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Palmzaden

Er zijn 31 producten.

Item 1-15 van 31 in totaal item(s)
California Fan Palm Seeds (Washingtonia filifera) 1.75 - 1

California Fan Palm Seeds...

Prijs € 1,75 (SKU: PS 1)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Washingtonia Seeds California Fan Palm</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Washingtonia Filifera is a palm native to the southern and southwestern  USA states and northwest Mexico. This palm grows up to 23 m  (exceptionally 30 m) in good growing conditions. The leaves have a petiole up to 2 m long, bearing a fan of leaflets 1.5-2 m long, with white, thread-like fibers between the segments. When the leaves die they bend downwards and form a skirt around the trunk. Washingtonia filifera can live from 80 to 250 years or more and is <strong>reported to be cold hardy to -12C.</strong></p> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">soak in water for 3-4  hours</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">min. 20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">until it germinates </span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color:#008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> <div><span style="color:#008000;"><em> </em></span></div> </td> </tr></tbody></table>
PS 1
California Fan Palm Seeds (Washingtonia filifera) 1.75 - 1
Pachypodium Lamerei Seeds 1.95 - 1

Pachypodium Lamerei Seeds

Prijs € 2,45 (SKU: PS 2)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;" class=""><strong>Pachypodium Lamerei Seeds - Succulent of Madagascar</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>This truly original succulent comes from the island of Madagascar off the East coast of Mozambique. Madagascar has evolved on its own for millions of years, even its dinosaur fossils are found nowhere else, and many of its plants are strange and wonderful too! This succulent is no exception, growing to a height of around 6 meters, it forms a stout trunk lined with many groups of 3 spines. The growing tip produces the lance shaped leaves which can grow to around 40 cm in length. Branching when older, Pacypodium Lamerei produces clusters of creamy white, yellow throated flowers around, 10 cm across. A must have plant for the succulent collection!</div> <div>Likes full sun, a well drained soil, and left dry in the winter, when it will shed its leaves. Keep above 10°C.</div> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">20-25 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1-6 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;</em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
PS 2
Pachypodium Lamerei Seeds 1.95 - 1

Best seller product
Travellers Palm Seeds

Travellers Palm Seeds

Prijs € 2,25 (SKU: PS 3)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Travellers Palm&nbsp;Seeds (Ravenala Madagascariensis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>A fast-growing palm that forms huge leaves (up to 20ft long in its tropical home) arranged in a fan shape. However, in the UK it is easily kept as a beautiful indoor banana. For those of you who like to know such things the name comes from two unusual features - firstly the fan-shaped leaf structure tends to grow East-West and secondly when cut, the leaves provide refreshment to the (desperate!) thirsty traveler.</p> <div></div> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p>Sowing Instructions</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p>Propagation:</p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p>Seeds</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p>Pretreat:</p> </td> <td valign="top"> <div>carefully remove the blue residue of the fruit</div> <div>soak for 2 days in tepid water at 25-30 °C (77-86 °F)</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p>Stratification:</p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p>0</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p>Sowing Time:</p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p>all year round</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p>Sowing Depth:</p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p>1 cm</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p>Sowing Mix:</p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p>sow the seeds in 1 pot with soil, cover the pot to minimise evaporation</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p>Germination temperature:</p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p>keep at 25-30 °C (77-86 °F)</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p>Location:</p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p>bright + keep constantly moist not wet</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p>Germination Time:</p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p>1 month to 1 year, very erratic</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p>Watering:</p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p>Water regularly during the growing season</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p>&nbsp;</p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p class=""><br>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;All Rights Reserved.</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
PS 3
Travellers Palm Seeds
Bermuda Palmetto, Bibby-tree Seeds frost-tolerant -14 °C

Bermuda Palmetto,...

Prijs € 2,00 (SKU: PS 4)
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2 id="short_description_content" class="rte align_justify"><span style="font-size: 14pt;" class=""><strong>Bermuda Palmetto, Bibby-tree Seeds frost-tolerant -14 °C</strong></span></h2> <h2 class="rte align_justify"><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong></strong><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></span></h2> <p>Sabal bermudana, commonly known as the Bermuda Palmetto or Bibby-tree, is one of 15 species of palm trees in the genus Sabal and is endemic to Bermuda although reportedly naturalized in the Leeward Islands. It was greatly affected by the introduction of non-native plants such as the Chinese Fan-Palm, which created competition for space that it usually lost.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>Sabal bermudana grows up to 25 m (82 ft) in height, with the occasional old tree growing up to 30 m (98 ft) in height, with a trunk up to 55 cm (22 in) in diameter. It is a fan palm (Arecaceae tribe Corypheae), with the leaves with a bare petiole terminating in a rounded fan of numerous leaflets. Each leaf is 1.5–2 m (4.9–6.6 ft) long, with 45-60 leaflets up to 75 cm (30 in) long. The flowers are yellowish-white, 5 mm (0.20 in) across, produced in large panicles up to 2.5 m (8.2 ft) long, extending out beyond the leaves. The fruit is a deep brown to black drupe about 1 cm (0.39 in) long containing a single seed. It is extremely salt-tolerant and is often seen growing near the Atlantic Ocean coast in Bermuda, and also frost-tolerant, surviving short periods of temperatures as low as -14 °C, although it will never get that cold in Bermuda.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>Bermudians used to use, for a short period, the leaflets of the palm to weave into hats and export them to the United Kingdom and other countries. Sabal bermudana also had hole drilled into its trunk and sap extracted to make "bibby", a strong alcoholic beverage.</p> <p>During the 17th century, most houses in Bermuda had palmetto-thatched roofs.</p> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
PS 4
Bermuda Palmetto, Bibby-tree Seeds frost-tolerant -14 °C

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.
Zaden Canarische dadelpalm...

Zaden Canarische dadelpalm...

Prijs € 1,95 (SKU: PS 5)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2 id="short_description_content"><strong>Zaden Canarische dadelpalm (Phoenix canariensis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Prijs voor pakket met 10, 50 zaden.</strong></span></h2> <p>De<span> </span><b>Canarische dadelpalm</b><span> </span>(<i>Phoenix canariensis</i>) is een tot 18 m hoge,<span> </span>tweehuizige<span> </span>palm<span> </span>met een gedrongen stam met bladlittekens en een dichte kroon met vijftig tot honderd geveerde<span> </span>bladeren. De bladeren zijn 5-6 m lang, breed, kort gesteeld en gebogen overhangend. De deelblaadjes zijn groen, stevig, smal-lancetvormig en V-vormig gevouwen. De onderste deelblaadjes zijn vaak gereduceerd en gedoornd. De middelste deelblaadjes zijn 40-50 cm lang.</p> <p>De palm bloeit van februari tot juni. Jonge<span> </span>bloeiwijzen<span> </span>worden door een<span> </span>schutblad<span> </span>omgeven. De<span> </span>bloemetjes<span> </span>zijn crèmekleurig tot geel. De mannelijke bloemen staan dicht opeen in de as van de mannelijke bloeiwijze. De vrouwelijke bloeiwijzen zijn sterk vertakt en verkleuren tijdens de bloei van lichtgeel tot oranjerood. De talrijke<span> </span>vruchten<span> </span>staan dicht opeen in vertakte trossen. Ze zijn langwerpig-eivormig, 1,5-2,3 cm lang, weinig vlezig en rijpen van oranje naar donker roodbruin. In tegenstelling tot de vruchten van de echte<span> </span>dadelpalm<span> </span>(<i>Phoenix dactylifera</i>) zijn ze oneetbaar.</p> <p>De Canarische dadelpalm is<span> </span>endemisch<span> </span>op de<span> </span>Canarische Eilanden. Palmen in hun natuurlijke leefgebied zijn zeldzaam geworden. De plant groeit sneller en is minder koudegevoelig dan de echte dadelpalm en wordt daarom in het hele<span> </span>Middellandse Zeegebied<span> </span>vaak als sierplant aangeplant.</p> <p></p> </body> </html>
PS 5
Zaden Canarische dadelpalm (Phoenix canariensis)
Exotic Snake Fruit Salak Seeds (Salacca edulis)

Exotic Snake Fruit Salak...

Prijs € 7,00 (SKU: V 60)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Exotic Snake Fruit Salak Seeds (Salacca edulis or Salacca zalacca)</strong></h2> <h3><strong style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 2 seeds.</strong></h3> <div>Salak palm (Salacca edulis or Salacca zalacca) often called Snake Fruit because of the scaly skin on the fruits.   This is a thorny species of palm tree native to Indonesia and Malaysia. It is a very short-stemmed palm making a cluster of short crowns, with leaves up to 5m long; each leaf has a  long petiole with spines one or two inches (2.5 to 5 cm) long, and numerous pinnate (feather like) leaflets.  The pictures show a small 5 liter bucket, not the normal 5 gallon ones.....</div> <div>The fruit grow in clusters at the base of the palm, and can be peeled by hand, or my favorite is to beak off the tip and insert the handle side of a spoon that will easily peel the fruit, kind of like a boiled egg.  There are three sections inside, with the color and texture of a peeled garlic but a taste that is unlike what you would expect!   It is mostly a combination apple and pineapple, and often tends to be a bit astringent unless very ripe.   Everybody likes them!  </div> <p><strong>Wikipedia:</strong></p> <p>Salak (Salacca zalacca) is a species of palm tree (family Arecaceae) native to Indonesia, Brunei and Malaysia. It is a very short-stemmed palm, with leaves up to 6 metres (20 ft) long; each leaf has a 2-metre long petiole with spines up to 15 centimetres (5.9 in) long, and numerous leaflets. Also it is Selim Celebi.</p> <p>The fruit grow in clusters at the base of the palm, and are also known as snake fruit due to the reddish-brown scaly skin. They are about the size and shape of a ripe fig, with a distinct tip. The pulp is edible. The fruit can be peeled by pinching the tip, which should cause the skin to slough off so it can be pulled away. The fruit inside consists of three lobes with the largest of the three containing a large inedible seed. The lobes resemble, and have the consistency of, large peeled garlic cloves. The taste is usually sweet and acidic, but its apple-like texture can vary from very dry and crumbly (salak pondoh from Yogyakarta) to moist and crunchy (salak Bali).</p> <p><strong><em>Cultivation</em></strong></p> <p>Salak fruit is indigenous to and has been cultivated throughout Indonesia, and there are at least 30 cultivars, most of which have an astringent taste and are sweet. Two popular cultivars are salak pondoh from Yogyakarta province (found in 1980s) and salak Bali from Bali island.</p> <p><strong>Salak pondoh</strong></p> <p>Salak pondoh is an important fruit in Yogyakarta province. In the five years to 1999, the annual production in Yogyakarta doubled to 28,666 tons. Its popularity (compared with other cultivars) among local Indonesian consumers is mainly due to the intensity of its aroma, which can be overripe and sweaty even before full maturation.</p> <p>Salak pondoh has three more superior variations, namely pondoh super, pondoh hitam (black pondoh), and pondoh gading (ivory / yellowish-skinned pondoh).</p> <p><strong>Salak Bali</strong></p> <p>Salak Bali is commonly sold all over the island of Bali, and is a popular fruit with both locals and tourists. The fruit is roughly the size of a large fig, and has a crunchy and moist consistency. The fruit has a starchy 'mouth feel', and a flavour reminiscent of dilute pineapple and lemon juice.</p> <p><strong>Salak gula pasir</strong></p> <p>The most expensive cultivar of the Bali salak is the gula pasir (literally "sand sugar" or "grain sugar", referring to its fine-grainedness), which is smaller than the normal salak and is the sweetest of all salak. The price in Bali is Rp 15,000-30,000 (US$1.50-3.00) per kilogram depending on time of year.</p> <p>Salak gula pasir or also known as Sugar salak which known for its juicy sweetness sometimes fermented into Salak wine which has an alcohol content of 13.5 percent, similar to traditional wine made from grapes.</p> <p><span style="font-size:10pt;"><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy7dK_7-j94&amp;feature=youtu.be" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span style="color:#ff0000;"><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy7dK_7-j94&amp;feature=youtu.be</strong></span></span></a></span></p>
V 60
Exotic Snake Fruit Salak Seeds (Salacca edulis)

Seeds Sago Palm, King Sago, Sago Cycad, Japanese Sago Palm 1.75 - 1

Seeds Sago Palm, King Sago,...

Prijs € 3,75 (SKU: PS 7)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Seeds Sago Palm, King Sago, Sago Cycad, Japanese Sago Palm</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Cycas revoluta (Sotetsu [Japanese ソテツ], sago palm, king sago, sago cycad, Japanese sago palm), is a species of gymnosperm in the family Cycadaceae, native to southern Japan including the Ryukyu Islands. It is one of several species used for the production of sago, as well as an ornamental plant.</p> <p><strong>Names</strong></p> <p>Cycads are not closely related to the true palms (Arecaceae). The Latin specific epithet revoluta means "curled back",[2] in reference to the leaves. This is also called Kungi (comb) Palm in Urdu speaking areas.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>This very symmetrical plant supports a crown of shiny, dark green leaves on a thick shaggy trunk that is typically about 20 cm (7.9 in) in diameter, sometimes wider. The trunk is very low to subterranean in young plants, but lengthens above ground with age. It can grow into very old specimens with 6–7 m (over 20 feet) of trunk; however, the plant is very slow-growing and requires about 50–100 years to achieve this height. Trunks can branch multiple times, thus producing multiple heads of leaves.</p> <p>The leaves are a deep semiglossy green and about 50–150 cm (20–59 in) long when the plants are of a reproductive age. They grow out into a feather-like rosette to 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. The crowded, stiff, narrow leaflets are 8–18 cm (3.1–7.1 in) long and have strongly recurved or revolute edges. The basal leaflets become more like spines. The petiole or stems of the sago cycad are 6–10 cm (2.4–3.9 in) long and have small protective barbs.</p> <p>Roots are called coralloid with an Anabaena symbiosis allowing nitrogen fixation. Tannins-rich cells are found on either side of the algal layer to resist the algal invasion.</p> <p>As with other cycads, it is dioecious, with the males bearing pollen cones (strobilus) and the females bearing groups of megasporophylls. Pollination can be done naturally by insects or artificially.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation and use</strong></p> <p>Propagation of Cycas revoluta is either by seed or by removal of basal offsets. It is one of the most widely cultivated cycads, grown outdoors in warm temperate and subtropical regions, or under glass in colder areas. It grows best in sandy, well-drained soil, preferably with some organic matter. It needs good drainage or it will rot. It is fairly drought-tolerant and grows well in full sun or outdoor shade, but needs bright light when grown indoors. The leaves can bleach somewhat if moved from indoors to full sun outdoors.</p> <p>Of all the cycads, C. revoluta is the most popular in cultivation. It is seen in almost all botanical gardens, in both temperate and tropical locations. In many areas of the world, it is heavily promoted commercially as a landscape plant. It is also quite popular as a bonsai plant. First described in the late 18th century, it is tolerant of mild to somewhat cold temperatures, provided the ground is dry. Frost damage can occur at temperatures below −10 °C (14 °F), and several healthy plants have been grown with little protection as far north as St. Louis Missouri and New York, New York, both in USDA zone 7b. C. revoluta usually defoliates in this temperate climate, but will usually flush (or grow) several new leaves by spring.</p> <p>This plant has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.</p> <p>The pith contains edible starch, and is used for making sago. Before use, the starch must be carefully washed to leach out toxins contained in the pith. Extracting edible starch from the sago cycad requires special care due to the poisonous nature of cycads. Cycad sago is used for many of the same purposes as palm sago. Sago is extracted from the sago cycad by cutting the pith from the stem, root and seeds of the cycads, grinding the pith to a coarse flour and then washing it carefully and repeatedly to leach out the natural toxins. The starchy residue is then dried and cooked, producing a starch similar to palm sago/sabudana. The cycad seed contains cycasin toxin and should not be eaten as it is possible for cycasin toxin to survive the most vigorous of repeated washings. Cycasin toxin can cause ALS, Parkinson's, prostate cancer and fibrolemellar hepatocellular carcinoma.</p> <p>Aulacaspis yasumatsui is a scale insect feeding on C. revoluta, and unchecked is able to destroy the plant.</p> <p><strong>Chemistry</strong></p> <p>The hydro-alcoholic extract of leaves of C. revoluta shows the presence of alkaloids, steroids and tannins while the chloroform extract shows the presence of saponins, tannins and sugars.[8] Leaflets also contain biflavonoids.[9] Estragole is the primary volatile compound emitted from the male and female cones of C. revoluta.</p> <p><strong>Toxicity</strong></p> <p>Cycad sago is extremely poisonous to animals (including humans) if ingested. Pets are at particular risk, since they seem to find the plant very palatable.[11] Clinical symptoms of ingestion will develop within 12 hours, and may include vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, seizures, and liver failure or hepatotoxicity characterized by icterus, cirrhosis, and ascites. The pet may appear bruised, have nose bleeds (epistaxis), melena (blood in the stool), hematochezia (bloody straining), and hemarthrosis (blood in the joints).[12] The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center estimates a fatality rate of 50 to 75% when ingestion of the sago palm is involved. If any quantity of the plant is ingested, a poison control center or doctor should be contacted immediately. Effects of ingestion can include permanent internal damage and death.</p> <p>All parts of the plant are toxic; however, the seeds contain the highest level of the toxin cycasin. Cycasin causes gastrointestinal irritation, and in high enough doses, leads to liver failure.[13] Other toxins include Beta-methylamino L-alanine, a neurotoxic amino acid, and an unidentified toxin which has been observed to cause hindlimb paralysis in cattle.</p> </body> </html>
PS 7
Seeds Sago Palm, King Sago, Sago Cycad, Japanese Sago Palm 1.75 - 1
Areca Nut Palm, Betel Palm Seeds (Areca catechu)  - 3

Areca Nut Palm, Betel Palm...

Prijs € 4,85 (SKU: PS 8)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Areca Nut Palm, Betel Palm Seeds (Areca catechu)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 seed.</strong></span></h2> <p>The species has many common names including the areca palm, areca nut palm, betel palm, Indian nut, Pinang palm, Telugu: పోక , Tagalog: bunga, Indonesia/Malay: pinang,[5] Malayalam: അടക്ക adakka, Kannada: ಅಡಿಕೆ Adike, (in Tamil "kamuhu", in Sinhala "Puwak" ). This palm is called the betel tree because its fruit, the areca nut, is often chewed along with the betel leaf, a leaf from a vine of the family Piperaceae.</p> <p>Areca is derived from a local name from the Malabar Coast of India and catechu is from another Malay name for this palm, caccu.</p> <p>Areca catechu is a species of palm which grows in much of the tropical Pacific, Asia, and parts of east Africa. The palm is believed to have originated in the Philippines, but is widespread in cultivation and is considered naturalized in southern China (Guangxi, Hainan, Yunnan), Taiwan, India, Bangladesh, the Maldives, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, New Guinea, many of the islands in the Pacific Ocean, and also in the West Indies.</p> <p>Areca catechu is a medium-sized and palm tree, growing straight to 20 m tall, with a trunk 10–15 cm in diameter. The leaves are 1.5–2 m long, pinnate, with numerous, crowded leaflets. It is also known as puga in Sanskrit,"puwak" in sinhala and supari in Marathi and Gujarati. Normally areca catechu known as pinang tree in Malaysia</p> <p>Areca catechu is grown for its commercially important seed crop, the areca nut.</p> <p>Tanjung Pinang, Pangkal Pinang cities in Indonesia, Indonesian province of Jambi (jambi or jambe is areca in Javanese, Sundanese, Balinese, and Old Malay), Penang Island, off the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia, Fua Mulaku in the Maldives, Guwahati in Assam, and coastal areas of Kerala and Karnataka in India, are some of the places named after a local name for areca nut. Actually, there are numerous city and areal names in Indonesia and Malaysia using the words pinang or jambe. This to shows how important areca nut is in the Austronesian civilization, especially in the modern day Indonesia or Malaysia.</p> <p>The seed contains alkaloids such as arecaidine and arecoline, which, when chewed, are intoxicating and slightly addictive. Areca palms are grown in Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Taiwan and many other Asian countries for their seeds.</p> <p>The seed also contains condensed tannins (procyanidins) called arecatannins which are carcinogenic.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>The areca nut is also popular for chewing throughout some Asian countries, such as China (mainly Hunan), Taiwan, Vietnam, the Philippines, Malaysia, Myanmar, and India and the Pacific, notably Papua New Guinea, where it is very popular. Chewing areca nut is quite popular among working classes in Taiwan. The nut itself can be addictive and has direct link to oral cancers.[7][8] Areca nuts in Taiwan will usually contain artificial additives such as limestone powder. The extract of Areca catechu has been shown to have antidepressant properties in rodents,[9] but it may be addictive.[10]</p> <p>The areca palm is also used as an interior landscaping species. It is often used in large indoor areas such as malls and hotels. It will not fruit or reach full size. Indoors, it is a slow growing, low water, high light plant that is sensitive to spider mites and occasionally mealybugs.</p> <p>In India the dry, fallen leaves are collected and hot-pressed into disposable palm leaf plates and bowls.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
PS 8
Areca Nut Palm, Betel Palm Seeds (Areca catechu)  - 3
Mediterranean dwarf palm Seeds (Chamaerops humilis) 3 - 3

Mediterranean dwarf palm...

Prijs € 3,00 (SKU: PS 9)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>European fan palm, Mediterranean dwarf palm Seeds (Chamaerops humilis)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Chamaerops is a genus of flowering plants in the palm family Arecaceae. The only currently fully accepted species is Chamaerops humilis, variously called European fan palm, or the Mediterranean dwarf palm. It is one of the more cold-hardy palms used in landscaping in temperate climates.</p> <p>Chamaerops humilis is a shrub-like clumping palm, with several stems growing from a single base. It has an underground rhizome which produces shoots with palmate, sclerophyllous leaves.</p> <p>The stems grow slowly and often tightly together, eventually reaching 2–5 m (10–20 ft) tall with a trunk diameter of 20–25 cm (8–10 in). It is a fan palm (Arecaceae tribe Corypheae), and as such, has leaves with petioles terminating in rounded fans of 10–20 leaflets. Each leaf is up to 1.5 m (5 ft) long, with leaflets 50–80 cm (20–30 in) long. The petioles are armed with numerous sharp, needle-like spines; these may protect the stem growing point from browsing animals.</p> <p>The flowers are borne in dense, short inflorescences at the tops of the stems. The plants usually, but not invariably, are dioecious with male and female flowers on separate plants. The prophyll covers the flowers on the inflorescence until the sexual phase (anthesis) and then splits open apically into two triangular lobes. The number of flowers per inflorescence is highly variable for both male and female plants, depending on the size of the inflorescence. Female flowers are tri-ovulate.[6] Unripe fruits are bright green, turning to dull yellow to brown as they ripen during autumn (September–November). The seed (usually 0.6–0.8 g or 1⁄50–3⁄100 oz) contains a small cylindrical embryo, which is surrounded by several layers, from inner to outer as follows:</p> <p>a nutritious endosperm,</p> <p>a wide woody layer or endocarp,</p> <p>a fleshy and fibrous mesocarp (the pulp), and</p> <p>the thin outer layer or exocarp.</p> <p><strong>Taxonomy</strong></p> <p>Apart from the fully accepted Chamaerops humilis there currently are a few species of unresolved status plus tens of species synonymised with Chamaerops humilis.</p> <p>The species Chamaerops humilis itself has three accepted varieties as follows:</p> <p>Chamaerops humilis var. argentea André (syn. C. h. var. cerifera) – "Atlas mountain palm" of Northwest Africa. Leaves glaucous.</p> <p>Chamaerops humilis var. epondraes – Northwest Africa. Leaves glaucous.</p> <p>Chamaerops humilis var. humilis – Southwest Europe. Leaves green.</p> <p>There also are at least three cultivars (C. humilis var. humilis 'Nana', C. humilis 'Vulcano', C. humilis 'Stella'). C. humilis 'Vulcano' is a compact, thornless cultivar. May be silvery, but less so than argentea. The leaves tend to be thicker, and the appearance of the plant is bushier than var. humilis or var. argentea.</p> <p>The genus Chamaerops is closely related to the genus Trachycarpus. The genera differ in that Trachycarpus lacks the clumping habit only forms single stems without basal suckers), the spiny leaf stems (spineless in Trachycarpus), and in small details of the flower anatomy.</p> <p><strong>Distribution</strong></p> <p>Chamaerops humilis is one of only two palm species native to southern Europe, the other being Phoenix theophrasti. It is mainly found in southwestern Europe (Malta, Sicily, over all the Mediterranean coast of Spain and Portugal, central and southern Italy, some parts of the southern Mediterranean coast of France and Monaco, as well as northwest Africa (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia). It is the northernmost naturally occurring palm in the world, with the northernmost standing at Hyères-les-Palmiers, at 43° 07′ N.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Chamaerops humilis is valued in gardening and landscaping in many parts of the world. It is very drought-tolerant once established.</p> <p><strong>It is hardy to −12 °C (10 °F), but does prefer hot summers. </strong></p> <p>It is a very slow-growing plant. The blue form of the species, native to high elevations of the Atlas Mountains, has recently been introduced into the trade and early reports indicate that it may be −12 °C (−22 °F) or more degrees hardier than the green form.</p> <p>It has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.</p> <p><strong>Ecology and interactions with animals</strong></p> <p>Chamaerops humilis flowers in spring, typically from April to May. The plant also may be partly anemophilous, that is to say, wind-pollinated, but it is at least partly entomophilous, that is to say dependent on pollination by insects. Only one insect species is known to pollinate it, namely a specific weevil, Derelomus chamaeropsis in the family Curculionidae.[13] The nature of the relationship with the weevil is a version of nursery pollination mutualism with the weevil; the form this takes is that once pollinating weevils have found a satisfactory plant, whether male or female, they usually stay on the same plant until the end of its anthesis, finding shelter, egg-laying sites, and food in the inflorescences.</p> <p>At anthesis, as is common in Angiosperms, both male and female Chamaerops humilis plants attract their pollinators with chemical compounds, but an unusual feature is that their scents are released by the leaves, and not by the flowers.[15] Towards the end of anthesis, weevils leave the plant and seek a new host plant, again either male or female.</p> <p>Larval development of the weevil Derelomus chamaeropsis occurs within rachises of inflorescences of male plants during autumn and winter. At the beginning of the next flowering period, adult weevils emerge from the dry and brittle stems of old inflorescences of the previous year of male plants only. Those that hatch in female plants die without concluding their development. This is because the palmettos are adapted to prevent the pollinating weevils from destroying the female inflorescences with their burden of seed. Weevils have been shown to lay eggs within female inflorescences, but as soon as seeds start to develop, eggs or larvae fail to continue their life cycle. On the other hand, male inflorescences have completed their function after pollination, so it is advantageous to the plant's reproduction for the weevils to complete their life cycles and shelter in the male inflorescences, thereby remaining available for pollination when they emerge in the following season.</p> <p>The ripe pulp of C. humilis has several important functions.</p> <p>When ripened, the pulp smells strongly of rancid butter[18] and thus acts as a foraging cue for nocturnal frugivores that commonly are fundamentally carnivorous mammals such as badgers and foxes.</p> <p>The pulp inhibits germination, ensuring that the seed does not germinate until has been dispersed.</p> <p>The pulp also acts as a chemical or physical barrier against invertebrate seed predators, typically beetles, and in particular weevils.</p> <p>Because of the combination of such functions in the pulp, the palm both benefits and suffers adverse consequences when carnivores feed on the fruit and thereby remove the pulp. On the one hand, the seeds that carnivores swallow, germinate more frequently than seeds in entire fruit. On the other hand, ingested seeds are more frequently destroyed by invertebrate pests than non-ingested seeds. However, because of the mobility of carnivores, their dispersal service is important to the palmetto, given the severe fragmentation and isolation of most populations across the increasingly densely populated Mediterranean basin.</p> <p><strong>Uses and threats</strong></p> <p>Chamaerops humilis has a wide distribution in uncultivated land, and it is adapted to regimes of frequent burning, which it survives largely by re-sprouting from underground rhizomes and from fire-damaged stems. Such factors make the species ecologically important in preventing erosion and desertification and in providing shelter and food to many species of animals.</p> <p>Apart from its material benefits, this palmetto is of emotional value as a charismatic component of the "garrigues" and "macchias" of the Mediterranean coastline.</p> <p>The leaves of the adult plants have been used to make brooms and for weaving mats, carrier baskets, and similar articles. For finer work the young, unopened leaves are treated with sulphur to soften them softer and provide supple fibre.</p> <p>The husk, known in southern Spain as "higa", is edible before it becomes too tough to eat as it matures. Because of their bitterness and high tannin content, the fruit are not used for human food, but in traditional medicine they have been used as an astringent.[19]</p> <p>Urbanization and other human activities are making such rapid inroads into the natural habitat of palmetto that they are raising concerns about its future and that of its environment. Accordingly there is an increase in regulations to protect both its stands and those of associated Mediterranean endemics.</p> <p>Another conservation problem is that particularly in the northernmost parts of its natural range, Chamaerops humilis is seriously threatened by an introduced South American moth Paysandisia archon.[9][20] Also, this Mediterranean native palm is affected by the introduction of related ornamental species because of the concurrent introduction of seed predators (such as Coccotrypes dactyliperda and Dactylotrypes longicollis) that feed on both the introduced and native palms.</p>
PS 9
Mediterranean dwarf palm Seeds (Chamaerops humilis) 3 - 3
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African Oil Palm Seeds (Elaeis guineensis)

African Oil Palm Seeds...

Prijs € 4,95 (SKU: PS 10)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>African Oil Palm Seeds (Elaeis guineensis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 seed.</strong></span></h2> <p>Elaeis guineensis is a species of palm commonly called African oil palm or macaw-fat. It is the principal source of palm oil. It is native to west and southwest Africa, specifically the area between Angola and the Gambia; the species name guineensis refers to the name for the area, Guinea, and not the modern country which now bears that name. The species is also now naturalised in Madagascar, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Indonesia, Central America, the West Indies and several islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. The closely related American oil palm Elaeis oleifera and a more distantly related palm, Attalea maripa, are also used to produce palm oil.</p> <p>Human use of oil palms may date as far back as 5,000 years in West Africa; in the late 1800s, archaeologists discovered palm oil in a tomb at Abydos dating back to 3,000 BCE. It is thought that Arab traders brought the oil palm to Egypt.</p> <p>The first western person to describe it and bring back seeds was the French naturalist Michel Adanson.</p> <p>Mature palms are single-stemmed and grow to 20 m tall. The leaves are pinnate and reach between 3-5 m long. A young palm produces about 30 leaves a year. Established palms over 10 years produce about 20 leaves a year. The flowers are produced in dense clusters; each individual flower is small, with three sepals and three petals.</p> <p>The palm fruit takes five to six months to mature from pollination to maturity. It is reddish, about the size of a large plum, and grows in large bunches. Each fruit is made up of an oily, fleshy outer layer (the pericarp), with a single seed (the palm kernel), also rich in oil. When ripe, each bunch of fruit weighs between 5–30 kg (11–66 lb) depending on the age of the palm tree.</p> <p><strong>Planting</strong></p> <p>For each hectare of oil palm, which is harvested year-round, the annual production averages 20 tonnes of fruit yielding 4,000 kg of palm oil and 750 kg of seed kernels yielding 500 kg of high quality palm kernel oil, as well as 600 kg of kernel meal. Kernel meal are processed for use as livestock feed.</p> <p>All modern, commercial planting material consists of tenera palms or DxP hybrids, which are obtained by crossing thickshelled dura with shell-less pisifera. Although common commercial germinated seed is as thick-shelled as the dura mother palm, the resulting palm will produce thin-shelled tenera fruit. An alternative to germinated seed, once constraints to mass production are overcome, are tissue-cultured or "clonal" palms, which provide "true copies" of high-yielding DxP palms.</p> <p>An oil palm nursery must have an uninterrupted supply of clean water and topsoil which is both well-structured and sufficiently deep to accommodate three rounds of on-site bag-filling. Approximately 35 ha can grow enough seedlings over a three-year period to plant a 5,000-ha plantation. Prenursery seedlings must be watered daily. Whenever rainfall is less than 10 mm per day, irrigation is required, and the system must be capable of uniformly applying 6.5 mm water per day.</p> <p>Prenursery seedlings in the four-leaf stage of development (10 to 14 weeks after planting) are usually transplanted to the main nursery after their gradual adjustment to full sunlight and a rigid selection process. During culling, seedlings that have grassy, crinkled, twisted, or rolled leaves are discarded.</p> <p>Weeds growing in the polybags must be carefully pulled out. Herbicides should not be used. Numerous insects (ants, armyworms, bagworms, aphids, thrips, mites, grasshoppers, and mealybugs) and vertebrates (rats, squirrels, porcupines, wild boar, and monkeys) are pests in oil palm nurseries and must be carefully identified before control measures are implemented.</p> <p>After eight months in the nursery, normal healthy plants should be 0.8–1 m in height and display five to eight functional leaves.</p> <p>The proper approach to oil palm development begins with the establishment of leguminous cover plants, immediately following land clearing. They help prevent soil erosion and surface run-off, improve soil structure and palm root development, increase the response to mineral fertilizer in later years, and reduce the danger of micronutrient deficiencies. Leguminous cover plants also help prevent outbreaks of Oryctes beetles, which nest in exposed decomposing vegetation. Both phosphorus and potassium fertilizers are needed to maximize the leguminous cover plants' symbiotic nitrogen-fixation potential of approximately 200 kg nitrogen/ha/yr, and are applied to most soils at 115 to 300 kg phosphorus oxide/ha and 35 to 60 kg potassium oxide/ha. Young palms are severely set back where grasses are allowed to dominate the inter-row vegetation, particularly on poor soils where the correction of nutrient deficiencies is difficult and costly.</p> <p><strong>Crop nutrient</strong></p> <p>Nutrient uptake is low during the first year but increases steeply between year one and year three (when harvesting commences) and stabilizes around years five to six. Early applications of fertilizer, better planting material, and more rigid culling have led to a dramatic increase in early yields in the third to sixth years from time of planting. In regions without a significant drop in rainfall, yields of over 25 tonnes of fresh fruit bunches per hectare have been achieved in the second year of harvesting.</p> <p>Nitrogen deficiency is usually associated with conditions of water-logging, heavy weed infestation, and topsoil erosion. Symptoms are a general paling and stiffening of the pinnae, which lose their glossy lustre. Extended deficiency will reduce the number of effective fruit bunches produced, as well as the bunch size.</p> <p>Phosphorus-deficient leaves do not show specific symptoms, but frond length, bunch size, and trunk diameter are all reduced.</p> <p>Potassium deficiency is very common and is the major yield constraint in sandy or peaty soils. The most frequent symptom is "confluent orange spotting". Pale green spots appear on the pinnae of older leaves; as the deficiency intensifies, the spots turn orange or reddish-orange and desiccation sets in, starting from the tips and outer margins of the pinnae. Other symptoms are "orange blotch" and "midcrown yellowing". In soils having a low water-holding capacity (sands and peats), potassium deficiency can lead to a rapid, premature desiccation of fronds.</p> <p>Copper deficiency is common on deep peat soils and occurs also on very sandy soils. It appears initially as whitish-yellow mottling of younger fronds. As the deficiency intensifies, yellow, mottled, interveinal stripes appear, and rusty, brown spots develop on the distal ends of leaflets. Affected fronds and leaflets are stunted and leaflets dry up. On sandy soils, palms recover rapidly after a basal application of 50 grams of copper sulphate. On peat soils, lasting correction of copper deficiency is difficult, as applied copper sulphate is rendered unavailable. A promising method of correcting copper deficiency on peat soil is to mix copper sulphate with clay soil and to form tennis-ball sized "copper mudballs" that are placed around the palm to provide a slow-release source of available copper.</p> <p>Healthy, well selected seedlings are necessary for early and sustained high yield. In most cases, granular multinutrient compound fertilizers are the preferred nutrient source for seedlings in the nursery. Where subsoil is used to fill the polybags, extra dressings of Kieserite may be required (10-15 g every six to eight weeks). Where compound fertilizers are not available, equivalent quantities of straight materials should be used.</p> <p>To maintain good fertilizer response and high yields in older palms, selective thinning is often necessary.</p> <p><strong>Cross-breeding</strong></p> <p>Unlike other relatives, oil palms do not produce offshoots; propagation is by sowing the seeds.</p> <p>Several varieties and forms of Elaeis guineensis have been selected that have different characteristics. These include:</p> <p>E. guineensis fo. dura</p> <p>E. guineensis var. pisifera</p> <p>E, guineensis fo. tenera</p> <p>Before the Second World War, selection work had started in the Deli dura population in Malaya. Pollen was imported from Africa, and DxT and DxP crosses were made. Segregation of fruit forms in crosses made in the 1950s was often incorrect. In the absence of a good marker gene, there was no way of knowing whether control of pollination was adequate.</p> <p>After the work of Beirnaert and Vanderweyen (1941), it became feasible to monitor the efficacy of controlled pollination. From 1963 until the introduction of the palm-pollinating weevil Elaeidobius kamerunicus in 1982, contamination in Malaysia's commercial plantings was generally low. Thrips, the main pollinating agent at that time, apparently rarely gained access to bagged female inflorescences. However, E. kamerunicus is much more persistent, and after it was introduced, Deli dura contamination became a significant problem. This problem apparently persisted for much of the 1980s, but in a 1991 comparison of seed sources, contamination had been reduced to below 2%, indicating control had been restored.</p> <p>A 1992 study at a trial plot in Banting, Selangor, revealed the "yield of Deli dura oil palms after four generations of selection was 60% greater than that of the unselected base population. Crossing the dura and pisifera to give the thin-shelled tenera fruit type improved partitioning of dry matter within the fruit, giving a 30% increase in oil yield at the expense of shell, without changing total dry matter production."</p> <p>In 2013, the gene responsible for controlling shell thickness was discovered, making it possible to verify tenera (DxP) status while palms are still in the nursery.</p> <p><strong>Disease</strong></p> <p>Basal stem rot (BSR), caused by the fungus Ganoderma, is the most serious disease of oil palm in Malaysia and Indonesia. Previously, research on basal stem rot was hampered by the failure to artificially infect oil palms with the fungus. Although Ganoderma had been associated with BSR, proof of its pathogenicity to satisfy Koch's postulate was only achieved in the early 1990s by inoculating oil palm seedling roots or by using rubber wood blocks. A reliable and quick technique was developed for testing the pathogenicity of the fungus by inoculating oil palm germinated seeds.</p> <p>This fatal disease can lead to losses as much as 80% after repeated planting cycles. Ganoderma produces enzymes that degrade the infected xylem, thus causing serious problems to the distribution of water and other nutrients to the top of the palm. Ganoderma infection is well defined by its lesion in the stem. The cross-section of infected palm stem shows that the lesion appears as a light brown area of rotting tissue with a distinctive, irregularly shaped, darker band at the borders of this area. The infected tissue become as an ashen-grey powdery and if the palm remains standing, the infected trunk rapidly become hollow.</p> <p>In a 2007 study in Portugal, scientists suggested control of the fungus on oil palms would benefit from further consideration of the process as one of white rot. Ganoderma is an extraordinary organism capable exclusively of degrading lignin to carbon dioxide and water; celluloses are then available as nutrients for the fungus. It is necessary to consider this mode of attack as a white rot involving lignin biodegradation, for integrated control. The existing literature does not report this area and appears to be concerned particularly with the mode of spread and molecular biology of Ganoderma. The white rot perception opens up new fields in breeding/selecting for resistant cultivars of oil palms with high lignin content, ensuring the conditions for lignin decomposition are reduced, and simply sealing damaged oil palms to stop decay. The spread likely is by spores rather than roots. The knowledge gained can be employed in the rapid degradation of oil palm waste on the plantation floor by inoculating suitable fungi, and/or treating the waste more appropriately (e.g. chipping and spreading over the floor rather than windrowing).</p> <p>Endophytic bacteria are organisms inhabiting plant organs that at some time in their life cycles can colonize the internal plant tissues without causing apparent harm to the host. Introducing endophytic bacteria to the roots to control plant disease is to manipulate the indigenous bacterial communities of the roots in a manner, which leads to enhanced suppression of soil-borne pathogens. The use of endophytic bacteria should thus be preferred to other biological control agents, as they are internal colonizers, with better ability to compete within the vascular systems, limiting Ganoderma for both nutrients and space during its proliferation. Two bacterial isolates, Burkholderia cepacia(B3) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa(P3) were selected for evaluation in the glasshouse for their efficacy in enhancing growth and subsequent suppression of the spread of BSR in oil palm seedlings.</p> <p>Little leaf syndrome has not been fully explained, but has often been confused with boron deficiency. The growing point is damaged, sometimes by Oryctes beetles. Small, distorted leaves resembling a boron deficiency emerge. This is often followed by secondary pathogenic infections in the spear that can lead to spear rot and palm death.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Elaeis guineensis originated in Guinea, Africa and was first illustrated by Nicholaas Jacquin in 1763.</p> <p>Oil palms were introduced to Java by the Dutch in 1848, and to Malaysia (then the British colony of Malaya) in 1910 by Scotsman William Sime and English banker Henry Darby. The species of palm tree Elaeis guineensis was taken to Malaysia from Eastern Nigeria in 1961. As noted it originally grew in West Africa. The southern coast of Nigeria was originally called the Palm oil coast by the first Europeans who arrived there and traded in the commodity. This area was later renamed the Bight of Biafra.</p> <p>In traditional African medicine different parts of the plant are used as laxative and diuretic, as a poison antidote, as a cure for gonorrhea, menorrhagia, and bronchitis, to treat headaches and rheumatism, to promote healing of fresh wounds and treat skin infections.</p> <p><strong>Malaysia</strong></p> <p>In Malaysia, the first plantations were mostly established and operated by British plantation owners, such as Sime Darby and Boustead, and remained listed in London until the Malaysian government engineered their "Malaysianisation" throughout the 1960s and 1970s.</p> <p>Federal Land Development Authority (Felda) is the world's biggest oil palm planter, with planted area close to 900,000 hectares in Malaysia and Indonesia. Felda was formed on July 1, 1956 when the Land Development Act came into force with the main aim of eradicating poverty. Settlers were each allocated 10 acres of land (about 4 hectares) planted either with oil palm or rubber, and given 20 years to pay off the debt for the land.</p> <p>After Malaysia achieved independence in 1957, the government focused on value-added of rubber planting, boosting exports, and alleviating poverty through land schemes. In the 1960s and 1970s, the government encouraged planting of other crops, to cushion the economy when world prices of tin and rubber plunged. Rubber estates gave way to oil palm plantations. In 1961, Felda's first oil palm settlement opened, with 3.75 km² of land. As of 2000, 6855.2 km² (approximately 76%) of the land under Felda's programmes were devoted to oil palms. By 2008, Felda's resettlement broadened to 112,635 families, who work on 8533.13 km² of agriculture land throughout Malaysia. Oil palm planting took up 84% of Felda's plantation landbank.</p> <p>FELDA's success led to the establishment of other development schemes to support the establishment of small-farmer oil palm cultivation. The Federal Land Consolidation and Rehabilitation Authority (FELCRA) was established in 1966 and the Sarawak Land Consolidation and Rehabilitation Authority (SALCRA) was formed in 1976. The primary objective of these organizations is to assist in the development of rural communities and reduce poverty through the cultivation of high yielding crops such as palm oil.</p> <p>As of November 2011, SALCRA had developed 18 estates totalling approximately 51,000 hectares. That year the organization shared dividends with 16,374 landowners participating in the program.</p> <p><strong>Palm oil production</strong></p> <p>Oil is extracted from both the pulp of the fruit (palm oil, an edible oil) and the kernel (palm kernel oil, used in foods and for soap manufacture). For every 100 kg of fruit bunches, typically 22 kg of palm oil and 1.6 kg of palm kernel oil can be extracted.</p> <p>The high oil yield of oil palms (as high as 7,250 liters per hectare per year) has made it a common cooking ingredient in Southeast Asia and the tropical belt of Africa. Its increasing use in the commercial food industry in other parts of the world is buoyed by its cheaper pricing, the high oxidative stability of the refined product, and high levels of natural antioxidants.</p> <p>The oil palm originated in West Africa, but has since been planted successfully in tropical regions within 20 degrees of the equator. In the Republic of the Congo, or Congo Brazzaville, precisely in the Northern part, not far from Ouesso, local people produce this oil by hand. They harvest the fruit, boil it to let the water evaporate, then press what is left to collect the reddish-orange-colored oil.</p> <p>In 1995, Malaysia was the world's largest producer, with a 51% of world share, but since 2007, Indonesia has been the world's largest producer, supplying approximately 50% of world palm oil volume.</p> <p>Worldwide palm oil production for season 2011/2012 was 50.3 million metric tons, increasing to 52.3 million tons for 2012/13. In 2010/2011, total production of palm kernels was 12.6 million tonnes.</p> <p>The Urhobo people of Nigeria use the extract to make Amiedi soup.</p> </body> </html>
PS 10
African Oil Palm Seeds (Elaeis guineensis)
Rattan Seeds (Calamus manan)

Rattan Seeds (Calamus manan)

Prijs € 4,50 (SKU: PS 11)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;" data-mce-style="font-size: 14pt;" class="n1ed--selected"><strong>Rattan Seeds (Calamus manan)</strong></span></h2><h2><span style="color: #fb0101; font-size: 14pt;" data-mce-style="color: #fb0101; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2><p><span>Calamus manan is a robust, single stemmed, high-climbing, dioecious rattan. Plants produce a strong durable cane up to 8 cm in diameter, with internodes to 40 cm in length, and with stems eventually reaching to over 100 m. Growth rates of over 7 m a year have been inferred from observation of plants in Sabah (Dransfield and Tan, pers. obs. 1989), but more usually 1-3 m or more a year. Leaves cirrate to 8 m long including the cirrus to 3 m long. Petiole short, leaflets irregular in juvenile leaves and regular in mature leaves, to 45 on each side of rachis, lanceolate. Inflorescences massive, the male much more finely branched than the female, 70 cm long. Ripe fruit rounded to ovoid, to 2.8 cm long by 2.0 cm wide and covered with 15 vertical rows of yellowish scales with blackish-brown margins. Seed ovoid, to 1.8 cm by 1.2 cm, with finely pitted surface.</span></p><p><span>Solitary massive high climbing rattan, reaching eventually lengths of over 100 m. Stem without sheaths to 8 cm in diameter, sometimes quite slender (2.5 cm) at the very base, with sheaths to 11 cm in diameter; internodes to 40 cm long. Sheaths dull grey green densely armed with black laminate hairy edged triangular spines arranged in lateral groups or scattered, the largest to J cm long by 1 cm wide at the base, and with numerous much smaller spines to 5 mm long between; spines horizontal or slightly reflexed; thin white wax abundant between spines. Knee conspicuous armed as leaf sheath. Ocrea ill-defined. Leaf cirrate very massive to 8 m long including the cirrus to 3 m long; petiole short, to 12 cm long by 5 cm wide in mature plants, much longer in juveniles armed densely as is the rachis with short triangular spines both on the upper surface and beneath, with scattered grey in dumentum between. Leaflets irregular in juvenile leaves, regular in mature leaves, limply pendulous and versatile, to 45 on each side, pale grey-green, the largest to 60 cm long by 6 cm wide bristly near the tips. Inflorescences massive, the male much more finely branched than the female, to 2.5 m long with up to 9 partial inflorescences on each side to 70 cm long; all bracts rather densely armed with triangular spines to 3 mm high and red-brown in dumentum. Rachillae to 15 cm long. Ripe fruit rounded to ovoid, to 2.8 cm long by 2.0 cm wide shortly beaked, and covered in 15 vertical rows of yellowish scales with blackish brown margins. Seed ovoid, to 1.8 cm long by 1.2 cm wide, with finely pitted surface; endosperm densely and deeply ruminate. Seedling leaf with 2 divergent leaflets cucullate with a waxy blue-grey bloom on a pale dull green surface. (J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Records 29.. 1979)/Palmweb. Editing by edric.</span></p><p><span>"Rotan manau" is widespread, but usually confined to steep slopes in hill Dipterocarp forest. It is rather rarely found in lowland Dipterocarp forest, and there, nearly always on steep slopes. It has an altitudinal range of about 50-1000 m and is at present most abundant between 600 and 1000 m altitude. It is likely however that it was formerly much more widespread, with its range being limited now by over exploitation. Seedlings are very characteristic and often abundant in hill forest. Calamus manan is variable in size and coloration. Beccari originally separated Malayan material as a separate species (C. giganteus) but I consider this to be conspecific with C. manan. Novices sometimes confuse "rotan manau" with "rotan dok" which is also very large and often grows with it. However, "rotan dok" is immediately distinguished because it has a flagellum and no cirrus whereas "rotan manau" has a cirrus but no flagellum. Calamus tumidus is very close to C. manan but can be separated on its smaller size, different leaf sheath armature and the very large bulbous, swollen knee. (J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. </span>Malayan Forest Records 29.. 1979)/Palmweb.</p>
PS 11
Rattan Seeds (Calamus manan)

Best seller product
Ruffled fan Palm Seeds  (Licuala  grandis) 3.8 - 1

Ruffled fan Palm Seeds...

Prijs € 4,80 (SKU: PS 12)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h3><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Ruffled fan Palm Seeds (Licuala  grandis)</strong> </span></h3> <h3><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong><span style="color: #f00404;">Price for Package of 3 seeds.</span></strong></span></h3> <p>Ruffled fan palm is perhaps one of the most interesting and elegant of all small palms. Its glossy, pleated, fan-like fronds are fantastic as are its drooping cluster of red fruits that mature late in the season. This evergreen, frost-tender palm is native to the wet, humid rainforests of the Republic of Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands east of Australia. It's a small understory palm that’s ideal for small, tropical landscapes as well as interiorscapes.</p> <p><span>Atop the thin, fiber covered trunk of this palm is a crown of twelve to twenty beautiful leaves. Each glossy, deep green frond is wedge-shaped and looks as if it’s been pleated. The frond stems (petioles) are long and have sharp, curved teeth at the base. Most are held upright but the oldest arch gracefully. In early or midsummer, a cluster of yellowish white blossoms appear. These develop into small, round, red fruits by autumn.</span></p> <p><span>Grow ruffled fan palm in partial shade or dappled sun when small and young. Older specimens will tolerate more sun if humidity is high and summer temperatures not too scorching. Although there are Licuala grandis known to have survived temperatures of -1.5° C. it is advisable to plant this palm in regions only where temperatures do not fall below 3 degrees C. For good health plant in a fast-draining soil that’s fertile and evenly moist. Sandy soil amended with lots of humus is ideal. For dramatic landscape effect, cluster ruffled fan palm beneath a tall shade tree or shaded building foundation. Indoors it will become a nice container specimen as long as it receives very bright light, warmth and its soil never becomes dry. This palm responds favorably to frequent, light fertilization.</span></p> <p><span>Solitary trunk of up to 3 m in height and 5-6 cm in diam., Leaf circular, undivided and regularly pleated leaf; about 22 inch or more in diameter with a notched edge, with the old dry leaves persisting.</span> </p> <p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hx6WBaQ1h5M" target="_blank" class="btn btn-default" rel="noreferrer noopener">Ruffled  fan Palm  (Licuala  grandis)</a></p> <p><strong><span>Scientific name:</span></strong><span> Licuala grandis</span></p> <p><strong><span>Common names</span></strong><span>: The Ruffled Fan Palm is also known Vanuatu Fan Palm, Palas Palm, and Ruffled Lantan Palm.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Family:</span></strong><span> Arecaceae</span></p> <p><strong><span>Origin:</span></strong><span> It is native to the Vanuatu Islands, off the coast of Australia.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Appearance:</span></strong><span> It has a single slender trunk, 4-5 inches in diameter that takes years to develop. The Ruffled Fan Palm is known for its unique palmate, or fan-shape leaves, with attractive splitting patterns that make it stand out in any environment. Leaves are circular, luscious green, glossy, ruffled, hence the name Ruffled Fan Palm, about 22 inches in diameter, with notched tips.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Flowers/Fruits:</span></strong><span> The inflorescence emerges from among the leaves bearing bisexual flowers, male and female reproductive organs grow on the same flower. Ruffled Fan Palm produces marble-like green fruit that turns red when ripe. This berry looking fruit is round with a single seed inside.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Growth Rate:</span></strong><span> Slow. Licuala grandis is a very attractive, slow growing palm that can get up to 5-10ft tall, but usually doesn’t get higher than 6ft with a spread of 5-10ft wide.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Outdoor/Indoor Use:</span></strong><span> Both.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Cold Tolerance:</span></strong><span> It can tolerate cold down to 30F when mature enough. It is great for growing in USDA Zones 10a (30 to 35 F) to 11 (above 40 F).</span></p> <p><strong><span>Light Req:</span></strong><span> Partial shade. It grows best in partial shade and should not be exposed to full sun.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Water Req:</span></strong><span> High. It needs a lot of water with good drainage</span></p> <p><strong><span>Maintenance:</span></strong><span> Easy. Make sure to protect it from high winds to avoid frond damage. To prevent nutritional deficiency, apply good quality palm fertilizer that has continuous release formula twice a year during growing season.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Propagation:</span></strong><span> Propagated by seed. It might take as long as 12 months for seeds to sprout.</span></p> </body> </html>
PS 12
Ruffled fan Palm Seeds  (Licuala  grandis) 3.8 - 1
Wild Banana Seeds (Musa balbisiana)  - 6

Wild Banana Seeds (Musa...

Prijs € 3,25 (SKU: V 88 MB)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Wild Banana Seeds (Musa balbisiana)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Musa balbisiana is a wild-type species of banana native to eastern South Asia, northern Southeast Asia, and southern China. It is one of the ancestors of modern cultivated bananas, along with Musa acuminata. It was first scientifically described in 1820 by the Italian botanist Luigi Aloysius Colla.</p> <p>It grows lush leaves in clumps with a more upright habit than most cultivated bananas. Flowers grow in inflorescences colored red to maroon. The fruit is between blue and green. They are considered inedible because of the seeds they contain but are very tasty.</p> <p>It may be assumed that wild bananas were cooked and eaten or agriculturalists would not have developed the cultivated banana.[4] Seeded Musa balbisiana fruit are called butuhan ('with seeds') in the Philippines, and kluai tani (กล้วยตานี) in Thailand. Natural parthenocarpic clones occur through polyploidy and produce edible bananas, examples of which are wild saba bananas.</p> </body> </html>
V 88 MB
Wild Banana Seeds (Musa balbisiana)  - 6
Chinese Dwarf Banana, Golden Lotus Banana Seeds 3.95 - 12

Chinese Dwarf Banana,...

Prijs € 3,95 (SKU: V 88 ML)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Chinese Dwarf Banana, Golden Lotus Banana Seeds (Musella lasiocarpa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Musella lasiocarpa, commonly known as Chinese dwarf banana, golden lotus banana or Chinese yellow banana, is the sole species in the genus Musella. It is thus a close relative of bananas, and also a member of the family Musaceae. The plant is native to the Yunnan province in China, where it grows high in the mountains up to an altitude of 2500 m. It is known for its yellow erect flower (see image), generally appearing during the second year of cultivation, that can last a few months. Just before opening, the flower resembles a lotus - from which the plant gets one of its names.</p> <p><iframe width="640" height="385" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bL_WGqgLBjw?rel=0&amp;hd=1" frameborder="0" class="embed-responsive-item"> </iframe></p>
V 88 ML
Chinese Dwarf Banana, Golden Lotus Banana Seeds 3.95 - 12
Red Tiger - Darjeeling Banana Seeds 2.25 - 3

Red Tiger - Darjeeling...

Prijs € 2,25 (SKU: V 150 RT)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong>Red Tiger - Darjeeling Banana Seeds (Musa sikkimensis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Bananas are enjoying a resurgence in popularity, justifiably so as they are easy to grow and few plants can rival their impact on any garden! Very few species are fully hardy, but once mature they can be planted out and wrapped up in sacking for winter. Some species are smaller in habit and make ideal houseplants. Musa sikkimensis is a fairly recent introduction to the UK. This striking Banana originates from Eastern India and is proving a pretty hardy species. A vigorous grower, it produces huge, tough green leaves with an attractive maroon midrib and strong, random streaks of maroon across the leaves. Mature plants (5 years +) bear long lasting yellow flowers. Although frost will not damage the roots, the leaves should be wrapped in fleece or sacking for the winter. Alternatively can be grown in a large container and moved to a frost free place over winter. All in all, an excellent addition to the subtropical border or achitectural planting scheme. Half Hardy Perennial (to 0C - wrap up in winter) Height: 3-4m Position: Sun or semi-shade preferably out of strong winds.</p> </div> </body> </html>
V 150 RT
Red Tiger - Darjeeling Banana Seeds 2.25 - 3

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