Persian Silk Tree, Pink Silk Tree Seeds

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Persian Silk Tree, Pink Silk Tree Seeds (Albizia julibrissin)

Price for Package of 10 seeds.

Albizia julibrissin (Persian silk tree, pink silk tree) is a species of tree in the family Fabaceae, native to southwestern and eastern Asia. The genus is named after the Italian nobleman Filippo degli Albizzi, who introduced it to Europe in the mid-18th century, and it is

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Persian Silk Tree, Pink Silk Tree Seeds (Albizia julibrissin)

Price for Package of 10 seeds.

Albizia julibrissin (Persian silk tree, pink silk tree) is a species of tree in the family Fabaceae, native to southwestern and eastern Asia.

The genus is named after the Italian nobleman Filippo degli Albizzi, who introduced it to Europe in the mid-18th century, and it is sometimes incorrectly spelled Albizzia. The specific epithet julibrissin is a corruption of the Persian word gul-i abrisham (گل ابریشم) which means "silk flower" (from gul گل "flower" + abrisham ابریشم "silk").

Names

Albizia julibrissin is known by a wide variety of common names, such as Persian silk tree or pink siris. It is also called Lenkoran acacia or bastard tamarind, though it is not too closely related to either genus. The species is usually called "silk tree" or "mimosa" in the United States, which is misleading - the former name can refer to any species of Albizia which is most common in any one locale. And, although once included in Mimosa, neither is it very close to the Mimoseae. To add to the confusion, several species of Acacia, notably Acacia baileyana and Acacia dealbata, are also known as "mimosa" (especially in floristry), and many Fabaceae trees with highly divided leaves are called thus in horticulture.

Its leaves slowly close during the night and during periods of rain, the leaflets bowing downward; thus its modern Persian name shabkhosb (شب‌خسب) means "night sleeper" (from shab شب‌ "night" and -khosb خسب "sleeper"). In Japan its common names are nemunoki, nemurinoki and nenenoki which all mean "sleeping tree". Nemu tree is a partial translation of nemunoki.

Description

A. julibrissin is a small deciduous tree growing to 5–12 m tall, with a broad crown of level or arching branches. The bark is dark greenish grey in colour and striped vertically as it gets older. The leaves are bipinnate, 20–45 cm long and 12–25 cm broad, divided into 6–12 pairs of pinnae, each with 20–30 pairs of leaflets; the leaflets are oblong, 1–1.5 cm long and 2–4 mm broad. The flowers are produced throughout the summer in dense inflorescences, the individual flowers with small calyx and corola (except the central ones), and a tight cluster of stamens 2–3 cm long, white or pink with a white base, looking like silky threads. They have been observed to be attractive to bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. The fruit is a flat brown pod 10–20 cm long and 2–2.5 cm broad, containing several seeds inside.

Cultivation and uses

A. julibrissin is widely planted as an ornamental plant in parks and gardens, grown for its leaf texture and flowers. The broad crown of a mature tree makes it useful for providing dappled shade. The flower colour varies from white in A. julibrissin f. alba, to rich red-tipped flowers. Variants with cream or pale yellow flowers are also reported. Other cultivars are becoming available: 'Summer Chocolate' has red foliage ageing to dark bronze, with pale pink flowers; 'Ishii Weeping' (or 'Pendula') has a drooping growth habit.

Other uses

The seeds are used as a food for livestock and by wildlife, and the sweet-scented flowers are a good nectar source for honeybees and butterflies.

Extracts of A. julibrissin has been found to possess antidepressant effects in mice in high doses, most likely mediated through 5-HT1A receptors.[4] In traditional Chinese medicine Albizzia jublibrissin (合歡花 Hé Huān Huā) is used to nourish the heart and calm the spirit.

Invasive species

In the wild, the tree tends to grow in dry plains, sandy valleys, and uplands. It has become an invasive species in Japan; and in the United States it has spread from southern New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, west to Missouri and Illinois, and south to Florida and Texas. It is cultivated in California and Oregon.

This tree is allelopathic to its neighbors and undergrowth (although Miner's Lettuce seems to thrive in its shadow in cool moist climates). Its seeds are numerous and they are fertile even over long periods of drought. Each pod, which resemble a flattened bean pod made of paper, contains an average of 8 seeds. The pods burst in strong winds, and the seeds carry over surprisingly long distances.

Breeding work is currently under way in the United States to produce ornamental plants which will not set seed and can therefore be planted without risk. However, in the eastern United States it is generally a short-lived tree, being highly susceptible to mimosa vascular wilt,[8] a fungal disease caused by a species of Fusarium, though the disease does not seem to have seriously impacted its populations. Because of its invasive tendencies and disease susceptibility, it is rarely recommended as an ornamental plant in the US, though it is still widely planted in parts of Europe.

The health benefits of Albizia julibrissin

Traditional Chinese Medicinal practitioners have long revered the bark, leaves and flowers of the Mimosa tree for its potent health benefits. The Mayan people of Central America also revered the plant, and commonly used it for aiding trauma injuries and burns. And while little modern scientific research has been conducted on the qualities of this plant, time-tested ancient wisdom has long praised this herb as an important therapeutic tool.

Usually, for health applications, the bark of the tree is shaved and dried and used in tincture and capsule forms. The leaves of the plant can also be dried and used as a tea. One of the most important applications of the dried/powder form of the bark is its use as an ancient mood enhancer. Known in China as the “Collective Happiness Bark,” the Mimosa tree was given to people who needed a “spiritual uplift or cleansing.” Similarly, the bark is used to cleanse the heart and liver meridians (energetic pathways) in the body. Mimosa tree bark is also used as a common remedy for generalized muscular discomfort and swelling.

For many, an effective natural approach for the treatment of mild states of depression and anxiety
Burn care
The Mimosa plant proved to be a key remedy for over 5,000 burn victims in the San Juanico Disaster of 1984. After a petroleum gas explosion occurred in Mexico, officials turned to this plant as a healing salve for the wounded.

Helps with Wounds
For more than 1000 years. The Mayans revered the Mimosa tree as a powerful support herb for external lesions and wounds. Procedures were created by roasting the bark and creating a poultice for the skin wound. The powdered bark is also an excellent cleanser against germs. In trauma injuries, it can protect protruding bones and aids in the restoration of damaged tissue.

Colds and Cough
Mimosa bark decoctions can aid in relieving the indications of upper respiratory ailments and cough.

Blood Coagulant
Related to these wound applications, powdered Mimosa bark holds extremely high amounts of antioxidant and astringent tannins. These qualities stop bleeding, reduce the chances of infection, and aid the skin in the formation of healthy tissue.

Balances Irritation
Mimosa bark and leaves have the ability to reduce redness and soothe discomfort. This is thought to be due to three forms of steroids present in the bark. Studies show that the bark powder has a anesthesia-like effect on the skin, and can reduce pain for up to three hours when applied topically. What is more, the bark aids in skin regeneration.

Oral Discomfort Reliever
Traditionally, a tea made from the leaves of the Mimosa tree was used to offer relief for toothache soreness.

Skin Disorders
Mimosa bark is helpful for some skin conditions. It has, as of late, become a popular ingredient in hair and skin products as it may stimulate the generation of skin elastin and collagen. This may be related to its high flavonoid and hyaluronic acid content, chemical compounds responsible for cell regeneration in skin.

Immune Booster
Mimosa is full of vital plant micronutrients, including copper, iron, zinc, manganese and magnesium. These nutrients promote cell health and a strong immune system.

History

The stem bark has been used as a sedative for hundreds of years as recorded in the Pharmacopeia of the People's Republic of China 2 , 8 , 9 and as an anti-inflammatory agent for swelling and pain in the lungs and to treat skin ulcers, wounds, bruises, abscesses, boils, hemorrhoids, and fractures, as well as to remove carbuncles. The dried stem bark is used as a tonic in China and Japan. 10 Indigenous people living in the southern mountainous region of Korea prepare the root as an infusion for bone diseases. 11 In India, a chloroform and methanol seed extract has been used to treat bronchitis, asthma, leprosy, and glands infected by tuberculous. 12 A bark extract to treat insomnia, diuresis, asthenia, and confusion has been used in Asia. 2 The plant's flowers have been used to treat symptoms associated with palpitations, anxiety, depression, and insomnia. 

The seed oil is a source of food for livestock and wildlife. The proteolytic enzymes in the seeds may also reduce bitterness in some cheeses. Mimosa may be used commercially as a promising seed oil crop for making soap, hair shampoo, and ultraviolet protectors in cosmetics, and in nutritional products due to its high level of polyunsaturated fatty acids. 

How To

Rinse the herbs with cold running water; then soak it for 30min. Water : Herbs (3L : 100g) 
Bring to a boil, lower the hear and simmer for a further 2hours. 
Keep refridgerated and take 1cup 3times daily.(hot or cold)

Advice to consumers
Some individuals may have adverse reactions to certain plants, herbs, and other natural products. 
Just because something is natural does not mean it is safe for everyone. 
On any issue where no specific advice is given to consumers please follow this general advice if you are currently taking the product:

you are advised to discontinue use and consult your pharmacist or herbal medical doctor. 
when speaking to your doctor of pharmacist you may find it helpful to take a copy of this MHRA advice about the product with you
you should continue to take any medication prescribed by your doctor.

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Persian Silk Tree, Pink Silk Tree Seeds

Persian Silk Tree, Pink Silk Tree Seeds

Persian Silk Tree, Pink Silk Tree Seeds (Albizia julibrissin)

Price for Package of 10 seeds.

Albizia julibrissin (Persian silk tree, pink silk tree) is a species of tree in the family Fabaceae, native to southwestern and eastern Asia. The genus is named after the Italian nobleman Filippo degli Albizzi, who introduced it to Europe in the mid-18th century, and it is

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