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Climbing Strawberry seeds "Mount Everest" (Fragaria x ananassa)

Climbing Strawberry seeds...

Cena 2,50 € (SKU: V 1 CS)
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5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Climbing Strawberry seeds "Mount Everest"</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><strong><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of<strong> 10 </strong>seeds.</strong></span><em><br /></em></strong></h3> <p>A unique climbing strawberry! This fast, strong growing variety will produce runners up to 1,5m in length that make a real talking point when trained up a trellis or obelisk climbing frame, or cascading from window boxes and hanging baskets. Better still, Strawberry 'Mount Everest' is an ever-bearering variety that produces a delicious crop of medium sized, sweet, juicy fruits from June right through to September! Height: 1,5m. Spread: 30cm.</p> <p>Estimated time to cropping once planted: 4-8 months.<br />Estimated time to best yields: 4-8 months.</p> </div>
V 1 CS
Climbing Strawberry seeds "Mount Everest" (Fragaria x ananassa)
Bougainvillea spectabilis Violet and Red Seeds

Bougainvillea spectabilis...

Cena 1,95 € (SKU: T 61)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Bougainvillea spectabilis Mix Violet and Red Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Planting bougainvillea seeds is sure way to add a vibrant splash of color to the home or garden. These tropical favorites are relatively easy to maintain. They can thrive for many years, becoming even more beautiful with age.</p> <p>Bougainvilleas are fast growing, tropical, semi-evergreen vines from South America that produce cascading clusters of long lasting, brightly colored, petal-like bracts surrounding small tubular flowers from early spring through late summer.In zones 10-12</p> <p>Bougainvillea plants can be grown in the garden where they can be trained to climb 10-20 feet to cover porches, archways or walls or they can be grown as a colorful, spreading ground cover.</p> <p>Bougainvilleas are also well adapted to growing in containers and can be grown as house plants.</p> <p>Bougainvilleas have strong, woody thorns.The older the plant gets, the longer and bigger the thorns will be.</p> <h2>Growing Bougainvillea Plants in the Garden</h2> <p>Bougainvillea plants do not transplant well, so select a sheltered planting site in full sun where they can grow undisturbed. They aren't overly fussy about the soil as long as it is well drained. However, the addition of compost, processed manure or peat moss to the planting hole will get your Bougainvillea off to a good start.</p> <p>Bougainvilleas are very drought tolerant once established and should only be watered when the soil is dry an inch below the surface, except when growing in containers which should be kept slightly moist.</p> <p>Feed your Bougainvillea monthly beginning in early spring using a low-nitrogen, bloom type fertilizer, following label directions carefully. Do not fertilize in the fall or winter.Prune freely after blooming. Flowers appear on the new growth.</p> <h2>Growing Bougainvilleas as House Plants</h2> <p>Bougainvilleas can be grown as house plants but they will not bloom well indoors unless you can provide a minimum of five hours of bright sun each day and adequate humidity.</p> <p>They should be grown in a rich, well-drained commercial planting mix that is NOT pre-fertilized. Repotting should be done in late winter or early in the spring.</p> <p>Keep the soil evenly moist during the growing season, but allow it to gradually dry out by winter.Feed actively growing plants every two weeks with a soluble house plant type fertilizer, following label directions carefully.</p> <p>Bougainvilleas grow best with night temperatures of 65° and daytime temperatures of 70°-80°.</p> <p>Grow your Bougainvillea on a strong trellis or prune it in the spring to maintain a shrubby growth habit. Container grown Bougainvilleas can be moved to a sunny spot in the garden for the summer, but should be allowed to gradually dry out before bringing them back indoors by mid autumn.</p> <p>Inspect your plants carefully for spider mites, mealybugs and scale before returning them to the house.Propagating Bougainvillea Plants and Growing them from Seed</p> <p>Bougainvillea seeds can be sown indoors at any time of the year. Maintain a temperature of 70°-75° within the growing medium until germination, which typically takes 30 days or longer.</p> <h2><strong>Preparing to Grow</strong></h2> <p>The requirements for bougainvillea seed growth are quite similar to those of the mature plant. Bougainvilleas demand well draining soil. Any quality potting soil will suffice as a growing medium as long as it drains well and is slightly acidic. Select a container that does not narrow at the top. The roots of bougainvilleas and delicate, when the time comes for transplanting, the bougainvillea needs to be able to slide easily out of the old container. The pot does not need to be deep, but should hold enough of the growing medium to make frequent watering unnecessary. The seeds will need a good light source.</p> <h2>WIKIPEDIA:</h2> <p>Bougainvillea is a genus of thorny ornamental vines, bushes, and trees with flower-like spring leaves near its flowers. Different authors accept between four and 18 species in the genus. They are native plants of South America from Brazil west to Peru and south to southern Argentina (Chubut Province). Bougainvillea are also known as buganvilla (Spain), bugambilia (Mexico, Guatemala, Cuba, Philippines), pokok bunga kertas (Indonesia), "'bougenville"' (Pakistan), Napoleón (Honduras), veranera (Colombia, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Costa Rica and Panama), trinitaria (Colombia, Panama, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic &amp; Venezuela), Santa Rita (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay) or papelillo (northern Peru).</p> <p>The vine species grow anywhere from 1 to 12 m (3 to 40 ft.) tall, scrambling over other plants with their spiky thorns. The thorns are tipped with a black, waxy substance. They are evergreen where rainfall occurs all year, or deciduous if there is a dry season. The leaves are alternate, simple ovate-acuminate, 4–13 cm long and 2–6 cm broad. The actual flower of the plant is small and generally white, but each cluster of three flowers is surrounded by three or six bracts with the bright colours associated with the plant, including pink, magenta, purple, red, orange, white, or yellow. Bougainvillea glabra is sometimes referred to as "paper flower" because the bracts are thin and papery. The fruit is a narrow five-lobed achene.</p> <p>Bougainvillea are relatively pest-free plants, but they may suffer from worms, snails and aphids. The larvae of some Lepidoptera species also use them as food plants, for example the giant leopard moth (Hypercompe scribonia).</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>The first European to describe these plants was Philibert Commerçon, a botanist accompanying French Navy admiral and explorer Louis Antoine de Bougainville during his voyage of circumnavigation of the Earth, and first published for him by Antoine Laurent de Jussieu in 1789.[2] It is possible that the first European to observe these plants was Jeanne Baré, Commerçon's lover and assistant who was an expert in botany. Because she was not allowed on ship as a woman, she disguised herself as a man in order to make the journey (and thus became the first woman to circumnavigate the globe).</p> <p>Twenty years after Commerçon's discovery, it was first published as 'Buginvillæa' in Genera Plantarum by A.L. de Jussieu in 1789.[4] The genus was subsequently spelled in several ways until it was finally corrected to 'Bougainvillea' in the Index Kewensis in the 1930s. Originally, B. spectabilis and B. glabra were hardly differentiated until the mid-1980s when botanists recognized them to be totally distinct species. In the early 19th century, these two species were the first to be introduced into Europe, and soon, nurseries in France and England did a thriving trade providing specimens to Australia and other faraway countries. Meanwhile, Kew Gardens distributed plants it had propagated to British colonies throughout the world. Soon thereafter, an important event in the history of bougainvillea took place with the discovery of a crimson specimen in Cartagena, Colombia, by Mrs. R.V. Butt. Originally thought to be a distinct species, it was named B. buttiana in her honour. However, it was later discovered to be a natural hybrid of a variety of B. glabra and possibly B. peruviana - a "local pink bougainvillea" from Peru. Natural hybrids were soon found to be common occurrences all over the world. For instance, around the 1930s, when the three species were grown together, many hybrid crosses were created almost spontaneously in East Africa, India, the Canary Islands, Australia, North America, and the Philippines.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation and uses</strong></p> <p>Bougainvilleas are popular ornamental plants in most areas with warm climates. Locarno in Switzerland, with its mild Mediterranean climate, is famous for its bougainvilleas.[citation needed]</p> <p>Although it is frost-sensitive and hardy in U.S. Hardiness Zones 9b and 10, bougainvillea can be used as a houseplant or hanging basket in cooler climates. In the landscape, it makes an excellent hot season plant, and its drought tolerance makes it ideal for warm climates year-round. Its high salt tolerance makes it a natural choice for color in coastal regions. It can be pruned into a standard, but is also grown along fence lines, on walls, in containers and hanging baskets, and as a hedge or an accent plant. Its long arching thorny branches bear heart-shaped leaves and masses of papery bracts in white, pink, orange, purple, and burgundy. Many cultivars, including double-flowered and variegated, are available.</p> <p>Many of today's bougainvillea are the result of interbreeding among only three out of the eighteen South American species recognized by botanists. Currently, there are over 300 varieties of bougainvillea around the world. Because many of the hybrids have been crossed over several generations, it is difficult to identify their respective origins. Natural mutations seem to occur spontaneously throughout the world; wherever large numbers of plants are being produced, bud-sports will occur. This had led to multiple names for the same cultivar (or variety) and has added to the confusion over the names of bougainvillea cultivars.</p> <p>The growth rate of bougainvilleas varies from slow to rapid, depending on the variety. They tend to flower all year round in equatorial regions. Elsewhere, they are seasonal, with bloom cycles typically four to six weeks. Bougainvilleas grow best in dry soil, in very bright full sun and with frequent fertilization; but they require little water once established, and in fact will not flourish if over-watered. They can be easily propagated via tip cuttings.</p> <p>The bougainvillea is also a very attractive species for Bonsai enthusiasts, due to their ease of training and their radiant flowering during the spring.[6] They can be kept as indoor houseplants in temperate regions and kept small by bonsai techniques.</p> <p>The hybrid cultivar B. × buttiana 'Poulton's Special' has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.</p> <p><strong>Symbolism and nomenclature</strong></p> <p>Various species of Bougainvillea are the official flowers of Guam (where it is known as the Puti Tai Nobiu);[8] Lienchiang and Pingtung Counties in Taiwan; Ipoh, Malaysia;[9] the cities of Tagbilaran, Philippines; Camarillo, California; Laguna Niguel, California; San Clemente, California; the cities of Shenzhen, Huizhou, Zhuhai, and Jiangmen in Guangdong Province, China; and Naha, Okinawa.</p> <p>Native to South America, Bougainvillea carries several names in the different regions where it is expontaneously present. Apart from Rioplatense Spanish santa-rita and Peruvian Spanish papelillo, it may be variously named primavera, três-marias, sempre-lustrosa, santa-rita, ceboleiro, roseiro, roseta, riso, pataguinha, pau-de-roseira and flor-de-papel in Brazilian Portuguese. Nevertheless, buganvílea [buɡɐ̃ˈviʎ̟ɐ] in Portuguese and buganvilia [buɣamˈbilja] in Spanish are the most common names accepted by people of the regions where these languages are spoken but it is an introduced plant.</p> <p><strong>Toxicity</strong></p> <p>The sap of the Bougainvillea can cause serious skin rashes, similar to toxicodendron species.</p>
T 61
Bougainvillea spectabilis Violet and Red Seeds

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Peru'dan Çeşitli
Aji Charapita chili Seeds 2.25 - 1

Nasiona Aji Charapita

Cena 1,95 € (SKU: C 111)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Nasiona Aji Charapita</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Cena za opakowanie 10, 25, 50 nasion.</strong></span></h2> <p><strong>Nasze rośliny Charapita 2020 rosną dobrze (patrz zdjęcia). Jak sam widzisz na naszych zdjęciach, nasiona pochodzą z naszych własnych roślin (uprawianych metodami ekologicznymi) i wiesz, co otrzymasz z nasion, które u nas kupujesz ...</strong></p> <p>Ta papryczka chili jest najdroższa na świecie! Chociaż wciąż dość nieznany w większości krajów zachodnich, Aji Charapita jest bardzo poszukiwaną ucztą wśród koneserów papryki chili i pięciogwiazdkowych szefów kuchni w restauracjach.</p> <p>Pochodząca z dżungli północnego Peru, Aji Charapita jest znana jako dzika papryka chili i dopiero niedawno była uprawiana do celów komercyjnych. Ze względu na swoją rzadkość i wysokie ceny, jest często nazywany „Matką Wszystkich Chili”. Aji Charapita z oceną gorąca Scoville'a między 30 000 - 50 000 jednostek wypali dziurę w twoim języku, jak również w portfelu.</p> <p>Nazywana „matką wszystkich chili” Aji Charapita podobno kosztuje co najmniej 25 000 dolarów za kilogram, co czyni ją najdroższą papryczką chili na świecie i jedną z najdroższych przypraw, obok wanilii i szafranu.</p> <p>Może być mały (do 1 metra wysokości), ale nie należy lekceważyć Charapita chili lub „aji Charapita”, jak jest znane w Peru. Aji Charapita (Capsicum chinense) lub Charapita to krzaczasty krzew, który produkuje masy (ponad 400 owoców na roślinę) małej dojrzewającej żółtej okrągłej papryki.</p> <p>Używana świeża, ta malutka papryka ma mocny owocowy smak, który nadaje salsom i sosom tropikalny smak, ale najczęściej jest używana w formie sproszkowanej, aby nadać jej nieco pikantności do różnych potraw. Dojrzały owoc po prostu przekłuwano lub wyciskano, a sok wykorzystywano jako pikantną przyprawę do wykańczania potraw. Te papryczki chili również przynoszą wiele korzyści zdrowotnych. Ich kapsaicynoidy mogą pomóc poprawić trawienie i krążenie, gdy są spożywane w ramach zbilansowanej diety.</p> <p>Odmiana Aji Charapita posiada bardzo małe nasiona, które z kolei wymagają idealnych warunków do siewu. Aby kiełkowanie było udane, należy zapewnić minimalną temperaturę 25 ° C przez cały okres kiełkowania i użyć podłoża siewnego lub tabletek Jiffy.</p> </body> </html>
C 111 (10 S)
Aji Charapita chili Seeds 2.25 - 1

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KAFFIR LIME Seeds (Citrus hystrix)  - 1

KAFFIR LIME Seeds (Citrus...

Cena 3,50 € (SKU: V 162)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>KAFFIR LIME SEEDS (CITRUS HYSTRIX)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 4 Seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The kaffir lime (Citrus hystrix), sometimes referred to in English as the makrut lime or Mauritius papeda, is a citrus fruit native to tropical Asia, including India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines.</p> <p>Its fruit and leaves are used in Southeast Asian cuisine and its essential oil is used in perfumery.</p> <p> </p> <p>Citrus hystrix is a thorny bush, 6 to 35 feet (1.8 to 10.7 m) tall, with aromatic and distinctively shaped "double" leaves. These hourglass-shaped leaves comprise the leaf blade plus a flattened, leaf-like stalk or petiole). The fruit is rough and green; it is distinguished by its bumpy exterior and its small size (approx. 4 cm (2 in) wide).</p> <p> </p> <h3><strong>Common names</strong></h3> <p>In English it is known as kaffir lime (also transliterated "kieffer lime") or makrut lime (magrood lime). The Oxford Companion to Food [6] recommends that the term "makrut lime" be favored over "kaffir lime" because Kaffir is an offensive term in some cultures and has no contemporary justification for being attached to this plant. The etymology of the name "kaffir lime" is uncertain, but most likely was used by Muslims as a reference to the location the plant grew, which was populated by non-Muslims. The Arabic word for non-Muslims is Kafir.</p> <p> </p> <h3><strong>Uses</strong></h3> <h3><strong>Cuisine</strong></h3> <p>The leaves are the most frequently used part of the plant, fresh, dried, or frozen. The leaves are widely used in Thai[10] and Lao cuisine (for dishes such as tom yum), and Cambodian cuisine (for the base paste "krueng"). Kaffir/Makrut lime leaves are used in Vietnamese cuisine to add fragrance to chicken dishes and to decrease the pungent odor when steaming snails. The leaves are used in Indonesian cuisine (especially Balinese cuisine and Javanese cuisine), for foods such as soto ayam, and are used along with Indonesian bay leaf for chicken and fish. They are also found in Malaysian and Burmese cuisines. In South Indian cuisine it is used widely.</p> <p> </p> <p>The rind (peel) is commonly used in Lao and Thai curry paste, adding an aromatic, astringent flavor. The zest of the fruit is used in creole cuisine to impart flavor in "arranged" (infused) rums in Martinique, Réunion and Madagascar. In Cambodia, the entire fruit is crystallized/candied for eating.</p> <p> </p> <h3><strong>Medicinal</strong></h3> <p>The juice and rinds are used in traditional medicine in some Asian countries; the fruit's juice is often used in shampoo and is believed to kill head lice.</p> <p> </p> <h3><strong>Other uses</strong></h3> <p>The juice finds use as a cleanser for clothing and hair in Thailand and very occasionally in Cambodia. Lustral water mixed with slices of the fruit is used in religious ceremonies in Cambodia.</p> <p> </p> <h3><strong>Cultivation</strong></h3> <p>Citrus hystrix is grown worldwide in suitable climates as a garden shrub for home fruit production. It is well suited to container gardens and for large garden pots on patios, terraces, and in conservatories.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Main constituents</strong></p> <p>The compound responsible for the characteristic aroma was identified as (–)-(S)-citronellal, which is contained in the leaf oil up to 80%; minor components include citronellol (10%), nerol and limonene.</p> <p> </p> <p>From a stereochemical point of view, it is remarkable that kaffir/makrut lime leaves contain only the (S) stereoisomer of citronellal, whereas its enantiomer, (+)-(R)-citronellal, is found in both lemon balm and (to a lesser degree) lemon grass, (note, however, that citronellal is only a trace component in the latter's essential oil).</p> <p> </p> <p>Kaffir/Makrut lime fruit peel contains an essential oil comparable to lime fruit peel oil; its main components are limonene and β-pinene.</p> </body> </html>
V 162
KAFFIR LIME Seeds (Citrus hystrix)  - 1
Nasion Pomarańcza bergamota...

Nasion Pomarańcza bergamota...

Cena 3,50 € (SKU: V 21 CB)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Nasion Pomarańcza bergamota (Citrus bergamia)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Cena za opakowanie 4 nasion.</strong></span></h2> <p><b>Pomarańcza bergamota</b><span> </span>(bergamota, bergamotka) (<i>Citrus bergamium</i>) –<span> </span>gatunek<span> </span>rośliny z rodziny<span> </span>rutowatych<sup id="cite_ref-grin_2-1" class="reference"></sup>. Jej ojczyzna jest nieznana, przypuszcza się, że pochodzi z Indii<sup id="cite_ref-S_3-0" class="reference"></sup>. Uprawiana jest głównie we Włoszech<sup id="cite_ref-grin_2-2" class="reference"></sup>.</p> <dl> <dt>Pokrój</dt> <dd>Niewielkie<span> </span>drzewo<span> </span>lub<span> </span>krzew<span> </span>o wysokości do 5 m. Ma szeroką koronę, a gałązki z rzadka pokryte krótkimi<span> </span>kolcami.</dd> <dt>Liście</dt> <dd>Podłużnie jajowate, na wąsko oskrzydlonych ogonkach. Brzegi ząbkowane.</dd> <dt>Kwiaty</dt> <dd>Małe, słodko pachnące, zebrane w gęste baldachokształtne<span> </span>kwiatostany. Mają 5-płatkową białą koronę, 1 słupek i liczne pręciki.</dd> <dt>Owoce</dt> <dd>Okrągława<span> </span>jagoda<span> </span>o gorzkim smaku i długości 6-8 cm. Ma gładką, żółtawozielonkawą okrywę i pachnący, kwaśny miąższ<sup id="cite_ref-S_3-1" class="reference">[3]</sup>.</dd> </dl> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Zastosowanie">Zastosowanie</span></h2> <p>Skórka owoców, kwiaty i liście są źródłem<span> </span>olejków eterycznych<span> </span>–<span> </span>olejku bergamotowego<span> </span>stosowanego w produkcji herbaty<span> </span>earl grey<span> </span>oraz<span> </span>olejku nerolowego<span> </span>stosowanego w<span> </span>perfumerii<span> </span>(m. in. woda kolońska)<sup id="cite_ref-S_3-2" class="reference">[3]</sup>. Znajduje też zastosowanie w<span> </span>aromaterapii<span> </span>(słynie ze swych właściwości antydepresyjnych) oraz leczniczo przy problemach<span> </span>układu trawiennego.</p> <p>Nie należy jej mylić z amerykańską<span> </span>byliną<span> </span>ozdobną –<span> </span>bergamotką<span> </span>(<i>Monarda didyma</i>) również słynącą ze swego intensywnego aromatu.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Zastosowanie_w_medycynie">Zastosowanie w medycynie</span></h3> <p>Skondensowany ekstrakt soku z bergamoty w postaci<span> </span>BPF<span> </span>wykazuje również korzyści dla zdrowia:</p> <ul> <li>redukcję<span> </span>cholesterolu LDL, podwyższenie cholesterolu HDL i obniżenie poziomu<span> </span>trójglicerydów<sup id="cite_ref-PH_4-0" class="reference">[4]</sup>;</li> <li>zmniejszenie fotostarzenia skóry, a co za tym idzie, ryzyka zmian nowotworowych<sup id="cite_ref-PH_4-1" class="reference">[4]</sup>;</li> <li>uzupełnienie terapii zaburzeń erekcji w przebiegu<span> </span>cukrzycy typu 2<sup id="cite_ref-PH2_5-0" class="reference">[5]</sup>;</li> <li>korzystny wpływ na śródbłonek naczyniowy u chorych z zaburzeniem gospodarki lipidowej i węglowodanowej<sup id="cite_ref-PH2_5-1" class="reference">[5]</sup>;</li> <li>działanie<span> </span>hipoglikemizujące<span> </span>(obniżające stężenie cukru we krwi)</li> </ul> </body> </html>
V 21 CB
Nasion Pomarańcza bergamota (Citrus bergamia)
Tulsi, Holy Basil Seeds...

Tulsi, Holy Basil Seeds...

Cena 1,65 € (SKU: MHS 89)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Thai Holy Basil Seeds (Ocimum tenuiflorum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 (0,019g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This kind of Basil has a spicy, peppery, clove-like taste, may be the basil Thai people love most and is at least used in all street kitchens and restaurants in the country.</p> <p>Ocimum tenuiflorum, also known as Ocimum sanctum, holy basil, or tulasi or tulsi (also sometimes spelled thulasi), is an aromatic plant in the family Lamiaceae which is native to the Indian subcontinent and widespread as a cultivated plant throughout the Southeast Asian tropics.[2][3] It is an erect, many-branched subshrub, 30–60 cm (12–24 in) tall with hairy stems and simple phyllotaxic green or purple leaves that are strongly scented.</p> <p> </p> <p>Leaves have petioles and are ovate, up to 5 cm (2.0 in) long, usually slightly toothed. The flowers are purplish in elongate racemes in close whorls.[3] The two main morphotypes cultivated in India and Nepal are green-leaved (Sri or Lakshmi tulasi) and purple-leaved (Krishna tulasi).[4]</p> <p> </p> <p>Tulasi is cultivated for religious and medicinal purposes, and for its essential oil. It is widely known across the Indian subcontinent as a medicinal plant and a herbal tea, commonly used in Ayurveda, and has an important role within the Vaishnava tradition of Hinduism, in which devotees perform worship involving holy basil plants or leaves. This plant is revered as an elixir of life.</p> <p> </p> <p>The variety of Ocimum tenuiflorum used in Thai cuisine is referred to as Thai holy basil (Thai: กะเพรา kaphrao);[2] it is not to be confused with Thai basil, which is a variety of Ocimum basilicum.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Genetics</strong></p> <p>DNA barcodes of various biogeographical isolates of Tulsi from the Indian subcontinent are now available. In a large-scale phylogeographical study of this species conducted using chloroplast genome sequences, a group of researchers from Central University of Punjab, Bathinda, have found that this plant originates from North Central India.[5][6] The discovery might suggest the evolution of Tulsi is related with the cultural migratory patterns in the Indian subcontinent.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p><strong>In Hinduism</strong></p> <p>Tulsi leaves are an essential part in the worship of Vishnu and his avatars, including Krishna and Ram, and other male Vaishnava deities such as Hanuman, Balarama, Garuda and many others. Tulsi is a sacred plant for Hindus and is worshipped as the avatar of Lakshmi.[7] It is believed that water mixed with the petals given to the dying raises their departing souls to heaven.[8] Tulsi, which is Sanskrit for "the incomparable one", is most often regarded as a consort of Krishna in the form of Lakshmi.[9][10] According to the Brahma Vaivarta Purana, tulsi is an expression of Sita.[11][full citation needed] There are two types of tulsi worshipped in Hinduism: "Rama tulsi" has light green leaves and is larger in size; "Shyama tulsi" has dark green leaves and is important for the worship of Hanuman.[12] Many Hindus have tulasi plants growing in front of or near their home, often in special pots. Traditionally, tulsi is planted in the centre of the central courtyard of Hindu houses. It is also frequently grown next to Hanuman temples, especially in Varanasi.[13][full citation needed]</p> <p> </p> <p>According to Vaishnavas, it is believed in Puranas that during Samudra Manthana, when the gods win the ocean-churning against the asuras, Dhanvantari comes up from the ocean with Amrit in hand for the gods. Dhanvantari, the divine healer, sheds happy tears, and when the first drop falls in the Amrit, it forms tulasi. In the ceremony of Tulsi Vivaha, tulsi is ceremonially married to Krishna annually on the eleventh day of the waxing moon or twelfth of the month of Kartik in the lunar calendar. This day also marks the end of the four-month Chaturmas, which is considered inauspicious for weddings and other rituals, so the day inaugurates the annual marriage season in India. The ritual lighting of lamps each evening during Kartik includes the worship of the tulsi plant, which is held to be auspicious for the home. Vaishnavas especially follow the daily worship of tulsi during Kartik.[14] In another legend, Tulsi was a pious woman who sought a boon to marry Vishnu. Lakshmi, Vishnu's consort, cursed her to become a plant in earth. However, Vishnu appeased her by giving her a boon that she would grace him when he appears in the form of Shaligrama in temples.[15]</p> <p> </p> <p>Vaishnavas traditionally use Hindu prayer beads made from tulsi stems or roots, which are an important symbol of initiation. Tulsi rosaries are considered to be auspicious for the wearer, and believed to put them under the protection of Hanuman. They have such a strong association with Vaishnavas, that followers of Hanuman are known as "those who bear the tulsi round the neck".</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Ayurveda</strong></p> <p>Tulasi (Sanskrit:-Surasa) has been used for thousands of years in Ayurveda for its diverse healing properties. It is mentioned in the Charaka Samhita,[16] an ancient Ayurvedic text. Tulsi is considered to be an adaptogen,[17] balancing different processes in the body, and helpful for adapting to stress.[18] Marked by its strong aroma and astringent taste, it is regarded in Ayurveda as a kind of "elixir of life" and believed to promote longevity.</p> <p> </p> <p>Tulasi extracts are used in ayurvedic remedies for a variety of ailments. Traditionally, tulasi is taken in many forms: as herbal tea, dried powder, fresh leaf or mixed with ghee. Essential oil extracted from Karpoora tulasi is mostly used for medicinal purposes and in herbal cosmetics.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Thai cuisine</strong></p> <p>The leaves of holy basil, known as kaphrao in the Thai language (Thai: กะเพรา), are commonly used in Thai cuisine. Kaphrao should not be confused with horapha (Thai: โหระพา), which is normally known as Thai basil, or with Thai lemon basil (maenglak; Thai: แมงลัก).</p> <p>The best-known dish made with this herb is phat kaphrao (Thai: ผัดกะเพรา) — a stir-fry of Thai holy basil with meats, seafood or, as in khao phat kraphao, with rice.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Insect repellent</strong></p> <p>For centuries, the dried leaves have been mixed with stored grains to repel insects.[24] In Sri Lanka this plant is used as a mosquito repellent. Sinhala: Maduruthalaa</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Pharmacological study</strong></p> <p>Some of the main chemical constituents of tulsi are: oleanolic acid, ursolic acid, rosmarinic acid, eugenol, carvacrol, linalool, β-caryophyllene (about 8%), β-elemene (c.11.0%), and germacrene D (about 2%).</p> <p>Isolated O. sanctum extracts have some antibacterial activity against E. coli, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Genome sequence</strong></p> <p>The genome of Tulsi plant has been sequenced and the draft genome has been published independently by research teams from CSIR-Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants at Lucknow and National Centre for Biological Sciences at Bengaluru. The genome size was estimated to be 612 mega bases and results from the sequencing project show that certain metabolite-biosynthesis genes such as genes for biosynthesis of Anthocyanin in Krishna Tulsi variety, Ursolic acid and Eugenol in Rama Tulsi variety were expressed in large quantities. These metabolites were shown to have anti-cancerous properties as well. It was further commented that these metabolites could be utilized as anti-cancerous drugs.</p> <p> </p> </body> </html>
MHS 89 OT
Tulsi, Holy Basil Seeds (Ocimum tenuiflorum)

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Yuzu Seeds Japanese citrus fruit -20°C (Citrus junos) 4.15 - 1

Yuzu nasion -20°C (Citrus...

Cena 4,15 € (SKU: V 118 Y)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Yuzu nasion -20°C (Citrus junos)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Cena za opakowanie 2 lub 4 nasion.</strong></span></h2> <p><b>Yuzu</b><span> (</span><i>Citrus junos</i><sup id="cite_ref-autonazwa1_3-0" class="reference"></sup><span>; </span>jap<span>: 柚子 – </span><i>yuzu</i><span> </span>kor<span>: 유자 – </span><i>yuja</i><span>) – niewielkie drzewo lub krzew należący do rodziny </span>rutowatych<span>. Pochodzi z Chin, został sprowadzony do Japonii i Korei w okresie dynastii </span>Tang<span>. Obecnie bardziej popularny w tych krajach niż w swojej ojczyźnie</span><sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference"></sup><span>. Uwaga: we współczesnym języku chińskim termin 柚子 </span><i>yòuzi</i><span> odnosi się do </span>pomelo<span>, podczas gdy yuzu określa się jako 香橙 </span><i>xiāngchéng</i><span>.</span></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Morfologia">Morfologia</span></h2> <dl> <dt>Pokrój</dt> <dd>Niewielkie drzewo lub ciernisty krzew,</dd> <dt>Liście</dt> <dd>Podobne do liści<span> </span>papedy, bardzo aromatyczne.</dd> <dt>Kwiaty</dt> <dd></dd> <dt>Owoce</dt> <dd>Okrągłe, podobne do<span> </span>mandarynki</dd> </dl> </body> </html>
V 118 Y 2-S
Yuzu Seeds Japanese citrus fruit -20°C (Citrus junos) 4.15 - 1
Ashitaba seeds (Tomorrow's Leaf) (Angelica keiskei) 3.95 - 1

Ashitaba seeds (Tomorrow's...

Cena 3,95 € (SKU: MHS 100)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Ashitaba seeds (Tomorrow's Leaf) (Angelica keiskei)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Angelica keiskei Koidzumi, commonly known under the Japanese name of Ashitaba (アシタバ or 明日葉 ashitaba, literally "Tomorrow's Leaf"), is a cold hardy perennial plant from the angelica genus with an average growth height of 50–120 cm. It is endemic to Hachijō-jima, though it is artificially cultivated in Izu Ōshima, Mikura-jima, Nii-jima, To-shima and parts of Honshū as well.</span></p> <p><span>The plant's additional cultivar epithet koidzumi refers to botanist Gen'ichi Koizumi, while its Japanese nomenclature stems from the above-average regenerative capabilities it exhibits after injury. Harvesting a leaf at the break of day often results in a new sprout growing overnight, being visible the following morning.</span></p> <p><span>Traditionally it is seen as a major contributor to the supposedly healthier, extended lives of the local residents, possibly due to the chalconoids that are unique to this species of angelica. At one point in Edo period, the haulm's yellow sap was effectively used in the external treatment of smallpox, which prompted Kaibara Ekken to describe the herb in his Yamato honzō (大和本草), under the name of ashitagusa (鹹草), as "a powerful tonic drug." In folk medicine it is claimed to be diuretic, tonic, to improve digestion, and, when applied topically, to speed wound healing and prevent infection. Also, its nutritive qualities are said to be the factor behind the internal exiles' and their families' never waning stamina in the face of their arduous compulsory labor.</span></p> <p><span>For similar reasons, it very widely serves as pasture for cows, reckoned to improve the quality of milk as well as the yield and to maintain cattle health at the same time. It should be pointed out that most of these claims have yet to be proven in clinical trials, while studies have substantiated the presence of furocoumarins in several of these plants' components. Furanocumarin is an agent known to increase skin sensitivity to sunlight and may cause dermatitis.</span></p> <p><span>Nonetheless, modest conditions for cultivation and fast rate of growth, with optimal temperatures ranging between 12-22 degrees, have led many locals to plant ashitaba in herb gardens, flower pots, and backyards. These days the main use of their stipes, leaves, and taproots is in regional cuisine, where they are prepared as soba, tempura, shōchū, tea, ice cream, pasta etc. The Mikura-jima variety might excel in this regard as it is reputed to be less bitter than others.</span></p> <p><span>Note that ashitaba closely resembles Angelica japonica, but can be distinguished by its blooming period, which lasts from May to October whereas A. japonica's blooming period lasts only between May and July. Another indicator is the characteristic color of its sap.[2] The larvae of the Common Yellow Swallowtail are known to feed frequently on the plant.</span></p> <h2><span>Medicinal properties</span></h2> <p><span>A. keiskei has been claimed to exhibit cytotoxic, antidiabetic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antihypertensive, and antimicrobial properties via in vitro studies, but the efficacy of these qualities have yet to be confirmed in vivo.[3] Among current investigations is its potential as a nerve growth factor,[4] as well as potential usefulness in cancer, menopause, and other conditions.[5] Ashitaba may have positive effects on circulation by preventing red blood cells from clumping.</span></p> <h2><strong><span>Claims of being a vegetable source of vitamin B12</span></strong></h2> <p><span>Although it is often suggested that A. keiskei is a vegetable source of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin), recently published, peer-reviewed scientific investigations of pharmacology and phytochemical constituents of interest report nothing that substantiates this claim.[7][8] Traditional methods for measuring vitamin B12 in foods are compromised by contaminants (e.g. soil, bacteria, etc.) that contain detectable concentrations of inactive B12 analogs, which may explain the origin of this belief.[9] More recent studies reveal certain mushrooms and algae as the only naturally occurring sources of B12 outside of the animal kingdom.[10] Of these, only Chlorella has demonstrated the ability to reduce methyl malonic acid (MMA) levels (a product of B12 deficiency) in human subjects.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Soak seeds overnight in cool, non-chlorinated water and then refrigerate the seeds (approximately 40 degrees F) in the moist medium for 3 days.  </span></strong></p> <p><strong><span>The moist medium could be moist sand, moist potting soil, moist coir or moist peat.  </span></strong></p> <p><strong><span>Note that our recommendation is MOIST, not SODDEN or VERY WET and that we are recommending REFRIGERATION not FREEZING.  </span></strong></p> <p><strong><span>After this pretreatment, plant the (still moist) seeds.  </span></strong></p> <p><strong><span>Sow on surface, barely cover with soil and press in firmly and keep evenly moist until germination.  </span></strong></p> <p><strong><span>Use a greenhouse, shade house or grow lights.  </span></strong></p> <p><strong><span>Germination Temperature is around 20C/68F</span></strong></p> <p><strong><span>Germination occurs 30 to 60 days after sowing.   </span></strong></p> <p><strong><span>Seedlings are slow-growing and will require about 60 days to transplant.  </span></strong></p> <p><strong><span>Once past the seedling stage, the plant is fast growing. </span></strong></p> <p><strong><span>The plants prefer rich, deep, ever moist, well-drained soil and full sun to part shade.  </span></strong></p> <p><strong>Water every other day.</strong></p>
MHS 100
Ashitaba seeds (Tomorrow's Leaf) (Angelica keiskei) 3.95 - 1

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Macadamia Nut Seeds (Macadamia integrifolia) 2.05 - 1

Macadamia Nut Seeds...

Cena 2,05 € (SKU: V 226)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Macadamia Nut, Bauple Nut Seeds (Macadamia integrifolia)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 seed.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>* Macadamia integrifolia is a tree in the Proteaceae family, native to Queensland in Australia. Common names include macadamia nut, bauple nut, Queensland nut or nut oak. </span></p> <p><span>* This species is a small tree; its leaves are simple with toothed margins and are 7 to 15 cm in length. The flowers are white or pinkish followed by woody, rounded fruits which are 2 to 3.5 cm in diameter.</span></p> <p><span>* Seed - raw or cooked. Sweet and delicious, they can be added to cakes, biscuits, ice cream, etc. They can also be ground into a flour and then added to cereals to enrich their protein value. The shell is very hard, making it difficult to extract the seed. Edible oil is obtained from the seed.</span></p> <p><span>* Plants grow best in rich moist soils and require copious summer watering in their early stages, though established plants are very drought resistant. Trees require a sheltered position and are easily damaged by strong winds. Plants can be grown in climates cooler than their native habitat, but they are not very hardy in Britain. They can survive slight frosts, however, and have succeeded outdoors in the Scilly Isles. Growth is optimal between temperatures of 20 - 25°c, ceasing when they fall below 10°c or rise above 30°c.</span></p> <p><span>* Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a warm greenhouse. The dehusked seed germinates quickly at 25°c. The seed can also be sown in the spring in a warm greenhouse. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. If trying them outdoors, give the plants some protection from the cold for their first few winters. Cultivars may be grafted.</span></p> <p><strong><span>The trees will survive in hardiness zones 10 and 11.</span></strong></p> <p><strong><span>Growing Info:</span></strong></p> <p><span>Scarification: Soak in water, let stand in water for 24 hours.</span></p> <p><span>Stratification: none required.</span></p> <p><span>Germination: sow seed 3/4" deep, tamp the soil, mulch the seedbed.</span></p> <p><span>Other: Seed needs warm temperatures after sowing to germinate (75 degrees F +).</span></p> <p><span> <iframe width="640" height="385" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jVqU2QNXpOA?rel=0&amp;hd=1" frameborder="0" class="embed-responsive-item"> </iframe></span></p> </body> </html>
V 226
Macadamia Nut Seeds (Macadamia integrifolia) 2.05 - 1
Finger Grape Seeds 2.25 - 1

Finger Grape Seeds

Cena 2,25 € (SKU: V 160)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Finger Grape Seeds</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Finger table grapes have elongated purple drupes. They look like small maroon chili peppers, tightly clustered together on bright green stems. The grapes have a crisp, thin skin over pale flesh. Witch Fingers have a very sweet flavor, not overly tannic and low in acidity. The overall taste is reminiscent of plums. Fingers is a grape grown for its flavor and appearance.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Seasons/Availability</strong></p> <p>Fingers grapes are available for a short time mid-summer.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Current Facts</strong></p> <p>Fingers grapes were created by a process of hybridization, using hand pollination, between an American cultivar developed by the University Of Arkansas Division Of Agriculture and a Mediterranean variety. Using these techniques, producers came up with a great tasting grape with a very interesting look.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Applications</strong></p> <p>Finger grapes were grown to be table grapes, enjoyed fresh out of hand. They would make a nice addition to fruit salads, offering something different than the average red grape. Witch Finger grapes pair well with mild cheeses and nuts and make a great snack for kids who find both the shape and taste appealing.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Geography/History</strong></p> <p>Finger grapes are grown exclusively for commercial distribution at only one vineyard in the San Joaquin Valley near Bakersfield, California. These finger-shaped grapes were developed through a breeding program with International Fruit Genetics, and were first grown in 2002. It took several years of selective breeding to find the perfect crop. They are sold at local farmer’s markets in Southern California and packaged for commercial markets nationwide.</p> <p> </p>
V 160
Finger Grape Seeds 2.25 - 1

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Persian lime Seeds – limoo, Tahiti lime  - 3

Pestki limonki perskiej...

Cena 1,95 € (SKU: V 119)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Pestki limonki perskiej (Citrus latifolia)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Cena za opakowanie 2 nasion.</strong></span></h2> <p>Limonka perska (Citrus × latifolia) lub limoo jest również znana jako limonka Tahiti lub limonka Bearss (nazwana na cześć Johna T. Bearssa, który opracował tę beznasienną odmianę około 1895 r. Limonka.</p> <p>Posiada wyjątkowo aromatyczny, korzenny aromat. Owoce mają około 6 cm średnicy, często z lekko sękatymi końcami i są sprzedawane zwykle jako zielone, chociaż żółkną, gdy osiągają pełną dojrzałość. Jest również powszechnie dostępny w postaci suszonej, ponieważ jest często używany w kuchni perskiej. Jest większa, o grubszej skórce, z mniej intensywnymi aromatami cytrusowymi niż limonka (Citrus aurantifolia).</p> <p>Zalety wapna perskiego w rolnictwie komercyjnym w porównaniu z wapnem kluczowym to większy rozmiar, brak nasion, odporność, brak cierni na krzakach i dłuższa trwałość owoców. Są mniej kwaśne niż kluczowe limonki i nie mają goryczki, która nadaje niepowtarzalny smak limonki.</p> <p>Limonki perskie są sprzedawane głównie w sześciu rozmiarach, znanych jako 110, 150, 175, 200, 230 i 250. Kiedyś uprawiana głównie na Florydzie w USA, zyskała na znaczeniu po zniszczeniu tam sadów wapiennych przez huragan w 1926 roku, według American Pomological Society, a następnie same perskie sady wapienne zostały zniszczone przez huragan Andrew w 1992 roku.</p> <p>Każdego roku uprawia się, przetwarza i eksportuje duże ilości perskich limonek, głównie z Meksyku na rynki amerykańskie, europejskie i azjatyckie. Import wapna perskiego z Meksyku do USA odbywa się głównie za pośrednictwem McAllen w Teksasie.</p> <p>Limonki perskie pochodzą z Dalekiego Wschodu i początkowo uprawiano je na dużą skalę w Persji (obecnie Iran) i południowym Iraku.</p> <p>southern Iraq.</p> </body> </html>
V 119
Persian lime Seeds – limoo, Tahiti lime  - 3
Giant strawberry seeds

Giant strawberry seeds

Cena 2,00 € (SKU: V 1 GS)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Giant strawberry seeds</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 10 seeds.</span><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><br /></span></em></strong></h2> <p>Strawberries, Fragaria ananassa L. Maximus, are quite easy to grow! They are perennial, winter hardy, and will thrive in full sunshine, as long as the soil is fertile and well-drained. Healthy plants will produce an abundance of berries for years! Strawberries are as big as apples! This standard "GIANT" type will provide you with the largest crop! These everbearing Giants will produce throughout the summer for Best desserts and snacks!</p> <p>Strawberries need light to germinate and their seeds shouldn't be covered. But practice has shown that uncovered strawberry seeds dry out very quickly during germination. I, therefore, recommend covering the seed very lightly with sieved seeding soil. After sowing and moistening, you can also place a glass pane on the sowing tray.</p> <p>Seeds need at least 60 days of stratification.</p> </body> </html>
V 1 GS
Giant strawberry seeds