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Bourbon Vanilla Seeds (Vanilla planifolia)

Bourbon Vanilla Seeds...

Pret 3,50 € (SKU: MHS 104)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Bourbon Vanilla Seeds (Vanilla planifolia)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80202; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 or 100 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Vanilla planifolia is a species of vanilla orchid. It is native to Mexico and Central America, and is one of the primary sources for vanilla flavouring, due to its high vanillin content. Common names are flat-leaved vanilla, Tahitian vanilla,[citation needed] and West Indian vanilla (also used for the Pompona vanilla, V. pompona). Often, it is simply referred to as "the vanilla". It was first scientifically named in 1808.</span></p> <p><span>Vanilla planifolia is found in Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and northeastern South America. It prefers hot, wet, tropical climates. </span></p> <p><span>It is cultivated and harvested primarily in Veracruz, Mexico and in Madagascar.</span></p> <p><span>Like all members of the genus Vanilla, V. planifolia is a vine. It uses its fleshy roots to support itself as it grows.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Flowers</span></strong></p> <p><span>Flowers are greenish-yellow, with a diameter of 5 cm (2 in). They last only a day, and must be pollinated manually, during the morning, if fruit is desired. The plants are self-fertile, and pollination simply requires a transfer of the pollen from the anther to the stigma. If pollination does not occur, the flower is dropped the next day. In the wild, there is less than 1% chance that the flowers will be pollinated, so in order to receive a steady flow of fruit, the flowers must be hand-pollinated when grown on farms.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Fruit</span></strong></p> <p><span>Fruit is produced only on mature plants, which are generally over 3 m (10 ft) long. The fruits are 15-23 cm (6-9 in) long pods (often incorrectly called beans). Outwardly they resemble small bananas. They mature after about five months, at which point they are harvested and cured. Curing ferments and dries the pods while minimizing the loss of essential oils. Vanilla extract is obtained from this portion of the plant.</span></p> <p><span>Vanilla is a flavoring derived from orchids of the genus Vanilla, primarily from the Mexican species, flat-leaved vanilla (V. planifolia). The word vanilla, derived from vainilla, the diminutive of the Spanish word vaina (vaina itself meaning sheath or pod), is translated simply as "little pod". Pre-Columbian Mesoamerican people cultivated the vine of the vanilla orchid, called tlilxochitl by the Aztecs. Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés is credited with introducing both vanilla and chocolate to Europe in the 1520s.</span></p> <p><span>Pollination is required to set the vanilla fruit from which the flavoring is derived. In 1837, Belgian botanist Charles François Antoine Morren discovered this fact and pioneered a method of artificially pollinating the plant.[3] The method proved financially unworkable and was not deployed commercially.[4] In 1841, Edmond Albius, a slave who lived on the French island of Réunion in the Indian Ocean, discovered at the age of 12 that the plant could be hand-pollinated. Hand-pollination allowed global cultivation of the plant.</span></p> <p><span>Three major species of vanilla currently are grown globally, all of which derive from a species originally found in Mesoamerica, including parts of modern-day Mexico.[6] They are V. planifolia (syn. V. fragrans), grown on Madagascar, Réunion, and other tropical areas along the Indian Ocean; V. tahitensis, grown in the South Pacific; and V. pompona, found in the West Indies, and Central and South America.[7] The majority of the world's vanilla is the V. planifolia species, more commonly known as Bourbon vanilla (after the former name of Réunion, Île Bourbon) or Madagascar vanilla, which is produced in Madagascar and neighboring islands in the southwestern Indian Ocean, and in Indonesia.</span></p> <p><span>Vanilla is the second-most expensive spice after saffron.  Despite the expense, vanilla is highly valued for its flavor.  As a result, vanilla is widely used in both commercial and domestic baking, perfume manufacture, and aromatherapy.</span></p> <p><strong><span>History</span></strong></p> <p><span>According to popular belief, the Totonac people, who inhabit the east coast of Mexico in the present-day state of Veracruz, were the first to cultivate vanilla. According to Totonac mythology, the tropical orchid was born when Princess Xanat, forbidden by her father from marrying a mortal, fled to the forest with her lover. The lovers were captured and beheaded. Where their blood touched the ground, the vine of the tropical orchid grew.[4] In the 15th century, Aztecs invading from the central highlands of Mexico conquered the Totonacs, and soon developed a taste for the vanilla pods. They named the fruit tlilxochitl, or "black flower", after the matured fruit, which shrivels and turns black shortly after it is picked. Subjugated by the Aztecs, the Totonacs paid tribute by sending vanilla fruit to the Aztec capital, Tenochtitlan.</span></p> <p><span>Until the mid-19th century, Mexico was the chief producer of vanilla. In 1819, French entrepreneurs shipped vanilla fruits to the islands of Réunion and Mauritius in hopes of producing vanilla there. After Edmond Albius discovered how to pollinate the flowers quickly by hand, the pods began to thrive. Soon, the tropical orchids were sent from Réunion to the Comoros Islands, Seychelles, and Madagascar, along with instructions for pollinating them. By 1898, Madagascar, Réunion, and the Comoros Islands produced 200 metric tons of vanilla beans, about 80% of world production. According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation, Indonesia is currently responsible for the vast majority of the world's Bourbon vanilla production and 58% of the world total vanilla fruit production.</span></p> <p><span>The market price of vanilla rose dramatically in the late 1970s after a tropical cyclone ravaged key croplands. Prices remained high through the early 1980s despite the introduction of Indonesian vanilla. In the mid-1980s, the cartel that had controlled vanilla prices and distribution since its creation in 1930 disbanded. Prices dropped 70% over the next few years, to nearly US$20 per kilogram; prices rose sharply again after tropical cyclone Hudah struck Madagascar in April 2000. The cyclone, political instability, and poor weather in the third year drove vanilla prices to an astonishing US$500/kg in 2004, bringing new countries into the vanilla industry. A good crop, coupled with decreased demand caused by the production of imitation vanilla, pushed the market price down to the $40/kg range in the middle of 2005. By 2010, prices were down to $20/kg. Cyclone Enawo caused in similar spike to $500/kg in 2017.</span></p> <p><span>Madagascar (especially the fertile Sava region) accounts for much of the global production of vanilla. Mexico, once the leading producer of natural vanilla with an annual yield of 500 tons of cured beans, produced only 10 tons in 2006. An estimated 95% of "vanilla" products are artificially flavored with vanillin derived from lignin instead of vanilla fruits.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Etymology</span></strong></p> <p><span>Vanilla was completely unknown in the Old World before Cortés. Spanish explorers arriving on the Gulf Coast of Mexico in the early 16th century gave vanilla its current name. Spanish and Portuguese sailors and explorers brought vanilla into Africa and Asia later that century. They called it vainilla, or "little pod". The word vanilla entered the English language in 1754, when the botanist Philip Miller wrote about the genus in his Gardener’s Dictionary. Vainilla is from the diminutive of vaina, from the Latin vagina (sheath) to describe the shape of the pods.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Vanilla orchid</span></strong></p> <p><span>The main species harvested for vanilla is V. planifolia. Although it is native to Mexico, it is now widely grown throughout the tropics. Indonesia and Madagascar are the world's largest producers. Additional sources include V. pompona and V. tahitiensis (grown in Niue and Tahiti), although the vanillin content of these species is much less than V. planifolia.</span></p> <p><span>Vanilla grows as a vine, climbing up an existing tree (also called a tutor), pole, or other support. It can be grown in a wood (on trees), in a plantation (on trees or poles), or in a "shader", in increasing orders of productivity. Its growth environment is referred to as its terroir, and includes not only the adjacent plants, but also the climate, geography, and local geology. Left alone, it will grow as high as possible on the support, with few flowers. Every year, growers fold the higher parts of the plant downward so the plant stays at heights accessible by a standing human. This also greatly stimulates flowering.</span></p> <p><span>The distinctively flavored compounds are found in the fruit, which results from the pollination of the flower. These seed pods are roughly a third of an inch by six inches, and brownish red to black when ripe. Inside of these pods is an oily liquid full of tiny seeds.[22] One flower produces one fruit. V. planifolia flowers are hermaphroditic: they carry both male (anther) and female (stigma) organs. However, self-pollination is blocked by a membrane which separates those organs. The flowers can be naturally pollinated by bees of genus Melipona (abeja de monte or mountain bee), by bee genus Eulaema, or by hummingbirds. The Melipona bee provided Mexico with a 300-year-long advantage on vanilla production from the time it was first discovered by Europeans. The first vanilla orchid to flower in Europe was in the London collection of the Honourable Charles Greville in 1806. Cuttings from that plant went to Netherlands and Paris, from which the French first transplanted the vines to their overseas colonies. The vines grew, but would not fruit outside Mexico. Growers tried to bring this bee into other growing locales, to no avail. The only way to produce fruits without the bees is artificial pollination. Today, even in Mexico, hand pollination is used extensively.</span></p> <p><span>In 1836, botanist Charles François Antoine Morren was drinking coffee on a patio in Papantla (in Veracruz, Mexico) and noticed black bees flying around the vanilla flowers next to his table. He watched their actions closely as they would land and work their way under a flap inside the flower, transferring pollen in the process. Within hours, the flowers closed and several days later, Morren noticed vanilla pods beginning to form. Morren immediately began experimenting with hand pollination. A few years later in 1841, a simple and efficient artificial hand-pollination method was developed by a 12-year-old slave named Edmond Albius on Réunion, a method still used today. Using a beveled sliver of bamboo, an agricultural worker lifts the membrane separating the anther and the stigma, then, using the thumb, transfers the pollinia from the anther to the stigma. The flower, self-pollinated, will then produce a fruit. The vanilla flower lasts about one day, sometimes less, so growers have to inspect their plantations every day for open flowers, a labor-intensive task.</span></p> <p><span>The fruit, a seed capsule, if left on the plant, ripens and opens at the end; as it dries, the phenolic compounds crystallize, giving the fruits a diamond-dusted appearance, which the French call givre (hoarfrost). It then releases the distinctive vanilla smell. The fruit contains tiny, black seeds. In dishes prepared with whole natural vanilla, these seeds are recognizable as black specks. Both the pod and the seeds are used in cooking.</span></p> <p><span>Like other orchids' seeds, vanilla seeds will not germinate without the presence of certain mycorrhizal fungi. Instead, growers reproduce the plant by cutting: they remove sections of the vine with six or more leaf nodes, a root opposite each leaf. The two lower leaves are removed, and this area is buried in loose soil at the base of a support. The remaining upper roots cling to the support, and often grow down into the soil. Growth is rapid under good conditions.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Cultivars</span></strong></p> <p><strong><span>Bourbon vanilla</span></strong><span> or Bourbon-Madagascar vanilla, produced from V. planifolia plants introduced from the Americas, is from Indian Ocean islands such as Madagascar, the Comoros, and Réunion, formerly the Île Bourbon. It is also used to describe the distinctive vanilla flavor derived from V. planifolia grown successfully in tropical countries such as India.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Mexican vanilla</span></strong><span>, made from the native V. planifolia,[26] is produced in much less quantity and marketed as the vanilla from the land of its origin. Vanilla sold in tourist markets around Mexico is sometimes not actual vanilla extract, but is mixed with an extract of the tonka bean, which contains the toxin coumarin. Tonka bean extract smells and tastes like vanilla, but coumarin has been shown to cause liver damage in lab animals and has been banned in food in the US by the Food and Drug Administration since 1954.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Tahitian vanilla</span></strong><span> is from French Polynesia, made with V. tahitiensis. Genetic analysis shows this species is possibly a cultivar from a hybrid of V. planifolia and V. odorata. The species was introduced by French Admiral François Alphonse Hamelin to French Polynesia from the Philippines, where it was introduced from Guatemala by the Manila Galleon trade.</span></p> <p><strong><span>West Indian vanilla</span></strong><span> is made from V. pompona grown in the Caribbean and Central and South America.</span></p> <p><span>The term French vanilla is often used to designate particular preparations with a strong vanilla aroma, containing vanilla grains and sometimes also containing eggs (especially egg yolks). The appellation originates from the French style of making vanilla ice cream with a custard base, using vanilla pods, cream, and egg yolks. Inclusion of vanilla varietals from any of the former French dependencies or overseas France may be a part of the flavoring. Alternatively, French vanilla is taken to refer to a vanilla-custard flavor.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Chemistry</span></strong></p> <p><span>Vanilla essence occurs in two forms. Real seedpod extract is a complex mixture of several hundred different compounds, including vanillin, acetaldehyde, acetic acid, furfural, hexanoic acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, eugenol, methyl cinnamate, and isobutyric acid.[citation needed] Synthetic essence consists of a solution of synthetic vanillin in ethanol. The chemical compound vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) is a major contributor to the characteristic flavor and aroma of real vanilla and is the main flavor component of cured vanilla beans.[30] Vanillin was first isolated from vanilla pods by Gobley in 1858. By 1874, it had been obtained from glycosides of pine tree sap, temporarily causing a depression in the natural vanilla industry. Vanillin can be easily synthesized from various raw materials, but the majority of food-grade (&gt; 99% pure) vanillin is made from guaiacol.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Pollination</span></strong></p> <p><span>Flowering normally occurs every spring, and without pollination, the blossom wilts and falls, and no vanilla bean can grow. Each flower must be hand-pollinated within 12 hours of opening. In the wild, very few natural pollinators exist, with most pollination thought to be carried out by the shiny green Euglossa viridissima, some Eulaema spp. and other species of the euglossine or orchid bees, Euglossini, though direct evidence is lacking. Closely related Vanilla species are known to be pollinated by the euglossine bees.[40] The previously suggested pollination by stingless bees of the genus Melipona is thought to be improbable, as they are too small to be effective and have never been observed carrying Vanilla pollen or pollinating other orchids, though they do visit the flowers.[41] These pollinators do not exist outside the orchid's home range, and even within that range, vanilla orchids have only a 1% chance of successful pollination. As a result, all vanilla grown today is pollinated by hand. A small splinter of wood or a grass stem is used to lift the rostellum or move the flap upward, so the overhanging anther can be pressed against the stigma and self-pollinate the vine. Generally, one flower per raceme opens per day, so the raceme may be in flower for over 20 days. A healthy vine should produce about 50 to 100 beans per year, but growers are careful to pollinate only five or six flowers from the 20 on each raceme. The first flowers that open per vine should be pollinated, so the beans are similar in age. These agronomic practices facilitate harvest and increases bean quality. The fruits require five to six weeks to develop, but around six months to mature. Over-pollination results in diseases and inferior bean quality.[35] A vine remains productive between 12 and 14 years.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Harvest</span></strong></p> <p><span>Harvesting vanilla fruits is as labor-intensive as pollinating the blossoms. Immature, dark green pods are not harvested. Pale yellow discoloration that commences at the distal end of the fruits is not a good indication of the maturity of pods. Each fruit ripens at its own time, requiring a daily harvest. "Current methods for determining the maturity of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) beans are unreliable. Yellowing at the blossom end, the current index, occurs before beans accumulate maximum glucovanillin concentrations. Beans left on the vine until they turn brown have higher glucovanillin concentrations but may split and have low quality. Judging bean maturity is difficult as they reach full size soon after pollination. Glucovanillin accumulates from 20 weeks, maximum about 40 weeks after pollination. Mature green beans have 20% dry matter but less than 2% glucovanillin."[46] The accumulation of dry matter and glucovanillin are highly correlated.To ensure the finest flavor from every fruit, each individual pod must be picked by hand just as it begins to split on the end. Overmatured fruits are likely to split, causing a reduction in market value. Its commercial value is fixed based on the length and appearance of the pod.</span></p> <p><span>If the fruit is more than 15 cm (5.9 in) in length, it is categorized as first-quality. The largest fruits greater than 16 cm and up to as much as 21 cm are usually reserved for the gourmet vanilla market, for sale to top chefs and restaurants. If the fruits are between 10 and 15 cm long, pods are under the second-quality category, and fruits less than 10 cm in length are under the third-quality category. Each fruit contains thousands of tiny black vanilla seeds. Vanilla fruit yield depends on the care and management given to the hanging and fruiting vines. Any practice directed to stimulate aerial root production has a direct effect on vine productivity. A five-year-old vine can produce between 1.5 and 3 kg (3.3 and 6.6 lb) pods, and this production can increase up to 6 kg (13 lb) after a few years. The harvested green fruit can be commercialized as such or cured to get a better market price.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Culinary uses</span></strong></p> <p><span>The four main commercial preparations of natural vanilla are:</span></p> <p><span>Whole pod</span></p> <p><span>Powder (ground pods, kept pure or blended with sugar, starch, or other ingredients)</span></p> <p><span>Extract (in alcoholic or occasionally glycerol solution; both pure and imitation forms of vanilla contain at least 35% alcohol)</span></p> <p><span>Vanilla sugar, a packaged mix of sugar and vanilla extract</span></p> <p><span>Vanilla flavoring in food may be achieved by adding vanilla extract or by cooking vanilla pods in the liquid preparation. A stronger aroma may be attained if the pods are split in two, exposing more of a pod's surface area to the liquid. In this case, the pods' seeds are mixed into the preparation. Natural vanilla gives a brown or yellow color to preparations, depending on the concentration. Good-quality vanilla has a strong, aromatic flavor, but food with small amounts of low-quality vanilla or artificial vanilla-like flavorings are far more common, since true vanilla is much more expensive.</span></p> <p><span>Regarded as the world's most popular aroma and flavor, vanilla is a widely used aroma and flavor compound for foods, beverages and cosmetics, as indicated by its popularity as an ice cream flavor.[64] Although vanilla is a prized flavoring agent on its own, it is also used to enhance the flavor of other substances, to which its own flavor is often complementary, such as chocolate, custard, caramel, coffee, and others. Vanilla is a common ingredient in Western sweet baked goods, such as cookies and cakes.</span></p> <p><span>The food industry uses methyl and ethyl vanillin as less-expensive substitutes for real vanilla. Ethyl vanillin is more expensive, but has a stronger note. Cook's Illustrated ran several taste tests pitting vanilla against vanillin in baked goods and other applications, and to the consternation of the magazine editors, tasters could not differentiate the flavor of vanillin from vanilla; however, for the case of vanilla ice cream, natural vanilla won out.[66] A more recent and thorough test by the same group produced a more interesting variety of results; namely, high-quality artificial vanilla flavoring is best for cookies, while high-quality real vanilla is slightly better for cakes and significantly better for unheated or lightly heated foods. The liquid extracted from vanilla pods was once believed to have medical properties, helping with various stomach ailments.</span></p> </body> </html>
MHS 104
Bourbon Vanilla Seeds (Vanilla planifolia)

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Worlds Largest Giant Corn...

Worlds Largest Giant Corn...

Pret 2,25 € (SKU: P 40)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Worlds Largest Giant Corn Seeds Cuzco</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 or 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Native to Peru and Ecuador Peruvian Giant Corn - also known as Choclo is a hideously large variety of corn.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">The stalks reach up to 5 - 5,50 meters in height, a runt in a litter of this cultivar would tower over standard varieties at a whopping 4 metars.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">In standard varieties of corn the average weight runs from 25 - 35 grams per 100 kernels In Peruvian Giant Corn the weight per 100 kernels runs from 90 - 95 grams per 100 kernels - that's nearly 3 times the size and yield.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">It is a late maturing corn and is estimated to need 120 - 150 days to mature. They are not an easy crop to produce, it requires determination and vigilance to grow.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">One would think being indigenous to the Andes mountainous they would be adapted to windy conditions, but this is not the case. They evolved in the Peruvian Urrabamba Valley and vicinity which is sheltered and has relatively mild weather.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Peruvian Giant Corn aka Choclo </span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">They do not withstand strong winds and need persistent staking, at 4 - 5,50 metars in height that's a chore and a half.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">The plants produce numerous relatively short cobs with gigundous kernels.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">The taste is comparable to standard sweet corn. It is not overly sweet - mild to blandly sweet with a creamy texture would be the best description. Peruvians usually boil them. In Ecuador and Bolivia they dry them first then burst or "pop" them in oil - somewhat like popcorn. We gringos can enjoy them the same as any other corn.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Corn Should be planted in blocks as opposed to rows and should not be planted near other varieties of Corn [See - Isolating Sweet Corn.] Cross pollination tends to produce poor tasting starchy corn. Sugar Pearl, as per some suppliers does not need to be isolated as other varieties do - this is just fine for the Sugar Pearl, but not necessarily the other variety.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Peruvian Giant Corn can be seeded directly into the soil, or it can also be started indoors and later transplanted. If starting indoors be sure you have a larger than standard container as it could easily outgrow the container before transplant time. Whichever you choose, Plant it in blocks, at least four rows wide, for proper pollination and well-filled ears</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Sowing depth Aprox.: 5 cm</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Germination: 6 to 8 days</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Maturity: at 120 - 150 days.</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Color: White - Pale Yellow</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Seed Spacing: 30-35 cm apart.</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Row spacing: 100 cm</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">USDA Hardiness Zones: 3- 9</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Plant Size: 400 - 550 cm</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Corn cob Size: 17-20 cm Long</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Full Sun</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Above Average Yields per Sq. Footage - Anticipate 3 or more ears per Stalk.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Corn has shallow roots, and uses a lot of nitrogen as well as trace elements. To help your crop get off to the best start possible, prepare the soil first with a nitrogen-rich fertilizer. Well rotted manure or compost is also helpful.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Plant in the northern side of the garden as corn stalks will deny sunlight to the rest of your garden crops ,you also might want to grow some where it will provide shade to plants that can not tolerate full sunlight.</span></p> <div> <h2><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/peruvian-giant-red-sacsa-kuski-corn-seeds.html" target="_blank" title="Peruvian Giant Red Sacsa Kuski Corn Seeds, you can buy HERE" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>Peruvian Giant Red Sacsa Kuski Corn Seeds, you can buy HERE</strong></a></h2> </div> </body> </html>
P 40 5S NS
Worlds Largest Giant Corn Seeds Cuzco - Cusco
Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds  - 3

Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo...

Pret 1,95 € (SKU: B 6)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds (Phyllostachys bambusoides)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Phyllostachys bambusoides, commonly called madake, giant timber bamboo or Japanese timber bamboo, is a bamboo species in the genus Phyllostachys.</p> <p>Madake is typically known for being the most common type of bamboo used in the making of shakuhachi flutes and is utilized in numerous Japanese, as well as Chinese, arts, and crafts.</p> <p>Phyllostachys bambusoides can reach a height of 15–22 m and a diameter of 10–15 cm. The culms are dark green, quite thick and very straight. The leaves are dark green. New stalks emerge in late spring and grow quite rapidly, up to 1 meter each day. The flowering interval of this species is very long, about 120 years. This strong plant is in Asia one of the preferred bamboos for building and in the manufacture of furniture.</p> <p>This species is native to China, but it is commonly grown worldwide, especially in Japan.</p> </body> </html>
B 6
Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds  - 3
Persian lime Seeds – limoo, Tahiti lime  - 3

Semințe de tei persan...

Pret 1,95 € (SKU: V 119)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Semințe de tei persan (Citrus latifolia)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Preț pentru pachetul de 2 semințe.</strong></span></h2> <p>Varul persan (Citrus × latifolia) sau limoo este, de asemenea, cunoscut sub numele de var de Tahiti sau var de Bearss (numit după John T. Bearss, care a dezvoltat acest soi fără sămânță în 1895 în pepinieră la Porterville, California), este un fruct citric legat de standard lămâie verde.</p> <p>Are o aromă picantă și parfumată. Fructul are aproximativ 6 cm în diametru, adesea cu capetele ușor sfărâmate și este de obicei vândut în timp ce este verde, deși se îngălbenește, deoarece atinge maturitatea completă. Este, de asemenea, disponibil pe scară largă, uscat, deoarece este adesea folosit în acest fel în gătitul persan. Este mai mare, cu piele mai groasă, cu aromă citrică mai puțin intensă decât varul cheie (Citrus aurantifolia).</p> <p>Avantajele varului persan în agricultura comercială în comparație cu varul cheie sunt dimensiunea mai mare, absența semințelor, rezistența, absența spinilor pe tufișuri și durata de valabilitate mai lungă a fructelor. Sunt mai puțin acizi decât teii-chei și nu au amărăciunea care conferă aroma unică a tei-cheie.</p> <p>Limesele persane sunt comercializate în principal în șase dimensiuni, cunoscute sub numele de 110, 150, 175, 200, 230 și 250. Odată crescut în principal în Florida în SUA, a ajuns la proeminență după ce livezile de var cheie au fost șterse de un uragan în 1926, potrivit Societății Pomologice Americane, ulterior, livezile de var persane au fost devastate de uraganul Andrew în 1992.</p> <p>Un număr mare de tei persani sunt cultivate, prelucrate și exportate în fiecare an în principal din Mexic pe piețele americane, europene și asiatice. Importurile de var persan din SUA din Mexic sunt gestionate în principal prin McAllen, Texas.</p> <p>Limesele persane provin din Orientul Îndepărtat și au fost cultivate mai întâi pe scară largă în Persia (acum Iranul) și sudul Irakului.</p> <p>ersia (now Iran) and southern Iraq.</p> </body> </html>
V 119
Persian lime Seeds – limoo, Tahiti lime  - 3
Golden Bamboo Seeds - fish pole bamboo (Phyllostachys aurea) 1.95 - 10

Golden Bamboo Seeds - fish...

Pret 1,95 € (SKU: B 7)
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;" class=""><strong>Golden Bamboo Seeds - fish pole bamboo (Phyllostachys aurea)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #d0121a; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of&nbsp;5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>One of the most common bamboos in the United States, and for a good reason: although usually not very tall, it is one of the strongest and most useful. Growing rigidly upright, this bamboo is one of the best for hedges and for planting next to driveways and walkways.</p> <p><span>&nbsp;</span>It often has a series of distorted internodes at the base of the cane, sometimes called "Tortoise Shell" internodes, that are quite ornamental and make this plant useful for craft work. Culm color of the species type is green. Like other Phyllostachys, when exposed to strong direct sunlight, the canes will fade to yellow with age. Phyllostachys aurea can be an aggressive spreader in hot climates, where care must be used in its placement.</p> <p>zones 7-10</p> <p><strong><em>WIKIPEDIA:</em></strong></p> <p>Phyllostachys aurea is a bamboo species of the 'running bamboo' type, belonging to the diverse Bambuseae tribe. It is native to Fujian and Zhejiang in China. It is commonly known by the names fishpole bamboo, golden bamboo, monk's belly bamboo, and fairyland bamboo (Australia).</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>P. aurea is cultivated as an ornamental plant for gardens. In the United States, it is considered an invasive species that crowds out native species and is difficult to remove. It is also the most commonly cultivated bamboo in the United States. It is a cold-hardy bamboo, performing well in USDA zones 6 to 10, (Connecticut to Florida).[2] It has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>P. aurea's lush foliage makes it desirable for ornamental purposes and privacy hedges, and its characteristic 'knotty' compressed lower internodes render it desirable among collectors.[2] It is well-suited to the making of bamboo pipes.</p> <p><strong>Identification and growth habit</strong></p> <p>The common forms of P. aurea are easily identified by their characteristic compressed internodes in the lower part of the canes which have a tortoise shell-like appearance. This internodal compression result in shorter heights (25 ft) and thicker cane diameters (relative to height) than many other Phyllostachys species.</p> <p>The canes turn yellow in full or partial sun, and deepen into a gold-orange color as the plant matures. Branching and foliage tend to start lower to the ground than many other Phyllostachys species, but some prefer to cut off lower branches to show off the interesting 'tortoise shell' lower part of the canes (see photo).</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
B 7
Golden Bamboo Seeds - fish pole bamboo (Phyllostachys aurea) 1.95 - 10
Cacao Tree Seeds (Theobroma cacao)

Cacao Tree Seeds (Theobroma...

Pret 4,00 € (SKU: V 86)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Cacao Tree Seeds (Theobroma cacao)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 seeds.<br /></strong></span></h2> <p><strong>As you can see from our pictures, our cocoa variety is larger than all others.</strong></p> <p>Theobroma cacao also cacao tree and cocoa tree, is a small (4–8 m (13–26 ft) tall) evergreen tree in the family Malvaceae, native to the deep tropical region of America. Its seeds are used to make cocoa powder and chocolate.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>Leaves are alternate, entire, unlobed, 10–40 cm (3.9–16 in) long and 5–20 cm (2.0–7.9 in) broad. The flowers are produced in clusters directly on the trunk and older branches; this is known as cauliflory. The flowers are small, 1–2 cm (0.39–0.79 in) diameter, with pink calyx. While many of the world's flowers are pollinated by bees (Hymenoptera) or butterflies/moths (Lepidoptera), cacao flowers are pollinated by tiny flies, Forcipomyia midges in the order Diptera.[2] The fruit, called a cacao pod, is ovoid, 15–30 cm (5.9–12 in) long and 8–10 cm (3.1–3.9 in) wide, ripening yellow to orange, and weighs about 500 g (1.1 lb) when ripe. The pod contains 20 to 60 seeds, usually called "beans", embedded in a white pulp. The seeds are the main ingredient of chocolate, while the pulp is used in some countries to prepare a refreshing juice. Each seed contains a significant amount of fat (40–50%) as cocoa butter. Their most noted active constituent is theobromine, a compound similar to caffeine.</p> <p><strong>Taxonomy and nomenclature</strong></p> <p>Cacao (Theobroma cacao) belongs to the genus Theobroma classified under the subfamily Sterculioidea of the mallow family Malvaceae. Cacao is one of 22 species of Theobroma.</p> <p>The generic name is derived from the Greek for "food of the gods"; from θεος (theos), meaning "god," and βρῶμα (broma), meaning "food".</p> <p>The specific name cacao is derived from the native name of the plant in indigenous Mesoamerican languages. The cacao was known as kakaw in Tzeltal, K’iche’ and Classic Maya; kagaw in Sayula Popoluca; and cacahuatl[dubious – discuss] in Nahuatl.</p> <p>The cupuaçu, Theobroma grandiflorum, is a closely related species also grown in Brazil. Like the cacao, it is also the source for a kind of chocolate known as cupulate or cupuaçu chocolate.</p> <p>The cupuaçu is considered of high potential by the food and cosmetics industries.</p> <p><strong>Distribution and domestication</strong></p> <p>T. cacao is widely distributed from southeastern Mexico to the Amazon basin. There were originally two hypotheses about its domestication; one said that there were two foci for domestication, one in the Lacandon area of Mexico and another in lowland South America. More recent studies of patterns of DNA diversity, however, suggest that this is not the case. Motomayor et al.[4] sampled 1241 trees and classified them into 10 distinct genetic clusters. This study also identified areas, for example around Iquitos in modern Peru, where representatives of several genetic clusters originated. This result suggests that this is where T. cacao was originally domesticated, probably for the pulp that surrounds the beans, which is eaten as a snack and fermented into a mildly alcoholic beverage.[5] Using the DNA sequences obtained by Motomayor et al. and comparing them with data derived from climate models and the known conditions suitable for cacao, Thomas et al. have further refined the view of domestication, linking the area of greatest cacao genetic diversity to a bean-shaped area that encompasses the border between Brazil and Peru and the southern part of the Colombian-Brazilian border.[6] Climate models indicate that at the peak of the last ice age 21,000 years ago, when habitat suitable for cacao was at its most reduced, this area was still suitable, and so provided a refugium for the species. Thomas et al. speculate that from there people took cacao to Mexico, where selection for the beans took place.</p> <p>Cacao trees grow well as understory plants in humid forest ecosystems. This is equally true of abandoned cultivated trees, making it difficult to distinguish truly wild trees from those whose parents may originally have been cultivated.</p> <p><strong>History of cultivation</strong></p> <p>Cultivation, use, and cultural elaboration of cacao were early and extensive in Mesoamerica. Ceramic vessels with residues from the preparation of cacao beverages have been found at archaeological sites dating back to the Early Formative (1900-900 BC) period. For example, one such vessel found at an Olmec archaeological site on the Gulf Coast of Veracruz, Mexico dates cacao's preparation by pre-Olmec peoples as early as 1750 BC. On the Pacific coast of Chiapas, Mexico, a Mokaya archaeological site provides evidence of cacao beverages dating even earlier, to 1900 BC. The initial domestication was probably related to the making of a fermented, thus alcoholic beverage.</p> <p>Several mixtures of cacao are described in ancient texts, for ceremonial or medicinal, as well as culinary, purposes. Some mixtures included maize, chili, vanilla (Vanilla planifolia), and honey. Archaeological evidence for use of cacao, while relatively sparse, has come from the recovery of whole cacao beans at Uaxactun, Guatemala and from the preservation of wood fragments of the cacao tree at Belize sites including Cuello and Pulltrouser Swamp. In addition, analysis of residues from ceramic vessels has found traces of theobromine and caffeine in early formative vessels from Puerto Escondido, Honduras (1100-900 BC) and in middle formative vessels from Colha, Belize (600-400 BC) using similar techniques to those used to extract chocolate residues from four classic period (circa 400 AD) vessels from a tomb at the archaeological site of Rio Azul. As cacao is the only known commodity from Mesoamerica containing both of these alkaloid compounds, it seems likely these vessels were used as containers for cacao drinks. In addition, cacao is named in a hieroglyphic text on one of the Rio Azul vessels. Cacao was also believed to be ground by the Aztecs and mixed with tobacco for smoking purposes</p> <table style="width: 712px;" border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" style="width: 708px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>growing instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Vermehrung:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreatment:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">soak seeds for 2-3 hours in warm water.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">all year</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">See picture 6</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing substrate:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Use high-quality, sterile potting soil</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">+25 - +28°C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist, not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">2-4 weeks.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Note:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">direct Sow onto bed in May.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing period</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><br /><span style="color: #008000;"> <em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </body> </html>
V 86
Cacao Tree Seeds (Theobroma cacao)
"DUKE" Highbush Blueberry Seeds (Vaccinium Corymbosum)

DUKE Blueberry Seeds...

Pret 1,95 € (SKU: V 194 D)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>DUKE Northern highbush Blueberry Seeds (Vaccinium Corymbosum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 (0,015g) seeds. </strong></span></h2> <p>Duke blueberries are the leading early-ripening (berries begin ripening in early June) blueberry variety. It is known for its high yields (one Duke plant can produce over 9 kg (20 lbs) of uniform-sized, quality fruits. Duke’s mild flavor seems to improve with cold storage.</p> <p>Maintaining the plant vigor of Duke blueberries can be a challenge over a long period of time. Growers must choose a quality growing site and continually employ good cultural practices.</p> <p>The Duke blueberry is one of the leading candidates for mechanical harvest, fresh, and process sales.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Many wild species of Vaccinium are thought to have been cultivated by Native Americans for thousands of years, with intentional crop burnings in northeastern areas being apparent from archeological evidence.[9] V. corymbosum, being one of the species likely used by these peoples, was later studied and domesticated in 1908 by Frederick Vernon Coville.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>In natural habitats it is a food source for native and migrating birds, bears, and small mammals.</p> <p>The berries were collected and used in Native American cuisine in areas where Vaccinium corymbosum grew as a native plant.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Vaccinium corymbosum is the most common commercially grown blueberry in present-day North America. It is also cultivated as an ornamental plant for home and wildlife gardens and natural landscaping projects.</p> <h2><em><span style="color: #000000;"><strong>Germination instructions</strong></span></em></h2> <p>Northern Highbush Blueberry (Vaccinium Corymbosum) – Soak the seeds in a small container of hand hot water and leave to cool for 24 hours. Then sow the seeds on the surface of free-draining, damp, lime-free seed compost and only just cover with compost. 90 days cold stratification at approx 3C° is now required, which can be achieved by either, covering and placing outside in a cold shaded area, or by sealing the pot in a plastic bag and place in a refrigerator. Then move indoors or to a propagator at a minimum temperature of 21C°, until after germination. When large enough to handle, transplant individual seedlings into 9cm pots of ericaceous compost and grow on. Protect from frost. Plant outdoors from June onwards, after hardening off.</p> </body> </html>
V 194 D
"DUKE" Highbush Blueberry Seeds (Vaccinium Corymbosum)

Această plantă are fructe uriașe
Giant strawberry seeds

Semințe de căpșuni uriașe

Pret 2,85 € (SKU: V 1 GS)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Semințe de căpșuni uriașe</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;"><strong><span>Preț pentru pachetul de 100 (0,06g) semințe.</span></strong></span></h2> <p>Căpșunile, Fragaria ananassa L. Maximus, sunt destul de ușor de cultivat! Sunt perene, rezistente la iarnă și vor prospera în plin soare, atâta timp cât solul este fertil și bine drenat. Plantele sănătoase vor produce o mulțime de fructe de pădure de ani de zile! Căpșunile sunt la fel de mari ca merele! Acest tip „GIANT” standard vă va oferi cea mai mare recoltă! Acești uriași veșnici vor produce pe tot parcursul verii pentru cele mai bune deserturi și gustări!<br><br>Căpșunile au nevoie de lumină pentru a germina și semințele lor nu ar trebui acoperite. Dar practica a arătat că semințele de căpșuni descoperite se usucă foarte repede în timpul germinării. Prin urmare, recomand să acoperiți semințele foarte ușor cu sol însămânțat. După însămânțare și umezire, puteți așeza și un geam pe tava de însămânțare.<br><br>Semințele au nevoie de cel puțin 60 de zile de stratificare</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 1 GS (0,06G)
Giant strawberry seeds

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Yuzu Seeds Japanese citrus fruit -20°C (Citrus junos) 4.15 - 1

Yuzu semințe -20°C (Citrus...

Pret 4,15 € (SKU: V 118 Y)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Yuzu semințe -20°C (Citrus junos)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Preț pentru pachetul de 2 sau 4 semințe.</strong></span></h2> <p><b>Yuzu</b><span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>Citrus ichangensis x C. reticulata</i>; în<span>&nbsp;</span>japoneză<span>&nbsp;</span>ユズ, 柚, 柚子<span>&nbsp;</span><i>yuzu</i>)) este o plantă citrică originară din<span>&nbsp;</span>Asia<span>&nbsp;</span>de est. Fructul seamănă cu un<span>&nbsp;</span>grapefruit<span>&nbsp;</span>mai mic (diametrul este între 5,5 și 7,5&nbsp;cm), de culoare galbenă sau verde.</p> <h3><span id=".C3.8Entrebuin.C8.9B.C4.83ri"></span><span class="mw-headline" id="Întrebuințări">Întrebuințări</span></h3> <p>Yuzu amintește la gust de<span>&nbsp;</span>grapefruit<span>&nbsp;</span>(dar oarecum și de<span>&nbsp;</span>mandarină) fiind acrișor-amărui. Nu este mâncat decât rareori ca fruct, în schimb este foarte mult folosit în<span>&nbsp;</span>bucătăria japoneză<span>&nbsp;</span>la fel cum este folosită<span>&nbsp;</span>lămâia<span>&nbsp;</span>în bucătăria europeană de exemplu.</p> <p>Din yuzu se face oțet, marmeladă, etc. și este folosit și ca ingredient al prăjiturilor.</p> <p>Are un miros plăcut, dar cam puternic, și de aceea uleiul obținut din coaja de yuzu este folosit ca parfumant. În<span>&nbsp;</span>Japonia, în ziua<span>&nbsp;</span>solstițiului de iarnă, există obiceiul ca fructul yuzu întreg, necojit, să fie băgat în apa de baie din cadă pentru a da camerei de baie un miros relaxant, dar și din motive terapeutice, cercetări recente arătând că o baie făcută în apă cu yuzu, ridică nivelul de<span>&nbsp;</span>noradrenalină<span>&nbsp;</span>în corpul omenesc de 4 ori<span>&nbsp;</span><sup id="cite_ref-1" class="reference">[1]</sup>. Astfel, se pare, că are efecte pozitive pentru combaterea<span>&nbsp;</span>nevralgiilor.<span>&nbsp;</span>Acidul citric<span>&nbsp;</span>și<span>&nbsp;</span>vitamina C<span>&nbsp;</span>din coajă se pare că contribuie la tratamentul diferitelor boli de piele (piele crăpată, degerături, etc.), circulația sângelui accelerându-se, astfel fiind un remediu pentru cei care sunt foarte sensibili la frig.</p> <p>În<span>&nbsp;</span>Coreea, (unde se numește<span>&nbsp;</span><i>yuja</i>) coaja tăiată în felii subțiri este folosită împreună cu<span>&nbsp;</span>zahăr<span>&nbsp;</span>și<span>&nbsp;</span>miere<span>&nbsp;</span>de albine pentru a face un fel de dulceață mai subțire, care apoi poate fi amestecată cu apă fierbinte rezultând într-o băutură numită<span>&nbsp;</span><i>yujacha</i><span>&nbsp;</span>(ceai de yuja), care este deseori folosită ca remediu pentru răceală.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 118 Y 2-S
Yuzu Seeds Japanese citrus fruit -20°C (Citrus junos) 4.15 - 1
Exotic Rare Black Strawberry Seeds

Black Strawberry Seeds -...

Pret 2,25 € (SKU: V 1)
,
5/ 5
<h2>Black Strawberry Seeds - Exotic Rare</h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 10 seeds.</span></h2> <p><strong style="color:#ff0000;font-size:18px;"></strong>A lovely Black Strawberry that is fully hardy. Perfect for small spaces or containers, it will produce an abundance of small sweet fruit, with a hint of pineapple.</p> <p>Heavy cropping and easy to grow.</p> <p>Perennial herb densely clustered with straighter branches.15-25cm in height. Cymose anthotaxy with juicy flesh. Require loosing and weeding at intervals on the loose fertile soil with ample organic fertilizers. Favor to warm and need moisture to live through the winter.</p> <div> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <h3 align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></h3> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">20-25°C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">1 - 8 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><br /><span style="color:#008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table><p> </p> </div> </div>
V 1
Exotic Rare Black Strawberry Seeds

المنتج الأكثر مبيعا

Soi din Spania
Mar Azul tomato seeds 1.75 - 1

Semințe de tomate Mar Azul

Pret 1,65 € (SKU: VT 1 MA)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Semințe de tomate Mar Azul</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Preț pentru pachetul de 10 sau 20 de semințe.</strong></span></h2> <strong>Anul acesta, ca în fiecare an, semănăm noi plante de roșii Mar Azul. Pozele sunt din acest an 2021 și nu le vom schimba în fiecare an.</strong><br><br><strong>Este foarte interesant faptul că soiul de roșii Mar Azul este extrem de puternic și crește rapid. Până acum, nu am văzut un soi de roșii care crește mai repede decât soiul Mar Azul. Rădăcina se dezvoltă extrem de rapid și este interesant faptul că plantele primesc lăstari laterali deja în containere.</strong><br><br>Roșia Mar Azul este o nouă varietate de roșii obținute prin tehnici total naturale. Culoarea albăstruie a roșiei se datorează unei concentrații ridicate de antociani, pigmenți naturali ai plantelor care oferă beneficii semnificative pentru sănătate.<br><br>De asemenea, ar trebui să subliniem aroma, aroma și senzațiile delicioase evocate de roșia din gură.<br><br>Culoare albăstrui-violet cu un interior roșu intens, strălucitor, atunci când este perfect copt.<br><br>Aceasta este o roșie cu umeri cu nervuri, cu o textură ușor crocantă și netedă și aciditate scăzută.<br><br>Sănătate<br><br>Roșia Mar Azul a făcut obiectul unor studii nutriționale riguroase pentru a-i determina proprietățile funcționale și sănătoase. Departamentul de Știință și Tehnologie Alimentară al Universității din Granada a prezentat rezultatele analizei fizico-chimice, certificând conținutul de vitamina C și B6 al roșiilor.<br><br>Excelent pentru toate tipurile de utilizare! <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VT 1 MA (10 S)
Mar Azul tomato seeds 1.75 - 1
Climbing Strawberry seeds "Mount Everest" (Fragaria x ananassa)

Climbing Strawberry seeds...

Pret 2,50 € (SKU: V 1 CS)
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="text-decoration: underline;" class=""><em><strong>Climbing Strawberry seeds "Mount Everest"</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of<strong>&nbsp;10&nbsp;</strong>seeds.</strong></span><em><br></em></strong></h3> <p>A unique climbing strawberry! This fast, strong growing variety will produce runners up to 1,5m in length that make a real talking point when trained up a trellis or obelisk climbing frame, or cascading from window boxes and hanging baskets. Better still, Strawberry 'Mount Everest' is an ever-bearering variety that produces a delicious crop of medium sized, sweet, juicy fruits from June right through to September! Height: 1,5m. Spread: 30cm.</p> <p>Estimated time to cropping once planted: 4-8 months.<br>Estimated time to best yields: 4-8 months.</p> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 1 CS
Climbing Strawberry seeds "Mount Everest" (Fragaria x ananassa)
German Extra Hardy Garlic cloves 2.95 - 3

German Extra Hardy Garlic...

Pret 2,95 € (SKU: P 416 GEH)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>German Extra Hardy Garlic cloves</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for 10 Garlic cloves</strong></span></h2> <p>German Extra Hardy, is also known as German White, Northern White and German Stiffneck is a large, beautiful and well-formed porcelain garlic. These are all the same garlic but grown in different places under different names. Its flavor is very strong and robust and sticks around for a long time.</p> <p>The average weight of garlic cloves 5-6 g.</p> <p>From a grower's perspective, it is a tall dark green plant and is a very good survivor, usually grows healthy and appears to be somewhat resistant to many of the diseases that can affect garlic. It originally came from Germany but grows well in all but the most southerly states, where it is marginal.</p> <p>Being a Porcelain, German Extra Hardy stores a long time at cool room temp for around 9-10 months or longer.</p> </body> </html>
P 416 GEH
German Extra Hardy Garlic cloves 2.95 - 3

Această plantă are fructe uriașe
Giant Blackberry Seeds (Rubus fruticosus) 1.85 - 3

Giant Blackberry Seeds...

Pret 1,85 € (SKU: V 126)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong>Giant Blackberry Seeds (Rubus fruticosus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><strong>This variety produces extremely large fruits weighing 10 grams per fruit.</strong></p> <p>Triple Crown Blackberry Seeds . The healthful benefits are many , rich in vitamin C , vitamin K , B vitamin , Omega-3 , Manganese .  Antioxidant strength at top of more than 1000 antioxidant foods consumed in the U.S.</p> <p><strong>Wikipedia:</strong></p> <p>The blackberry is an edible fruit produced by many species in the Rubus genus in the Rosaceae family, hybrids among these species within the Rubus subgenus, and hybrids between the Rubus and Idaeobatus subgenera. What distinguishes the blackberry from its raspberry relatives is whether or not the torus (receptacle or stem) 'picks-with' (i.e. stays with) the fruit. When picking a blackberry fruit, the torus does stay with the fruit. With a raspberry, the torus remains on the plant, leaving a hollow core in the raspberry fruit. The term 'bramble', a word meaning any impenetrable scrub, has traditionally been applied specifically to the blackberry or its products,[1] though in the United States it applies to all members of the Rubus genus. In the western US, the term caneberry is used to refer to blackberries and raspberries as a group rather than the term bramble.</p> <p>The usually black fruit is not a berry in the botanical sense of the word. Botanically it is termed an aggregate fruit, composed of small drupelets. It is a widespread and well-known group of over 375 species, many of which are closely related apomictic microspecies native throughout Europe, northwestern Africa, temperate western and central Asia and North and South America.</p> <p><strong>Growth and anatomical description</strong></p> <p>Blackberries are perennial plants which typically bear biennial stems ("canes") from the perennial root system.</p> <p>In its first year, a new stem, the primocane, grows vigorously to its full length of 3–6 m (in some cases, up to 9 m), arching or trailing along the ground and bearing large palmately compound leaves with five or seven leaflets; it does not produce any flowers. In its second year, the cane becomes a floricane and the stem does not grow longer, but the lateral buds break to produce flowering laterals (which have smaller leaves with three or five leaflets).[3] First- and second-year shoots usually have numerous short-curved, very sharp prickles that are often erroneously called thorns. These prickles can tear through denim with ease and make the plant very difficult to navigate around. Prickle-free cultivars have been developed. Recently the University of Arkansas has developed primocane fruiting blackberries that grow and flower on first-year growth much as the primocane-fruiting (also called fall bearing or everbearing) red raspberries do.</p> <p>Unmanaged mature plants form a tangle of dense arching stems, the branches rooting from the node tip on many species when they reach the ground. Vigorous and growing rapidly in woods, scrub, hillsides, and hedgerows, blackberry shrubs tolerate poor soils, readily colonizing wasteland, ditches, and vacant lots.</p> <p>The flowers are produced in late spring and early summer on short racemes on the tips of the flowering laterals.[3] Each flower is about 2–3 cm in diameter with five white or pale pink petals.[3]</p> <p>The drupelets only develop around ovules that are fertilized by the male gamete from a pollen grain. The most likely cause of undeveloped ovules is inadequate pollinator visits.[5] Even a small change in conditions, such as a rainy day or a day too hot for bees to work after early morning, can reduce the number of bee visits to the flower, thus reducing the quality of the fruit. Incomplete drupelet development can also be a symptom of exhausted reserves in the plant's roots or infection with a virus such as Raspberry bushy dwarf virus.</p> <p>In botanical terminology, the fruit is not a berry but an aggregate fruit of numerous drupelets.</p> <p><strong>Ecology</strong></p> <p>Blackberry leaves are food for certain caterpillars; some grazing mammals, especially deer, are also very fond of the leaves. Caterpillars of the concealer moth Alabonia geoffrella have been found feeding inside dead blackberry shoots. When mature, the berries are eaten and their seeds dispersed by several mammals, such as the red fox and the Eurasian badger, as well as by small birds.</p> <p>Blackberries grow wild throughout all parts of the United Kingdom and Ireland. They are an important element in the ecology of those countries. Harvesting the berries is a popular pastime in these countries. However, it is also considered an invasive weed, sending down its strong suckering roots amongst garden hedges and shrubs. In some parts of the world, such as in Australia, Chile, New Zealand, and the Pacific Northwest of North America, some blackberry species, particularly Rubus armeniacus (syn. R. procerus, 'Himalaya') and Rubus laciniatus ('Evergreen'), are naturalised and considered an invasive species and a serious weed.</p> <p>The blackberry tends to be red during its unripe ("green") phase, leading to an old expression that "blackberries are red when they're green".</p> <p>In various parts of the United States, wild blackberries are sometimes called "Black-caps", a term more commonly used for black raspberries, Rubus occidentalis.</p> <p>As there is forensic evidence from the Iron Age Haraldskær Woman that she consumed blackberries some 2500 years ago, it is reasonable to conclude that blackberries have been eaten by humans over thousands of years.</p> <p><strong><em>Uses</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Food</strong></p> <p>The soft fruit is popular for use in desserts, jams, seedless jelly, and sometimes wine. It is often mixed with apples for pies and crumbles. Blackberries are also used to produce candy.</p> <p>Good nectar producers, blackberry shrubs bearing flowers yield a medium to dark, fruity honey.</p> <p><strong>Phytochemical research</strong></p> <p>Blackberries contain numerous phytochemicals including polyphenols, flavonoids, anthocyanins, salicylic acid, ellagic acid, and fiber.[7][8] Anthocyanins in blackberries are responsible for their rich dark color.</p> <p>Phytochemical components of blackberries, salicylic acid and ellagic acid have been associated in preliminary research with toxicity to cancer cells,[9][10] including breast cancer cells.</p> <p>Blackberries rank highly among fruits for in vitro antioxidant strength, particularly because of their dense content of polyphenolic compounds, such as ellagic acid, tannins, ellagitannins, quercetin, gallic acid, anthocyanins, and cyanidins.[12][13] One report placed blackberry at the top of more than 1000 antioxidant foods consumed in the United States.</p> <p><strong>Nutrients</strong></p> <p>Blackberries are notable for their high nutritional contents of dietary fiber, vitamin C, vitamin K, and the essential mineral manganese.</p> <p>Blackberries have both soluble and insoluble fiber.[15] One cup of blackberries (144 g) has an average of 7.6 g of fibre and contains half the daily recommended dose of vitamin C.[8] Dietary fiber is important in maintaining a healthy digestive system, as it supports regular bowel movements.</p> <p><strong>Nutrient content of seeds</strong></p> <p>Blackberries contain numerous large seeds that are not always preferred by consumers. The seeds contain oil rich in omega-3 (alpha-linolenic acid) and -6 fats (linoleic acid) as well as protein, dietary fiber, carotenoids, ellagitannins and ellagic acid.</p> <p><strong><em>Cultivation</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Commercial cultivation</strong></p> <p>Worldwide, Mexico is the leading producer of blackberries, with nearly the entire crop being produced for export into the off-season fresh markets in North America and Europe. The Mexican market is almost entirely from the cultivar 'Tupy' (often spelled 'Tupi', but the EMBRAPA program in Brazil from which it was released prefers the 'Tupy' spelling.). In the US, Oregon is the leading commercial blackberry producer, producing 42.6 million pounds on 6,180 acres (25.0 km2), in 1995[17] and 56.1 million pounds on 7,000 acres (28 km2) in 2009.</p> <p>Numerous cultivars have been selected for commercial and amateur cultivation in Europe[2] and the United States.[19] Since the many species form hybrids easily, there are numerous cultivars with more than one species in their ancestry.</p> <p>'Marion' (marketed as "marionberry") is an important cultivar that was selected from seedlings from a cross between 'Chehalem' and 'Olallie' (commonly called "olallieberry") berries.[20] 'Olallie' in turn is a cross between loganberry and youngberry. 'Marion', 'Chehalem' and 'Olallie' are just three of many trailing blackberry cultivars developed by the United States Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) blackberry breeding program at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon.</p> <p>The most recent cultivars released from this program are the prickle-free cultivars 'Black Diamond', 'Black Pearl', and 'Nightfall' as well as the very early-ripening 'Obsidian' and 'Metolius'. 'Black Diamond' is now the leading cultivar being planted in the Pacific Northwest. Some of the other cultivars from this program are 'Newberry', 'Waldo', 'Siskiyou', 'Black Butte', 'Kotata', 'Pacific', and 'Cascade'.</p> <p>Trailing blackberries are vigorous and crown forming, require a trellis for support, and are less cold hardy than the erect or semi-erect blackberries. In addition to the United States's Pacific Northwest, these types do well in similar climates such as the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Chile, and the Mediterranean countries.</p> <p>Semi-erect, prickle-free blackberries were first developed at the John Innes Centre in Norwich, UK, and subsequently by the USDA-ARS in Beltsville, Maryland. These are crown forming and very vigorous and need a trellis for support. Cultivars include 'Black Satin' 'Chester Thornless', 'Dirksen Thornless', 'Hull Thornless', 'Loch Ness', 'Loch Tay', 'Merton Thornless', 'Smoothstem', and 'Triple Crown'. Recently, the cultivar 'Cacanska Bestrna' (also called 'Cacak Thornless') has been developed in Serbia and has been planted on many thousands of hectares there.</p> <p>The University of Arkansas has developed cultivars of erect blackberries. These types are less vigorous than the semi-erect types and produce new canes from root initials (therefore they spread underground like raspberries). There are prickly and prickle-free cultivars from this program, including 'Navaho', 'Ouachita', 'Cherokee', 'Apache', 'Arapaho', and 'Kiowa'. They are also responsible for developing the primocane fruiting blackberries such as 'Prime-Jan' and 'Prime-Jim'.</p> <p>In raspberries, these types are called primocane fruiting, fall fruiting, or everbearing. 'Prime-Jim' and 'Prime-Jan' were released in 2004 by the University of Arkansas and are the first cultivars of primocane fruiting blackberry.[22] They grow much like the other erect cultivars described above, however the canes that emerge in the spring, will flower in mid-summer and fruit in late summer or fall. The fall crop has its highest quality when it ripens in cool mild climate such as in California or the Pacific Northwest.</p> <p>'Illini Hardy' a semi-erect prickly cultivar introduced by the University of Illinois is cane hardy in zone 5, where traditionally blackberry production has been problematic, since canes often failed to survive the winter.</p> <p>Blackberry production in Mexico has expanded enormously in the past decade. While once based on the cultivar 'Brazos', an old erect blackberry cultivar developed in Texas in 1959, the Mexican industry is now dominated by the Brazilian 'Tupy' released in the 1990s. 'Tupy' has the erect blackberry 'Comanche', and a "wild Uruguayan blackberry" as parents.[23] Since there are no native blackberries in Uruguay, the suspicion is that the widely grown 'Boysenberry' is the male parent. In order to produce these blackberries in regions of Mexico where there is no winter chilling to stimulate flower bud development, chemical defoliation and application of growth regulators are used to bring the plants into bloom.</p> <p><strong>Diseases and pests</strong></p> <p>As a result of blackberries belonging to the same genus as raspberries,[24] they share the same diseases including anthracnose which can cause the berry to have uneven ripening and sap flow may also be slowed.[25][26] They also share the same remedies including the Bordeaux mixture,[27] a combination of lime, water and Copper(II) sulfate.[28] The rows between blackberry plants must be free of weeds, blackberry suckers and grasses which may lead to pests or diseases.[29] Fruit growers are selective when planting blackberry bushes as wild blackberries may be infected[29] and gardeners are recommended to purchase only certified disease-free plants.</p> <p>The spotted-wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii is a serious pest of blackberries.[31] Unlike its vinegar fly relatives which are primarily attracted to rotting or fermented fruit, D. suzukii attacks fresh, ripe fruit by laying eggs under the soft skin. The larvae hatch and grow in the fruit, destroying the fruit's commercial value.</p> <p>Another pest is Amphorophora rubi, known as the Blackberry Aphid, which not only eats blackberries but raspberries as well.</p> <p> Byturus tomentosus (Raspberry beetle), Lampronia corticella (Raspberry Moth) and Anthonomus rubi (Strawberry blossom weevil) are also known to infest blackberries.</p> <p><strong>Folklore</strong></p> <p>Folklore in the United Kingdom is told that blackberries should not be picked after Old Michaelmas Day (11 October) as the devil has claimed them. There is some value behind this legend as wetter and cooler weather often allows the fruit to become infected by various molds such as Botryotinia which give the fruit an unpleasant look and may be toxic.</p> </div> </body> </html>
V 126
Giant Blackberry Seeds (Rubus fruticosus) 1.85 - 3

Această plantă are fructe uriașe
Giant Sunflower Seeds - Giant Russian Mammoth 1.85 - 1

Seminte de floarea-soarelui...

Pret 1,85 € (SKU: VE 68)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Seminte de floarea-soarelui gigant - Gigant Rus Mammoth</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Preț pentru pachetul de 1g (10), 9g (100) semințe.</strong></span></h2> <p>Această floare de soare gigantică mamut rusesc (Helianthus annuus), populară și ușor de cultivat, este o varietate organică de moștenire.</p> <p>Aceste plante produc flori frumoase care produc semințe gustoase, comestibile. Tulpinile pot crește până la 2,1-3,7 metri cu flori uriașe. Va tolera solurile de calitate mai slabă.</p> <p>Semănați sămânța după pericolul de îngheț într-o zonă cu soare plin. Semănați semințe la 20 cm distanță și aproximativ 2,5 cm adâncime. Răsaduri subțiri când au o înălțime de 7,5 cm, astfel încât distanța finală să fie separată de 13 cm. Înfloresc în timpul verii.</p>
VE 68 (1g)
Giant Sunflower Seeds - Giant Russian Mammoth 1.85 - 1

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