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Patates ailesi

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Medium Long Eggplant Seeds

2.200 Seeds Medium Long...

Fiyat €8,35 (SKU: P 101)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2>2200 Seeds Medium Long Eggplant</h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong><span style="font-size: 14pt;">Price for Package of 2200 seeds (10g).</span></strong></span></h2> <div>Early medium maturing variety, tolerant to heat and humidity, vigorous growth, strong diseases resistance, long harvest period, long straight fruit, beautiful shape, glossy purple skin, good quality, extremly high yield, each fruit is about 28-35 cm in length, 4.5-6 cm in diameter, 250-400g in weight.</div> <div>The eggplant, brinjal eggplant, aubergine, melongene, brinjal or guinea squash (Solanum melongena) is a plant of the family Solanaceae (also known as the nightshades) and genus Solanum. It bears a fruit of the same name, commonly used in cooking. As a nightshade, it is closely related to the tomato and potato. It was domesticated in India from Solanum incanum.</div> <div>It is a delicate perennial often cultivated as an annual. It grows 40 to 150 cm (16 to 57 in) tall, with large, coarsely lobed leaves that are 10 to 20 cm (4–8 in) long and 5 to 10 cm (2–4 in) broad. Semiwild types can grow much larger, to 225 cm (7 ft) with large leaves over 30 cm (12 in) long and 15 cm (6 in) broad. The stem is often spiny. The flower is white to purple, with a five-lobed corolla and yellow stamens. The fruit is fleshy, has a meaty texture. It is less than 3 cm (1.2 in) in diameter on wild plants, but much larger in cultivated forms.</div> <div>The fruit is botanically classified as a berry and contains numerous small, soft seeds which are edible, but have a bitter taste because they contain nicotinoid alkaloids; this is unsurprising as it is a close relative of tobacco.</div> <div>History</div> <div>The plant is native to the Indian Subcontinent.[1][2] It has been cultivated in southern and eastern Asia since prehistory,[citation needed] but appears to have become known to the Western world no earlier than circa 1500. The first known written record of the plant is found in Qí mín yào shù, an ancient Chinese agricultural treatise completed in 544.[4] The numerous Arabic and North African names for it, along with the lack of the ancient Greek and Roman names, indicate it was introduced throughout the Mediterranean area by the Arabs in the early Middle Ages. The specific name melongena is derived from a 16th-century Arabic term for one variety.</div> <div>The name "aubergine" is from the French, a diminutive of auberge, a variant of alberge, ‘a kind of peach’ or from the Spanish alberchigo or alverchiga, ‘an apricocke’.[5] It may be also be derived from Catalan albergínia, from Arabic al-baðinjān from Persian bâdenjân, from Sanskrit vātiga-gama).</div> <div>Aubergine is also the name of the purple color resembling that of the fruit,[5] and is a commonly known color scheme[6] applied to articles as diverse as cloth or bathroom suites.</div> <div>The popular name "eggplant" is used in the United States, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. It derives from the fruits of some 18th-century European cultivars which were yellow or white and resembled goose or hen's eggs.[7] In Indian native languages Hindi and Urdu, it is called "Baingan"or"Baigan".[8]</div> <div>In Indian, South African, Malaysian and Singaporean English, the fruit is called baigan brinjal, being derived directly from the Portuguese beringela. A less common British English word is melongene, which is also from French (derived) from Italian melanzana from Greek μελιτζάνα. In the Caribbean Trinidad, it also goes by meloongen from melongene.</div> <div>Because of the plant's relationship with the Solanaceae (nightshade) family, the fruit was at one time believed to be extremely poisonous. The flowers and leaves, though, can be poisonous if consumed in large quantities, due to the presence of solanine.[9]</div> <div>Cooking  </div> <div>The raw fruit can have a somewhat bitter taste, but becomes tender when cooked and develops a rich, complex flavor. Many recipes advise salting, rinsing and draining of the sliced fruit (known as "degorging"), to soften it and to reduce the amount of fat absorbed during cooking, but mainly to remove the bitterness of the earlier cultivars. Some modern varieties - including large, purple varieties commonly imported into western Europe - do not need this treatment. The fruit is capable of absorbing large amounts of cooking fats and sauces, making for very rich dishes, but salting reduces the amount of oil absorbed. The fruit flesh is smooth; as in the related tomato, the numerous seeds are soft and edible along with the rest of the fruit. The thin skin is also edible.</div> <div>The plant is used in the cuisine of many countries. It is often stewed, as in the French ratatouille, or deep fried as in the Italian parmigiana di melanzane, the Turkish karnıyarık or Turkish and Greek musakka/moussaka, and Middle-Eastern and South Asian dishes. Eggplants can also be battered before deep-frying and served with a sauce made of tahini and tamarind. In Iranian cuisine, it can be blended with whey as kashk e-bademjan, tomatoes as mirza ghasemi or made into stew as khoresh-e-bademjan. It can be sliced and deep-fried, then served with plain yogurt, (optionally) topped with a tomato and garlic sauce, such as in the Turkish dish patlıcan kızartması (meaning: fried aubergines) or without yogurt as in patlıcan şakşuka. Perhaps the best-known Turkish eggplant dishes are İmam bayıldı (vegetarian) and Karnıyarık (with minced meat).</div> <div>It may also be roasted in its skin until charred, so the pulp can be removed and blended with other ingredients, such as lemon, tahini, and garlic, as in the Middle Eastern baba ghanoush and the similar Greek melitzanosalata. Grilled, mashed and mixed with onions, tomatoes and spices make the Indian and Pakistani dish baingan ka Bhartha or gojju, similar to salată de vinete in Romania, while a mix of roasted eggplant, roasted red peppers, chopped onions, tomatoes, mushrooms, carrots, celery and spices is called zacuscă in Romania or ajvar in Croatia and the Balkans. A simpler version of the dish, baigan-pora (eggplant-charred or burnt), is very popular in the east Indian states of Orissa and Bengal, and Bangladesh where the pulp of vegetable is mixed with raw chopped onions, green chillies, salt and mustard oil. Sometimes fried whole tomatoes and burnt potatoes are also added which is called baigan bharta. A Spanish dish called escalivada calls for strips of roasted aubergine, sweet pepper, onion and tomato. In Spain, is typical to find eggplant as berenjenas de Almagro. There, eggplants are also cooked with vinegar, red peppers, paprika and olive oil.</div> <div>The fruit can also be hollowed out and stuffed with meat, rice, or other fillings, and then baked. In the Caucasus, for example, it is fried and stuffed with walnut paste to make nigvziani badrijani. It can also be found in Chinese cuisine, braised (紅燒茄子), stewed (魚香茄子), steamed (凉拌茄子), or stuffed (釀茄子).</div> <div>As a native plant, it is widely used in Indian cuisine, for example in sambhar, dalma (a dal preparation with vegetables, native to Orissa), chutney, curry, and achaar. Owing to its versatile nature and wide use in both everyday and festive Indian food, it is often described (under the name brinjal) as the "king of vegetables". In one dish[which?], brinjal is stuffed with ground coconut, peanuts, and masala, and then cooked in oil.</div> <div>Cultivation</div> <div>In tropical and subtropical climates, eggplant can be sown directly into the garden. Eggplant grown in temperate climates fares better when transplanted into the garden after all danger of frost is passed. Seeds are typically started eight to 10 weeks prior to the anticipated frost-free date.</div> <div>Many pests and diseases which afflict other solanaceous plants, such as tomato, pepper (capsicum), and potato, are also troublesome to eggplants. For this reason, it should not be planted in areas previously occupied by its close relatives. Four years should separate successive crops of eggplants. Common North American pests include the potato beetles, flea beetles, aphids, and spider mites. (Adults can be removed by hand, though flea beetles can be especially difficult to control.) Good sanitation and crop rotation practices are extremely important for controlling fungal disease, the most serious of which is Verticillium.</div> <div>Spacing should be 45 cm (18 in.) to 60 cm (24 in.) between plants, depending on cultivar, and 60 cm to 90 cm (24 to 36 in.) between rows, depending on the type of cultivation equipment being used. Mulching will help conserve moisture and prevent weeds and fungal diseases. The flowers are relatively unattractive to bees and the first blossoms often do not set fruit. Hand pollination will improve the set of the first blossoms. Fruits are typically cut from the vine just above the calyx owing to the somewhat woody stems. Flowers are complete, containing both female and male structures, and may be self-pollinated or cross-pollinated.</div> <div> <p><em><strong>Health properties</strong></em></p> </div> <table cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Eggplant, raw</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Energy</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">102 kJ (24 kcal)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Carbohydrates</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">5.7 g</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>- </strong><strong>Sugars</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2.35 g</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>- </strong><strong>Dietary fiber</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">3.4 g</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Fat</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.19 g</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Protein</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1.01 g</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Thiamine (vit. B<sub>1</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.039 mg (3%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Riboflavin (vit. B<sub>2</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.037 mg (3%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Niacin (vit. B<sub>3</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.649 mg (4%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Pantothenic acid (B<sub>5</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.281 mg (6%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Vitamin B<sub>6</sub></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.084 mg (6%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Folate (vit. B<sub>9</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">22 μg (6%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Vitamin C</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2.2 mg (3%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Calcium</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">9 mg (1%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Iron</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.24 mg (2%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Magnesium</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">14 mg (4%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Manganese</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.25 mg (12%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Phosphorus</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">25 mg (4%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Potassium</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">230 mg (5%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Zinc</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.16 mg (2%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Percentages are relative to</span><br /><span style="color: #008000;">US recommendations for adults.</span><br /><span style="color: #008000;">Source: USDA Nutrient Database</span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>A 1998 study at the Institute of Biology of São Paulo State University, Brazil, found eggplant juice to significantly reduce weight, plasma cholesterol levels, and aortic cholesterol content in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.<sup>[13]</sup></p> <p>The results of a 2000 study on humans suggested <em>S. melongena</em> infusion had a modest and transitory effect, no different from diet and exercise.<sup>[14]</sup></p> <p>A 2004 study on humans at the Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo found no effects at all and did not recommend eggplant as an alternative to statins.<sup>[15]</sup></p> <p>The nicotine content of aubergines, though low in absolute terms, is higher than any other edible plant, with a concentration of 0.01 mg per 100 g. The amount of nicotine consumed by eating eggplant or any other food is negligible compared to being in the presence of a smoker.<sup>[16]</sup> On average, 9 kg (20 lbs) of eggplant contains about the same amount of nicotine as a cigarette.</p> <div> <p><em><strong>Allergies</strong></em></p> </div> <p>Case reports of itchy skin or mouth, mild headache, and stomach upset after handling or eating eggplant have been reported anecdotally and published in medical journals (see also oral allergy syndrome). A 2008 study of a sample of 741 people in India, where eggplant is commonly consumed, found nearly 10% reported some allergic symptoms after consuming eggplant, while 1.4% showed symptoms within less than two hours.<sup>[17]</sup> Contact dermatitis from eggplant leaves<sup>[18]</sup> and allergy to eggplant flower pollen<sup>[19]</sup> have also been reported. Individuals who are atopic(genetically predisposed to developing certain allergic hypersensitivity reactions) are more likely to have a reaction to eggplant, which may be because eggplant is high in histamines. A few proteins and at least one secondary metabolite have been identified as potential allergens.<sup>[20]</sup> Cooking eggplant thoroughly seems to preclude reactions in some individuals, but at least one of the allergenic proteins survives the cooking process.</p> </body> </html>
P 101
Medium Long Eggplant Seeds

Thai Green Eggplant Seeds (Solanum melongena)

Tay Yuvarlak Yeşil Patlıcan...

Fiyat €1,95 (SKU: P 394)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Tay Yuvarlak Yeşil Patlıcan Tohumları (Solanum melongena)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>10 tohum paketi için fiyat.</strong></span></h2> <p>Tay patlıcan, Güneydoğu Asya mutfaklarında kullanılan patlıcan çeşitlerinin, çoğunlukla patlıcan Solanum melongena türlerinin adıdır. Ayrıca Sri Lanka'da yetiştirilirler ve Sri Lanka mutfağında yer alırlar. Bu golf topu boyutlu patlıcanlar Tayland mutfağında yaygın olarak kullanılmaktadır. Tayland'daki bazı çeşitler Tay Moru, Tay Yeşili, Tay Sarı ve Tay Beyazı'dır.</p> <p><strong>Kullanımları</strong></p> <p>Tay patlıcanının yeşil-beyaz çeşitleri, Tay köri yemeklerinde, kaeng tai pla, yeşil ve kırmızı köri gibi temel bileşenlerdir. Genellikle yarıya ya da dörde bölünürler, ancak bütün olarak da kullanılabilirler ve köri sosunda pişirilirler, daha yumuşak olurlar ve sosun lezzetini emerler. Ayrıca Tayland salatalarında veya Tay chili macunlarında (nam phrik) çiğ yenir.</p> <p>Bazen Tayland dışındaki Tayland restoranlarında Tayland patlıcanlarının yerini yerel patlıcanlar alır.</p>
P 394
Thai Green Eggplant Seeds (Solanum melongena)
Tarambulo - Hairy eggplant Seeds (Solanum ferox) 2 - 1

Tarambulo - Hairy eggplant...

Fiyat €2,25 (SKU: P 424)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Tarambulo - Hairy eggplant Seeds (Solanum ferox)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Tarambulo is a small, suberect, prickly, hairy herb, 0.5 to 1.5 meters high. Leaves are broadly ovate, 15 to 20 centimeters long, 12 to 23 centimeters wide, lobed at the margins, and densely covered with stiff wooly hairs above and wooly hairs and prickly spines on the nerves beneath; the lobes are triangular and 2.5 to 4 centimeters deep. Flowers are borne on lateral racemes. The calyx is shortly funnel-shaped, with ovate-triangular lobes. Corolla is densely wooly outside, white, oblong-loved, 2 to 2.5 centimeters long.</p> <p>The fruit is an EDIBLE berry, yellow, globose, 2.5 to 3.5 centimeters in diameter, densely covered with needle-like hairs, and many-seeded.</p>
P 424
Tarambulo - Hairy eggplant Seeds (Solanum ferox) 2 - 1
Organic Black Beauty Eggplant Seeds 1.8 - 1

Organic Black Beauty...

Fiyat €1,80 (SKU: P 380)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Organic Black Beauty Eggplant Seeds</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds. </strong></span></h3> <p>HEIRLOOM. From 1902, it remains a standard worldwide for large-fruited black eggplant. The plump, slightly lobed, rich flavored fruits of this heirloom are a beautiful, shiny purple black and are typically used for making Eggplant Parmesan.</p> <p>Over 100 years old, this 1902 introduction was an immediate hit because the plants ripened perfect fruits dramatically earlier than other varieties. It became the common market eggplant of today. Harvested fresh, however, makes all the difference.</p>
P 380
Organic Black Beauty Eggplant Seeds 1.8 - 1
Turkey Berry - Pea Eggplant Seeds (Solanum torvum)

Hindi Berry - Bezelye...

Fiyat €2,55 (SKU: P 364)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Hindi Berry - Bezelye Patlıcan tohumları (Solanum torvum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>5, 10 tohum Paketi için fiyat.</strong></span></h2> <p>Solanum torvum, patlıcan için bir anaç olarak bahçecilikte kullanılan gür, dik ve dikenli çok yıllık bir bitkidir. Aşılı bitkiler çok kuvvetlidir ve kök sistemini etkileyen hastalıkları tolere eder, böylece mahsulün bir yıl daha devam etmesine izin verir.</p> <p>Hindi meyvesi, dikenli nighthade, shoo-shoo çalı, yabani patlıcan, bezelye patlıcan, bezelye patlıcan, susumber (Jamaika), boo, terongan, tekokak, berenjena cimarrona, berenjena de gallina, berenjena silvestre, tabacón, pendejera, tomatillo, bâtard balengène, zamorette, friega-platos, kudanekayi (Kannada: ಕುದನೆಕಾಯಿ), sundaikkai (Tamil: சுண்டைக்காய்), [3] (Malayalam: ചുണ്ട), thibbatu (Sinhala), makhuea phuang (Tay dili: พวงอพวง), suzume nasu ( Japonya: 雀 茄子), jurubeba (Brezilya Portekizcesi) ve diğer birçok isim (Howard 1989, Little ve diğerleri 1974, Pasifik Ada Ekosistemleri Risk Altında 2001).</p> <p>Bitki genellikle 2 veya 3 m yüksekliğinde ve 2 cm bazal çapındadır, ancak 5 m yüksekliğinde ve 8 cm bazal çapında olabilir. Çalı genellikle zemin seviyesinde tek bir gövdeye sahiptir, ancak alt gövdede dallanabilir. Kök kabuğu gri ve yükseltilmiş mercimeklerle neredeyse pürüzsüz. İç kabuk fildişi rengi üzerinde yeşil bir tabakaya sahiptir (Little ve diğerleri 1974). Yazar tarafından incelenen, sert topraklarda yetişen bitkiler, zayıf tarotlara ve iyi gelişmiş yanlara sahipti. Kökler beyazdır. Yeşillik büyüyen dallarla sınırlıdır.</p> <p>Dallar gri-yeşil ve yıldız şeklindeki kıllarla kaplıdır. Dikenler kısa ve hafifçe kavislidir ve yaprak ortalığı da dahil olmak üzere bitki boyunca kalınlıktan tamamen yokluğa kadar değişir. Yapraklar zıt veya düğüm başına birdir, sınırın tamamı veya derin bir şekilde loblanmış olarak genişçe ovaldir. Yaprak sapları 1 ila 6 cm uzunluğunda ve bıçaklar 7 ila 23 x 5 ila 18 cm arasındadır ve kısa kıllarla kaplıdır. Çiçekler beyaz, 5 sivri loblu tübülerdir ve corymbiform cymes içinde gruplandırılmıştır. Açıldıktan kısa bir süre sonra dökülürler.</p> <p>Meyveler, yeşil bezelye gibi görünen küçük yeşil küre kümelerinde (yaklaşık 1 cm çapında) büyüyen meyvelerdir. Tamamen olgunlaştıklarında sarı olurlar. İnce etlidirler ve çok sayıda düz, yuvarlak, kahverengi tohum içerirler (Howard 1989, Liogier 1995, Little ve diğerleri 1974).</p> <p>Aralık</p> <p>Türkiye meyvesi, Florida ve güney Alabama'dan Batı Hint Adaları ve Meksika'dan Orta Amerika ve Güney Amerika'dan Brezilya'ya kadar yereldir (Little ve diğerleri 1974). Bozulmuş topraklarda yabani ot olarak hızlı yayılması nedeniyle, hangi popülasyonların yerli ve hangilerinin tanıtıldığını söylemek zordur. Türkiye meyvesi tropikal Afrika, Asya, Avustralya ve Hawaii, Guam ve Amerikan Samoası (Risk 2001'de Pasifik Ada Ekosistemleri) dahil olmak üzere Pasifik Adaları'nda tanıtıldı ve doğallaştırıldı. Jamaika'da bu meyveye susumba veya kuru fasulye denir ve genellikle tuzlu balık ve ackee ile birlikte bir tabakta pişirilir. Demir ile dolu olduğuna inanılır (yenildiğinde güçlü bir demir gibi tadı vardır) ve demir düşük olduğunda tüketilir.</p> <p>Ekoloji</p> <p>Porto Riko'da hindi meyvesi, yıllık yaklaşık 1000 ila 4000 mm yağış alan yüksek arazilerde yetişir. Daha kuru bölgelerdeki kıyı bölgelerinde de yetişir. Türkiye berry, Porto Riko'da (Küçük ve diğerleri 1974) deniz seviyesinden yaklaşık 1.000 m ve Papua Yeni Gine'de (Risk 2001'de Pasifik Adası Ekosistemleri) 2000 m'ye kadar her türlü nemli, verimli toprakta yetişir. Rahatsızlıktan sonra eşit bir başlangıç ​​yapıldığında, hindi meyvesi çoğu bitki, ot ve diğer çalıların üstesinden hızla geçer. Tam güneş ışığında en iyi şekilde büyür ve günün bir kısmında hafif gölgede veya gölgede iyi sonuç verir, ancak kapalı bir orman gölgelik altında hayatta kalamaz. Türkiye, tek bitki, grup ve çalılıkları en çok yol kenarlarında, boş arazilerde, fırçalanmış meralarda, yakın zamanda terk edilmiş tarım arazilerinde, toprak kaymalarında ve nehir kıyılarında görülür.</p> <p>üreme</p> <p>Çalılıklar yaklaşık 1 ila 1,5 m yüksekliğe ulaştıktan sonra çiçeklenme ve meyve verme süreklidir. Porto Riko'da toplanan olgun meyveler ortalama 1.308 + 0.052 g idi. Bu meyvelerden hava ile kuru tohumlar ortalama 0.00935 g veya 1.070.000 tohum / kg ağırlığındaydı. Bu tohumlar ticari saksı karışımına ekilmiş ve ekimden sonraki 13 ila 106 gün arasında yüzde 60'ı filizlenmiştir. Fideler son zamanlarda rahatsız olmuş zeminlerde yaygındır. Tutumlu kuşlar meyveleri yerler ve tohumları yayarlar (Pasifik Adası Ekosistemleri Risk Altında 2001). Türkiye meyvesi bir ay boyunca sis odasına yapraklı veya yapraksız dal kesimleri yerleştirilerek vejetatif olarak çoğaltılabilir (Badola ve diğerleri 1993).</p> <p>Büyüme ve yönetim</p> <p>Türkiye meyvesi yılda yaklaşık 0.75 ila 1.5 m yüksekliktedir. Türler uzun ömürlü değildir; Çoğu bitki yaklaşık 2 yıl yaşar. Çalıların fiziksel kontrolü bitkilerin toplanmasıyla yapılabilir; durmak onları öldürmeyecek. Yapraklara veya kesilmiş kütüklere uygulanan transloklanmış herbisitler tarafından öldürülebilirler (Pasifik Adası Ekosistemleri Risk Altında 2001).</p> <p>Yerel mutfak</p> <p>Yeşil taze meyveler yenilebilir ve Tay mutfağında, bazı Tay körilerinde bir bileşen olarak veya bazı Tay biber ezmelerinde (nam phrik) çiğ olarak kullanılır. [4] [5] Ayrıca Lao mutfağında (Royal Horticultural Society 2001) ve Jamaika mutfağında kullanılmaktadır. [6] Meyveler Fildişi Sahili'ndeki çorba ve soslara dahil edilir (Herzog ve Gautier-Béguin 2001).</p> <p>Tamil Nadu, Hindistan'da, meyve doğrudan veya Sundaikkai Sambar, Sundaikkai Poriyal, Sundaikkai Aviyal ve Sundaikkai Pulikulambu gibi pişmiş gıda olarak tüketilir. Pıhtıya batırdıktan ve kurutulduktan sonra, nihai ürün Sundaikkai vattral (tüm Tamil Nadu süpermarketlerinde mevcuttur) olarak yağda kızartılır, Tamil Nadu'da ünlüdür. Siddha tıbbında, Hindistan Sundaivattral Choornam'ın geleneksel sistemlerinden biri sindirimi iyileştirmek için kullanılır.</p> <p>Haiti Mitolojisi</p> <p>Bu meyvenin Haiti voodoo ritüellerinde kullanıldığı bildirilmektedir.</p> <p>Kimya</p> <p>Türkiye meyvesi, sapogenin steroid klorojen dahil olmak üzere bir dizi potansiyel farmakolojik olarak aktif kimyasal içerir.</p> <p>Hindi meyvesinin sulu özleri, kanlarındaki eritrosit, lökosit ve trombosit sayısını azaltarak fareler için öldürücüdür (Tapia ve diğerleri 1996). İlgili bir kimyasal, kolekalsiferol, bir dizi ticari rodentisitteki aktif maddedir.</p> <p>Bitki özlerinin hiperaktivite, soğuk algınlığı ve öksürük, sivilce, cilt hastalıkları ve cüzzam tedavisinde yararlı olduğu bildirilmektedir.</p> <p>S. torvum'un meyvesinden ekstrakte edilen metil caffeate, streptozotosin kaynaklı diyabetik sıçanlarda antidiyabetik bir etki gösterir.</p> <p>Jamaikalı yemeklerde hazırlanan Solanum torvum meyvelerinin tüketimi sonucunda kolinerjik zehirlenme bildirilmiştir.</p>
P 364
Turkey Berry - Pea Eggplant Seeds (Solanum torvum)

African eggplant Seeds (Solanum aethiopicum)

African eggplant Seeds...

Fiyat €2,45 (SKU: P 347)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration:underline;">African eggplant Seeds (Solanum aethiopicum)</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>African eggplants of the Kumba group have a depressed globular shape with deep furrows and range from 5-15 centimeters in diameter. The fruit may be harvested green, white or even red, and the leaves are occasionally eaten as a sautéed vegetable as well. This variety is firm and bitter and best stewed or pickled.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Current Facts</strong></p> <p>African eggplants are botanically classified as Solanum aethiopicum and also commonly known as Mock Tomato, Bitter Tomato, Ethiopian nightshade and Scarlet Eggplant. They range widely in color and shape depending upon the cultivar and are divided into four groups: Gilo, Shum, Kumba and Aculeatum. This particular variety of African eggplant is of the Kumba Group.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Nutritional Value</strong></p> <p>African eggplant leaves are rich on beta-carotene, ascorbic acid, iron and calcium. The fruits bitter taste is attributed to furostanol glycosides (saponins).</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Applications</strong></p> <p>The leaves and young shoots of the African eggplant are just as important as the fruits themselves. Containing most of the plant’s nutritional value, they are used in soups, stews, sautés and even pickled. The inherent bitterness of the African eggplant is complimented by slightly sweet flavors, rich proteins and smoked meats. They take well to strong flavors of curry or long braises in a simple blend of oil and garlic. Pair the leaves and fruits in recipes that include nutty cheeses such as parmesan, ham, bacon, sausage, caramelized onions or mushrooms, sweet potatoes, beans and peanuts.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Ethnic - Cultural Info</strong></p> <p>A similar eggplant variety found in Brazil is referred to as jiló, and often breaded in cornmeal and fried, like green tomatoes in American Southern cuisine.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Geography - History</strong></p> <p>African eggplants are grown predominantly in their native home of Africa, specifically in Central and West Africa. They have since been introduced into the Caribbean and South America and are even grown in some of the warmer climates of southern Italy.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong><em>Propagation</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Basic requirements</strong></p> <p>Growth requirements for African eggplant vary with variety. All types grow best in full sun in well-draining, deep soils with a pH between 5.5 and 6.8. Gilo types grow best at daytime temperatures between 25 and 35°C (77 and 95°F). Kumba types can grow in hotter temperatures of up to 45°C in low humidity, whereas Shum types require warm and humid conditions in order to thrive. No varieties of African eggplant tolerate very cold or water-logged conditions.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Growing from seed</strong></p> <p>African eggplant seeds can be collected from fully ripe fruits. Once the seeds have been extracted, they should be laid out on a piece paper to dry in a place where they are not exposed to direct sunlight. Once dry, seeds can be stored for many years and still remain viable. Seeds should be planted in a prepared nursery bed and should be sown 15 cm (6 in) apart with a further 20 cm (8 in) between rows. Seedlings are ready for transplanting when they reach 15 to 20 cm (6–8 in) in height and have 5–7 leaves. Plants should be hardened prior to transplanting by gradually reducing the amount of water they receive. Plants should be spaced 50 cm (20 in) apart allowing 75 cm (30 in) between rows.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>General care and maintenance</strong></p> <p>African eggplants will benefit from frequent irrigation during the dry season, particularly when fruiting, to ensure high yields. The crop should be weeded as required to prevent competition. Addition of fertilizer in the form of cattle or chicken or cattle manure or compost will improve yields.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Harvesting</strong></p> <p>African eggplant is typically ready for harvest 100 to 120 days after planting. The fruit should be harvested before the skin changes color from white to pale yellow when the skin becomes tough. Fruits should be harvested regularly to encourage maximum fruit production. Young leaves may be harvested from 45-60 days of growth.</p>
P 347
African eggplant Seeds (Solanum aethiopicum)
Ronde De Valence Eggplant Seeds  - 4

Ronde De Valence Eggplant...

Fiyat €2,25 (SKU: P 294)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>RONDE DE VALENCE EGGPLANT SEEDS (AUBERGINE)</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 30 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Lovely, black fruit are almost perfectly round in shape and the size of a grapefruit, with deep purple color. A wonderful variety for stuffing, with great-tasting, tender flesh. A traditional French heirloom named after the city of Valence, a quaint city on the Rhone River.</p> <p>The eggplant, brinjal eggplant, aubergine, melongene, brinjal or guinea squash (Solanum melongena) is a plant of the family Solanaceae (also known as the nightshades) and genus Solanum. It bears a fruit of the same name, commonly used in cooking. As a nightshade, it is closely related to the tomato and potato. It was domesticated in India from Solanum incanum.</p> <p>It is a delicate perennial often cultivated as an annual. It grows 40 to 150 cm (16 to 57 in) tall, with large, coarsely lobed leaves that are 10 to 20 cm (4–8 in) long and 5 to 10 cm (2–4 in) broad. Semiwild types can grow much larger, to 225 cm (7 ft) with large leaves over 30 cm (12 in) long and 15 cm (6 in) broad. The stem is often spiny. The flower is white to purple, with a five-lobed corolla and yellow stamens. The fruit is fleshy, has a meaty texture. It is less than 3 cm (1.2 in) in diameter on wild plants, but much larger in cultivated forms.</p> <p>The fruit is botanically classified as a berry and contains numerous small, soft seeds which are edible, but have a bitter taste because they contain nicotinoid alkaloids; this is unsurprising as it is a close relative of tobacco.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>The plant is native to the Indian Subcontinent.[1][2] It has been cultivated in southern and eastern Asia since prehistory,[citation needed] but appears to have become known to the Western world no earlier than circa 1500. The first known written record of the plant is found in Qí mín yào shù, an ancient Chinese agricultural treatise completed in 544.[4] The numerous Arabic and North African names for it, along with the lack of the ancient Greek and Roman names, indicate it was introduced throughout the Mediterranean area by the Arabs in the early Middle Ages. The specific name melongena is derived from a 16th-century Arabic term for one variety.</p> <p>The name "aubergine" is from the French, a diminutive of auberge, a variant of alberge, ‘a kind of peach’ or from the Spanish alberchigo or alverchiga, ‘an apricocke’.[5] It may be also be derived from Catalan albergínia, from Arabic al-baðinjān from Persian bâdenjân, from Sanskrit vātiga-gama).</p> <p>Aubergine is also the name of the purple color resembling that of the fruit,[5] and is a commonly known color scheme[6] applied to articles as diverse as cloth or bathroom suites.</p> <p>The popular name "eggplant" is used in the United States, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. It derives from the fruits of some 18th-century European cultivars which were yellow or white and resembled goose or hen's eggs.[7] In Indian native languages Hindi and Urdu, it is called "Baingan"or"Baigan".[8]</p> <p>In Indian, South African, Malaysian and Singaporean English, the fruit is called baigan brinjal, being derived directly from the Portuguese beringela. A less common British English word is melongene, which is also from French (derived) from Italian melanzana from Greek μελιτζάνα. In the Caribbean Trinidad, it also goes by meloongen from melongene.</p> <p>Because of the plant's relationship with the Solanaceae (nightshade) family, the fruit was at one time believed to be extremely poisonous. The flowers and leaves, though, can be poisonous if consumed in large quantities, due to the presence of solanine.[9]</p> <p><strong>Cooking  </strong></p> <p>The raw fruit can have a somewhat bitter taste, but becomes tender when cooked and develops a rich, complex flavor. Many recipes advise salting, rinsing and draining of the sliced fruit (known as "degorging"), to soften it and to reduce the amount of fat absorbed during cooking, but mainly to remove the bitterness of the earlier cultivars. Some modern varieties - including large, purple varieties commonly imported into western Europe - do not need this treatment. The fruit is capable of absorbing large amounts of cooking fats and sauces, making for very rich dishes, but salting reduces the amount of oil absorbed. The fruit flesh is smooth; as in the related tomato, the numerous seeds are soft and edible along with the rest of the fruit. The thin skin is also edible.</p> <p>The plant is used in the cuisine of many countries. It is often stewed, as in the French ratatouille, or deep fried as in the Italian parmigiana di melanzane, the Turkish karnıyarık or Turkish and Greek musakka/moussaka, and Middle-Eastern and South Asian dishes. Eggplants can also be battered before deep-frying and served with a sauce made of tahini and tamarind. In Iranian cuisine, it can be blended with whey as kashk e-bademjan, tomatoes as mirza ghasemi or made into stew as khoresh-e-bademjan. It can be sliced and deep-fried, then served with plain yogurt, (optionally) topped with a tomato and garlic sauce, such as in the Turkish dish patlıcan kızartması (meaning: fried aubergines) or without yogurt as in patlıcan şakşuka. Perhaps the best-known Turkish eggplant dishes are İmam bayıldı (vegetarian) and Karnıyarık (with minced meat).</p> <p>It may also be roasted in its skin until charred, so the pulp can be removed and blended with other ingredients, such as lemon, tahini, and garlic, as in the Middle Eastern baba ghanoush and the similar Greek melitzanosalata. Grilled, mashed and mixed with onions, tomatoes and spices make the Indian and Pakistani dish baingan ka Bhartha or gojju, similar to salată de vinete in Romania, while a mix of roasted eggplant, roasted red peppers, chopped onions, tomatoes, mushrooms, carrots, celery and spices is called zacuscă in Romania or ajvar in Croatia and the Balkans. A simpler version of the dish, baigan-pora (eggplant-charred or burnt), is very popular in the east Indian states of Orissa and Bengal, and Bangladesh where the pulp of vegetable is mixed with raw chopped onions, green chillies, salt and mustard oil. Sometimes fried whole tomatoes and burnt potatoes are also added which is called baigan bharta. A Spanish dish called escalivada calls for strips of roasted aubergine, sweet pepper, onion and tomato. In Spain, is typical to find eggplant as berenjenas de Almagro. There, eggplants are also cooked with vinegar, red peppers, paprika and olive oil.</p> <p>The fruit can also be hollowed out and stuffed with meat, rice, or other fillings, and then baked. In the Caucasus, for example, it is fried and stuffed with walnut paste to make nigvziani badrijani. It can also be found in Chinese cuisine, braised (紅燒茄子), stewed (魚香茄子), steamed (凉拌茄子), or stuffed (釀茄子).</p> <p>As a native plant, it is widely used in Indian cuisine, for example in sambhar, dalma (a dal preparation with vegetables, native to Orissa), chutney, curry, and achaar. Owing to its versatile nature and wide use in both everyday and festive Indian food, it is often described (under the name brinjal) as the "king of vegetables". In one dish[which?], brinjal is stuffed with ground coconut, peanuts, and masala, and then cooked in oil.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>In tropical and subtropical climates, eggplant can be sown directly into the garden. Eggplant grown in temperate climates fares better when transplanted into the garden after all danger of frost is passed. Seeds are typically started eight to 10 weeks prior to the anticipated frost-free date.</p> <p>Many pests and diseases which afflict other solanaceous plants, such as tomato, pepper (capsicum), and potato, are also troublesome to eggplants. For this reason, it should not be planted in areas previously occupied by its close relatives. Four years should separate successive crops of eggplants. Common North American pests include the potato beetles, flea beetles, aphids, and spider mites. (Adults can be removed by hand, though flea beetles can be especially difficult to control.) Good sanitation and crop rotation practices are extremely important for controlling fungal disease, the most serious of which is Verticillium.</p> <p>Spacing should be 45 cm (18 in.) to 60 cm (24 in.) between plants, depending on cultivar, and 60 cm to 90 cm (24 to 36 in.) between rows, depending on the type of cultivation equipment being used. Mulching will help conserve moisture and prevent weeds and fungal diseases. The flowers are relatively unattractive to bees and the first blossoms often do not set fruit. Hand pollination will improve the set of the first blossoms. Fruits are typically cut from the vine just above the calyx owing to the somewhat woody stems. Flowers are complete, containing both female and male structures, and may be self-pollinated or cross-pollinated.</p> <div> <p><em><strong>Health properties</strong></em></p> </div> <table cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2"> <p align="center"><span><strong>Eggplant, raw</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td colspan="2" valign="top"> <p align="center"><span><strong>Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span><strong>Energy</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>102 kJ (24 kcal)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span><strong>Carbohydrates</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>5.7 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span><strong>- </strong><strong>Sugars</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>2.35 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span><strong>- </strong><strong>Dietary fiber</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>3.4 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span><strong>Fat</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.19 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span><strong>Protein</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>1.01 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Thiamine (vit. B<sub>1</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.039 mg (3%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Riboflavin (vit. B<sub>2</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.037 mg (3%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Niacin (vit. B<sub>3</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.649 mg (4%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Pantothenic acid (B<sub>5</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.281 mg (6%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Vitamin B<sub>6</sub></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.084 mg (6%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Folate (vit. B<sub>9</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>22 μg (6%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Vitamin C</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>2.2 mg (3%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Calcium</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>9 mg (1%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Iron</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.24 mg (2%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Magnesium</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>14 mg (4%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Manganese</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.25 mg (12%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Phosphorus</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>25 mg (4%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Potassium</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>230 mg (5%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Zinc</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.16 mg (2%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td colspan="2" valign="top"> <p align="center"><span>Percentages are relative to</span><br /><span>US recommendations for adults.</span><br /><span>Source: USDA Nutrient Database</span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table><p>A 1998 study at the Institute of Biology of São Paulo State University, Brazil, found eggplant juice to significantly reduce weight, plasma cholesterol levels, and aortic cholesterol content in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.<sup>[13]</sup></p> <p>The results of a 2000 study on humans suggested <em>S. melongena</em> infusion had a modest and transitory effect, no different from diet and exercise.<sup>[14]</sup></p> <p>A 2004 study on humans at the Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo found no effects at all and did not recommend eggplant as an alternative to statins.<sup>[15]</sup></p> <p>The nicotine content of aubergines, though low in absolute terms, is higher than any other edible plant, with a concentration of 0.01 mg per 100 g. The amount of nicotine consumed by eating eggplant or any other food is negligible compared to being in the presence of a smoker.<sup>[16]</sup> On average, 9 kg (20 lbs) of eggplant contains about the same amount of nicotine as a cigarette.</p> <div> <p><em><strong>Allergies</strong></em></p> </div> <p>Case reports of itchy skin or mouth, mild headache, and stomach upset after handling or eating eggplant have been reported anecdotally and published in medical journals (see also oral allergy syndrome). A 2008 study of a sample of 741 people in India, where eggplant is commonly consumed, found nearly 10% reported some allergic symptoms after consuming eggplant, while 1.4% showed symptoms within less than two hours.<sup>[17]</sup> Contact dermatitis from eggplant leaves<sup>[18]</sup> and allergy to eggplant flower pollen<sup>[19]</sup> have also been reported. Individuals who are atopic(genetically predisposed to developing certain allergic hypersensitivity reactions) are more likely to have a reaction to eggplant, which may be because eggplant is high in histamines. A few proteins and at least one secondary metabolite have been identified as potential allergens.<sup>[20]</sup> Cooking eggplant thoroughly seems to preclude reactions in some individuals, but at least one of the allergenic proteins survives the cooking process.</p>
P 294
Ronde De Valence Eggplant Seeds  - 4

Greek Eggplant Seeds TSAKONIKI  - 4

Greek Eggplant Seeds TSAKONIKI

Fiyat €1,75 (SKU: P 290)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Greek Eggplant Seeds TSAKONIKI</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 50 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Many people complain that eggplants are bitter, well guess what? The Greek variety Tsakoniki is not, it is actually mild, almost sweet. This eggplant is from the town of Leonidio in Peloponissos, it is long with white stripes and it has PDO status, which means that it must come from Leonidio to be called Tsakoniki.</p> <p>When eggplant season comes around there are all sorts of traditional Greek recipes to choose from.</p> <p>The eggplant is a decadent vegetable; when cooked it literally melts in your mouth and caramelizes giving it a sweet taste. Although Greeks have plenty of eggplant recipes, the Mediterranean in general is known for its love of eggplants and there is an abundance of  traditional recipes to choose from.</p> <p>Nutritionally, eggplants are a fantastic vegetable to include in your diet, here’s why: Eggplants are a source of soluble fiber, this type of fiber slows down the emptying of your stomach making you feel full longer and that can help you eat less if your are trying to lose weight. But one of the most important functions is that this fiber may lower the levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol in your blood.</p> <p>Eggplants also contain several substances that can protect from chronic disease. One of them is chlorogenic acid, don’t worry about pronouncing it correctly, all you need to know is that this substance is an antioxidant and it appears to control blood sugar levels. Anthocyanin is another a substance present in these vegetables, it is responsible for the purple color and it also has antioxidant properties, studies show that it may offer protection from cancer.</p>
P 290
Greek Eggplant Seeds TSAKONIKI  - 4
White Eggplant Seeds 1.85 - 1

White Eggplant Seeds

Fiyat €1,85 (SKU: P 287)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;color:#000000;"><strong><em>WHITE EGGPLANT SEEDS</em></strong></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>White skinned eggplant that produces early!  Produces 25 – 30 cm long , pearly-white fruits with flesh that is delicate and sweet, without bitterness, with succulent mushroom-like flavor. With white flesh, this eggplant variety can grow anywhere in the World.</p> <p> </p> <p>Product Details</p> <p>Breed: Heirloom</p> <p>Zones: 3-9</p> <p>Germination: 8-10 days</p> <p>Days to Maturity: 70 days</p> <p>Head Size: 25 – 30 cm</p> <p>Head Color: White</p> <p>Fruit Weight: 350 – 400 g</p>
P 287
White Eggplant Seeds 1.85 - 1
Aubergine – Eggplant Seeds “Rosa Bianca“ Seeds Gallery - 4

Aubergine – Eggplant Seeds...

Fiyat €1,85 (SKU: P 143)
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Aubergine – Eggplant Seeds “Rosa Bianca“ </span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>80 days. Colorful, light pink-lavender fruit with white shading. Rich, mild flesh is very popular with chefs and gardeners alike! no bitterness. A great variety for heirloom market growers. Use the color that sells!</p> </div>
P 143
Aubergine – Eggplant Seeds “Rosa Bianca“ Seeds Gallery - 4
Medium Long Eggplant Seeds  - 2

Medium Long Eggplant Seeds

Fiyat €1,95 (SKU: P 101)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Medium Long Eggplant Seeds Domestic (Aubergine)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 200 seeds (1g).</strong></span></h2> <div>Early medium maturing variety, tolerant to heat and humidity, vigorous growth, strong diseases resistance, long harvest period, long straight fruit, beautiful shape, glossy purple skin, good quality, extremly high yield, each fruit is about 28-35 cm in length, 4.5-6 cm in diameter, 250-400g in weight.</div> <div>The eggplant, brinjal eggplant, aubergine, melongene, brinjal or guinea squash (Solanum melongena) is a plant of the family Solanaceae (also known as the nightshades) and genus Solanum. It bears a fruit of the same name, commonly used in cooking. As a nightshade, it is closely related to the tomato and potato. It was domesticated in India from Solanum incanum.</div> <div>It is a delicate perennial often cultivated as an annual. It grows 40 to 150 cm (16 to 57 in) tall, with large, coarsely lobed leaves that are 10 to 20 cm (4–8 in) long and 5 to 10 cm (2–4 in) broad. Semiwild types can grow much larger, to 225 cm (7 ft) with large leaves over 30 cm (12 in) long and 15 cm (6 in) broad. The stem is often spiny. The flower is white to purple, with a five-lobed corolla and yellow stamens. The fruit is fleshy, has a meaty texture. It is less than 3 cm (1.2 in) in diameter on wild plants, but much larger in cultivated forms.</div> <div>The fruit is botanically classified as a berry and contains numerous small, soft seeds which are edible, but have a bitter taste because they contain nicotinoid alkaloids; this is unsurprising as it is a close relative of tobacco.</div> <div>History</div> <div>The plant is native to the Indian Subcontinent.[1][2] It has been cultivated in southern and eastern Asia since prehistory,[citation needed] but appears to have become known to the Western world no earlier than circa 1500. The first known written record of the plant is found in Qí mín yào shù, an ancient Chinese agricultural treatise completed in 544.[4] The numerous Arabic and North African names for it, along with the lack of the ancient Greek and Roman names, indicate it was introduced throughout the Mediterranean area by the Arabs in the early Middle Ages. The specific name melongena is derived from a 16th-century Arabic term for one variety.</div> <div>The name "aubergine" is from the French, a diminutive of auberge, a variant of alberge, ‘a kind of peach’ or from the Spanish alberchigo or alverchiga, ‘an apricocke’.[5] It may be also be derived from Catalan albergínia, from Arabic al-baðinjān from Persian bâdenjân, from Sanskrit vātiga-gama).</div> <div>Aubergine is also the name of the purple color resembling that of the fruit,[5] and is a commonly known color scheme[6] applied to articles as diverse as cloth or bathroom suites.</div> <div>The popular name "eggplant" is used in the United States, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. It derives from the fruits of some 18th-century European cultivars which were yellow or white and resembled goose or hen's eggs.[7] In Indian native languages Hindi and Urdu, it is called "Baingan"or"Baigan".[8]</div> <div>In Indian, South African, Malaysian and Singaporean English, the fruit is called baigan brinjal, being derived directly from the Portuguese beringela. A less common British English word is melongene, which is also from French (derived) from Italian melanzana from Greek μελιτζάνα. In the Caribbean Trinidad, it also goes by meloongen from melongene.</div> <div>Because of the plant's relationship with the Solanaceae (nightshade) family, the fruit was at one time believed to be extremely poisonous. The flowers and leaves, though, can be poisonous if consumed in large quantities, due to the presence of solanine.[9]</div> <div>Cooking  </div> <div>The raw fruit can have a somewhat bitter taste, but becomes tender when cooked and develops a rich, complex flavor. Many recipes advise salting, rinsing and draining of the sliced fruit (known as "degorging"), to soften it and to reduce the amount of fat absorbed during cooking, but mainly to remove the bitterness of the earlier cultivars. Some modern varieties - including large, purple varieties commonly imported into western Europe - do not need this treatment. The fruit is capable of absorbing large amounts of cooking fats and sauces, making for very rich dishes, but salting reduces the amount of oil absorbed. The fruit flesh is smooth; as in the related tomato, the numerous seeds are soft and edible along with the rest of the fruit. The thin skin is also edible.</div> <div>The plant is used in the cuisine of many countries. It is often stewed, as in the French ratatouille, or deep fried as in the Italian parmigiana di melanzane, the Turkish karnıyarık or Turkish and Greek musakka/moussaka, and Middle-Eastern and South Asian dishes. Eggplants can also be battered before deep-frying and served with a sauce made of tahini and tamarind. In Iranian cuisine, it can be blended with whey as kashk e-bademjan, tomatoes as mirza ghasemi or made into stew as khoresh-e-bademjan. It can be sliced and deep-fried, then served with plain yogurt, (optionally) topped with a tomato and garlic sauce, such as in the Turkish dish patlıcan kızartması (meaning: fried aubergines) or without yogurt as in patlıcan şakşuka. Perhaps the best-known Turkish eggplant dishes are İmam bayıldı (vegetarian) and Karnıyarık (with minced meat).</div> <div>It may also be roasted in its skin until charred, so the pulp can be removed and blended with other ingredients, such as lemon, tahini, and garlic, as in the Middle Eastern baba ghanoush and the similar Greek melitzanosalata. Grilled, mashed and mixed with onions, tomatoes and spices make the Indian and Pakistani dish baingan ka Bhartha or gojju, similar to salată de vinete in Romania, while a mix of roasted eggplant, roasted red peppers, chopped onions, tomatoes, mushrooms, carrots, celery and spices is called zacuscă in Romania or ajvar in Croatia and the Balkans. A simpler version of the dish, baigan-pora (eggplant-charred or burnt), is very popular in the east Indian states of Orissa and Bengal, and Bangladesh where the pulp of vegetable is mixed with raw chopped onions, green chillies, salt and mustard oil. Sometimes fried whole tomatoes and burnt potatoes are also added which is called baigan bharta. A Spanish dish called escalivada calls for strips of roasted aubergine, sweet pepper, onion and tomato. In Spain, is typical to find eggplant as berenjenas de Almagro. There, eggplants are also cooked with vinegar, red peppers, paprika and olive oil.</div> <div>The fruit can also be hollowed out and stuffed with meat, rice, or other fillings, and then baked. In the Caucasus, for example, it is fried and stuffed with walnut paste to make nigvziani badrijani. It can also be found in Chinese cuisine, braised (紅燒茄子), stewed (魚香茄子), steamed (凉拌茄子), or stuffed (釀茄子).</div> <div>As a native plant, it is widely used in Indian cuisine, for example in sambhar, dalma (a dal preparation with vegetables, native to Orissa), chutney, curry, and achaar. Owing to its versatile nature and wide use in both everyday and festive Indian food, it is often described (under the name brinjal) as the "king of vegetables". In one dish[which?], brinjal is stuffed with ground coconut, peanuts, and masala, and then cooked in oil.</div> <div>Cultivation</div> <div>In tropical and subtropical climates, eggplant can be sown directly into the garden. Eggplant grown in temperate climates fares better when transplanted into the garden after all danger of frost is passed. Seeds are typically started eight to 10 weeks prior to the anticipated frost-free date.</div> <div>Many pests and diseases which afflict other solanaceous plants, such as tomato, pepper (capsicum), and potato, are also troublesome to eggplants. For this reason, it should not be planted in areas previously occupied by its close relatives. Four years should separate successive crops of eggplants. Common North American pests include the potato beetles, flea beetles, aphids, and spider mites. (Adults can be removed by hand, though flea beetles can be especially difficult to control.) Good sanitation and crop rotation practices are extremely important for controlling fungal disease, the most serious of which is Verticillium.</div> <div>Spacing should be 45 cm (18 in.) to 60 cm (24 in.) between plants, depending on cultivar, and 60 cm to 90 cm (24 to 36 in.) between rows, depending on the type of cultivation equipment being used. Mulching will help conserve moisture and prevent weeds and fungal diseases. The flowers are relatively unattractive to bees and the first blossoms often do not set fruit. Hand pollination will improve the set of the first blossoms. Fruits are typically cut from the vine just above the calyx owing to the somewhat woody stems. Flowers are complete, containing both female and male structures, and may be self-pollinated or cross-pollinated.</div> <div> <p><em><strong>Health properties</strong></em></p> </div> <table cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Eggplant, raw</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td colspan="2" valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Energy</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">102 kJ (24 kcal)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Carbohydrates</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">5.7 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>- </strong><strong>Sugars</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">2.35 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>- </strong><strong>Dietary fiber</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">3.4 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Fat</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.19 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Protein</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">1.01 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Thiamine (vit. B<sub>1</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.039 mg (3%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Riboflavin (vit. B<sub>2</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.037 mg (3%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Niacin (vit. B<sub>3</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.649 mg (4%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Pantothenic acid (B<sub>5</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.281 mg (6%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Vitamin B<sub>6</sub></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.084 mg (6%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Folate (vit. B<sub>9</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">22 μg (6%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Vitamin C</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">2.2 mg (3%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Calcium</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">9 mg (1%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Iron</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.24 mg (2%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Magnesium</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">14 mg (4%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Manganese</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.25 mg (12%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Phosphorus</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">25 mg (4%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Potassium</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">230 mg (5%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Zinc</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.16 mg (2%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td colspan="2" valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Percentages are relative to</span><br /><span style="color:#008000;">US recommendations for adults.</span><br /><span style="color:#008000;">Source: USDA Nutrient Database</span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table><p>A 1998 study at the Institute of Biology of São Paulo State University, Brazil, found eggplant juice to significantly reduce weight, plasma cholesterol levels, and aortic cholesterol content in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.<sup>[13]</sup></p> <p>The results of a 2000 study on humans suggested <em>S. melongena</em> infusion had a modest and transitory effect, no different from diet and exercise.<sup>[14]</sup></p> <p>A 2004 study on humans at the Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo found no effects at all and did not recommend eggplant as an alternative to statins.<sup>[15]</sup></p> <p>The nicotine content of aubergines, though low in absolute terms, is higher than any other edible plant, with a concentration of 0.01 mg per 100 g. The amount of nicotine consumed by eating eggplant or any other food is negligible compared to being in the presence of a smoker.<sup>[16]</sup> On average, 9 kg (20 lbs) of eggplant contains about the same amount of nicotine as a cigarette.</p> <div> <p><em><strong>Allergies</strong></em></p> </div> <p>Case reports of itchy skin or mouth, mild headache, and stomach upset after handling or eating eggplant have been reported anecdotally and published in medical journals (see also oral allergy syndrome). A 2008 study of a sample of 741 people in India, where eggplant is commonly consumed, found nearly 10% reported some allergic symptoms after consuming eggplant, while 1.4% showed symptoms within less than two hours.<sup>[17]</sup> Contact dermatitis from eggplant leaves<sup>[18]</sup> and allergy to eggplant flower pollen<sup>[19]</sup> have also been reported. Individuals who are atopic(genetically predisposed to developing certain allergic hypersensitivity reactions) are more likely to have a reaction to eggplant, which may be because eggplant is high in histamines. A few proteins and at least one secondary metabolite have been identified as potential allergens.<sup>[20]</sup> Cooking eggplant thoroughly seems to preclude reactions in some individuals, but at least one of the allergenic proteins survives the cooking process.</p>
P 101
Medium Long Eggplant Seeds  - 2
STRIPED TOGA Eggplant Seeds Heirloom Aubergine 2.25 - 4

STRIPED TOGA Eggplant Seeds...

Fiyat €2,25 (SKU: P 66 ST)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2>STRIPED TOGA Eggplant Seeds (Solanum aethiopicum)</h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Not only beautiful, it is delicious also! Eggplant heirloom variety, the plants are high yielding, the oval shaped fruits grow in small clusters together, fruit size is about fruits 7.5cm long x 2.5cm. The fruit start green with darker green stripes later turning yellow and beautiful glossy orange with green stripes. Highly decorative for flower arrangements and fruit plates. The small fruits are edible. Plant high 1-1.20m</p> <h2>Current Facts</h2> <p><span>Toga eggplants, botanically classified as Solanum aethiopicum, are a rare heirloom variety belonging to the Solanaceae, or nightshade family, which contains 3,000 species including tomatoes, peppers, and potatoes. Also known as Striped Toga eggplants, Toga eggplants are mostly used as an ornamental in home gardens. Toga eggplants can be left hanging on the stems and used in fresh or dry floral arrangements where they will last for several months.</span></p> <h2>Nutritional Value</h2> <p><span>Toga eggplants contain small amounts of protein, starch, and minerals like calcium, iron, and potassium. </span></p> <h2>Applications</h2> <p><span>Toga eggplants are best suited for cooked applications such as grilling, frying, and sautéing. They are popularly sautéed and used alongside other vegetables in stews as their flavor alone can be bitter. Toga eggplants retain their color when fried and can add an attractive dash of color to dishes. They can also be grilled on skewers and served as a side dish or incorporated into curries for added crunch. Toga eggplants pair well with tomatoes, peppers, feta, garlic, onions, and meats such as chicken or pork. Toga eggplants will keep up to a week when stored whole in the refrigerator. </span></p> <h2>Ethnic/Cultural Info</h2> <p><span>Toga eggplants are thought to have been created from African varieties of eggplant. Eggplants in Africa are used as a staple cooking ingredient and are sometimes dried in rural areas that struggle with access to electricity and refrigeration. In Ghana, eggplants are among the most-consumed vegetable and are commonly eaten raw or used in stews. </span></p> <h2>Geography/History</h2> <p><span>Toga eggplants are believed to have originated in sub-Saharan Africa and were brought to Europe via the slave trade where they are commercially produced today. Toga eggplants can be found at specialty grocers and farmers markets in Europe, Africa, South America, and the United States. </span></p> </body> </html>
P 66 ST
STRIPED TOGA Eggplant Seeds Heirloom Aubergine 2.25 - 4


Peruvian Purple Potato Seeds 3.05 - 6

Peru Mor Patates Tohumları

Fiyat €2,95 (SKU: P 441)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Peru Mor Patates Tohumları</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Fiyat 5 veya 10 mor tohumluk patates içindir.</strong></span></h2> <p>Küçük ve küçük gibi gönderiyoruz, böylece herhangi bir Posta Kutusuna teslim edilebilir. Sıradan bir çeşidin tadı ve dokusuna sahiptir, ancak pişirme sırasında rengini koruyan canlı mor ete sahiptir. Yüksek antosiyanin antioksidanları, sizin için de daha iyidir. Ezme, pişirme, kızartma ve mikrodalgada pişirmenin yanı sıra muhteşem cips ve Pommes Frites yapmak için ideal!</p> <p>If you’re a spud lover but stopped eating potatoes due to their reputation of causing weight gain, you may be in luck. Studies show it could be the potato you choose in addition to how the potato is prepared that make a difference. What about french fries? Well, those fries are six times more likely to cause weight gain if enjoyed too often, and besides, the super high temperatures they’re cooked at cause the loss of any possible nutrients, so why bother? And if you think adding all those delicious fatty toppings is the way to go, think again. Instead, opt for purple potatoes.</p> <p>Purple potatoes are <strong>high-antioxidant foods</strong> that are eye-catching since the skin and the flesh are both purple, making them a beautiful adornment to any plate. But it’s not just the color that’s appealing. Purple potatoes offer a host of awesome benefits from working as a healthy food-coloring agent to helping regulate blood pressure to aiding athletic performance and more.</p> <p><strong>Benefits of Purple Potatoes</strong></p> <ol> <li><strong> Healthy Food-Coloring Alternative</strong></li> </ol> <p>Potatoes, carrots and other <strong>root vegetables</strong> are used for coloring foods and grown specifically for the natural colors industry. This is great news since they’re completely natural versus the numerous chemical <strong>food dyes linked to cancer</strong> that have been used for years.</p> <p>The American Chemical Society documents the research that has been done regarding this food use, noting that the purple sweet potato is chock-full of anthocyanins, which provide health benefits not found in artificial food colors. Purple sweet potato anthocyanins are great for food and beverage coloring and are used in food products, such as fruit drinks, vitamin waters, ice cream and yogurt. What makes them unique goes beyond their color. They’re more stable options because they do not break down easily, making them consistent in providing color while giving little to no taste. (2)</p> <p>Though it’s difficult to extract, it’s still a better choice given the traditional synthetic versions of colorings and the process of extraction from cochineal insects. In fact, cochineal insects feed on a certain type of cactus native to South America and Mexico, and it takes about 2,500 bugs to produce just one ounce of cochineal extract, which is often used in ice creams, yogurts, candy, beverages and the like.</p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong> Help Lower and Regulate Blood Pressure</strong></li> </ol> <p>A small study presented by the American Chemical Society found that eating purple potatoes may lower blood pressure. This could be because of their effect on the capillaries and blood vessels, along with the high concentration of a phytochemical called chlorogenic acid, which has been linked to lower blood pressure found in some studies. (3) This research shows that plain purple potatoes, baked or cooked in the microwave, lowered the blood pressure of subjects that were reviewed by 3 percent to 4 percent, with no weight gain, and was likely due to the antioxidant behavior and phytonutrient density that these colorful gems exude.</p> <p>The health benefits are similar to what the popular nutrient-rich providers <strong>broccoli</strong>, spinach and Brussels sprouts provide. And let’s not forget about the potassium they contain, which offers the regulation of blood pressure. (4) This makes purple potatoes and other similar foods excellent additions to any <strong>high blood pressure diet</strong> treatment plan.</p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong> May Prevent Blood Clots</strong></li> </ol> <p><strong>Thrombosis</strong>, a formal name for blood clotting, is a leading cause of death throughout the world but can be prevented, possibly by adding a little purple potato into your diet. As noted previously, the purple potato contains chlorogenic acid. This acid has been shown to break down blood clots and inhibit the enzymatic activity of procoagulant proteins and peptides.</p> <p>Research published in the <em>Journal of Biochemical and Molecular Toxicology</em>found that chlorogenic acid delayed the development of blood clots in mice, demonstrating the anti-thrombotic effect and making it a potential agent for the treatment of blood clots, including possible prevention.</p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong> Jam-Packed with Antioxidants and Phytonutrients</strong></li> </ol> <p>The purple potato is loaded with antioxidants and disease-fighting <strong>phytonutrients</strong> that work together to offer amazing health benefits, such as reducing inflammation. One of the elements within this powerful cocktail is the anthocyanin, which is what gives the potato its brilliant purple color. But it’s the <strong>free-radical scavenging</strong> and antioxidant capabilities of the anthocyanin pigments that gives the desired health benefits.</p> <p>Anthocyanin pigments as medicine have been a part of folk medicine for ages and used as remedies for liver dysfunction and hypertension, and much like the <strong>bilberry</strong>, anthocyanins have been linked to helping reduce the risks of eye diseases and infections. (6) </p> <ol start="5"> <li><strong> Provides Fiber</strong></li> </ol> <p>Most people don’t eat enough fiber, according to numerous reports. Maybe a little purple potato can help with that problem since it’s a healthier <strong>high-fiber food</strong>. Why is fiber so important? One of the biggest reasons is it helps keep things moving along smoothly through your digestive system, which can help eliminate constipation, irregularity and discomfort.</p> <p>Fiber is classified as soluble, which means it dissolves in water, or insoluble, which doesn’t. Potatoes contain the insoluble form as well as whole-wheat flour, wheat bran, nuts, beans, and vegetables, like cauliflower and green beans. Including both soluble and insoluble fiber promotes the best health, and purple potatoes offer a good dose of the insoluble kind to help reach the proper amount of fiber needs. (7) </p> <ol start="6"> <li><strong> Great for Endurance Athletes and Ultra Runners</strong></li> </ol> <p>Another reason that insoluble fiber is so helpful is that it can provide a sort of time-released effect that helps endurance athletes sustain high energy levels for long periods of time. In fact, it’s not unusual to find potatoes at an aid station during a long-distance race.</p> <p><em>Runner’s World</em> reports that while the ever-so famous carb-loader pasta seems to take front stage, the potato may do a better job, not only the night before but also the day of an event by providing more energy-delivering complex carbohydrates. Not only are they super easy to prepare, but they’re easy to digest — a common concern with most athletes. As well, potassium is useful for athletes of all types, in particular, due to the electrolytes it contains. The purple potato contains 341 milligrams of potassium per half cup serving, which is 10 percent of the daily recommended value. This may make the potato the perfect carb for athletes — and to help prevent <strong>low potassium</strong>. (8)</p> <p><strong>Purple Potatoes Nutrition</strong></p> <p>A half cup of diced, raw purple potatoes contains about: (9)</p> <ul> <li>52 calories</li> <li>12 grams carbohydrates</li> <li>1.4 grams protein</li> <li>0.1 gram fat</li> <li>1.3 grams fiber</li> <li>6.5 milligrams vitamin C (11 percent DV)</li> <li>341 milligrams potassium (10 percent DV)</li> <li>0.1 milligrams vitamin B6 (6 percent DV)</li> <li>45.7 milligrams phosphorus (5 percent DV)</li> <li>0.1 milligrams copper (5 percent DV)</li> <li>0.1 milligram manganese (5 percent DV)</li> <li>0.1 milligram thiamine (4 percent DV)</li> <li>0.9 milligram niacin (4 percent DV)</li> <li>16.5 milligrams magnesium (4 percent DV)</li> </ul> <p><strong>How to Use Purple Potatoes</strong></p> <p>Purple potatoes are versatile but can become a little mushy if overcooked. Even though they have a rich, vibrant violet color, their flavor is more subtle than some other potato varieties. Because of this, unlike the <strong>sweet potato</strong> that’s delicious all by itself, the purple potato is usually prepared by adding seasonings. Keep in mind that boiling or baking is the best method versus deep frying, which kills any useful nutrients. Use a little coconut or olive oil with some salt and pepper for a delightful addition to any meal.</p> <p><strong>Purple Potato Recipes</strong></p> <p>There are many ways to utilize purple potatoes in recipes. Try this one to start:</p> <p><strong>Roasted Rosemary Garlic and Turmeric Purple Potatoes with Leeks</strong></p> <p>INGREDIENTS:</p> <ul> <li>2 sprigs fresh rosemary (save one for garnish)</li> <li>10 small purple potatoes</li> <li>1 teaspoon sea salt</li> <li>1 teaspoon pepper</li> <li>1 teaspoon turmeric</li> <li>1/4 cup leeks, sliced</li> <li>2 cloves garlic, minced</li> <li>2.5 tablespoons coconut oil</li> </ul> <p>DIRECTIONS:</p> <ol> <li>Preheat oven to 375 degrees.</li> <li>Slice the leeks and garlic and set aside.</li> <li>Rinse potatoes and cut in small pieces about a quarter inch thick.</li> <li>In a bowl, mix the leeks, garlic, turmeric and potatoes with the coconut oil. It may help to melt the coconut oil first.</li> <li>Add the sea salt, pepper and chopped rosemary, and mix well.</li> <li>Now place the potatoes to a baking sheet lined with foil.</li> <li>Roast for 35–45 minutes or until potatoes are soft and begin to brown.</li> <li>Place a half cup serving as a side dish on a plate, and garnish with a small sprig of rosemary.</li> </ol> <p>You can also try Purple Potato Salad with Avocado-Chia Dressing recipe and use purple potatoes in most side dishes that utilize potatoes.</p> <p><strong>History of Purple Potatoes</strong></p> <p>The history of the purple potato goes back to what’s known as the purple Peruvian, which is an heirloom fingerling potato. Potatoes, in addition to tomatoes, peppers and eggplants, are part of the <em>Solanaceae</em> or <strong>nightshade vegetables</strong> family. The purple or blue violet potato fits into what has been called vitelotte, though not necessarily violet in color. This violet or purple potato may have been noted as early as 1817, listed as available at the market of Les Halles.</p> <p>Information published in 1863 listed five possible colors for the vitelotte, which were white, yellow, pink, red and violet. In 1873, Alexandre Dumas, a French author, wrote in his Grand dictionnaire de cuisine that “… the best of all are unquestionably the violet [ones], preferable even to the red [ones], [and] known in Paris by the name of <em>Vitelottes.” </em>(10, 11) </p> <p>The purple potato comes with special names, such as purple majesty, purple viking and purple Peruvian, and is usually available all year long. These golf ball-sized potatoes are popular in South America, originating in Peru and Bolivia, and they can reach a slightly larger size if allowed to reach full maturity. They have a nutty, earthy flavor and are perfect as a side dish for most anything. (12)</p> <p>While all potatoes, including the purple potato, blue potato, white potato, yellow potato and sweet potato, are high in <strong>carbohydrates</strong>, they contain useful fiber, vitamins and minerals. But the most nutrient-dense versions are those with the colorful flesh.</p> <p><strong>Risks with Purple Potatoes</strong></p> <p>There are no known risks of eating purple potatoes, but as always, if you experience a negative reaction, stop eating immediately.</p> <p><strong>Final Thoughts on Purple Potatoes</strong></p> <p>The purple potato, if prepared correctly, can be an excellent spud for your health. It’s a better choice for food colorings, eliminating chemical intake in the body, contains useful phytonutrients and the antioxidants it contains are so powerful that may help with inflammation.</p> <p>In addition, purple potatoes can help eliminate possible blood clots and provide useful fiber to help with <strong>constipation</strong> and digestion. A potassium-loaded complex carbohydrate, this powerful potato may help athletes with performance and sustainability during endurance-based activities as well</p> <p>From the sound of it, you might think leaky gut only affects the digestive system, but in reality it can affect more. Because Leaky Gut is so common, and such an enigma, I’m offering a free webinar on all things leaky gut.</p> </body> </html>
P 441 5K
Peruvian Purple Potato Seeds 3.05 - 6
Red Skin - White Flesh KENNEBEC Potato Seeds 1.95 - 2

Red Skin - White Flesh...

Fiyat €1,95 (SKU: P 247 RK)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Red Skin - White Flesh KENNEBEC Potato Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>These red-skinned and white flesh tubers make excellent table potatoes. The fairly firm texture when boiled. They are highly recommended for fries and chips. Plants are compact and erect with pointed smooth leaves and; numerous big white flowers with slight reddish-purple tinge on backs.</p> <p>Potatoes can be grown from true seeds just as easily and reliably as tomatoes, peppers or eggplants. True potato seed is a new development offering the advantages of, lower cost than mini-tubers, completely disease-free, and always available at the right planting time for gardeners in any region. This is the new wave in potato culture.</p> <p>Start indoors in seedling trays. Fill each cell to 1cm (1/2") from the top with sterilized seed starting mix. Moisten with water and place one seed on the top of the soil per cell. Cover with vermiculite and water in. Note: Potato seeds require light to germinate, so do not bury.  Optimal soil temperature for germination: 15-27°C (65-80°F). Seeds should germinate in 6-10 days.</p> <p><strong>Starting</strong><br />Keep the soil evenly moist during germination, but allow free drainage so that excess water does not collect. Water before mid-day to allow foliage to dry completely by nightfall. Potato seedlings <span>tend to stay prostrate immediately after emergence if they have 13 or more hours of daylight. As a somewhat longer stem is desired to ease transplanting, keep seedlings in about 12-hour light per day. During the last week expose seedlings to full sunlight to strengthen the stem. At optimal temperature, transplants will be ready 4 to 6 weeks after seeding.</span></p> <p><span>If field conditions are very different from indoor conditions, allow one week of hardening off. Water the plugs heavily the day before and day of the transplant, and transplant into moist soil.</span></p> <p><strong>Growing</strong><br />Ideal pH: 5.0-6.0. Plant seedlings so that only the crown of its top, 2-5cm (1-2“) is above soil level, burying the whole plug and a good part of the stem of the seedling. Seedlings cannot be completely buried, the growing point needs to stay above ground. Space seedlings 10-25cm (4-10") apart in rows 75cm (30") apart. Wider spacing produces fewer, but larger tubers. Keep the area well-watered for several weeks after transplant.</p> <p><strong>Hilling<br /></strong><span>When seedlings reach 10-15cm  (4-6") in height, they should be hilled, probably three weeks after transplanting. This operation takes soil from the centre of the row, and covers the seedlings up to half of their height, creating a small hill. It is best to work from the centre of the furrow towards the plants. Do not cut too deep into the soil near the plant to avoid root damage. Just before hilling, fertilizer can be applied near the base of the seedlings, and this will be covered when hilling.</span></p> <p>A second hilling and side dressing of balanced organic fertilizer should follow 3-4 weeks after the first, again depositing soil up to half the height of the plants. Again, increase the depth of the furrow in its centre and bring this soil on top of the small hill created in the first hilling operation.</p> <p><strong>Harvest</strong></p> <p><span>In the garden, potatoes can be harvested without destroying the plant if only a few potatoes are needed. Carefully scrape soil near the base of the stem until the skin of a potato is found, and pull it from the stolon. Consume it that day for a tasty and nutritious meal. </span>If potatoes need to be stored for some time, remove the foliage 3 weeks before harvest. This "sets" (hardens) the skin, and it will store better as the thicker skin will reduce water loss from the tubers. Keep them dark up to 2 to 3 months at high humidity before eating.</p> <p><strong>Seed Info</strong><br />In optimal conditions, at least 75% of the seeds will germinate. Usual seed life: 3 years. Per 100′ row: 200 seeds, per acre: 8.8M seeds.</p> <p><strong>Diseases &amp; Pests</strong><br />Protect from cabbage moths and other insect pests with floating row cover. Prevent disease with strict 4-year crop rotation, avoiding planting Brassicas in the same spot more than once every four years.</p> <p><strong>Companion Planting</strong><br />A worthy companion for beets, Brassicas, cucumbers, and onions. Avoid planting near peppers, pole beans, strawberries, and tomatoes.</p> </body> </html>
P 247 RK
Red Skin - White Flesh KENNEBEC Potato Seeds 1.95 - 2

Salute Multi-colored True Potato Seeds  - 6

Salute Multi-colored True...

Fiyat €6,00 (SKU: P 408)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Salute Multi-colored True Potato Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of +-30 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>A mixture of medium-ripening varieties, original color, both peel and pulp of tubers. The plant is semi-straight, of medium height, with real fireworks shades during flowering. The tubers are oval, elongate-oval, with small and medium-sized eyes, with smooth, white, yellow, red, burgundy, dark purple skin, and with white, yellow, brown, reddish, light and dark purple flesh, 75-130 grams, excellent taste. Productivity 4,5-5,5 kg / m2. Multicolored potatoes are ideal for cooking vinaigrettes, cabbage soup and borsch, and other dishes. The mixture is resistant to potato cancer.</span></p> <p><span>Growing potatoes from seeds makes it possible to get a healthy (free from viral, bacterial and fungal diseases), planting (tubers) material, which deteriorates annually when vegetative reproduction of tubers. Recommended for growing in seedlings. Seeds for seedlings are sown in April in seedling boxes in rows, with a distance of 2 cm in a row, to a depth of no more than 0.3-0.5 cm. At an optimum temperature of 18-22 ° C, sprouts appear on the 8-12 day. Seedlings in a phase of 2 leaves dive into pots with a diameter of 5-7 cm. Care of seedlings is in timely and regular watering and top dressing with a solution of the full complex fertilizer Fertika- plus, from the calculation of 2 g per 1 liter of water and every 7-10 Days. In the open ground potato seedlings are planted in late May - early June according to the scheme 70x20-25 cm, so that only 2-4 leaves remain above the surface of the soil. It is very important during 2-3 days after planting, to cover seedlings from direct sunlight and to protect against possible frosts in a timely manner. Care of plants is the regular weeding, loosening, hilling and fertilizing with full mineral fertilizers (azofosca, nitrophoska or fecal potato), and if necessary and in watering, especially at first. If necessary, processing of plants from the Colorado beetle is carried out.</span></p>
P 408
Salute Multi-colored True Potato Seeds  - 6