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Organic Spices

There are 95 products.

Showing 1-15 of 95 item(s)
Green cardamom whole fruits...

Green cardamom whole fruits...

Price €1.85 (SKU: Z 3)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Green cardamom spice - whole fruits</strong><br><span style="color: rgb(248, 0, 0);" data-mce-style="color: #f80000;"><strong>The price is for packing 5 grams.</strong></span></h2><p><span style="font-size: medium;" data-mce-style="font-size: medium;">The most common form of cardamom - green cardamom - is used as a flavoring, mainly for coffee and tea.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: medium;" data-mce-style="font-size: medium;">In some Middle Eastern countries, coffee and cardamom are often cooked and ground together in a mihbaz, an oven using wood or gas, and in a wooden mortar to produce mixtures that are as much as forty percent cardamom. In some cultures, the grinding is ritualized and accompanied by singing and dancing.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: medium;" data-mce-style="font-size: medium;">All the different cardamom species and varieties are used mainly as cooking spices and as&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: medium;" data-mce-style="font-size: medium;">Cardamom has a strong, unique taste, with an intensely aromatic fragrance. Black cardamom has a distinctly more astringent aroma, though not bitter, with a coolness similar to mint, though with a different aroma. It is a common ingredient in Indian cooking, and is often used in baking in Nordic countries, such as in the Finnish sweet-bread pulla It is one of the most expensive spices by weight, and little is needed to impart the flavor. Cardamom is best stored in pod form, because once the seeds are exposed or ground, they quickly lose their flavor. However, high-quality ground cardamom is often more readily (and cheaply) available, and is an acceptable substitute. For recipes requiring whole cardamom pods, a generally accepted equivalent is 10 pods equals 1½ teaspoons of ground cardamom.</span></p>
Z 3 (5g)
Green cardamom whole fruits spice

Barberry - whole fruit (dried)

Barberry - whole fruit (dried)

Price €1.26 (SKU: Z 14)
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Barberry - whole fruit (dried)</strong></span><br /><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="color:#d0121a;">The price is for packaging of 10 grams of this spice.</span></strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;"><i><b>Berberis vulgaris</b></i><span>, also known as </span><b>common barberry</b><span>,</span><span> </span><b>European barberry</b><span> or simply </span><b>barberry</b><span>, is a </span>shrub<span> in the genus </span><i>Berberis</i><span>. It produces edible but sharply acidic berries, which people in many countries eat as a tart and refreshing fruit. <span>The shrub is native to central and southern </span>Europe<span>, northwest </span>Africa<span> and western </span>Asia<span>;</span><span> it is also </span>naturalised<span> in northern Europe, including the </span>British Isles<span> and </span>Scandinavia<span>, and </span>North America<span>. In the </span>United States<span> and </span>Canada<span>, it has become established in the wild over an area from </span>Nova Scotia<span> to </span>Nebraska<span>, with additional populations in </span>Colorado<span>, </span>Idaho<span>, </span>Washington State<span>, </span>Montana<span>, and </span>British Columbia<span>.</span><span> Although not naturalised, in rural </span>New Zealand<span> it has been widely cultivated as a hedge on farms. It is cultivated for its fruits in many countries.</span></span></span></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2> <p>It is a deciduous shrub growing up to 4 metres (13 ft) high. The leaves are small oval, 2–5 centimetres (0.79–1.97 in) long and 1–2 centimetres (0.39–0.79 in) broad, with a serrated margin; they are borne in clusters of 2–5 together, subtended by a three-branched spine 3–8 mm long. The flowers are yellow, 4–6 millimetres (0.16–0.24 in) across, produced on 3–6 centimetres (1.2–2.4 in) long panicles in late spring. The fruit is an oblong red berry 7–10 millimetres (0.28–0.39 in) long and 3–5 millimetres (0.12–0.20 in) broad, ripening in late summer or autumn; they are edible but sour.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Culinary_uses">Culinary uses</span></h2> <p>The berries are edible and rich in vitamin C, though with a very sharp flavor; the thorny shrubs make harvesting them difficult, so in most places, they are not widely consumed. They are an important food for many small birds, which disperse the seeds in their droppings.</p> <p>In Europe, the berries have been traditionally used as an ingredient in making jam. The berries are high in pectin which makes the jam congeal as it cools after having been boiled. In southwestern Asia, especially Iran, the berries are used for cooking, as well as for jam-making. In Iran, barberries are commonly used as a currant in rice pilaf.</p> <p><i>Zereshk</i> or <i>sereshk</i> is the Persian name for the dried fruit of <i>Berberis</i> spp., specially that of <i>Berberis integerrima</i> 'Bidaneh', which is widely cultivated in Iran. Iran is the largest producer of <i>zereshk</i>.</p> <p>The South Khorasan province in Iran is the main area of <i>zereshk</i> and saffron production in the world, especially around Birjand and Qaen. About 85% of production is in Qaen and about 15% in Birjand. There is evidence of cultivation of seedless barberry in South Khorasan two hundred years ago. A garden of <i>zereshk</i> is called <i>zereshk-estan</i>. Zereshk is widely used in cooking, imparting a tart flavor to chicken dishes. It is usually cooked with rice, called <i>zereshk polo</i>, and provides a nice meal with chicken.</p>
Z 14
Barberry - whole fruit (dried)
Allspice or pimenta spice

Allspice or pimenta spice

Price €1.60 (SKU: Z 16)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt;">Allspice or pimenta spice</span></strong><br /><strong><span style="color:#d0121a;font-size:14pt;">The price is for packaging of 10 grams of this spice.</span></strong></h2> <p><b>Allspice</b>, also called <b>pimenta</b>, <b>Jamaica pimenta</b>, or <b>myrtle pepper</b>, is the dried unripe fruit(berries, used as a spice) of <i>Pimenta dioica</i>, a midcanopy tree native to the Greater Antilles, southern Mexico, and Central America, now cultivated in many warm parts of the world.The name "allspice" was coined as early as 1621 by the English, who thought it combined the flavour of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves.</p> <p>Several unrelated fragrant shrubs are called "Carolina allspice" (<i>Calycanthus floridus</i>), "Japanese allspice" (<i>Chimonanthus praecox</i>), or "wild allspice" (<i>Lindera benzoin</i>). "Allspice" is also sometimes used to refer to the herb costmary (<i>Tanacetum balsamita</i>)</p> <p>Allspice is the dried fruit of the <i>Pimenta dioica</i> plant. The fruits are picked when green and unripe and are traditionally dried in the sun. When dry they are brown and resemble large, smooth peppercorns. Fresh leaves are similar in texture to bay leaves and similarly used in cooking. Leaves and wood are often used for smoking meats where allspice is a local crop.</p> <p>Care must be taken during drying to ensure that volatile oil, such as eugenol, remains in the end products. Allspice can also be found in essential oil form.</p> <p>Allspice is one of the most important ingredients of Caribbean cuisine. It is used in Jamaican jerk seasoning (the wood is used to smoke jerk in Jamaica, although the spice is a good substitute), in <i>moles</i>, and in pickling; it is also an ingredient in commercial sausage preparations and curry powders. Allspice is also indispensable in Middle Eastern cuisine, particularly in the Levant, where it is used to flavour a variety of stews and meat dishes. In Arab cuisine, for example, many main dishes call for allspice as the sole spice added for flavouring. In the West Indies, an allspice liqueur is produced under the name "pimento dram" due to conflation of <i>pimenta</i> and <i>pimento</i>.</p> <p>In the United States, it is used mostly in desserts, but it is also responsible for giving Cincinnati-style chili its distinctive aroma and flavor. Allspice is commonly used in Great Britain, and appears in many dishes, including cakes and also in beauty products. In Poland, allspice is used in a variety of dishes, including savory foods like deli meats, soups, marinades and pickles, and to a lesser extent in desserts and fruit drinks. Even in many countries where allspice is not very popular in the household, as in Germany, it is used in large amounts by commercial sausage makers.</p>
Z 16
Allspice or pimenta spice
Caraway spice - whole fruit

Caraway spice - whole fruit

Price €1.10 (SKU: Z 39)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Caraway spice and medicine - whole fruit</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>The price is for packaging of 8 grams of this spice.</strong></span></h2> <p><b>Caraway</b>, also known as <b>meridian fennel</b> and <b>Persian cumin</b> (<i>Carum carvi</i>), is a biennial plant in the family Apiaceae, native to western Asia, Europe, and North Africa.<span style="font-size: xx-small;"> </span>The plant is similar in appearance to other members of the carrot family, with finely divided, feathery leaves with thread-like divisions, growing on 20–30 cm (7.9–11.8 in) stems. The main flower stem is 40–60 cm (16–24 in) tall, with small white or pink flowers in umbels. Caraway fruits(erroneously called seeds) are crescent-shaped achenes, around 2 mm (0.08 in) long, with five pale ridges. The fruits, usually used whole, have a pungent, anise-like flavor and aroma that comes from essential oils, mostly carvone, limonene, and anethole. Caraway is used as a spice in breads, especially rye bread.</p> <p>Caraway is also used in desserts, liquors, casseroles, and other foods. It is also found in European cuisine. For example, it is used in caraway seed cake. The roots may be cooked as a vegetable like parsnips or carrots. Additionally, the leaves are sometimes consumed as herbs, either raw, dried, or cooked, similar to parsley.</p> <p>In Serbia, caraway is commonly sprinkled over home-made salty scones (<i>pogačice s kimom</i>). It is also used to add flavor to cheeses such as <i>bondost, pultost</i>, <i>havarti</i> and <i>Tilsit cheese</i>. Scandinavian <i>Akvavit</i>, including Icelandic Brennivin, and several liqueurs are made with caraway.In Middle Eastern cuisine, caraway pudding, called Meghli, is a popular dessert during Ramadan. It is typically made and served in the Levant area in winter and on the occasion of having a new baby. Caraway is also added to flavor <i>harissa</i>, a Tunisian chili pepper paste. In Aleppian, Syr ian cuisine it is used to make the sweet scones named <i>keleacha</i>.</p> <p>Caraway fruit oil is also used as a fragrance component in soaps, lotions, and perfumes. Caraway is also used as a breath freshener, and it has a long tradition of use in folk medicine.</p> <p>In the United States, the most common use of caraway is whole as an addition to rye bread. Often called seeded rye or Jewish rye bread. Caraway fruits are frequently used in Irish soda bread, along with raisins and currants.</p> </body> </html>
Z 39
Caraway spice - whole fruit

Yellow mustard spices - unground 1.25 - 1

Yellow mustard spices -...

Price €1.25 (SKU: Z 21)
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Yellow mustard spices - unground</strong></span><br /><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="color:#d0121a;">The price is for packaging of 10 grams of this spice.</span></strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;"><b>Mustard seeds</b><span> are the small round seeds of various </span>mustard plants<span>. The seeds are usually about 1 to 2 millimetres (0.039 to 0.079 in) in diameter and may not becolored from yellowish white to black. They are an important </span>spice<span> in many regional foods and may come from one of three different plants: black mustard (</span><i>Brassica nigra</i><span>), brown </span>Indian<span> mustard (</span><i>B. juncea</i><span>), or white/yellow mustard (</span><i>B. hirta/Sinapis alba</i><span>). <span>Grinding and mixing the seeds with </span>water<span>, </span>vinegar<span> or other liquids creates the yellow </span>condiment<span> known as </span>prepared mustard<span>.</span></span></span></p> <p>These mustard seeds are known in Hindi, Urdu, and Punjabi as <i>sarson</i> (Indian colza, <i>Brassica rapa</i> subsp. <i>trilocularis</i>, syn. <i>Brassica campestris</i> var. <i>sarson</i>), in Bengali as <i>shorshe</i>. These are used as a spice in Pakistan, Northern India, Nepal, and Bangladesh. The seeds are usually roasted until they pop. They are also planted to grow <i>saag</i>(greens) which are stir-fried and eaten as a vegetable preparation, called <i>sarson ka saag</i> in Urdu and Hindi (<i>sarron da saag</i> in Punjabi).</p> <p>In Maharashtra, it is called as <i>mohari</i>, and is used frequently in Marathi recipes. <i>Sarson ka tel</i> (mustard oil) is used for body massage during extreme winters, as it is assumed to keep the body warm. In Bengali cuisine mustard oil or <i>shorsher tel</i> is the predominant cooking medium. Mustard seeds are also essential ingredients in spicy fish dishes like <i>jhaal</i> and <i>paturi</i>.</p> <p><i>Raai</i> (Gujarati), <i>Mohari</i> (Marathi: मोहरी ), <i>aavalu</i> (Telugu: ఆవాలు), <i>kadugu</i> (Tamil: கடுகு), or <i>sasive</i> (Kannada:ಸಾಸಿವೆ), <i>kadugu</i> (Malayalam: കടുക്) variety of Indian pickleconsisting mainly of mangoes, red chilli powder, and <i>aavaa pindi</i> (powdered mustard seed) preserved in mustard oil, is popular in southern India with its origin in Andhra Pradesh.</p> <p>Mustard seeds generally take eight to ten days to germinate if placed under the proper conditions, which include a cold atmosphere and relatively moist soil. Mature mustard plants grow into shrubs.</p> <p>Mustard grows well in temperate regions. Major producers of mustard seeds include India, Pakistan, Canada, Nepal, Hungary, Great Britain and the United States. Brown and black mustard seeds return higher yields than their yellow counterparts. In Pakistan, rapeseed-mustard is the second most important source of oil, after cotton. It is cultivated over an area of 307,000 hectares with annual production of 233,000 tonnes and contributes about 17% to the domestic production of edible oil. Mustard seeds are a rich source of oil and protein. The seed has oil as high as 46-48%, and whole seed meal has 43.6% protein.</p>
Z 21
Yellow mustard spices - unground 1.25 - 1
Coriander spice - whole fruit

Coriander spice - whole fruit

Price €5.00 (SKU: Z 37)
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Coriander spice and medicine - whole fruit</strong></span><br /><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="color:#d0121a;">The price is for packaging of 8 grams of this spice.</span></strong></span></h2> <p><b>Coriander</b> (<i>Coriandrum sativum</i>), also known as <b>cilantro</b> or <b>Chinese parsley</b>, is an annual herb in the family Apiaceae. All parts of the plant are edible, but the fresh leaves and the dried seeds are the parts most traditionally used in cooking.</p> <p>Most people perceive the taste of coriander leaves as a tart, lemon/lime taste, but a smaller group, of about 4–14% of people tested, think the leaves taste like bath soap, as linked to a gene which detects aldehyde chemicals also present in soap.<span>Raw coriander leaves are 92% water, 4% </span>carbohydrates<span>, 2% </span>protein<span>, and less than 1% </span>fat<span>(table). The nutritional profile of coriander seeds is different from the fresh stems or leaves. In a 100 gram reference amount, leaves are particularly rich in </span>vitamin A<span>, </span>vitamin C<span> and </span>vitamin K<span>, with moderate content of </span>dietary minerals<span> (table). Although seeds generally have lower content of vitamins, they do provide significant amounts of </span>dietary fiber<span>, </span>calcium<span>, </span>selenium<span>, </span>iron<span>, </span>magnesium<span> and </span>manganese<span>.</span></p> <p>The leaves are variously referred to as coriander leaves, fresh coriander, dhania, Chinese parsley, or (in the US and commercially in Canada) cilantro.</p> <p>Coriander potentially may be confused with culantro (<i>Eryngium foetidum</i> L.), an Apiaceae like coriander (<i>Coriandrum sativum</i> L.), but from a different genus. Culantro has a distinctly different spiny appearance, a more potent volatile leaf oil and a stronger aroma.</p> <p>The leaves have a different taste from the seeds, with citrus overtones.</p> <p>The fresh leaves are an ingredient in many South Asian foods (such as chutneys and salads); in Chinese, Thai, and Burmese dishes; in Mexican cooking, particularly in salsa and guacamoleand as a garnish; and in salads in Russia and other CIS countries. In Portugal, chopped coriander is used in the bread soup Açorda, and in India, chopped coriander is a garnish on Indian dishes such as <i>dal</i>. As heat diminishes their flavour, coriander leaves are often used raw or added to the dish immediately before serving. In Indian and Central Asian recipes, coriander leaves are used in large amounts and cooked until the flavour diminishes. The leaves spoil quickly when removed from the plant, and lose their aroma when dried or frozen.</p> <p>The dry fruits are known as coriander seeds. The word "coriander" in food preparation may refer solely to these seeds (as a spice), rather than to the plant. The seeds have a lemony citrus flavour when crushed, due to terpenes linalool and pinene. It is described as warm, nutty, spicy, and orange-flavoured.</p> <p>The variety <i>C. s. vulgare</i> has a fruit diameter of 3–5 mm (0.12–0.20 in), while var. <i>C. s. microcarpum</i> fruits have a diameter of 1.5–3 mm (0.06–0.12 in). Large-fruited types are grown mainly by tropical and subtropical countries, e.g. Morocco, India, and Australia, and contain a low volatile oil content (0.1-0.4%). They are used extensively for grinding and blending purposes in the spice trade. Types with smaller fruit are produced in temperate regions and usually have a volatile oil content around 0.4-1.8%, so are highly valued as a raw material for the preparation of essential oil.</p>
Z 37
Coriander spice - whole fruit
Black kampot pepper - finest flavor

Black kampot pepper -...

Price €2.50 (SKU: Z 10)
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Black kampot pepper - finest flavor</strong></span><br /><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="color:#d0121a;">The price is for packaging of 5 grams of this spice.</span></strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;"><b>Kampot pepper</b><span> is a </span>cultivar<span> of </span>pepper<span> (</span><i>piper nigrum</i><span>) grown and produced in </span>Kampot Province<span>, </span>Cambodia<span>. It is a certified </span>appellation of origin<span> product since 2010. </span></span></p> <p>Kampot pepper is organically grown and produced and sold in green, black, white and red varieties, all from the same plant. The climate of Kampot Province offers perfect conditions for growing pepper and the quartz content of the soil in the foothills of the Elephant Mountains helps to give Kampot pepper its unique terroir.</p> <p>The growing conditions are only one of several elements of importance to the production of Kampot pepper. Knowledge of pepper cultivation and production has been handed down from generation to generation in Kampot Province since at least the 13th century. Storage conditions are also of importance and different qualities of Kampot pepper are produced and sold.</p> <p>Plantations are inspected by the Kampot Pepper Producers Association (KPPA) and by the independent certification body Eco-Cert. Only accredited members of the KPPA, adhering to the PGI criteria, are authorised to sell pepper using the “Kampot Pepper” appellation of origin. In 2015, a year of drought, the production amounted to 50 tonnes and it is expected to increase to 500 tonnes in 2018.</p> <p></p>
Z 10
Black kampot pepper - finest flavor
Tasmanian peppercorns - spice

Tasmanian peppercorns - spice

Price €3.80 (SKU: Z 6)
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Tasmanian peppercorns - spice</strong></span><br /><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="color:#d0121a;">The price is for packaging of 5 grams of this spice.</span></strong></span></h2> <p><i><b>Tasmannia lanceolata</b></i> (syn. <i>Drimys lanceolata</i>), commonly known as the <b>mountain pepper</b>(Aus), or <b>Cornish pepper lea<span style="color:#000000;">f</span></b><span style="color:#000000;"> (UK), is a <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shrub" title="Shrub"><span style="color:#000000;">shrub</span></a> native to <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodland" title="Woodland"><span style="color:#000000;">woodlands</span></a> and <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cool_temperate" class="mw-redirect" title="Cool temperate"><span style="color:#000000;">cool temperate</span></a> <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rainforest" title="Rainforest"><span style="color:#000000;">rainforest</span></a>of south-eastern <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australia" title="Australia"><span style="color:#000000;">Australia</span></a>. The shrub varies from 2 to 10 m high. The <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aromatic" class="mw-redirect" title="Aromatic"><span style="color:#000000;">aromatic</span></a> <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leaves" class="mw-redirect" title="Leaves"><span style="color:#000000;">leaves</span></a> are <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lanceolate" class="mw-redirect" title="Lanceolate"><span style="color:#000000;">lanceolate</span></a> to narrow-elliptic or <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oblanceolate" class="mw-redirect" title="Oblanceolate"><span style="color:#000000;">oblanceolate</span></a>, 4–12 cm long, and 0.7–2.0 cm wide, with a distinctly pale undersurface. Stems are quite red in colour. The small cream or white flowers appear in summer and are followed by black, globose, two-lobed berries 5–8 mm wide, which appear in autumn. There are separate male and female plants.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;">Originally described by French botanist <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Louis_Marie_Poiret" title="Jean Louis Marie Poiret"><span style="color:#000000;">Jean Louis Marie Poiret</span></a>, it gained its current name in 1969 by A.C. Smith. It had been known for many years as <i><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drimys" title="Drimys"><span style="color:#000000;">Drimys</span></a> lanceolata</i>.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;">Also known as Tasmanian pepperberry, it is found from <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tasmania" title="Tasmania"><span style="color:#000000;">Tasmania</span></a>, northwards through <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_(Australia)" title="Victoria (Australia)"><span style="color:#000000;">Victoria</span></a> to <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barrington_Tops" title="Barrington Tops"><span style="color:#000000;">Barrington Tops</span></a> in <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_South_Wales" title="New South Wales"><span style="color:#000000;">New South Wales</span></a>.</span> It is found in gullies in rainforest.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner">Poly<span style="color:#000000;"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polygodial" title="Polygodial"><span style="color:#000000;">godial</span></a> has been identified as the primary active compound in <i>Tasmannia lanceolata</i>, and is also responsible for its peppery taste.</span></div> </div> <p><span style="color:#000000;">The leaf and berry are used as a <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spice" title="Spice"><span style="color:#000000;">spice</span></a>, typically dried. Mountain pepper was used as a colonial pepper substitute. More recently, it has become popularised as <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bushfood" class="mw-redirect" title="Bushfood"><span style="color:#000000;">bushfood</span></a> condiment. It can be added to curries, cheeses, and alcoholic beverages. It is exported to Japan to flavour <i><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wasabi" title="Wasabi"><span style="color:#000000;">wasabi</span></a></i>. The berries are sweet at first with a peppery aftertaste. Dried <i>T. lanceolata</i> berries and leaves have strong <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antimicrobial" title="Antimicrobial"><span style="color:#000000;">antimicrobial</span></a> activity against food <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_spoilage" title="Food spoilage"><span style="color:#000000;">spoilage</span></a> organisms. It also has high <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antioxidant" title="Antioxidant"><span style="color:#000000;">antioxidant</span></a>activity. Low <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safrole" title="Safrole"><span style="color:#000000;">safrole</span></a> <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cloning" title="Cloning"><span style="color:#000000;">clonal</span></a> selections are grown in plantations for commercial use, as safrole is considered a low-risk <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toxin" title="Toxin"><span style="color:#000000;">toxin</span></a>.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;">Used in colonial medicine as a substitute for <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drimys_winteri" title="Drimys winteri"><span style="color:#000000;">Winter's bark</span></a>, a <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stomachic" title="Stomachic"><span style="color:#000000;">stomachic</span></a>,</span> it was also used for treating <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scurvy" title="Scurvy">scurvy</a>.Mountain pepper is one of a number of native Australian herbs and food species being supported by the Australian Native Food Industry Ltd, which brings together producers of food species from all parts of Australia.<span style="font-size:xx-small;"> </span>The pepperberry can be used as a fish poison.</p> <p>The 1889 book 'The Useful Native Plants of Australia records that common names included "Pepper Tree" and that "The drupe is used as a condiment, being a fair substitute for pepper, or rather allspice The leaves and bark also have a hot, biting, cinnamon-like taste."</p> <p>It can be grown as a<span style="color:#000000;"> <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_plant" class="mw-redirect" title="Garden plant"><span style="color:#000000;">garden plant</span></a>. Its berries attract birds, including <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Currawong" title="Currawong"><span style="color:#000000;">Currawongs</span></a>, that feed on them. It can be propagated from cuttings or seed, and can grow in a well-drained acidic soil with some shade, but is sensitive to <i><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytophthora_cinnamomi" title="Phytophthora cinnamomi"><span style="color:#000000;">Phytophthora cinnamomi</span></a></i>.</span></p> <p>Garden cultivars include 'Mt. Wellington', a compact plant with coppery new growth, and 'Suzette', a variegated cultivar</p>
Z 6
Tasmanian peppercorns - spice

Cardamom spice and tea  -...

Cardamom spice and tea -...

Price €2.10 (SKU: Z 26)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Cardamom spice and tea - minced</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt; color: #ff0000;"><strong>The price is for packaging of 10 grams of this spice.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color: #000000;"><b>Cardamom</b><span> (</span><span class="nowrap"><span class="IPA nopopups noexcerpt">/<span><span title="/ˈ/: primary stress follows">ˈ</span><span title="'k' in 'kind'">k</span><span title="/ɑːr/: 'ar' in 'far'">ɑːr</span><span title="'d' in 'dye'">d</span><span title="/ə/: 'a' in 'about'">ə</span><span title="'m' in 'my'">m</span><span title="/ə/: 'a' in 'about'">ə</span><span title="'m' in 'my'">m</span></span>/</span></span><span>), sometimes </span><b>cardamon</b><span> or </span><b>cardamum</b><span>,</span><span> is a </span>spice<span> made from the seeds of several plants in the </span>genera<span> </span><i>Elettaria</i><span> and </span><i>Amomum</i><span> in the family </span>Zingiberaceae<span>. Both genera are native to the </span>Indian subcontinent<span> and </span>Indonesia<span>. They are recognized by their small seed pods: triangular in cross-section and spindle-shaped, with a thin, papery outer shell and small, black seeds; </span><i>Elettaria</i><span> pods are light green and smaller, while </span><i>Amomum</i><span> pods are larger and dark brown. </span></span>Cardamom is a native to Kerala, Karnataka and the forests of the Western Ghats of Southwestern India. The first references to cardamom are found in Sumer, and in the Ayurvedic literatures of India. Nowadays, it is also cultivated in some other countries, such as Guatemala, Malaysia and Tanzania. The German coffee planter Oscar Majus Kloeffer introduced Indian cardamom (<i>kerala</i>) to cultivation in Guatemala before World War I; by 2000, that country had become the biggest producer and exporter of cardamom in the world, followed by India.<sup id="cite_ref-karun_5-0" class="reference"> </sup>Cardamom is the world's third-most expensive spice, surpassed in price per weight only by vanilla and saffron.</p> <p>Both forms of cardamom are used as flavourings and cooking spices in both food and drink, and as a medicine. <i>E. cardamomum</i> (green cardamom) is used as a spice, a masticatory, and in medicine; it is also smoked.</p> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"> <div class="thumbcaption">Besides use as flavourant and spice in foods, cardamom-flavoured tea, also flavoured with cinnamon, is consumed as a hot beverage in Bangladesh, India, Nepal, and Pakistan.</div> </div> </div> <p>Cardamom has a strong, unique taste, with an intensely aromatic, resinous fragrance. Black cardamom has a distinctly more smoky, though not bitter, aroma, with a coolness some consider similar to mint.</p> <p>Green cardamom is one of the most expensive spices by weight, but little is needed to impart flavour. It is best stored in the pod, as exposed or ground seeds quickly lose their flavour. Grinding the pods and seeds together lowers both the quality and the price. For recipes requiring whole cardamom pods, a generally accepted equivalent is 10 pods equals ​<span class="frac nowrap">1<span class="visualhide"> </span><sup>1</sup>⁄<sub>2</sub></span> teaspoons of ground cardamom.<sup id="cite_ref-19" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>It is a common ingredient in Indian cooking. It is also often used in baking in the Nordic countries, in particular in Sweden, Norway, and Finland, where it is used in traditional treats such as the Scandinavian Jule bread <i>Julekake</i>, the Swedish <i>kardemummabullar</i> sweet bun, and Finnish sweet bread <i>pulla</i>. In the Middle East, green cardamom powder is used as a spice for sweet dishes, as well as traditional flavouring in coffee and tea. Cardamom is used to a wide extent in savoury dishes. In some Middle Eastern countries, coffee and cardamom are often ground in a wooden mortar, a <i>mihbaj</i>, and cooked together in a skillet, a <i>mehmas</i>, over wood or gas, to produce mixtures as much as 40% cardamom.</p> <p>In Asia, both types of cardamom are widely used in both sweet and savory dishes, particularly in the south. Both are frequent components in spice mixes, such as Indian and Nepali masalas and Thai curry pastes. Green cardamom is often used in traditional Indian sweets and in <i>masala chai</i> (spiced tea). Both are also often used as a garnish in basmati rice and other dishes. Individual seeds are sometimes chewed and used in much the same way as chewing gum. It is used by confectionery giant Wrigley; its Eclipse Breeze Exotic Mint packaging indicates the product contains "cardamom to neutralize the toughest breath odors". It is also included in aromatic bitters, gin, and herbal teas.</p> <p>In Korea, medicinal cardamom (<i>Amomum villosum</i> var. <i>xanthioides</i>) and black cardamom (<i>Amomum tsao-ko</i>) are used in traditional tea called <i>jeho-tang</i>.</p> <p>The content of essential oil in the seeds is strongly dependent on storage conditions, but may be as high as 8%. In the oil were found α-terpineol 45%, myrcene 27%, limonene8%, menthone 6%, β-phellandrene 3%, 1,8-cineol 2%, sabinene 2% and heptane 2%. Other sources report 1,8-cineol (20 to 50%), [[α-terpenylacetate In the seeds of round cardamom from Java (<i>A. kepulaga</i>), the content of essential oil is lower (2 to 4%), and the oil contains mainly 1,8-cineol (up to 70%) plus β-pinene (16%); furthermore, α-pinene, α-terpineol and humulene were found.</p> </body> </html>
Z 26
Cardamom spice and tea  - minced
Madagascar black peppercorn - whole

Madagascar black peppercorn...

Price €2.50 (SKU: Z 9)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Madagascar black peppercorn - whole</strong></span><br /><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="color:#d0121a;">The price is for packaging of 5 grams of this spice.</span></strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;"><span>Madagascar peppercorns are largely unknown to American Chefs.  Madagascar pepper features a medium-sized berry brownish-gray in color with a robust aroma reminiscent of hickory smoke or charred oak barrels.  Is especially good for meats but also very versatile for general use.  Some Chefs in France refuse to use anything else, and it is definitely one of our favorites. </span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;"><span>The island of Madagascar was once a colony of France and the close relationship continues with most of their peppercorns being exported to there.  Anyone seeking to recapture that smoky, robust flavor of French meat dishes needs to try Madagascar Peppercorns. You might also want to try Madagascar Peppercorns in dried food products. From tomatoes to home-made beef jerky, these peppercorns can make it seem like your dried foods were slowly cooked for days on an outdoor camp fire. In addition, vegans and vegetarians craving the smoky flavor of bacon or meat products will love the ‘oak and hickory’ taste imparted by Madagascar Peppercorns.</span></span></p>
Z 9
Madagascar black peppercorn - whole

Black/brown mustard spices - unground

Black/brown mustard spices...

Price €1.70 (SKU: Z 22)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Black/brown mustard spices - unground</strong></span><br /><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="color:#d0121a;">The price is for packaging of 10 grams of this spice.</span></strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;"><i><b>Brassica juncea</b></i><span>, commonly </span><b>brown mustard</b><span>, </span><b>Chinese mustard</b><span>, </span><b>Indian mustard</b><span>, </span><b>leaf mustard</b><span>, </span><b>Oriental mustard</b><span> and </span><b>vegetable mustard</b><span>, is a species of </span>mustard plant<span>.</span><span>One </span>subvariety<span> is </span><i>southern giant curled mustard</i><span>, which resembles a headless cabbage such as </span>kale<span>, but with a distinct horseradish or mustard flavor. It is also known as </span><i>green mustard cabbage</i><span>. </span></span></p> <p>The leaves, seeds, and stems of this mustard variety are edible. The plant appears in some form in African, Bangladeshi, Chinese, Italian, Indian, Japanese, Nepali, Pakistani, Korean, and African-American (soul food) cuisines. Cultivars of <i>B. juncea</i> are grown for their greens, and for the production of oilseed. The mustard condiment made from the seeds of the <i>B. juncea</i> is called brown mustard and is considered to be spicier than yellow mustard.</p> <p>Because it may contain erucic acid, a potential toxin, mustard oil is restricted from import as a vegetable oil into the United States. Essential oil of mustard, however, is accepted as GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe). But in Russia, this is the main species grown for the production of mustard oil. It is widely used in canning, baking and margarine production in Russia, and the majority of Russian table mustard is also made from <i>B. juncea</i>.</p> <p>The leaves are used in African cooking, and all plant parts are used in Nepali cuisine, particularly in the mountain regions of Nepal, as well as in the Punjab cuisine of India and Pakistan, where a dish called <i>sarson da saag</i> (mustard greens) is prepared. <i>B. juncea</i> subsp. <i>tatsai</i>, which has a particularly thick stem, is used to make the Nepali pickle called <i>achar</i>, and the Chinese pickle <i>zha cai</i>.</p> <p>The Gorkhas of Darjeeling, Sikkim and Nepal prepare pork with mustard greens (also called <i>rayo</i> in Nepali). It is usually eaten with relish and steamed rice, but can also be eaten with <i>roti</i> (griddle breads). In Nepal it is also a common practice to cook these greens with meat of all sorts specially goat meat; which is normally prepared in a pressure cooker with minimal use of spices to focus on the flavour of the greens and dry chillies. <i>Brassica juncea</i> (especially the seeds) is more pungent than greens from the closely related <i>Brassica oleracea</i> (kale, broccoli, and collard greens),<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup> and is frequently mixed with these milder greens in a dish of "mixed greens".</p> <p>Chinese and Japanese cuisines also make use of mustard greens. In Japanese cuisine, it is known as <i>takana</i> and often pickled for use as filling in onigiri or as a condiment. Many varieties of <i>B. juncea</i> cultivars are used, including <i>zha cai</i>, <i>mizuna</i>, <i>takana</i> (var. <i>integrifolia</i>), <i>juk gai choy</i>, and <i>xuelihong</i>. Asian mustard greens are most often stir-friedor pickled. A Southeast Asian dish called <i>asam gai choy</i> or <i>kiam chai boey</i> is often made with leftovers from a large meal. It involves stewing mustard greens with tamarind, dried chillies and leftover meat on the bone. Brassica juncea is also known as <i>gai choi</i>, <i>siu gai choi</i>, <i>xaio jie cai</i>, baby mustard, Chinese leaf mustard or <i>mostaza</i>.</p>
Z 22
Black/brown mustard spices - unground

Dried rosemary - spice and...

Dried rosemary - spice and...

Price €1.10 (SKU: Z 38)
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Dried rosemary - spice and medicine</strong></span><br /><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="color:#d0121a;">The price is for packaging of 8 grams of this spice.</span></strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;"><i><b>Rosmarinus officinalis</b></i><span>, commonly known as </span><b>rosemary</b><span>, is a woody, </span>perennial<span> </span>herb<span> with fragrant, </span>evergreen<span>, needle-like leaves and white, pink, purple, or blue flowers, </span>native<span> to the </span>Mediterranean region<span>.</span><span>It is a member of the mint family </span>Lamiaceae<span>, which includes many other herbs. The name "rosemary" derives from the </span>Latin<span> for "dew" (</span><i>ros</i><span>) and "sea" (</span><i>marinus</i><span>), or "dew of the sea".</span><span>The plant is also sometimes called </span><b>anthos</b><span>, from the ancient Greek word ἄνθος, meaning "flower".</span><span> Rosemary has a </span>fibrous root system<span>.</span></span></p> <p>Rosemary leaves are used as a flavoring in foods, such as stuffing and roast lamb, pork, chicken, and turkey. Fresh or dried leaves are used in traditional Mediterranean cuisine. They have a bitter, astringenttaste and a characteristic aroma which complements many cooked foods. Herbal tea can be made from the leaves. When roasted with meats or vegetables, the leaves impart a mustard-like aroma with an additional fragrance of charred wood that goes well with barbecued foods.</p> <p>In amounts typically used to flavor foods, such as one teaspoon (1 gram), rosemary provides no nutritional value. Rosemary extracthas been shown to improve the shelf life and heat stability of omega 3-rich oils which are prone to rancidity.</p>
Z 38
Dried rosemary - spice and medicine

Phlox sumac spice - minced (Rhus coriaria)

Phlox sumac spice - minced...

Price €1.25 (SKU: Z 13)
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Phlox sumac spice - minced (<span class="binomial"><i>Rhus coriaria</i></span></strong></span><br /><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="color:#d0121a;">The price is for packaging of 10 grams of this spice.</span></strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;"><i><b>Rhus coriaria</b></i><span>, commonly called </span><b>Sicilian sumac</b><span>,</span><span> </span><b>tanner's sumach</b><span>,</span><span> or </span><b>elm-leaved sumach</b><span>, is a </span>deciduous<span> </span>shrub<span> to small </span>tree<span> in the </span>Anacardiaceae<span> or </span>cashew<span> family, native to southern </span>Europe<span>.</span><span> The dried </span>fruits<span> are used as a </span>spice<span>, particularly in combination with other spices in the mixture called </span>za'atar<span>.</span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;"><span><span>The plant will grow in any type of </span>soil<span> that is deep and well-drained.</span></span></span></p> <p>The fruit has a sour taste; dried and crushed, it is a popular spice in the Middle East. Immature fruits and seeds are also eaten. It is traditionally used and also clinically investigated for lipid lowering effects.</p> <p>The leaves and the bark were traditionally used in leather tanning and contain tannic acid.</p> <p>Dyes of various colours, red, yellow, black, and brown, can be made from different parts of the plant.</p> <p>Oil extracted from the seeds can be used to make candles.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Medical_Benefits">Medical Benefits</span></h2> <p>Scientific studies indicate <i>Rhus coriaria</i> is hepatoprotective (protects the liver), antimicrobial and exhibits a strong antioxidant activity which is rich in anthocyanins and hydrolysable tannins. Unlike the similiarly named poison sumac (Toxicodendron vernix), there are no reactions from <i>Rhus coriaria</i> documented in medical literature.</p> <p></p>
Z 13
Phlox sumac spice - minced (Rhus coriaria)

Black cardamom spice - whole

Black cardamom spice - whole

Price €2.10 (SKU: Z 28)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Black cardamom spice - whole</strong></span><br /><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="color:#d0121a;">The price is for packaging of 10 grams of this spice.</span></strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;"><b>Black cardamom</b><span>, also known as </span><b>hill cardamom</b><span>,</span><span> </span><b>Bengal cardamom</b><span>,</span><span> </span><b>greater cardamom</b><span>,</span><span> </span><b>Indian cardamom</b><span>,</span><span> </span><b>Nepal cardamom</b><span>,</span><span> </span><b>winged cardamom</b><span>,</span><span> or </span><b>brown cardamom</b><span>, comes from either of two species in the family </span>Zingiberaceae<span>. Its seed pods have a strong, </span>camphor<span>-like flavor, with a smoky character derived from the method of drying.</span><span>The pods are used as a </span>spice<span>, in a similar manner to the green </span>Indian<span> </span>cardamom<span> pods, but with a different flavor. Unlike green cardamom, this spice is rarely used in sweet dishes. Its smoky flavor and aroma derive from traditional methods of drying over open flames.</span></span></p> <p>Black cardamom is used for hearty meat stews and similar dishes. Although the flavor differs from the smaller green cardamom, black cardamom is sometimes used by large-scale commercial bakers because of its low cost.</p> <p>Black cardamom is often erroneously described as an inferior substitute for green cardamom by those unfamiliar with the spice. It is just not as well suited for the sweet/hot dishes that typically include cardamom and that are more commonly prepared outside the plant's native range.</p> <p>The spice adds very intense aroma when used in Black Tea or Green Tea.</p> <p>In China, the pods are used for <i>jin-jin</i> braised meat dishes, particularly in the cuisine of the central-western province of Sichuan. The pods are often used in Vietnam, where they are called <i>thảo quả</i> and used as an ingredient in the broth for the noodle soup called <i>phở</i>.</p> <p>The largest producer of the black cardamom is Nepal, followed by India and Bhutan. In traditional Chinese medicine, black cardamom is used for stomach disorders and malaria.In the traditional medicine of India, decoction of <i>Amomum subulatum</i> rhizomes is used in the therapy of jaundice.</p>
Z 28
Black cardamom spice - whole

Chia seeds Spice 1.2 - 1

Chia seeds Spice

Price €1.20 (SKU: Z 20)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Chia seeds</strong></span><br /><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="color:#d0121a;">The price is for packaging of 10 grams of this spice.</span></strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;"><b>Chia</b><span> is the edible seed of </span><i>Salvia hispanica</i><span>, a flowering plant in the mint family (</span>Lamiaceae<span>) native to Central America, or of the related </span><i>Salvia columbariae</i><span> of the southwestern United States and Mexico. Chia seeds are oval and gray with black and white spots, having a diameter around 1 millimetre (0.04 in). The seeds are </span>hydrophilic<span>, absorbing up to 12 times their weight in liquid when soaked and developing a </span>mucilaginous<span> coating that gives chia-based creams and beverages a distinctive </span>gel<span> texture. <span>There is evidence the crop was widely </span>cultivated<span> by the </span>Aztecs<span> in </span>pre-Columbian times<span>, and was a </span>staple food<span> for </span>Mesoamerican<span> cultures. Chia seeds are cultivated on a small scale in their ancestral homeland of central Mexico and Guatemala, and they are cultivated commercially throughout Central and South America.</span></span></span></p> <p>Typically, chia seeds are small flattened ovals measuring on average 2.1 mm × 1.3 mm × 0.8 mm (0.08 in × 0.05 in × 0.03 in), with an average weight of 1.3 mg per seed. They are mottle-colored with brown, gray, black, and white. The seeds are hydrophilic, absorbing up to 12 times their weight in liquid when soaked; they develop a mucilaginous coating that gives chia-based creams and beverages a distinctive gel texture.</p> <p>Chia (or chian or chien) has mostly been identified as <i>Salvia hispanica</i> L. Other plants referred to as "chia" include "golden chia" (<i>Salvia columbariae</i>). The seeds of <i>Salvia columbariae</i> are used medicinally and for food.</p> <p>In the 21st century, chia is grown and consumed commercially in its native Mexico and Guatemala, as well as Bolivia, Argentina, Ecuador, Nicaragua, and Australia. New patented varieties of chia have been developed in Kentucky for cultivation in northern latitudes of the United States.</p> <p>Seed yield varies depending on cultivars, mode of cultivation, and growing conditions by geographic region. For example, commercial fields in Argentina and Colombia vary in yield range from 450 to 1250 kg/ha. A small-scale study with three cultivars grown in the inter-Andean valleys of Ecuador produced yields up to 2300 kg/ha, indicating that favorable growing environment and cultivar interacted to produce such high yields. Genotype has a larger effect on yield than on protein content, oil content, fatty acid composition, or phenolic compounds, whereas high temperature reduces oil content and degree of unsaturation, and raises protein content.</p> <p>Dried chia seeds contain 6% water, 42% carbohydrates, 16% protein, and 31% fat (table). In a 100-gram amount, chia seeds are a rich source (20% or more of the Daily Value, DV) of the B vitamins, thiamin and niacin (54% and 59% DV, respectively), and a moderate source of riboflavin (14% DV) and folate (12% DV). Several dietary minerals are in rich content, including calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, and zinc (all more than 20% DV; table).</p> <p>The fatty acids of chia seed oil are mainly unsaturated, with linoleic acid (17–26% of total fat) and linolenic acid (50-57%) as the major fats.</p>
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