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Ayurveda Plants

There are 6 products.

Showing 1-6 of 6 item(s)

Ayurveda Plant

Medicinal or spice plant

Variety from India
Kulikhara, Kokilaksah Seeds...

Kulikhara, Kokilaksah Seeds...

Price €3.95 SKU: VE 207 (1g)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Kulikhara, Kokilaksah Seeds (Asteracantha longifolia)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;"><strong>Price for Package of 450 (1g) Seeds.</strong></span></h2> Asteracantha longifolia is a herbaceous, medicinal plant in the acanthus family that grows in marshy places and is native to tropical Asia and Africa. In India, it is commonly known as kokilaksha or gokulakanta, in Sri Lanka as neeramulli. In Kerala it is called vayalchulli (വയൽച്ചുളളി). In Tamil, it is called Neermulli (நீர்முள்ளி).<br><br>Kulikhara, Kokilaksah, Long Leaves Barleria (Asteracantha longifolia) Nees, Acanthaceae, is a source of the ayurvedic drug, 'Kokilaaksha' and the Unani drug, Talimakhana. The seeds are acrid, bitter, aphrodisiac, tonic, sedative, used for diseases of the blood. The plant is known to possess antitumor, hypoglycemic, aphrodisiac, antibacterial, free radical scavenging and lipid peroxidation, hepatoprotective and hematopoietic activity. It contains lupeol, stigmasterol, bulletin, fatty acids, and alkaloids. The present review article is focused on phytochemical, pharmacological, and other important aspects of Talimakhana<br><br>Uses: Roots are sweet, sour, bitter, refrigerant, diuretic, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, hemopoietic, hepatoprotective, and tonic. It is useful in inflammations, hyperdipsia, strangury, jaundice, and vesical calculi. It is also used in flatulence and dysentery. Leaves are hemopoietic, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, analgesic, antidiabetic, stomachic, ophthalmic, diuretic, and liver tonic. It is used in hepatic obstruction, jaundice, arthritis, rheumatism, and diseases of the urinogenital tract. It is useful in flatulence and other stomach-related diseases. It is useful in anemia and for treating blood diseases. It is used to lower the blood sugar level. Seeds are gelatinous, febrifuge, rejuvenating and nervine tonic. It is used in burning sensations, fever, and headaches. It is also used in diarrhea and dysentery. A paste of the seeds mixed with buttermilk or whey is given for diarrhea. A decoction of the roots is used as a diuretic and to treat rheumatism, gonorrhea, and other diseases of the genito-urinary tract, jaundice, and anasarca.<script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 207 (1g)
Kulikhara, Kokilaksah Seeds (Asteracantha longifolia)

Ayurveda Plant
Ajwain, ajowan Seeds...

Ajwain, ajowan Seeds...

Price €1.85 SKU: VE 184 (1g)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Ajwain, ajowan Seeds (Trachyspermum ammi)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 1000+ (1g) seeds.&nbsp;</strong></span></h2> <div class=""><b style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">Ajwain</b><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">,<span>&nbsp;</span></span><b style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">ajowan</b><sup id="cite_ref-oed_3-0" class="reference" style="color: #202122; font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>(</span><span class="rt-commentedText nowrap" style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span class="IPA nopopups noexcerpt">/<span><span title="/ˈ/: primary stress follows">ˈ</span><span title="/æ/: 'a' in 'bad'">æ</span><span title="/dʒ/: 'j' in 'jam'">dʒ</span><span title="/ə/: 'a' in 'about'">ə</span><span title="'w' in 'wind'">w</span><span title="/ɒ/: 'o' in 'body'">ɒ</span><span title="'n' in 'nigh'">n</span></span>/</span></span><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">), or<span>&nbsp;</span></span><i style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><b>Trachyspermum ammi</b></i><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">—also known as<span>&nbsp;</span></span><b style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">ajowan caraway</b><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">,<span>&nbsp;</span></span><b style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">thymol seeds</b><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">,<span>&nbsp;</span></span><b style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">bishop's weed</b><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">, or<span>&nbsp;</span></span><b style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">carom</b><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">—is an<span>&nbsp;</span></span>annual<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span></span>herb<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>in the family<span>&nbsp;</span></span>Apiaceae<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">.</span><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>Both the leaves and the<span>&nbsp;</span></span>seed<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">‑like<span>&nbsp;</span></span>fruit<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>(often mistakenly called seeds) of the plant are consumed by humans. The name "</span>bishop's weed<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">" also is a common name for other plants. The "seed" (i.e., the fruit) is often confused with<span>&nbsp;</span></span>lovage<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>"seed".<br><br><span>Ajwain's small, oval-shaped, seed-like fruits are pale brown&nbsp;</span>schizocarps<span>, which resemble the seeds of other plants in the family Apiaceae such as&nbsp;</span>caraway<span>,&nbsp;</span>cumin<span>&nbsp;and&nbsp;</span>fennel<span>. They have a bitter and pungent taste, with a flavor similar to&nbsp;</span>anise<span>&nbsp;and&nbsp;</span>oregano<span>. They smell almost exactly like&nbsp;</span>thyme<span>&nbsp;because they also contain&nbsp;</span>thymol<span>, but they are more aromatic and less subtle in taste, as well as being somewhat bitter and pungent. Even a small number of fruits tends to dominate the flavor of a dish.</span><br><br></span> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation_and_production">Cultivation and production</span></h2> <p>The plant is mainly cultivated in<span>&nbsp;</span>Iran<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>India.<sup id="cite_ref-Green2006_5-2" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Culinary_uses">Culinary uses</span></h2> <p>The fruits are rarely eaten raw; they are commonly<span>&nbsp;</span>dry-roasted<span>&nbsp;</span>or fried in<span>&nbsp;</span>ghee<span>&nbsp;</span>(clarified butter). This allows the spice to develop a more subtle and complex aroma. It is widely used in the<span>&nbsp;</span>cuisine of the Indian subcontinent, often as part of a<span>&nbsp;</span>chaunk<span>&nbsp;</span>(also called a<span>&nbsp;</span><i>tarka</i>), a mixture of spices - sometimes with a little chopped garlic or onion - fried in oil or clarified butter, which is used to flavor a dish at the end of cooking. It is also an important ingredient for herbal medicine practiced there. In<span>&nbsp;</span>Afghanistan, the fruits are sprinkled over bread and biscuits.<sup id="cite_ref-Davidson2014_6-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="As_a_medication">As a medication</span></h2> <p>There is little high-quality<span>&nbsp;</span>clinical evidence<span>&nbsp;</span>that ajwain has anti-disease properties in humans.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_7-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[7]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Ajwain is sold as a<span>&nbsp;</span>dietary supplement<span>&nbsp;</span>in<span>&nbsp;</span>capsules, liquids, or powders.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_7-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[7]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>An<span>&nbsp;</span>extract<span>&nbsp;</span>of bishop's weed is manufactured as a<span>&nbsp;</span>prescription drug<span>&nbsp;</span>called<span>&nbsp;</span>methoxsalen<span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>Uvadex</i>,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>8-Mop</i>,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Oxsoralen</i>) provided as a<span>&nbsp;</span>skin cream<span>&nbsp;</span>or oral capsule to treat<span>&nbsp;</span>psoriasis, repigmentation from<span>&nbsp;</span>vitiligo, or skin disorders of<span>&nbsp;</span>cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_7-2" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[7]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-drugs-meth_8-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[8]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Because methoxsalen has numerous interactions with<span>&nbsp;</span>disease-specific drugs, it is prescribed to people only by experienced<span>&nbsp;</span>physicians.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs-meth_8-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <p>Ajwain is used in<span>&nbsp;</span>traditional medicine<span>&nbsp;</span>practices, such as<span>&nbsp;</span>Ayurveda, in<span>&nbsp;</span>herbal blends<span>&nbsp;</span>in the belief it can treat various disorders.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_7-3" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>There is no evidence or regulatory approval that oral use of ajwain in herbal blends is effective or safe.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_7-4" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <h3 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.2em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Adverse_effects">Adverse effects</span></h3> <p>Women who are pregnant should not use ajwain due to potential<span>&nbsp;</span>adverse effects<span>&nbsp;</span>on fetal development, and its use is discouraged while breastfeeding.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_7-5" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>In high amounts taken orally, bishop's weed is considered to be<span>&nbsp;</span>toxic<span>&nbsp;</span>and can result in fatal poisoning.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_7-6" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <h3 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.2em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Essential_oil">Essential oil</span></h3> <p>Hydrodistillation<span>&nbsp;</span>of ajwain fruits yields an<span>&nbsp;</span>essential oil<span>&nbsp;</span>consisting primarily of<span>&nbsp;</span>thymol,<span>&nbsp;</span>gamma-terpinene,<span>&nbsp;</span>p-cymene, and more than 20 trace compounds which are predominantly<span>&nbsp;</span>terpenoids.</p> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 184 (1g)
Ajwain, ajowan Seeds (Trachyspermum ammi)

Ayurveda Plant

Variety from India
Chaksu, Jasmejaaz Seeds...

Chaksu, Jasmejaaz Seeds...

Price €1.95 SKU: P 170 CA
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Chaksu, Jasmejaaz Seeds (Cassia absus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.&nbsp;</strong></span></h2> Annual herb, to 60 cm, glandular-hairy. Leaves: petiole to 4 cm, without a gland; leaves with 2 pairs of opposite leaflets with a gland on the rhachis between each pair. Inflorescences terminal. Petals 5-6 mm, yellow, orange, salmon, or pinkish-red with reddish-brown veins. Stamens 5, subequal; filaments straight. Pod 3-6 cm, flat.<br><br>Seeds contain alkaloids that have powerful actions on the nervous and vascular systems and are used accordingly for a variety of purposes in folk medicine.<br><br>In disturbed grassland or open woodland, also on roadsides, riverine alluvium, and formerly cultivated areas.<br><br>Widespread in the tropics and subtropics.<br><br>Health Benefits of Cassia Absus Seed<br><br>Due to the sudden increase in the number of chaksu seed buyers, the commercial cultivation of this medicinal plant is seriously being considered by farmers and those involved in the production of ayurvedic medicines. This is an Indian medicinal herb belonging to the Caesalpiniaceae family of plants. Also known as Cassia Absus, Chaksu seeds have many medicinal properties making them one of the most sought-after ayurvedic herbs that can be used in the form of decoction, powder, and even juice.<br><br>Chaksu Seeds for Lowering Blood Pressure<br><br>What makes these seeds really popular, is their ability to lower blood pressure. Acting as a hypotensive agent, this humble seed works wonders for those looking to control their BP naturally. It is a strong anti-bacterial agent and works as an astringent. It is also full of many phytochemicals such as alkaloids, essential fatty acids, and sterols. It is available in the form of seeds and Chaksu oil.<br><br>Medicinal Properties of Chaksu Seeds<br><br>These seeds are highly effective in treating common coughs.<br>You can get rid of ringworms by mixing Jasmezaaj seed paste in oil and applying it directly over the affected area.<br>The same oil can be used for curing many skin diseases.<br>It is an effective home remedy for treating urinary bladder problems.<br>Suffering from purulent conjunctivitis? Use Chakus seeds to cure it fast.<br>Treating wounds and sores with Chaksu seeds is very common in various parts of India.<br>Diuretic formulations are prepared by using these wonderful herbal plant seeds.<br>Eye lotions are prepared using Chaksu seeds.<br>It is an effective herbal treatment for eye ailments such as trachoma, ulcers, cataract, and polyps.<br>Pus formation and watering of eyes and many other eye infections are treated with Chaksu seed-based medicines.<br><br>Chaksu Synonyms<br><br>There are various other popular names of Chaksu in different parts of India. Let us take a look at some of it its synonyms<br><br>In Hindi Speaking Areas, it is known as Chaaksu.<br>In English, it is known as Chaksu seeds and Jasmejaaz.<br>It is called Chaksu in Sanskrit as well and also as Chakushya. In fact, the Hindi name has been derived from the original Sanskrit word.<br>In Tamil, it is popularly known as “Karun kanami”.<br>In Telugu, they are known as Chanupala vittulu.<br>In Bengali, it is called Chaakut.<br>Gujrati people call it Chimeru.<br>In most parts of Kerala and the surrounding Malayalam-speaking areas, it is known as Karinkolla.<br><br>No matter what you prefer to call these seeds, you’ll be immensely benefited by the herbal properties of this plant, its seeds and of course medicines prepared with it.<script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
P 170 CA
Chaksu, Jasmejaaz Seeds (Cassia absus)

Ayurveda Plant
Sickle senna seeds (Cassia...

Sickle senna seeds (Cassia...

Price €2.55 SKU: VE 179 (1g)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Sickle senna seeds (Cassia tora)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for package 1 g (40) seeds.</strong></span></h2> Senna tora (originally described by Linnaeus as Cassia tora) is a plant species in the family Fabaceae and the subfamily Caesalpinioideae. Its name is derived from its Sinhala name tora (තෝර). It grows wild in most of the tropics and is considered a weed in many places. Its native range is in Central America. Its most common English name is sickle senna[2] or sickle wild sensitive-plant.[3] Other common names include sickle pod, tora, coffee pod, tovara, chakvad, thakara in Malayalam, and foetid cassia. It is often confused with Chinese senna or sicklepod, Senna obtusifolia.<br><br>Senna tora is an herbaceous annual foetid herb. The plant can grow 30–90 centimeters (12–35 in) tall and consists of alternative pinnate leaves with leaflets mostly with three opposite pairs that are obovate in shape with a rounded tip. The leaves grow up to 3–4.5 centimeters long. The stems have distinct smelling foliage when young. The flowers occur in pairs in axils of leaves with five petals and pale yellow in color. The stamens are of unequal length. The pods are somewhat flattened or four-angled, 10–15 cm long, and sickle-shaped, hence the common name sicklepod. There are 30–50 seeds within a pod.<br><br> <h3><strong>Growing conditions</strong></h3> Senna tora is found in many parts of the world. It grows abundantly in parts of Afghanistan, India, Nigeria, China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Nepal and Bhutan. It is also grown and cultivated areas in the Himalayas at an elevation of 1400 meters in Nepal. It is distributed throughout India, Sri Lanka, West China, and the tropics, particularly in forest and tribal areas.<br><br>Senna tora is considered an annual weed, is very stress-tolerant, and is easily grown. In India, it occurs as a wasteland rainy season weed and its usual flowering time is after the monsoon rains, during the period of October to February. Senna tora grows in dry soil from sea level up to 1800 meters. The seed can remain viable for up to twenty years. Up to 1000 plants can emerge per square meter following rain. Once the seed has matured, it is gathered and dried in the sun. In South Asia, it usually dies off in the dry season of July–October.<br><br> <h2><strong>Uses</strong></h2> Senna tora has many uses. The whole plant and roots, leaves, and seeds have been widely used in traditional Indian and South Asian medicine. The plant and seeds are edible. Young leaves can be cooked as a vegetable while the roasted seeds are used as a substitute coffee. In Sri Lanka, the flowers are added to food. It is used as a natural pesticide in organic farms, and as a powder commonly used in the pet food industry. It is mixed with guar gum for use in mining and other industrial applications. The seeds and leaves are used to treat skin disease and its seeds can be utilized as a laxative. Senna tora is made into tea. In the Republic of Korea, it is believed to rejuvenate human vision. This tea has been referred to as "coffee-tea", because of its taste and its coffee aroma. Since Senna tora has an external germicide and antiparasitic character, it has been used for treating skin diseases such as leprosy, ringworm, itching, and psoriasis and also for snakebites. Other medicinal provisions from plant parts include balm for arthritis using the leaves. Senna tora is one of the recognized plants that contain the organic compound anthraquinone and is used in Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine. This herb is used in Ayurveda for the treatment of swellings.<br><br> <h3><strong>Sowing the seeds&nbsp;</strong></h3> Soak the seeds for 2–3 hours in warm water before sowing it from early spring to early summer in a warm greenhouse or pot in your own home. The seed usually germinates in 1–12 weeks at 23°C. <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 179 (1g)
Sickle senna seeds (Cassia tora)

Ayurveda Plant

Medicinal or spice plant
Orchid tree - mountain...

Orchid tree - mountain...

Price €1.25 SKU: T 91
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Orchid tree - mountain ebony seeds (Bauhinia variegata)</strong></h2> <h2 style="color: #232323; font-size: 2rem;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><i><b>Bauhinia variegata</b></i><span>&nbsp;</span>is a species of<span>&nbsp;</span>flowering plant<span>&nbsp;</span>in the legume family,<span>&nbsp;</span>Fabaceae. It is native to an area from China through<span>&nbsp;</span>Southeast Asia<span>&nbsp;</span>to the<span>&nbsp;</span>Indian subcontinent.<sup id="cite_ref-GRIN_2-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Common names include<span>&nbsp;</span><b>orchid tree</b><span>&nbsp;</span>(though not belonging to the family<span>&nbsp;</span>Orchidaceae) and<span>&nbsp;</span><b>mountain ebony</b>.</p> <p>It is a small to medium-sized tree growing to 10–12 metres (33–39&nbsp;ft) tall,<span>&nbsp;</span>deciduous<span>&nbsp;</span>in the<span>&nbsp;</span>dry season. The<span>&nbsp;</span>leaves<span>&nbsp;</span>are 10–20 centimetres (3.9–7.9&nbsp;in) obcordate shaped, long and broad, rounded, and bilobed at the base and apex. The<span>&nbsp;</span>flowers<span>&nbsp;</span>are conspicuous, bright pink or white, 8–12 centimetres (3.1–4.7&nbsp;in) diameter, with five petals. Pollens are elongated, approximately 75 microns in length.</p> <p>The<span>&nbsp;</span>fruit<span>&nbsp;</span>is a<span>&nbsp;</span>seedpod<span>&nbsp;</span>15–30 centimetres (5.9–11.8&nbsp;in) long, containing several<span>&nbsp;</span>seeds. The seedpod dries completely on the tree, and when mature begins to twist into a helix or corkscrew shape, (see<span>&nbsp;</span>below), ultimately exploding open—with a very audible "clack"—to deliver its seeds into the environs.</p> <p>The anatomy of the stem was studied by taking transverse section. Periderm and cortex were seen distinctly. Secondary phloem was wide and continuous cylindrical, it consisted of thin and narrow straight rays, three or four cylinders of discontinuous masses of fibres and randomly distributed sieve elements. Secondary xylem was diffuse porous and it included vessels, fibres, xylem rays and xylem parenchyma. Xylem fibres had thick lignified walls or some had gelatinous walls. Xylem parenchyma cells were abundant in the xylem. Xylem rays were one cell wide; they were straight and consisted of radially elongated thick walled lignified walls. Calcium-oxalate crystals are predominantly prismatic crystals and druses type. Powder microscopical examination showed presence of fibres, parenchymatous cells, periderm and vessel elements. Histochemical analysis of stem showed presence of protein, tannin, lignin and cellulose.<sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[3]</sup></p> <p>The anatomy of the root was studied by taking transverse section. Secondary phloem and secondary xylem were seen distinctly. Secondary phloem had fairly wide rays, dense masses of phloem fibers and radial rows of phloem elements. Secondary xylem had much wider, thin-walled vessels which were either solitary or in radial multiples. The xylem fibers constituted gelatinous type and normal type. Calcium oxalate crystals were predominantly prismatic type. Powder microscopical examination showed presence of xylem parenchyma cells, xylem fibers and vessel elements.<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="In_cultivation">In cultivation</span></h2> <p>This is a very popular<span>&nbsp;</span>ornamental tree<span>&nbsp;</span>in subtropical and tropical climates, grown for its scented flowers and also used as a food item in<span>&nbsp;</span>Indian cuisine. In the<span>&nbsp;</span>Neotropics, it can be used to attract<span>&nbsp;</span>hummingbirds—such as<span>&nbsp;</span>sapphire-spangled emerald<span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>Amazilia lactea</i>),<span>&nbsp;</span>glittering-bellied emerald<span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>Chlorostilbon lucidus</i>), or<span>&nbsp;</span>white-throated hummingbird<span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>Leucochloris albicollis</i>)—into gardens and parks.<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>On the other hand, in some areas it has become<span>&nbsp;</span>naturalised<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>invasive.</p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2> <p>Kachnar is a local name in the Indian subcontinent for the edible buds collected from the tree; it is widely used as an ingredient in many subcontinent recipes. Traditional kachnar curry is prepared using kachnar buds, yogurt, onions and native spices. Kachnar buds are also eaten as a stir-fried vegetable and used to make<span>&nbsp;</span>achaar, a pickle in many parts of the Indian sub-continent.<sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>It shows a good antioxidant and anticancer activity.</p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><br><sup id="cite_ref-GRIN_2-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <br><br> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
T 91 (5 S)
Orchid tree - mountain ebony seeds (Bauhinia variegata)

Ayurveda Plant

Medicinal or spice plant
Gotu kola Seeds (Centella...

Gotu kola Seeds (Centella...

Price €2.45 SKU: MHS 78
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Gotu kola Seeds (Centella asiatica)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #fd0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><i><b>Centella asiatica</b></i>, commonly known as<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Gotu kola</b>,<span>&nbsp;</span><b>kodavan</b>,<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Indian pennywort</b><span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Asiatic pennywort</b>, is a<span>&nbsp;</span>herbaceous,<span>&nbsp;</span>perennial plant<span>&nbsp;</span>in the<span>&nbsp;</span>flowering plant<span>&nbsp;</span>family<span>&nbsp;</span>Apiaceae.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>It is native to the wetlands in<span>&nbsp;</span>Asia.<sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-FD_4-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>It is used as a culinary<span>&nbsp;</span>vegetable<span>&nbsp;</span>and as a<span>&nbsp;</span>medicinal herb.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-2" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><i>Centella</i><span>&nbsp;</span>grows in<span>&nbsp;</span>temperate<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>tropical<span>&nbsp;</span>swampy areas in many regions of the world.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-3" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The stems are slender, creeping<span>&nbsp;</span>stolons, green to reddish-green in color, connecting plants to each other.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-4" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>It has long-stalked, green, rounded apices which have smooth texture with palmately netted veins.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-5" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The leaves are borne on pericladial petioles,<sup class="noprint Inline-Template" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[<i><span title="The text near this tag may need clarification or removal of jargon. (September 2021)">clarification needed</span></i>]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>around 2&nbsp;cm (0.79&nbsp;in). The rootstock consists of<span>&nbsp;</span>rhizomes, growing vertically down. They are creamish in color and covered with root hairs.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-6" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[2]</sup></p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">The<span>&nbsp;</span>flowers<span>&nbsp;</span>are white or<span>&nbsp;</span>crimson<span>&nbsp;</span>in color, born in small, rounded bunches (umbels) near the surface of the soil.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-7" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Each flower is partly enclosed in two green bracts. The hermaphrodite flowers are minute in size, less than 3&nbsp;mm (0.12&nbsp;in), with five to six corolla lobes per flower. Each flower bears five stamens and two<span>&nbsp;</span>styles. The fruit are densely reticulate, distinguishing it from species of<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Hydrocotyle</i><span>&nbsp;</span>which have smooth, ribbed or warty fruit.<sup id="cite_ref-FD_4-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[4]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The crop matures in three months, and the whole plant, including the roots, is harvested manually. It is a highly<span>&nbsp;</span>invasive<span>&nbsp;</span>plant, rated as "high risk".<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-8" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span><i>Centella</i><span>&nbsp;</span>has numerous common names in its regions of distribution.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-9" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[2]</sup></p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Habitat">Habitat</span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><i>Centella asiatica</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is indigenous to the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, and wetland regions of the Southeastern US.<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[5]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[6]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Because the plant is aquatic, it is especially sensitive to biological and chemical pollutants in the water, which may be absorbed into the plant. It can be cultivated in drier soils as long as they are watered regularly enough (such as in a home garden arrangement).<sup class="noprint Inline-Template Template-Fact" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[<i><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (June 2021)">citation needed</span></i>]</sup></p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Chemistry">Chemistry</span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><i>Centella</i><span>&nbsp;</span>contains pentacyclic<span>&nbsp;</span>triterpenoids, including<span>&nbsp;</span>asiaticoside,<span>&nbsp;</span>brahmoside,<span>&nbsp;</span>asiatic acid, and<span>&nbsp;</span>brahmic acid<span>&nbsp;</span>(madecassic acid). Other constituents include<span>&nbsp;</span>centellose,<span>&nbsp;</span>centelloside, and madecassoside.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[7]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[8]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[9]</sup></p> <p style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Culinary_use">Culinary</span><span id="Culinary_use"> use</span><span id="Culinary_use"><br></span><span></span></p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">In<span>&nbsp;</span>Burmese cuisine, raw pennywort is used as the main constituent in a salad mixed with onions, crushed peanuts, bean powder and seasoned with lime juice and fish sauce. Centella is used as a leafy green in<span>&nbsp;</span>Sri Lankan<span>&nbsp;</span>cuisine, being the predominantly locally available leafy green, where it is called<span>&nbsp;</span><i lang="si-Latn" title="Sinhala-language romanization">gotu kola</i>. It is most often prepared as<span>&nbsp;</span><i lang="si-Latn" title="Sinhala-language romanization">malluma</i>, a traditional accompaniment to<span>&nbsp;</span>rice<span>&nbsp;</span>and vegetarian dishes, such as<span>&nbsp;</span><i lang="hi-Latn" title="Hindi-language romanization">dal</i>, and<span>&nbsp;</span>jackfruit<span>&nbsp;</span>or<span>&nbsp;</span>pumpkin<span>&nbsp;</span>curry. It is considered nutritious. In addition to finely chopped<span>&nbsp;</span><i lang="si-Latn" title="Sinhala-language romanization">gotu kola</i><span>&nbsp;</span>plants, the<span>&nbsp;</span><i lang="si-Latn" title="Sinhala-language romanization">gotu kola malluma</i><span>&nbsp;</span>may be eaten with grated<span>&nbsp;</span>coconut, diced<span>&nbsp;</span>shallots,<span>&nbsp;</span>lime<span>&nbsp;</span>(or<span>&nbsp;</span>lemon) juice, and sea salt. Additional ingredients are finely chopped green<span>&nbsp;</span>chilis,<span>&nbsp;</span>chili powder,<span>&nbsp;</span>turmeric<span>&nbsp;</span>powder, or chopped<span>&nbsp;</span>carrots. The<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Centella</i><span>&nbsp;</span>fruit-bearing structures are discarded from the<span>&nbsp;</span><i lang="si-Latn" title="Sinhala-language romanization">gotu kola malluma</i><span>&nbsp;</span>due to their intense bitter taste. A variation of<span>&nbsp;</span>porridge<span>&nbsp;</span>known as<span>&nbsp;</span><i lang="si-Latn" title="Sinhala-language romanization">kola kenda</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is also made with<span>&nbsp;</span><i lang="si-Latn" title="Sinhala-language romanization">gotu kola</i><span>&nbsp;</span>in Sri Lanka.<span>&nbsp;</span><i lang="si-Latn" title="Sinhala-language romanization">Gotu kola kenda</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is made with well-boiled red rice with some extra liquid,<span>&nbsp;</span>coconut milk<span>&nbsp;</span>first extract, and<span>&nbsp;</span><i lang="si-Latn" title="Sinhala-language romanization">gotu kola</i><span>&nbsp;</span>purée. The porridge is accompanied with<span>&nbsp;</span>jaggery<span>&nbsp;</span>for sweetness.<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Centella</i><span>&nbsp;</span>leaves are also used in modern sweet pennywort drinks and herbal teas. In addition the leaves are served stir-fried whole in coconut oil, or cooked in coconut milk with garlic or<span>&nbsp;</span><i lang="hi-Latn" title="Hindi-language romanization">dhal</i>.</p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">In<span>&nbsp;</span>Indonesia, the leaves are used for<span>&nbsp;</span><i>sambai oi peuga-ga</i>, an<span>&nbsp;</span>Aceh<span>&nbsp;</span>type of salad, and is also mixed into<span>&nbsp;</span><i>asinan</i><span>&nbsp;</span>in<span>&nbsp;</span>Bogor. In<span>&nbsp;</span>Cambodia,<span>&nbsp;</span>Vietnam<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>Thailand, this leaf is used for preparing a drink or can be eaten in raw form in salads or<span>&nbsp;</span>cold rolls. In Bangkok, vendors in the<span>&nbsp;</span>Chatuchak Weekend Market<span>&nbsp;</span>sell it alongside coconut,<span>&nbsp;</span>roselle,<span>&nbsp;</span>chrysanthemum, orange and other health drinks. In<span>&nbsp;</span>Malay cuisine<span>&nbsp;</span>it is known as pegaga, and the leaves of this plant are used for<span>&nbsp;</span><i>ulam</i>, a type of vegetable salad.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-10" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span><i>C. asiatica</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is widely used in various<span>&nbsp;</span>Indian regional cuisines. In Bangladesh Centella is called<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Thankuni Pata</i><span>&nbsp;</span>and used in various dishes, one of the most appetising of which is the<span>&nbsp;</span>pakora-like snack called<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Thankuni Patar Bora</i>; made of mashed<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Centella</i>,<span>&nbsp;</span>lentils,<span>&nbsp;</span>julienne-ed onion and<span>&nbsp;</span>green chilli.<sup class="noprint Inline-Template Template-Fact" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[<i><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (January 2021)">citation needed</span></i>]</sup></p> <h2 style="font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Traditional_medicine">Traditional medicine</span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">In<span>&nbsp;</span>traditional medicine,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>C. asiatica</i><span>&nbsp;</span>has been used to treat various disorders and minor wounds,<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-11" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>although clinical efficacy and safety have not been scientifically confirmed.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_10-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[10]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Contact dermatitis<span>&nbsp;</span>and skin irritation can result from<span>&nbsp;</span>topical application.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_10-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[10]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Drowsiness<span>&nbsp;</span>may occur after consuming it.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_10-2" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[10]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The herb may have<span>&nbsp;</span>adverse effects<span>&nbsp;</span>on<span>&nbsp;</span>liver function<span>&nbsp;</span>when used over many months.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_10-3" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[10]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[11]</sup></p> <h2 style="font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Agriculture">Agriculture</span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">In the context of<span>&nbsp;</span>phytoremediation,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>C. asiatica</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is a potential<span>&nbsp;</span>phytoextraction<span>&nbsp;</span>tool owing to its ability to take up and<span>&nbsp;</span>translocate<span>&nbsp;</span>metals from root to shoot when grown in soils contaminated by<span>&nbsp;</span>heavy metals.<span id="Culinary_use"></span><span class="mw-headline" id="Culinary_use"><br></span></p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 78
Gotu kola Seeds (Centella asiatica)