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Banana Seeds

There are 10 products.

Showing 1-10 of 10 item(s)

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.
Musa nagensium Banana Seeds...

Musa nagensium Banana Seeds...

Price €5.00 (SKU: V 111 MN)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Musa nagensium Banana Seeds Cold Hardy -20 °C</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Musa nagensium is a beautiful, slender banana with a striking dark purple-red to almost black pseudo-stem which is very waxy.</p> <p>The abaxial surface of the leaf has a dark red midrib and the lamina is so waxy that is nearly white.</p> <p>The pseudo-stem may exceed 6 m high. Produces suckers. The leaf is up to 3 m long and blue-gray. The leaves are quite far from each other compared to other bananas from the Eumusa group, further adding to the slender appearance of the plant .</p> <p>Inflorescence is pendulous. The bracts are oblong and lanceolate, the lower are 20-25 cm long and 10 cm wide, the top ones are 15-18 cm long, almost 8 cm wide, red outside, bright orange on the inside. Each with 18 to 20 flowers in two rows. The perianth is orange, 6 cm long, 1.3 cm wide, four-lobed, free petal ovate-lanceolate, more than 2.5 cm long, pointed.</p> <p>The fruits are 13-15 cm long, petiolate, not recurved. The seeds are very big: nearly 1.3 cm long and 1 cm wide.</p> <p><strong>Origin:</strong></p> <p>India, Assam, Naga mountains</p> <p><strong>Hardiness: </strong>-20 °C</p> <p><strong>Soil:</strong></p> <p>Rich and well drained</p> <p><strong>Height:</strong></p> <p>6 m</p> <p><strong>Exposure:</strong></p> <p>Sun</p> <p><strong>Propagation:</strong></p> <p>Seed</p> <p>Suckers</p> <p><strong>Germination</strong></p> <p>Banana seeds are not easy to germinate, with germination taking weeks or months, but it is extremely rewarding to see them succeed.</p> <p>Prepare the seeds by soaking in tepid, sterilised or distilled water.  Using a very small amount of the saltpetre powder provided (no more than half a teaspoon per 3 litres of water) will help remove and residue from the seeds and may aide germination by removing residue from the seeds.</p> <p>Soak the seeds for two days, using the saltpetre on the first day and switching to distilled/sterilised water only on the second day.</p> <p>Sow seeds into sterilised compost, vermiculite or a coir/perlite mix.</p> <p>Use a heated propagator or place the planted seeds in a warm airing cupboard, away from direct sunlight.  A temperature of 30-35 Celsius is required.</p> </body> </html>
V 111 MN
Musa nagensium Banana Seeds Cold Hardy -20 °C
Musa acuminata Seeds, edible dessert banana  - 2

Musa acuminata Seeds,...

Price €2.55 (SKU: V 150 MA)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Musa acuminata Seeds, edible dessert banana</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><strong>The cold-tolerant banana plant that's hardy to zone 8</strong></p> <p>Musa acuminata is a species of banana native to Southeast Asia. Most of the modern edible dessert bananas belong to this species, although some are hybrids with Musa balbisiana. First cultivated by humans at around 8000 BC is one of the early examples of domesticated plants.</p> <p>Musa acuminata is an evergreen perennial, not a tree. The trunk (known as the pseudostem) is made of tightly packed layers of leaf sheaths emerging from completely or partially buried corms.</p> <p>The inflorescence grows horizontally or obliquely from the trunk. The individual flowers are white to yellowish-white in color and are negatively geotropic (that is, growing upwards and away from the ground). Both male and female flowers are present in a single inflorescence. Female flowers located near the base (and develop into fruit), and the male flowers located at the topmost top-shaped bud in between leathery bracts.</p> <p>The rather slender fruits are berries, the size of each depends on the number of seeds they contain. Each fruit can have 15 to 62 seeds. Each fruit bunch can have an average of 161.76 ± 60.62 fingers with each finger around 2.4 cm (0.94 in) by 9 cm (3.5 in) in size.</p> <p>The seeds of wild Musa acuminata are around 5 to 6 mm (0.20 to 0.24 in) in diameter. They are subglobose or angular in shape and very hard. The tiny embryo is located at the end of the micropyle. Each seed of Musa acuminata typically produces around four times its size in edible starchy pulp (the parenchyma, the portion of the bananas eaten), around 0.23 cm3 (0.014 cu in). Wild Musa acuminata is diploid with 2n=2x=22 chromosomes, while cultivated varieties (cultivars) are mostly triploid (2n=3x=33) and parthenocarpic, producing fruit without seeds. The most familiar dessert banana cultivars belong to the Cavendish subgroup. The ratio of pulp to seeds increases dramatically in "seedless" edible cultivars: the small and largely sterile seeds are now surrounded by 23 times their size inedible pulp. The seeds themselves are reduced to tiny black specks along the central axis of the fruit.</p> <p><strong>Taxonomy</strong></p> <p>Musa acuminata belongs to section Musa (formerly Eumusa) of the genus Musa. It belongs to the family Musaceae of the order Zingiberales. It is divided into several subspecies (see the section below).</p> <p>Musa acuminata was first described by the Italian botanist Luigi Aloysius Colla in the book Memorie della Reale Accademia delle Scienze di Torino (1820). Although other authorities have published various names for this species and its hybrids mistaken for different species (notably Musa sapientum by Linnaeus which is now known to be a hybrid of Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana), Colla's publication is the oldest name for the species and thus has precedence over the others from the rules of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature. Colla also was the first authority to recognize that both Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana were wild ancestral species, even though the specimen he described as a naturally occurring seedless polyploid like cultivated bananas.</p> <p><strong>Distribution</strong></p> <p>Musa acuminata is native to the biogeographical region of Malesia and most of mainland Indochina.</p> <p>Musa acuminata favors wet tropical climates in contrast to the hardier Musa balbisiana, the species it hybridized extensively with to provide almost all modern cultivars of edible bananas.[16] Subsequent spread of the species outside of its native region is thought to be purely the result of human intervention. Early farmers introduced M. acuminata into the native range of M. balbisiana resulting in hybridization and the development of modern edible clones.</p> <p>AAB cultivars were spread from somewhere around the Philippines 4000 years ago and resulted in the distinct banana cultivars known as the Maia Maoli or Popoulo group bananas in the Pacific islands. They may have been introduced as well to South America during Precolumbian times from contact with early Polynesian sailors, although evidence of this is debatable.</p> <p>Westward spread included Africa which already had evidence of Musa acuminata × Musa balbisiana hybrid cultivation from as early as 1000 to 400 BC. They were probably introduced first to Madagascar from Indonesia.</p> <p>From West Africa, they were introduced to the Canary islands by the Portuguese in the 16th century, and from there were introduced to Hispaniola (modern Haiti and the Dominican Republic) in 1516.</p> <p><strong>Ecology</strong></p> <p>Musa acuminata is propagated sexually by seeds or asexually by suckers in the wild. Edible parthenocarpic cultivars are usually cultivated by suckers in plantations or cloned by tissue culture. Seeds are also still used in research for developing new cultivars.</p> <p>Musa acuminata is a pioneer species. It rapidly exploits newly disturbed areas, like areas recently subjected to forest fires. It is also considered a 'keystone species' in certain ecosystems, paving the way for greater wildlife diversity once they have established themselves in an area. It is particularly important as a food source for wildlife due to its rapid regeneration.</p> <p>Musa acuminata bears flowers that by their very structure, make it difficult to self-pollinate. It takes about four months for the flowers to develop in the fruits, with the fruit clusters at the bases ripening sooner than those at the tip.</p> <p>A large variety of wildlife feeds on the fruits. These include frugivorous bats, birds, squirrels, tree shrews, civets, rats, mice, monkeys, and apes. These animals are also important for seed dispersal.</p> <p><strong>Mature seeds germinate readily 2 to 3 weeks after sowing.  They can remain viable from a few months to two years of storage.</strong></p> <p><strong>Domestication</strong></p> <p>In 1955, Norman Simmonds and Ken Shepherd revised the classification of modern edible bananas based on their genetic origins. Their classification depends on how many of the characteristics of the two ancestral species (Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana) are exhibited by the cultivars. Most banana cultivars that exhibit purely or mostly Musa acuminata genomes are dessert bananas, while hybrids of M. acuminata and M. balbisiana are mostly cooking bananas or plantains.</p> <p>Musa acuminata is one of the earliest plants to be domesticated by humans for agriculture. They were first domesticated in Southeast Asia and surrounding areas (possibly New Guinea, eastern Indonesia, and the Philippines) at around 8000 BC. It has been suggested that M. acuminata may have originally been domesticated for parts other than the fruit. Either for fiber, for construction materials, or for its edible male bud. They were selected early for parthenocarpy and seed sterility in their fruits, a process that might have taken thousands of years. This initially led to the first 'human-edible' banana diploid clones (modern AA cultivars). Diploid clones are still able to produce viable seeds when pollinated by wild species. This resulted in the development of triploid clones that were conserved for their larger fruit.</p> <p>M. acuminata was later introduced into mainland Indochina into the range of another ancestral wild banana species - Musa balbisiana, a hardier species of lesser genetic diversity than M. acuminata. Hybridization between the two resulted in drought-resistant edible cultivars. Modern edible banana and plantain cultivars are derived from permutations of hybridization and polyploidy of the two.</p> <p><strong>Ornamental</strong></p> <p>M. acuminata is one of several banana species cultivated as an ornamental plant, for its striking shape and foliage. In temperate regions it requires protection from winter frosts. The cultivar M. acuminata (AAA Group) 'Dwarf Cavendish' has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.</p> </body> </html>
V 150 MA
Musa acuminata Seeds, edible dessert banana  - 2
Banana Musa Ornata Seeds

Banana Musa Ornata Seeds

Price €2.75 (SKU: V 32)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Banana Musa Ornata Seeds</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>beautiful and very easy to grow Musa Ornata Purple. Originally from India this 9 foot plant is hardy to zones 9-11. It can benefit from slow release fertilizer and kept in full sun. It has beautiful pestfree foliage and a reddish midrib running down the 6 foot leaf. This easy to grow plant with yellowish edible fruit is very good growing in containers also. The seeds need to be soaked for 24 hrs and then sown 1" deep and kept at 68 - 77 degrees with light. These can take anywhere from 8 weeks to 4 months to germinate.</div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Pour hot water over the seeds and left them in water 24 hours.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">28-30 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1-6 Monts</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;</em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> <div><span style="color: #008000;"><em> </em></span></div> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 32
Banana Musa Ornata Seeds
Darjeeling Banana Seeds (Musa sikkimensis)

Darjeeling Banana Seeds...

Price €2.75 (SKU: V 110 MS)
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;" class="">Darjeeling Banana Seeds (Musa sikkimensis)</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Bananas are enjoying a resurgence in popularity, justifiably so as they are easy to grow and few plants can rival their impact on any garden! Very few species are fully hardy, but once mature they can be planted out and wrapped up in sacking for winter. Some species are smaller in habit and make ideal houseplants. Musa sikkimensis is a fairly recent introduction to the UK. This striking Banana originates from Eastern India and is proving a pretty hardy species. A vigorous grower, it produces huge, tough green leaves with an attractive maroon midrib and strong, random streaks of maroon across the leaves. Mature plants (5 years +) bear long lasting yellow flowers. Although frost will not damage the roots, the leaves should be wrapped in fleece or sacking for the winter. Alternatively can be grown in a large container and moved to a frost free place over winter. All in all, an excellent addition to the subtropical border or achitectural planting scheme. Half Hardy Perennial (to 0C - wrap up in winter) Height: 3-4m Position: Sun or semi-shade preferably out of strong winds.</p> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 110 MS (3 S)
Darjeeling Banana Seeds (Musa sikkimensis)
Wild Banana Seeds (Musa balbisiana)  - 6

Wild Banana Seeds (Musa...

Price €3.25 (SKU: V 88 MB)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Wild Banana Seeds (Musa balbisiana)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Musa balbisiana is a wild-type species of banana native to eastern South Asia, northern Southeast Asia, and southern China. It is one of the ancestors of modern cultivated bananas, along with Musa acuminata. It was first scientifically described in 1820 by the Italian botanist Luigi Aloysius Colla.</p> <p>It grows lush leaves in clumps with a more upright habit than most cultivated bananas. Flowers grow in inflorescences colored red to maroon. The fruit is between blue and green. They are considered inedible because of the seeds they contain but are very tasty.</p> <p>It may be assumed that wild bananas were cooked and eaten or agriculturalists would not have developed the cultivated banana.[4] Seeded Musa balbisiana fruit are called butuhan ('with seeds') in the Philippines, and kluai tani (กล้วยตานี) in Thailand. Natural parthenocarpic clones occur through polyploidy and produce edible bananas, examples of which are wild saba bananas.</p> </body> </html>
V 88 MB
Wild Banana Seeds (Musa balbisiana)  - 6
Burmese Blue Banana Seeds (Musa itinerans) 3.05 - 1

Burmese Blue Banana Seeds...

Price €3.05 (SKU: V 125)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Burmese Blue Banana Seeds (Musa itinerans)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This rare and moderately sized banana is found in Burma, northern Thailand, Laos and Vietnam. It was formerly associated with both the musa acuminata and the balbisian musa, but it is now believed to be more closely related musa and similar to the recently described variety m. guangdongensis, but it is not the same one that grows considerably larger and develops new buds (stolons). 2 to 3 meters away from the main plant (parent plant).</p> <p>The ripe fruits are bluish to purple, small and are much appreciated locally in Thai cuisine.</p> <p>It is currently not known in cultivation, but is unlikely to pose any particular challenges to cultivation in tropical and / or temperate climates.</p> <p>It is a more cold-resistant variety, occurring in its original habitat at altitudes that can range from 200 - 1800 meters along steep roads, ravines and slopes. It can withstand seasonal frost, quickly emerging new leaves in early spring.</p> <p>Note: This species has been treated by some as the newly discovered musa guangdongensis, but it is not the same species.</p> <p>Tip:</p> <p>In cultivation, it requires conditions that suit ferns rather than ordinary and regular banana trees; due to its native habitat.</p>
V 125
Burmese Blue Banana Seeds (Musa itinerans) 3.05 - 1
Pink Banana, Velvet Banana Seeds 1.95 - 4

Pink Banana, Velvet Banana...

Price €1.95 (SKU: V 88 MV)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Pink Banana, Velvet Banana Seeds (Musa velutina)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>These lovely dwarf banana plants are typically used in the landscape for their ornamental appeal. The rootstock will survive outdoors to -5°C (23°F) with some winter protection. Musa velutina also makes a good houseplant.&nbsp;<span>Once established they will bloom reliably. The exotic flowers (inflorescence) are pink to orange and are followed by bright, velvety, pink bananas.</span></div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>However, more than an ornamental, the fruits are actually edible if you don't mind working around the seeds. They will peel themselves back when ripe. If you catch them at the right time, but you have only maybe a day or so to catch it when ripe, opened, and unspoiled, you'll notice the best flavour.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Bananas are herbaceous plants that have a “pseudostem” a cylinder of leaf-petiole sheaths, because of this they are sometimes mistaken for trees.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span><strong>Sowing:</strong>&nbsp;Sow indoors at any time of year.</span></div> <div><span>Sow seeds as soon as you are able. If you are not going to sow them, store them in their packaging in a cool, dark, dry place. (Do not refrigerate)</span></div> <div><span>Soak seed for 3-4 days in warm water, which has been previously boiled. Change the water each day. (This process is important, as gets rid of germination inhibitors)</span></div> <div><span>Fill either large cells or trays with perlite, vermiculite or sterilized compost. Stand the trays in water until the medium is completely moist</span></div> <div><span>Sow the seeds 2.5cm (1”) deep. Spray the seeds with a little copper based fungicide</span></div> <div><span>Bottom heat is helpful, place in a propagator if you have one or in a warm location out of direct sunlight. Do not exclude light as this helps germination. Keep at a constant temperature of 20-25°C (68-77°F).</span></div> <div><span>Check the seeds daily for germination. If mold or fungus appears, remove the seeds and wash them in warm water. Spray them with fungicide and re-sow in a fresh medium in a sterilized pot.</span></div> <div><span>Keep the surface of the compost moist but not waterlogged. Patience is needed as germination is erratic and take from one to twelve months. Do not give up too soon!</span></div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span><strong>Growing:&nbsp;</strong></span></div> <div><span>When large enough to handle, transplant seedlings into 7.5cm (3 inch) pots, taking care not to damage the root system. Grow on in well-lit conditions, and pot on, into rich, well drained soil, as required. Water the plant thoroughly and every 1 to 3 days thereafter depending on the season. Do not soak! Remember moist soil, not wet, not dry.</span></div> <div><span>&nbsp;</span></div> <div><span><strong>Position:&nbsp;</strong></span></div> <div><span>The planting site should be chosen for protection from wind and cold weather, if possible, the south or southeast side of the house. Banana plants will grow in most soils, but to thrive, they should be planted in a rich, well-drained soil. Before planting, test your soil’s ability to drain properly. Dig a post-hole about 2 feet deep. Fill it with water. If it empties within two hours, the drainage should be ideal.</span></div> <div><span>&nbsp;</span></div> <div><span><strong>Cultivation:&nbsp;</strong></span></div> <div><span>Their rapid growth rate makes bananas plants heavy feeders. During warm weather, apply a balanced fertilizer once a month. Spread the fertilizer evenly around the plant in a circle extending 4 feet from the trunk. Feed container banana plants on the same monthly schedule using about half the rate for outside plants.</span></div> <div><span>&nbsp;</span></div> <div><span><strong>Overwintering:&nbsp;</strong></span></div> <div><span>Bring container grow plants indoors. Outdoor plants need protection, either wrap the trunk or cover with blanket if the banana plants are small and low temperatures are predicted. You can also dig up the roots, and store in a dark dry place inside until spring. (Foliage can be cut back to 6-8”) This is the best way for most.</span></div> <div><span>Leaves are damaged at 0°C (32°F) but the plant will grow back from the root (corm)</span></div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 88 MV
Pink Banana, Velvet Banana Seeds 1.95 - 4
BLOOD BANANA Seeds  - 5

BLOOD BANANA Seeds

Price €2.25 (SKU: V 150 MAZ)
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong>BLOOD BANANA Seeds (Musa acuminata ssp. zebrina)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The blood banana (Musa acuminata ssp. zebrina), is a subspecies of the wild banana Musa acuminata native to Sumatra, Indonesia. The blood banana is an ornamental plant, named for the dark red patches on its leaves, though its small seeded fruits are also edible.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>Blood bananas are characterized by dark red patches of variable sizes on their dark green leaves. Their pseudostems are characteristically very slender. They bear small slender fruits filled with grape-like seeds.</p> <p><strong>Taxonomy and nomenclature</strong></p> <p>The blood banana is a subspecies of the wild banana species Musa acuminata, one of the two ancestors of modern edible bananas. They were once classified as separate species under the now invalid names (synonyms) Musa zebrina and Musa sumatrana. They were also sometimes incorrectly classified as cultivars.</p> <p>Blood bananas are also known as the red banana tree though it should not be confused with the red banana cultivar. Other common names in English include seeded red banana, Sumatra ornamental banana, and maroon-variegated banana plant. They are also known as banano rojo in Spanish, ゼブリナバナナ (zeburina banana) in Japanese, กล้วยมะนี (kluai ma ni) in Thai, and chuối kiểng in Vietnamese.</p> <p><strong>Distribution</strong></p> <p>Blood bananas are native to Java, Indonesia. They are notable for being one of the earliest banana subspecies to be spread by humans out of Southeast Asia. Introduced eastward to Africa, it became the ancestors for the genetically distinct and commercially important East African Highland bananas (Mutika/Lujugira subgroup of the AAA group).</p> <p>It is probably the only seeded banana to ever be introduced into Hawaii before European contact. It is known as the Mai'a 'Oa in Hawaiian, though the name is also applied to the species Musa balbisiana which was introduced later on.</p> </div>
V 150 MAZ
BLOOD BANANA Seeds  - 5
Red Tiger - Darjeeling Banana Seeds 2.25 - 3

Red Tiger - Darjeeling...

Price €2.25 (SKU: V 150 RT)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong>Red Tiger - Darjeeling Banana Seeds (Musa sikkimensis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Bananas are enjoying a resurgence in popularity, justifiably so as they are easy to grow and few plants can rival their impact on any garden! Very few species are fully hardy, but once mature they can be planted out and wrapped up in sacking for winter. Some species are smaller in habit and make ideal houseplants. Musa sikkimensis is a fairly recent introduction to the UK. This striking Banana originates from Eastern India and is proving a pretty hardy species. A vigorous grower, it produces huge, tough green leaves with an attractive maroon midrib and strong, random streaks of maroon across the leaves. Mature plants (5 years +) bear long lasting yellow flowers. Although frost will not damage the roots, the leaves should be wrapped in fleece or sacking for the winter. Alternatively can be grown in a large container and moved to a frost free place over winter. All in all, an excellent addition to the subtropical border or achitectural planting scheme. Half Hardy Perennial (to 0C - wrap up in winter) Height: 3-4m Position: Sun or semi-shade preferably out of strong winds.</p> </div> </body> </html>
V 150 RT
Red Tiger - Darjeeling Banana Seeds 2.25 - 3

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.
Wild forest banana seeds...

Wild forest banana seeds...

Price €3.05 (SKU: V 125 MY)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Wild forest banana seeds (Musa yunnanensis )</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><strong>A new, cold-tolerant species from the mountains of southwest China.</strong><br>Musa yunnanensis, commonly known as the Yunnan banana or the wild forest banana, is a recently described plant in the banana and plantain family that is native to Yunnan, southern China. The sample was collected in 2005 in Xishuangbanna (an autonomous prefecture on the border with Indochina) at an altitude of 1,150 meters.<br><br>Very fast growing, with slender pseudo stems and bluish petioles. The history of this species in horticultural culture is short but rather confused. We originally introduced it as Ensete wilsonii first because it was misidentified. It was later mistaken for Musa itinerans, but then turned out to be a new species, officially described by Markku Hakkinen in 2007 as Musa yunnanensis. We also had plants for a while as Musa sp. 'Yangtze' in culture.<br><br>Although M. yunnanesis grows in the montane tropical forest, it is both shade and frost tolerant, sensitive to direct sunlight and therefore essentially an underplant. Individuals typically reach a height of about 5 to 5.25 meters as they mature. Bark on pseudo-trunks is coated with wax, which is white with a bluish tinge. The top of the leaves is also bluish, although their undersides are colored red.<br><br>Musa yunnanensis has value to local wildlife, its summer fruits are consumed by birds, bats and possibly elephants.&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"></p>
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Wild forest banana seeds (Musa yunnanensis)

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