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Semințe de plante uriașe

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1000 Seeds Giant Sunflower - Mongolian Giant 9.95 - 2

1000 Seeds Giant Sunflower...

Pret 9,95 € (SKU: P 389)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>1000 Seeds Giant Sunflower - Mongolian Giant</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package with 1000+- (100g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>A true giant reaching up to 420cm (14ft) tall with one of the largest flowering sunflower seed heads available which can achieve up to 45cm (18in) across.   The seeds are one of the largest available for Helianthus (Sunflower) and ideal for birds over-winter.  Not suitable for exposed sites and will need support.</p> <p>Days To Germination:  14-21 days</p> <p>Optimum Soil Temp. for Germination: 68F-86F</p> <p>Planting Depth: 1/4  inch</p> <p>Spacing, Seed: 4-6 inch</p> <p>Spacing, Plant: 24-36 inches</p> <p>Plant Height: 10-14 ft</p> <p>Light:  Full Sun</p> </body> </html>
P 389
1000 Seeds Giant Sunflower - Mongolian Giant 9.95 - 2

مجموعة متنوعة من بيرو
Peruvian Giant Red Sacsa Kuski Corn Seeds 3.499999 - 11

Peruvian Giant Red Sacsa...

Pret 2,25 € (SKU: P 40 SK)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Peruvian Giant Red Sacsa Kuski Corn Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 or 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 14pt;">Large-kernel variety of field corn from the Andes, kernel is white-red color. Excellent for cooking and baking, very sweet and large grain so it is best used for cooking.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 14pt;">One of the most widely-consumed foodstuffs in Peruvian cuisine. This corn has been planted in Peru since at least 1200 BC. The ancient Peruvian farmers achieved a degree of sophistication in the selection and creation of new varieties which adapted to varying terrains and climates.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 14pt;">Sixteenth-century Spanish chronicler Bernabé Cobo wrote how in ancient Peru one could find corn (known locally as choclo) in every color under the sun: white, yellow, purple, black, red and mixed. Today, farmers along the Peruvian coast, highlands and jungle grow more than 55 varieties of corn, more than anywhere else on Earth.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 14pt;">Native historian Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, in his Royal Commentaries of the Incas, wrote in detail on eating habits in colonial times. In those days, corn was a key part of nutritional needs, and the locals called it Sara, eating it roasted or boiled in water. On major occasions, they milled the kernels to bake a type of bread called tanta or huminta. For solemn events such as the Festival of the Sun (Inti Raymi), they would bake breadrolls called zancu. The Peruvian corn was also roasted and called the same today as it was then: cancha (the predecessor of popcorn).</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 14pt;">Today, Peru features regional varieties on ways to prepare delicious dishes based on corn. In northern Peru, the locals are particularly fond of pepián, a stew based on grated corn kernels mixed with onion, garlic and the chilli pepper and which takes on a particularly heightened flavor when cooked with turkey. Arequipa inhabitants prepare a dish called soltero (beans, corn, onion and dressing made from fresh cheese). In the jungle, one of the most typical dishes, inchi cache, is made from chicken cooked in a stew made of roasted corn and peanuts. Desserts include the sanguito (made from yellow cornflour, cooking fat, raisins and a sugarcane molasses called chancaca).</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 14pt;">Peruvian Corn is also used to make cornmash pastries called tamales and humitas, which can come in a wide range of colors and flavors (green, brown and yellow; sweet and savory); peruvian corn is also the main ingredient of the chicha morada (drink made from purple corn) or chicha de jora (fermented corn beer) and the sweet purple corn jelly called mazamorra, for special occasions.</span></p> </body> </html>
P 40 SK 5-S NS
Peruvian Giant Red Sacsa Kuski Corn Seeds 3.499999 - 11

Giant leek Allium Sensation Mix - bulbs 4.5 - 8

Giant leek Allium Sensation...

Pret 4,50 € (SKU: F 83 GAB)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Giant leek Allium Sensation Mix - bulbs</strong></span><br /><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:14pt;"><strong>The price is for package of 3 bulbs.</strong></span></h2> <div><span style="font-size:11pt;">These flowers are absolutely huge! They measure a whopping 6 - 8" wide! This variety of Allium makes an excellent dried flower. They are also a favorite of bees.</span></div> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;"><strong>Wikipedia:</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Allium giganteum, also known as Giant Onion, is a perennial bulbous plant of the onion genus, used as a flowering garden plant, and growing to 2 metres. It is the tallest ornamental Allium in common cultivation. In early to midsummer, small globes of intense purple flower heads (umbels) appear, followed by attractive seed heads. A popular cultivar, 'Globemaster', is shorter (80 centimetres (31 in)) but produces much bigger, deep violet, flower heads (15–20 centimetres (5.9–7.9 in)). Both varieties have been granted the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">NAME: Giant Allium ‘Globemaster’</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">SCIENTIFIC NAME: Allium Giganteum</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">COLOR: Purple 6 - 8” round flower heads</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">PLANT SEEDS: Outdoors after frost / Indoors weeks before last frost</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">BLOOM TIME: Late Spring - Mid Summer</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">HARDINESS ZONE: 4 - 9</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">PLANT HEIGHT: 36 - 48”</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">PLANT SPACING: 12 - 15”</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">LIGHT REQUIREMENTS: Sun</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">SOIL &amp; WATER PREFERENCES: Average</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Always use sterilized planting soil.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Moisten planting media, place the fine seeds on the soil and cover them lightly.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Stratify the seeds by placing the pot in a plastic bag at approx. 5°C.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">After 3-4 weeks place the pot to germination temperature, approx. 15°C.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Within 1-? months the seeds will germinate, germination can be very slow.</span></p>
F 83 GAB
Giant leek Allium Sensation Mix - bulbs 4.5 - 8

Lima Bean Ping Zebra Seeds (Phaseolus lunatus)  - 4

Lima Bean Ping Zebra Seeds...

Pret 1,95 € (SKU: P 172)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Giant Lima Bean Ping Zebra Seeds (Phaseolus lunatus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #d0121a;"><strong>Price for package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Phaseolus lunatus Ping Zebra is one of many varieties of Lima beans. The appearance of the seed, ie, the grain itself, is called the zebra because it is very specific and completely resembles the zebras stripes.</p> <p>Phaseolus lunatus, commonly known as the lima bean, butter bean, sieva bean or Madagascar bean is a legume grown for its edible seeds or beans.</p> <p>Although lima beans have been cultivated in Peru for more than 7,000 years, historians are unsure whether they originated there or in Guatemala. Soon after Columbus' discovery of America, Spanish explorers noticed different varieties of lima beans growing throughout the South America, Central America and the Caribbean. They introduced them to Europe and Asia, while the Portuguese explorers introduced lima beans into Africa. Since lima beans can withstand humid tropical weather better than most beans, they have become an important crop in areas of Africa and Asia. Lima beans were introduced into the United States in the 19th century with the majority of domestic commercial production centered in California.</p> <p>Lima bean is a herbaceous plant with two main types of growth habit. The perennial form is an indeterminate, vigorous, climbing and trailing plant, up to 2-6 m tall, with axillary flowering only. It has swollen and fleshy roots up to 2 m long. Annual lima bean is a pseudo-determinate, bushy plant, 0.3-0.9 m tall with both terminal and axillary flowering. It has thin roots .The stems may be up to 4.5-8 m long. The leaves are alternate and trifoliate with ovate leaflets, 3-19.5 cm long x 1-11 cm broad. Inflorescences are 15 cm long and bear 24 white or violet bisexual flowers. The fruits are 5-12 cm long, dehiscent pods with 2 to 4 seeds. Seeds are very variable in size, shape and color. Cultivar groups have been distinguished according to seed differences.</p> <p>Lima bean sprouts, leaves, young pods and green seeds (immature or dry) are edible and eaten as vegetables. The dry seeds are eaten boiled, fried, ground into powder and baked, and used in soups and stews. The vines, leaves and empty pods left after the harvest can serve as fodder, and can be made into hay or silage. Lima bean may be used for green manure or as a cover crop. Lima bean might be valuable in intercropping systems, though only few cultivars are suitable for this.</p> <p><strong>Health Benefits</strong></p> <p>Lima beans are a very good source of cholesterol-lowering fiber, as are most other legumes. In addition to lowering cholesterol, lima beans' high fiber content prevents blood sugar levels from rising too rapidly after a meal, making these beans an especially good choice for individuals with diabetes, insulin resistance or hypoglycemia. When combined with whole grains such as rice, lima beans provide virtually fat-free high quality protein. You may already be familiar with beans' fiber and protein, but this is far from all lima beans have to offer.</p> <p><strong>Lower Your Heart Attack Risk</strong></p> <p>Lima beans' contribution to heart health lies not just in their fiber, but in the significant amounts of folate, and magnesium these beans supply. Folate helps lower levels of homocysteine, an amino acid that is an intermediate product in an important metabolic process called the methylation cycle. Elevated blood levels of homocysteine are an independent risk factor for heart attack, stroke, or peripheral vascular disease, and are found in between 20-40% of patients with heart disease. It has been estimated that consumption of 100% of the daily value (DV) of folate would, by itself, reduce the number of heart attacks suffered by Americans each year by 10%.</p> <p>Lima beans' good supply of magnesium puts yet another plus in the column of its beneficial cardiovascular effects. Magnesium is Nature's own calcium channel blocker. When enough magnesium is around, veins and arteries breathe a sigh of relief and relax, which lessens resistance and improves the flow of blood, oxygen and nutrients throughout the body. Studies show that a deficiency of magnesium is not only associated with heart attack but that immediately following a heart attack, lack of sufficient magnesium promotes free radical injury to the heart. Want to literally keep your heart happy? Eat lima beans.</p> <p><strong>How to Grow Lima Beans</strong></p> <p>Lima bean is a tender annual. Sow lima beans in the garden 3 to 4 weeks after the average date of the last frost in spring when the soil temperature has warmed to 65° or more for at least 5 days and daytime temperatures are consistently warm. Start lima beans indoors as early as 2 to 3 weeks before the average last frost date in spring for transplanting into the garden. Lima beans require 60 to more than 90 warm, frost-free days to reach harvest depending upon type and variety.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>Lima beans are tender annuals grown for their flat, crescent-oval-shaped seeds. There are two types of lima beans: bush and pole or vine varieties. Bush types grow to about 2 feet tall and tend to have smaller seeds; they bear more quickly than pole lima bean varieties. Pole lima beans have large seeds and can grow 10 to 12 feet high. Small-seeded limas, usually bush types, are also called butter beans, sieva beans, Burma beans, Madagascar beans, Carolina beans, and “baby limas.” Large-seeded lima beans are sometimes called potato limas. Large-seeded limas are often sold as dry beans. Lima beans have pale green pods that vary from 3 to 4 inches long to 5 to 8 inches long depending upon variety. Lima bean seeds are eaten, not the pods. Leaves are commonly composed of three leaflets and the flowers are white. Bush lima bean varieties are ready for harvest from 60 to 80 days from sowing; pole bean varieties are ready for harvest in 85 to 90 days.</p> <p><strong>Yield</strong></p> <p>Grow 4 to 8 lima bean plants per each household member.</p> <p><strong>Site</strong></p> <p>Grow lima beans in full sun; they will grow in partial shade but the harvest will not be full. Lima beans prefer loose, well-drained soil rich in organic matter. Beans prefer a soil pH of 6.0 to 6.8. Prepare planting beds in advance by working in plenty of aged compost. Avoid planting beans where soil nitrogen is high or where green manure crops have just grown; these beans will produce green foliage but few beans.</p> <p><strong>Planting time</strong></p> <p>Lima beans are a tender annual that grow best in air temperatures between 60° and 70°F. Sow lima beans in the garden 3 to 4 weeks after the average date of the last frost in spring when the soil temperature has warmed to 65° or more for at least 5 days. Start beans indoors as early as 2 or 3 weeks before the average last frost date in spring for transplanting into the garden 3 or 4 weeks after the last frost. Start beans indoors in a biodegradable peat or paper pot that can be set whole into the garden so as not to disturb plant roots. For continuous harvest through the growing season, sow succession crop bush lima beans every two weeks or follow bush lima beans with long-maturing pole lima beans. Beans can continue in the garden until the first frost in fall. Pole lima beans require a long growing period and are not a good choice where the season is short. Lima beans will not set pods in temperatures above 80°F or in cold or wet weather. Time your plantings to avoid hot weather. In mild-winter regions, lima beans can be sown in autumn for winter harvest.</p> <p><strong>Planting and spacing</strong></p> <p>Sow lima beans 1½ to 2 inches deep. Plant bush lima beans 3 to 6 inches apart; set rows 24 to 30 inches apart. Plant pole lima beans 6 to 10 inches apart; set rows 30 to 36 inches apart. Set poles, stakes, or supports in place at planting time. Pole beans also can be planted in inverted hills–5 or 6 seeds to a hill; space hills 40 inches apart. Thin strong seedlings from 4 to 6 inches apart. Remove weaker seedlings by cutting them off at soil level with a scissors being careful not to disturb the roots of other seedlings. Bean can be crowded; they will use each other for support.</p> <p><strong>Water and feeding</strong></p> <p><strong></strong>Grow lima beans in soil that is evenly moist and well drained. Bean seeds may crack and germinate poorly if the soil moisture is too high at sowing. Do not soak seeds in advance of planting or they may crack; do not over-water after sowing. Keep the soil evenly moist during flowering and pod formation. Rain or overhead irrigation during flowering can cause flowers and small pods to fall off. Once the soil temperature averages greater than 60°F, mulch to conserve moisture.</p> <p>Beans are best fertilized with aged garden compost; they do not require extra nitrogen. Beans set up a mutual exchange with soil microorganisms called nitrogen-fixing bacteria which produce the soil nitrogen beans require. Avoid using green manures or nitrogen-rich fertilizers.</p> <p><strong>Companion plants</strong></p> <p>Bush beans: cucumbers, corn, cucumbers, celery, potatoes, summer savory. Pole beans: corn, scarlet runner beans, summer savory, sunflowers. Do not plant beans with onions, beets, or kohlrabi.</p> <p><strong>Care</strong></p> <p>Large lima bean seed may have trouble pushing through soil that has not been well worked; at sowing, cover the seeds with sand, vermiculite, or a peat moss-vermiculite mix instead. Cultivate around beans carefully to avoid disturbing the shallow root system. Do not handle beans when they are wet; this may spread fungus spores. Set poles, stakes, or trellises in place before planting pole beans. Select supports that are tall enough for the variety being grown. Rotate beans to plots where lettuce, squash, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, or collards have grown in the past year or two.</p> <p><strong>Container growing</strong></p> <p>Bush lima beans can be grown in containers, but you may need several containers for a practical harvest. Beans will grow in 8-inch containers.</p> <p><strong>Pests</strong></p> <p>Beans can be attacked by aphids, bean beetles, flea beetles, leafhoppers and mites. Aphids, leafhoppers, and mites can be sprayed away with a blast of water from the hose or controlled with insecticidal soap. Look for eggs and infestations and crush them between your fingers and thumb. Pinch out and remove large infestations. Aphids can spread bean mosaic virus. Keep the garden clean and free of debris so that pests can not harbor or over-winter in the garden.</p> <p><strong>Diseases</strong></p> <p>Beans are susceptible to blight, mosaic, and anthracnose. Plant disease-resistant varieties. Keep the garden clean and free of debris. Avoid handling plants when they are wet so as not to spread fungal spores. Removed diseased plants; put them in a paper bag and throw them away. Beans are susceptible to many soil-borne diseases; rotating beans so that they do not grow in the same location more than every three years will reduce soil-borne diseases.</p> <p><strong>Harvest</strong></p> <p>Bush lima beans will be ready for harvest 60 to 80 after sowing; pole beans will be ready for harvest 85 to 90 days after harvest. Pick lima beans when pods are plump and firm. Continue to pick pods as soon as they become plump to extend flowering and the production of new pods. When seeds mature, the plant will die. Pods left too long will result in seeds that are tough and mealy. Bush lima beans should produce 2 or 3 pickings in a season.</p> </body> </html>
P 172
Lima Bean Ping Zebra Seeds (Phaseolus lunatus)  - 4

Rare Giant Purple Pepino Seeds (Solanum muricatum)

Rare Giant Purple Pepino...

Pret 2,50 € (SKU: V 59 GP)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Rare Giant Purple Pepino Seeds (Solanum muricatum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#f60101;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>The Purple Pepino is entirely edible: skin, flesh, pulp and seeds. The white to slight light green interior is fine-grained and sweetly aromatic, intensifying as it ripens. Its flavor can be described as a mix of honeydew and cucumber, with a slightly bitter bite and pear-like texture. Care must be taken when handling Pepino fruits as once ripe they are delicate and easily prone to bruising.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Current Facts</span></strong></p> <p><span>The Purple Pepino is botanically classified as Solanum muricatum. The word "Pepino" is Spanish for cucumber and appears to be universal with slight variations of spelling or added epithets, such as "Pepino Dulce" or Sweet cucumber. Other names include tree melon and melon pear. This name "Pepino" is also used in parts of South America for the cassabanana. It is the fruit of a small evergreen shrub. In fact, it is commonly mis-labeled as a melon, when it actually is classified as a berry within the Solanaceae or nightshade family, like tomatoes, potatoes, eggplants.</span></p>
V 59 GP
Rare Giant Purple Pepino Seeds (Solanum muricatum)

مجموعة متنوعة من اليابان
“Daikon” Giant Long Japanese Radish Seeds

Daikon Giant Long Japanese...

Pret 2,35 € (SKU: P 415)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em>“Daikon” Giant Long White Japanese Radish Seeds</em></strong></span></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ed0404;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p><span>Daikon radishes are used for pickles, cooking and grated raw in salads. Very easy to grow this asian radish. They grow very large (50 cm and 4 kg) but taste better picked young. Produces long white tapered roots with a mild mustard flavour. Used in Japanese Taku-An pickles. Becoming very popular due to its mild mustard flavours.</span></p> <p><span>Widespread in ancient times, said to originate from China and Japan. Matures quickly. Likes rich soil. Keep well watered. Grow fresh crisp radish any time, will withstand light frost.</span></p> </body> </html>
P 415
“Daikon” Giant Long Japanese Radish Seeds
Giant Water Lily Lotus Seeds (Victoria amazonica) 2.25 - 11

Giant Water Lily Lotus...

Pret 2,25 € (SKU: F 78)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Giant Water Lily Lotus Seeds (Victoria amazonica)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #fd0606; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Queen of the water lilies, this Amazonian giant has a remarkable life cycle.</span></p> <p><span>Victoria Amazonica is well known for its huge circular leaves, which are often pictured with a small child sitting supported in the centre as a demonstration of their size and strength. The species is highly prized as an ornamental, despite having somewhat particular requirements for successful cultivation.</span></p> <p><span>Victoria Amazonica seeds from Thailand that have a perfectly can grow every weather that have a very big size most 3.5 metre. The seeds very fresh easy for grow the most quality 85%. Every seeds had quality cue in with thoroughly.</span></p> <h2><span>How To Grow Victoria amazonica Seeds</span></h2> <p><span>Put the seeds in to washtub and wait 5 weeks.</span></p> <p><span>When the roots thrown out and flowers thrive then after that put the underground and wait for until the lotus grow up.</span></p> <h2><strong><span>WIKIPEDIA:</span></strong></h2> <p><span>Victoria amazonica is a species of flowering plant, the largest of the Nymphaeaceae family of water lilies. It is the National flower of Guyana.</span></p> <p><span>The species has very large leaves, up to 3 m in diameter, that float on the water's surface on a submerged stalk, 7–8 m in length. The species was once called Victoria regia after Queen Victoria, but the name was superseded. V. amazonica is native to the shallow waters of the Amazon River basin, such as oxbow lakes and bayous. It is depicted in the Guyanese coat of arms. The flowers are white the first night they are open and become pink the second night. They are up to 40 cm in diameter, and are pollinated by beetles. This process was described in detail by Sir Ghillean Prance and Jorge Arius.[4][5]It is the largest waterlily in the world.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Classification</span></strong></p> <p><span>A member of the genus Victoria placed in the Nymphaeaceae family or, sometimes, in the Euryalaceae.[6] The first published description of the genus was by John Lindley in October 1837, based on specimens of this plant returned from British Guiana by Robert Schomburgk. Lindley named the genus after the newly ascended Queen Victoria, and the species Victoria regia.[1] The spelling in Schomburgk's description in Athenaeum, published the month before, was given as Victoria Regina.[2] Despite this spelling being adopted by the Botanical Society of London for their new emblem, Lindley's was the version used throughout the nineteenth century.</span></p> <p><span>An earlier account of the species, Euryale amazonica by Eduard Friedrich Poeppig, in 1832 described an affinity with Euryale ferox. A collection and description was also made by the French botanist Aimé Bonpland in 1825.[1][1][8] In 1850 James De Carle Sowerby[9] recognised Poeppig's earlier description and transferred its epithet amazonica. The new name was rejected by Lindley. The current name, Victoria amazonica, did not come into widespread use until the twentieth century.</span></p> <p><strong><span>History</span></strong></p> <p><span>Victoria regia, as it was named, was discovered by Tadeáš Haenke in 1801.[10] It was once the subject of rivalry between Victorian gardeners in England. Always on the look out for a spectacular new species with which to impress their peers, Victorian "Gardeners"[11] such as the Duke of Devonshire, and the Duke of Northumberland started a well-mannered competition to become the first to cultivate and bring to flower this enormous lily. In the end, the two aforementioned Dukes became the first to achieve this, Joseph Paxton (for the Duke of Devonshire) being the first in November 1849 by replicating the lily's warm swampy habitat (not easy in winter in England with only coal-fired boilers for heating), and a "Mr Ivison" the second and more constantly successful (for Northumberland) at Syon House.</span></p> <p><span>The species captured the imagination of the public, and was the subject of several dedicated monographs. The botanical illustrations of cultivated specimens in Fitch and W.J. Hooker's 1851 work Victoria Regia[12] received critical acclaim in the Athenaeum, "they are accurate, and they are beautiful".[13] The Duke of Devonshire presented Queen Victoria with one of the first of these flowers, and named it in her honour. The lily, with ribbed undersurface and leaves veining "like transverse girders and supports", was Paxton's inspiration for The Crystal Palace, a building four times the size of St. Peter's in Rome.</span></p> <h2><strong>Video:</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #fc0303;"><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkI9-rhumbs" target="_blank" class="btn btn-default" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span style="color: #fc0303;">How To Grow Lotus From Seeds </span></a></span><br /></strong></h2> </body> </html>
F 78
Giant Water Lily Lotus Seeds (Victoria amazonica) 2.25 - 11

مجموعة متنوعة من إيطاليا
Parsley 6.000 Seeds Italian Giant Flat Multiannual

Parsley 6.000 Seeds Italian...

Pret 8,00 € (SKU: MHS 2)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong>Parsley Seeds Italian Giant Flat Multiannual</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 6000 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <div>Especially popular with chefs, this Italian favourite produces an abundance of bright dark flat green leaves of excellent strong flavour held well above the ground on 12 inch plants.  Can be grown on the windowsill or equally  in the garden for a continuous all year round crop.</div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">soak in water for 12-24  hours</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">18-20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">20 days</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </body> </html>
MHS 2 20g
Parsley 6.000 Seeds Italian Giant Flat Multiannual

مجموعة متنوعة من بيرو
Giant Peruvian Chullpi Corn - Maiz Seeds 2.45 - 1

Giant Peruvian Chullpi Corn...

Pret 2,45 € (SKU: P 40 C)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Giant Peruvian Chullpi Corn Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #fd0202;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Large grain 2 cm long. Chullpi-Maiz Chullpi has a softer shell and interior, and for this reason is most widely used as a toasted (cancha).</span></p> <p><span>This unusual large kernel corn is grown for popping. The robust kernels explode when heated Having enough force to jump out of the pot. Unlike the popcorn that most of us are used to, Chullpi corn does not “pop” all the way, instead, the heart stays meaty and “puffy” with a nice toasted flavor. Being from the Andes, this is surely another long season corn that is most adapted to short daylengths.</span></p> <p><span>Chullpi maize is a native variety of Peru and the provinces of Jujuy and Salta, in North-western Argentina. Its spikes are oval to conical in shape, with numerous rows of 18 to 24 kernels each. The grains are long, narrow, containing starch in the heel and dextrin or sugar at the apex and becoming wrinkled when mature. Chullpi maize is still produced in its native area by farmers of pre-Hispanic origin, who traditionally use it as a food reserve for the winter. Its roasted grains are eaten as they are or together with goat cheese, another product of the region. In addition, it can also be transformed into a typical breakfast drink. Finally, its green ears, called ‘choclos’, can be occasionally consumed boiled in water or roasted, their taste being sweeter than the mature ones as they feature a higher sugar content. The survival of the Chullpi variety is now severely endangered, as on the one hand it requires particular weather conditions for its growth and on the other, it suffers from the competition of other commercial sweet corn varieties, which are both sold frozen in the cobs and shelled in cans. This caused its cultivation to plunge, and it is today rare to see it exchanged with other products.</span></p> </body> </html>
P 40 C
Giant Peruvian Chullpi Corn - Maiz Seeds 2.45 - 1
Giant Corsican Citron Seeds - 4 kg fruit (Citrus medica Cedrat) 3.7 - 1

Giant Corsican Citron Seeds...

Pret 3,70 € (SKU: V 230)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant Corsican Citron Seeds - 4 kg fruit (Citrus medica Cedrat)</strong></h2><h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 seeds.</strong></span></h2><p><span>The Corsican citron (alimea in Corsican cedrat in french) is a citron variety that contains a non-acidic pulp. The name is from its most original cultivation center which is even today, at the French Island of Corsica or Corse. It is said to be one of the first citrus fruit to reach the Corsican soil.</span></p><p><span>This slow-growing tree reaches a height of about 3 to 4 meters, open and spreading, rather small according to different varieties. Medium-thorny with some large, stout spines. The incredibly fragrant blossom appears in March–April and lasts until September, producing good honey with honey bees. Flowers, buds and new growth are not purple-tinted.</span></p><p><span>The tree produces large fruit, ellipsoid to very slightly obovate; basal area slightly depressed and radially furrowed; apical nipple suppressed or indistinct. Color lemon-yellow when ripe. Rind very thick and fleshy, sweet with some bitter after-taste; surface rather rough, bumpy, and commonly somewhat ribbed. Flesh crisp and solid; lacking in juice; flavor sweet without acid. Seeds white-yellowish. <br /><br /><strong>This giant citron can measure up to 25 cm in length and weigh up to 4 kg.</strong></span></p><h3><strong><span>History, production, and uses</span></strong></h3><p><span>Traditionally, it was one of the most important varieties employed in Succade production. The fruit used to be shipped to Genoa, Italy, where it was de-pulped in the large centers in Livorno, hence its name the Citron of Commerce.</span></p><p><span>With 45,000 tons per year, Corsica was once the world’s leading producer of citron. The historian Laurence Pinelli explains:</span></p><p><span>Citron was a source of considerable wealth for Corsica. It shaped the landscape, added a great deal to our culinary heritage and boosted the island’s economy considerably.</span></p><h3><strong><span>Etrog</span></strong></h3><p><span>For a short period of time Genoese merchants, who always supplied fruit for the Jewish ritual of Etrog, used to ship also some amount of this Corsican variety, while there was not enough available from Diamante. This tradition terminated due to competition with the Greek citron which was considered to be of extraordinary beauty.</span></p><p><span>Today, the citron is cooked with sugar to produce a jam.</span></p>
V 230
Giant Corsican Citron Seeds - 4 kg fruit (Citrus medica Cedrat) 3.7 - 1

المنتج الأكثر مبيعا
Giant Sunflower Seeds - Giant Russian Mammoth 1.85 - 1

Seminte de floarea-soarelui...

Pret 1,85 € (SKU: P 388)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Seminte de floarea-soarelui gigant - Gigant Rus Mammoth</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Preț pentru pachetul de 1g (10), 9g (100) semințe.</strong></span></h2> <p>Această floare de soare gigantică mamut rusesc (Helianthus annuus), populară și ușor de cultivat, este o varietate organică de moștenire.</p> <p>Aceste plante produc flori frumoase care produc semințe gustoase, comestibile. Tulpinile pot crește până la 2,1-3,7 metri cu flori uriașe. Va tolera solurile de calitate mai slabă.</p> <p>Semănați sămânța după pericolul de îngheț într-o zonă cu soare plin. Semănați semințe la 20 cm distanță și aproximativ 2,5 cm adâncime. Răsaduri subțiri când au o înălțime de 7,5 cm, astfel încât distanța finală să fie separată de 13 cm. Înfloresc în timpul verii.</p>
P 388 (1 g)
Giant Sunflower Seeds - Giant Russian Mammoth 1.85 - 1
Giant Sunflower - Mongolian Giant Seeds 3.85 - 1

Giant Sunflower - Mongolian...

Pret 4,85 € (SKU: P 389)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Giant Sunflower - Mongolian Giant Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 100</strong> (11g) seeds.</span></h2> <p>A true giant reaching up to 420cm (14ft) tall with one of the largest flowering sunflower seed heads available which can achieve up to 45cm (18in) across.   The seeds are one of the largest available for Helianthus (Sunflower) and ideal for birds over-winter.  Not suitable for exposed sites and will need support.</p> <p>Days To Germination:  14-21 days</p> <p>Optimum Soil Temp. for Germination: 68F-86F</p> <p>Planting Depth: 1/4  inch</p> <p>Spacing, Seed: 4-6 inch</p> <p>Spacing, Plant: 24-36 inches</p> <p>Plant Height: 10-14 ft</p> <p>Light:  Full Sun</p> </body> </html>
P 389
Giant Sunflower - Mongolian Giant Seeds 3.85 - 1

مجموعة متنوعة من أمريكا
Spinach Seeds GIANT AMERICAN 2.15 - 1

Spinach Seeds GIANT AMERICAN

Pret 2,15 € (SKU: P 382)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="color:#000000;font-size:14pt;"><strong>Spinach Seeds GIANT AMERICAN</strong></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p><span style="color:#000000;">A really dark green spinach with heavily blistered, rounded leaves on semi-erect plants.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;">The dark green heavily blistered leaves of Giant American can be harvested all through the summer and autumn months. A very productive variety.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;"> </span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;">Produces masses of heavily blistered dark green leaves.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;">Thin, juicy and sweetly flavoured.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;">Harvest during the summer and autumn.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;">Suitable For - Vegetable plot, raised beds, container garden, limited space, window boxes</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;"> </span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;">Sowing Months - March - August</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;">Harvest - May - November</span></p>
P 382
Spinach Seeds GIANT AMERICAN 2.15 - 1
GIANT WALNUT Seeds (Juglans regia)

GIANT WALNUT Seeds (Juglans...

Pret 15,00 € (SKU: V 206)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>GIANT WALNUT Seeds (Juglans regia)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><strong>This walnut is 3 - 4 times bigger than any other!!!</strong> </p> <p>A walnut is the nut of any tree of the genus Juglans (Family Juglandaceae), particularly the Persian or English walnut, Juglans regia. Technically a walnut is the seed of a drupe or drupaceous nut, and thus not a true botanical nut. It is used for food after being processed while green for pickled walnuts or after full ripening for its nutmeat. Nutmeat of the eastern black walnut from the Juglans nigra is less commercially available, as are butternut nutmeats from Juglans cinerea. The walnut is nutrient-dense with protein and essential fatty acids.</p> <p>Walnuts are rounded, single-seeded stone fruits of the walnut tree commonly used for the meat after fully ripening. Following full ripening, the removal of the husk reveals the wrinkly walnut shell, which is usually commercially found in two segments (three-segment shells can also form). During the ripening process, the husk will become brittle and the shell hard. The shell encloses the kernel or meat, which is usually made up of two halves separated by a partition. The seed kernels – commonly available as shelled walnuts – are enclosed in a brown seed coat which contains antioxidants. The antioxidants protect the oil-rich seed from atmospheric oxygen, thereby preventing rancidity.</p> <p>Walnuts are late to grow leaves, typically not until more than halfway through the spring. They secrete chemicals into the soil to prevent competing vegetation from growing. Because of this, flowers or vegetable gardens should not be planted close to them.</p> <p><strong>Food use</strong></p> <p>Walnut meats are available in two forms; in their shells or shelled. The meats can be as large as halves or any smaller portions that may happen during processing, candied or as an ingredient in other foodstuffs. Pickled walnuts that are the whole fruit can be savory or sweet depending on the preserving solution. Walnut butters can be homemade or purchased in both raw and roasted forms. All walnuts can be eaten on their own (raw, toasted or pickled) or as part of a mix such as muesli, or as an ingredient of a dish. For example, walnut pie is prepared using walnuts as a main ingredient. Walnut Whip, coffee and walnut cake, and pickled walnuts are more examples. Walnuts are also popular in brownie recipes and as ice cream toppings.</p> <p>Walnut oil is available commercially and is chiefly used as a food ingredient particularly in salad dressings. It has a low smoke point, which limits its use for frying.</p> <p>Walnut is the main ingredient of Fesenjan, a khoresh (stew) in Iranian cuisine.</p> <p><strong>Nutritional value</strong></p> <p>Walnuts without shells are 4% water, 15% protein, 65% fat, and 14% carbohydrates, including 7% dietary fiber (table).</p> <p>In a 100 gram serving, walnuts provide 2,740 kilojoules (654 kcal) and rich content (more than 19% of the Daily Value or DV) of several dietary minerals, particularly manganese at 163% DV, and B vitamins (table).</p> <p>While English walnuts are the most commonly consumed, their nutrient density and profile are generally similar to those of black walnuts.</p> <p>Unlike most nuts that are high in monounsaturated fatty acids, walnut oil is composed largely of polyunsaturated fatty acids (72% of total fats), particularly alpha-linolenic acid (14%) and linoleic acid (58%), although it does contain oleic acid as 13% of total fats.</p> <p><strong>Health claims</strong></p> <p>Having evaluated the scientific literature on the potential health value of consuming walnuts, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provided guidance described as a Qualified Health Claim to manufacturers for labeling of food and dietary supplement products, stating: "Supportive but not conclusive research shows that eating 1.5 ounces per day of walnuts, as part of a low saturated fat and low cholesterol diet and not resulting in increased caloric intake, may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease."</p> <p>One manufacturer of walnut products received an FDA Warning Letter for making unsubstantiated claims in the prevention, mitigation, and treatment of disease, causing the products to be misbranded as "drugs", and so violating regulations of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act in Title 21 of the US Code of Federal Regulations.</p> <p><strong>Folk medicine</strong></p> <p>Walnuts have been listed as one of the 38 substances used to prepare Bach flower remedies,[13] a kind of traditional medicine promoted for its possible effect on health. However, according to Cancer Research UK, "there is no scientific evidence to prove that flower remedies can control, cure or prevent any type of disease, including cancer".</p> <p><strong>Inks and dyes</strong></p> <p>The husks of the black walnut Juglans nigra were once used to make an ink for writing and drawing, having been used by artists including Leonardo da Vinci and Rembrandt.</p> <p>Walnut husk pigments are used as a brown dye for fabric[16] as once applied in classical Rome and medieval Europe for dyeing hair.</p> <p><strong>Cleaning</strong></p> <p>The United States Army once used ground walnut shells for the cleaning of aviation parts because of low cost and non-abrasive qualities. However, an investigation of a fatal Boeing CH-47 Chinook helicopter crash (September 11, 1982, in Mannheim, Germany) revealed that walnut grit clogged an oil port, leading to the accident and the discontinuation of walnut shells as a cleaning agent.</p> <p><strong>Chemical analysis</strong></p> <p>Walnut hulls contain polyphenols that stain hands and can cause skin irritation. Seven phenolic compounds, including ferulic acid, vanillic acid, coumaric acid, syringic acid, myricetin, juglone, were identified in walnut husks. Juglone, the predominant phenolic, was found in concentrations of 2-4% fresh weight.</p> <p>Walnuts also contain the ellagitannin pedunculagin.[20] Regiolone has been isolated with juglone, betulinic acid and sitosterol from the stem bark of J. regia.</p> <p><strong>Uses in Chinese culture</strong></p> <p>In China, pairs of walnuts have traditionally been rotated and played with in the palm of the hand, both as a means to stimulate blood circulation and as a status symbol. Individual and pairs of large, old, symmetrically shaped, and sometimes intricately carved walnuts are valued highly and have recently been used as an investment, with some of them fetching tens of thousands of dollars.</p> <p>Pairs of walnuts are sometimes sold in their green husks for a form of gambling known as du he tao.</p> <p><strong>Types</strong></p> <p>The two most common major species of walnuts are grown for their seeds – the Persian or English walnut and the black walnut. The English walnut (J. regia) originated in Persia, and the black walnut (J. nigra) is native to eastern North America. The black walnut is of high flavor, but due to its hard shell and poor hulling characteristics it is not grown commercially for nut production. Numerous walnut cultivars have been developed commercially, which are nearly all hybrids of the English walnut.</p> <p>Other species include J. californica, the California black walnut (often used as a root stock for commercial breeding of J. regia), J. cinerea (butternuts), and J. major, the Arizona walnut. Other sources list J. californica californica as native to southern California, and Juglans californica hindsii, or just J. hindsii, as native to northern California; in at least one case these are given as "geographic variants" instead of subspecies (Botanica).</p> <p><strong>Production</strong></p> <p>In 2013, worldwide production of walnuts was 3.458 million tonnes, with China contributing 49% of the world total (table).[3] Other major producers were (in the order of decreasing harvest): Iran, United States, Turkey and Ukraine.</p> <p>The average worldwide walnut yield was about 3.5 tonnes per hectare in 2013.[3] Eastern European countries had the highest yield, with Slovenia and Romania each harvesting about 22 tonnes per hectare.</p> <p>The United States is the world's largest exporter of walnuts, followed by Turkey.[4] The Central Valley of California produces 99 percent of United States commercial English walnuts.</p> <p><strong>Storage</strong></p> <p>Walnuts, like other tree nuts, must be processed and stored properly. Poor storage makes walnuts susceptible to insect and fungal mold infestations; the latter produces aflatoxin – a potent carcinogen. A mold-infested walnut batch should be entirely discarded.</p> <p>The ideal temperature for longest possible storage of walnuts is in the −3 to 0 °C (27 to 32 °F) and low humidity – for industrial and home storage. However, such refrigeration technologies are unavailable in developing countries where walnuts are produced in large quantities; there, walnuts are best stored below 25 °C (77 °F) and low humidity. Temperatures above 30 °C (86 °F), and humidities above 70 percent can lead to rapid and high spoilage losses. Above 75 percent humidity threshold, fungal molds that release dangerous aflatoxin can form.</p> </body> </html>
V 206
GIANT WALNUT Seeds (Juglans regia)
Parsley Giant of Naples Seeds (Petroselinum crispum)

Parsley Giant of Naples...

Pret 1,50 € (SKU: MHS 83)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Parsley Giant of Naples Seeds (Petroselinum crispum)</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100+ seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Parsley Giant of Naples. Very large flat-leaf variety from Naples with incredible flavor. Plants are large with strong, long stalks and large leaves.</p> <p>Start from seed or transplants. Leaves grow back stronger after cutting. 75-80 days. Very cold hardy. Will overwinter in most areas.</p> <p> </p> <h2><strong>PARSLEY PLANTING, GROWING, AND HARVESTING PARSLEY</strong></h2> <p>Parsley is a biennial plant with bright green, featherlike leaves and is in the same family as dill. This herb is used in soups, sauces, and salads, and it lessens the need for salt in soups. Not only is it the perfect garnish, but also it is healthy; it’s rich in iron and vitamins A and C.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>PLANTING</strong></p> <p>For a head start, plant seeds in individual pots indoors 10 to 12 weeks before the last spring frost. For better germination, you can soak the seeds overnight.</p> <p>Plant the seeds 3 to 4 weeks before the last spring frost because parsley is a slow starter. (The plants can handle the cold weather.) It can take up to 3 weeks for the plants to sprout.</p> <p>Plant the seeds in moist, rich soil about 6 to 8 inches apart. For thinner plants, plant about 6 to 10 inches apart. Try to pick an area that is weed-free; that way, you’ll be able to see the parsley sprouting after about 3 weeks.</p> <p>You can use a fluorescent light to help the seedlings grow. Make sure it remains two inches above the leaves at all times.</p> <p>To ensure the best growth, the soil should be around 70ºF.</p> <p>Plant parsley near asparagus, corn, and tomatoes in your garden.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>CARE</strong></p> <p>Be sure to water the seeds often while they germinate so that they don’t dry out.</p> <p>Throughout the summer, be sure to water the plants evenly.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>PESTS/DISEASES</strong></p> <p>Stem rot</p> <p>Leaf spots</p> <p>Black swallowtail larvae</p> <p>Carrot fly and celery fly larvae</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>HARVEST/STORAGE</strong></p> <p>When the leaf stems have three segments, parsley is ready to be harvested.</p> <p>Cut leaves from the outer portions of the plant whenever you need them. Leave the inner portions of the plant to mature.</p> <p>One method of storing the parsley fresh is to put the leaf stalks in water and keep them in the refrigerator.</p> <p>Another method of storage is drying the parsley. Cut the parsley at the base and hang it in a well-ventilated, shady, and warm place. Once it’s completely dry, crumble it up and store it in an airtight container.</p> <p>If you want fresh parsley throughout the winter, replant a parsley plant in a pot and keep it in a sunny window.</p>
MHS 83
Parsley Giant of Naples Seeds (Petroselinum crispum)