato, white potato, yellow potato and sweet potato, are high in <strong>carbohydrates</strong>, they contain useful fiber, vitamins and minerals. But the most nutrient-dense versions are those with the colorful flesh.</p> <p><strong>Risks with Purple Potatoes</strong></p> <p>There are no known risks of eating purple potatoes, but as always, if you experience a negative reaction, stop eating immediately.</p> <p><strong>Final Thoughts on Purple Potatoes</strong></p> <p>The purple potato, if prepared correctly, can be an excellent spud for your health. It’s a better choice for food colorings, eliminating chemical intake in the body, contains useful phytonutrients and the antioxidants it contains are so powerful that may help with inflammation.</p> <p>In addition, purple potatoes can help eliminate possible blood clots and provide useful fiber to help with <strong>constipation</strong> and digestion. A potassium-loaded complex carbohydrate, this powerful potato may help athletes with performance and sustainability during endurance-based activities as well</p> <p>From the sound of it, you might think leaky gut only affects the digestive system, but in reality it can affect more. Because Leaky Gut is so common, and such an enigma, I’m offering a free webinar on all things leaky gut.</p> </body> </html>
P 441 5K
Peruvian Purple Potato Seeds 3.05 - 6
Turmeric Live Rhizomes (Curcuma longa)

Zerdeçal Rizomlar (Curcuma...

Fiyat €7,95 (SKU: P 418)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Zerdeçal Rizomlar (Curcuma longa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>10 Rhizomes paketinin fiyatı.</strong></span></h2> <p><strong>Zerdeçal</strong> (<em>Curcuma longa</em>), zencefilgiller (Zingiberaceae) familyasından sarı çiçekli, büyük yapraklı, çok yıllık otsu bir bitki cinsidir. <em>Hint safranı</em> olarak da bilinir. Anavatanı Güney Asya'dır.</p> <p>Diğer isimleri zerdeçöp , safran kökü, sarıboya, zerdeçav, hint safranıdır. Başta Pakistan, Hindistan, Çin ve Bangladeş olmak üzere Asya’nın tropik bölgelerde yetişir. Bitkinin toprak altındaki ana kökleri yumurta veya armut seklindedir. Yan kökleri ise parmak şeklindedir. Rizomların üst yüzü sarımsı, iç yüzü ise sarı renklidir. Acımsı bir tadı vardır.</p> <h2>Kullanımı</h2> <p>Zerdeçal, ipek kumaşlar ve ince derilerin boyanmasında ve kına yakmada da renklendirici olarak kullanılmaktadır. Aynı zamanda eskiden turnusol kağıdı yerine zerdeçal kağıdı kullanılmaktaydı. Baharat olarak kullanılması için, zerdeçal bitkisinin temizlendikten sonra suda kaynatılıp kurutulmuş, koyu sarı renkli kök saplarının öğütülmesi gerekir. Elde edilen baharat safran yerine de kullanılır. Balık çorbası, pilav, söğüş ve çeşitli sebze yemeklerine çeşni olarak katılır. İspanyolların deniz ürünlerinden yapılan ünlü "paella" adlı yemeğinde ve Hintlerin "köri" sosunda kullanılır.</p> <p>Öğütülmüş zerdeçal karanlıkta ya da ışıktan koruyan kaplarda saklanmalıdır; ışıkta bozulur.</p> <h2>Tıbbi kullanım</h2> <p>Piyasada parmak şeklinde (rizom) ve toz şeklinde bulunur. İçinde çok fazla madde bulundurur. Etken maddesi kurkumindir. 1 silme tatlı kaşığı zerdeçal (~3 gram), ortalama 30–90 mg kurkumin içerir. 200 mg/gün’lük dozlarda (yaklaşık 2-4 silme tatlı kaşığı toz) kullanılır.</p> <p>Bazı araştırmalarda zerdeçalın antienflamatuvar, antikanserojen ve antiaterojenik olarak kullanılmasının olası olduğu gösterilmiştir.<sup></sup></p> <p>Zerdeçal (Zerdeçöp): Mide ülserinde ve safra kanalı tıkanıklıklarında kullanılmamalı, safra taşı olması durumunda doktor kontrolünde kullanılmalıdır.</p> <p>Çinli bilim adamı Xiaoyao-san tarafından yapılan araştırmada Azheimer hastalığına iyi geldiği anlaşılmıştır</p> </body> </html>
P 418
Turmeric Live Rhizomes (Curcuma longa)

Giant Dutch Crocus "Pickwick" Bulbs 3.5 - 2

Giant Dutch Crocus...

Fiyat €3,50 (SKU: F 81 GD)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2>Giant Dutch Crocus 'Pickwick' Bulbs</h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;">The price is for a package of 3 bulbs.</span></h2> <p>Giant Dutch Crocus 'Pickwick' bears large, cup-like silver-lilac owers, heavily striped with pale and dark lilac stripes. Extremely vigorous, long-lived and appropriate for naturalizing, this crocus belongs to the Crocus vernus group, known for its owers that are larger than any other of the crocuses. An rst-rate choice for planting in big, bold drifts in the grass, where it will quickly spread.</p> <p>★ This crocus blooms for about 3 weeks in early spring. The calyx-shaped owers open only when the sun shines or when there is a lot of light; they close up in rainy weather and at night.</p> <p>Did you know that crocus bulbs remaining in the ground will always bloom a bit earlier than the ones planted the previous year?</p> <p>★ Growing up to 4-6 inches tall (10-15 cm), this beauty naturalizes easily and will come back year after year!</p> <p>★ Easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun or light shade.</p> <p>★ Stunning in beds, lawns, under trees, rock gardens, in front of shrubs, along walkways. Spectacular in large sweeping drifts. For optimal eect, 100 to 150 corms should be planted. If used in lawns, however, the grass may not be mowed until six weeks after the crocuses have bloomed. If mowed earlier than this, the newly forming cormlets (developing on top of the mother corm) will not become large enough to ower next year. Great for forcing!</p> <p>★ To be planted in fall.</p> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 13pt; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/saffron-bulbs-saffron-crocus.html" target="_blank" title="Saffron Bulbs can be purchased here" style="color: #ff0000;" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>Saffron Bulbs can be purchased here</strong></a></span></h2> </body> </html>
F 81 GD
Giant Dutch Crocus "Pickwick" Bulbs 3.5 - 2
White Crocus bulbs 3.5 - 1

White Crocus bulbs

Fiyat €3,50 (SKU: F 81 W)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2>White Crocus bulbs</h2> <h2><span style="font-family: helvetica;"><strong><span style="font-size: 14pt; color: #ff0000;">The price is for package of 3 bulbs.</span></strong></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size: 11pt; color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><i><b><strong><span style="font-size: 12pt;">This variety is famous for its delightful fragrance. There's nothing like closing your eyes and breathing in the sweet scent of Spring! </span></strong></b></i></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 11pt; color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><i><b>Crocus</b></i> (English plural: crocuses or croci) is a genus of flowering plants in the iris family comprising 90 species of perennials growing from corms. Many are cultivated for their flowers appearing in autumn, winter, or spring. The spice saffron is obtained from the stigmas of <i>Crocus sativus</i>, an autumn-blooming species. Crocuses are native to woodland, scrub, and meadows from sea level to alpine tundra in central and southern Europe, in particular Krokos, Greece<sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference"></sup>, on the islands of the Aegean, North Africa and the Middle East, and across Central Asia to Xinjiang Province in western China.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;">The cup-shaped, solitary, salverform flower tapers off into a narrow tube. Their colors vary enormously, although lilac, mauve, yellow, and white are predominant. The grass-like, ensiform leaf<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference"></sup> shows generally a white central stripe along the leaf axis. The leaf margin is entire.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;">A crocus has three stamens, while a similar-looking toxic plant, <i>colchicum</i>, sometimes popularly referred to as "autumn crocus", has six stamens. In addition, crocus have one style, while <i>colchicum</i> have three.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;">About 30 of the species are cultivated, including <i>Crocus sativus</i> for saffron production. The varieties cultivated for decoration mainly represent five species: <i>C. vernus</i>, <i>C. chrysanthus</i>, <i>C. flavus</i>, <i>C. sieberi</i>, and <i>C. tommasinianus</i>. Among the first flowers to bloom in spring, crocuses are popular with gardeners. Their flowering time varies from the late winter <i>C. tommasinianus</i> to the later large hybridized and selected Giant "Dutch crocuses" (<i>C. vernus</i>). Crocus flowers and leaves are protected from frost by a waxy cuticle; in areas where snow and frost occasionally occur in the early spring, it is not uncommon to see early flowering crocuses blooming through a light late snowfall.</span></p> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 13pt; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/saffron-bulbs-saffron-crocus.html" target="_blank" title="Saffron Bulbs can be purchased here" style="color: #ff0000;" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>Saffron Bulbs can be purchased here</strong></a></span></h2> </body> </html>
F 81 W
White Crocus bulbs 3.5 - 1

Tohum tedarikçimiz olun Seeds Gallery - 1

Tohum tedarikçimiz olun

Fiyat €0,00 (SKU: )
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Tohum tedarikçimiz olun</strong></h2> <h2><strong>Tohum tedarikçimiz olmak için ne gerekiyor?</strong></h2> <p>Tedarikçimiz olmak için, kişisel detaylarınız ve açıkça görülebilecek bir kağıt tarihi (PayPal için kullandığınız adınız ve e-posta adresinizle) ile bize sunduğunuz bitkilerin meyvelerinin bir videosuna ve resimlerine sahip olmanız gerekir. ).</p> <p>Bir sebze ise (domates, biber, salatalık ...) çeşitliliğin tam adını bilmeniz gerekir, çünkü başka bir ad kullanırsanız ve internette bilgi bulamazsak, o zaman bunlarla ilgilenmiyoruz tohumları.</p> <p>Tohum çimlenme testi yapabilmemiz için bize daha az miktarda tohum (20) göndermeniz gerekecektir. Bundan sonra, tohumun sizden daha fazla satın alınmasını ayarlayabiliriz.</p> <p>Biz Çin, Endonezya tedarikçileri İLGİLİ DEĞİLDİR ...</p> <p>Ödemeleri yalnızca PayPal üzerinden yapıyoruz (başka bir ödeme seçeneği yoktur).</p> </body> </html>
Tohum tedarikçimiz olun Seeds Gallery - 1

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