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Item 1-7 van 7 in totaal item(s)



Tomato Seeds BLACK FROM TULA

BLACK FROM TULA Tomato Seeds

Normale prijs € 1,95 -19% Prijs € 1,58 (SKU: P 303)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Tomato Seeds BLACK FROM TULA</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The Black from Tula is an excellent delicious Russian tomato. A dark high-yielding old tomato variety that came to from an old Russian city Tula from Russia. This old Russian variety produces tomatoes with a unique deep purple color with a rich sweet flavor.</p> <p>The Black from Tula is widely known as one of the best flavored dark tomatoes and when mature, fruits grow up to 400 grams (14 ounces) and have a diameter of approx. 7-10 cm.</p> <p>Fruits are medium to large ripening to a black-red with a deep colored pulp. The plant has vigorous growth and reaches a size of almost 2 meters. Even with less sun in summer, lots of ripe fruit. High yield.</p> <p>Indeterminate.</p> </body> </html>
P 303
Tomato Seeds BLACK FROM TULA
  • -19%


Carolina Reaper Powder World Record Hottest! HP22B  - 3

Carolina Reaper Powder...

Normale prijs € 2,00 -2% Prijs € 1,96 (SKU: Z 81)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Carolina Reaper Powder World Record Hottest! HP22B</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>5, 50, 500 grams of powder per package.</strong></span></h2> <p><strong>Zoals elk jaar, en dit jaar 2021 zullen we weer 1200 van onze planten hebben waarvan we je zowel zaden als gemalen Carolina Reaper aanbieden.</strong></p> <p>Extremely spicy Carolina Reaper is great for meats, rubs, fish, soups, and much more! The small-sized packets are an excellent way to try out how spicy they are.</p> <p>The Carolina Reaper, originally named the HP22BNH7, is a cultivar of chili pepper of the Capsicum chinense species. Bred in the Rock Hill, South Carolina greenhouse by Ed Currie, who runs the PuckerButt Pepper Company in Fort Mill, South Carolina, it has been rated as the world's hottest chili pepper by Guinness World Records since August 7, 2013. The original crossbreed was between a ghost pepper (a former world record holder) and a red habanero. The official Guinness World Record heat level is 1,569,300 Scoville Heat Units (SHU), according to tests conducted by Winthrop University in South Carolina.</p> <p>At the second annual New York City Hot Sauce Expo on 30 March 2014, Ed Currie was presented with his world record by Guinness World Records and an eating competition was held in which the fastest time to consume three Carolina Reapers was determined for a new Guinness World Records at 12.23 seconds by Russel Todd. This record was beaten in September 2014 by Jason McNabb, who finished three peppers in 10.95 seconds.</p> </body> </html>
Z 81
Carolina Reaper Powder World Record Hottest! HP22B  - 3
  • -2%

Cayenne Chilipeper gemengde...

Cayenne Chilipeper gemengde...

Normale prijs € 1,95 -8% Prijs € 1,79 (SKU: C 19 MIX)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Cayenne Chilipeper gemengde kleuren zaden</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Prijs voor een pakket van 10 of 50 zaden.</strong></span></h2> <div> <p>Sterke rechtopstaande planten produceren grootgeschouderde, gerimpelde, taps toelopende en gebogen vruchten variërend van 15 tot 20 cm lang en 3 cm in diameter met medium dik vruchtvlees.<br><br>De vruchtkleur is donkergroen en verkleurt naar geel, oranje, rood als hij rijp is. 30.000 - 40.000 SHU's.<br><br>Rijpt in 70-80 dagen.&nbsp;</p> </div>
C 19 MIX
Cayenne Chilipeper gemengde kleuren zaden
  • -8%
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Chickpea Seeds (Cicer arietinum)  - 7

Chickpea Seeds (Cicer...

Normale prijs € 1,85 -27% Prijs € 1,35 (SKU: P 166)
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Chickpea Seeds (Cicer arietinum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 6g (20) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The chickpea (Cicer arietinum) is a legume of the family Fabaceae, subfamily Faboideae. Formerly known as the gram,[1] it is also commonly known as garbanzo or garbanzo bean and sometimes known as ceci, cece, channa, or Bengal gram. Its seeds are high in protein. It is one of the earliest cultivated legumes: 7,500-year-old remains have been found in the Middle East.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>The plant grows to between 20–50 cm (8–20 inches) high and has small feathery leaves on either side of the stem. Chickpeas are a type of pulse, with one seedpod containing two or three peas. It has white flowers with blue, violet or pink veins.</p> <p><strong>Etymology</strong></p> <p>The name "chickpea" traces back through the French chiche to cicer, Latin for ‘chickpea’ (from which the Roman cognomen Cicero was taken). The Oxford English Dictionary lists a 1548 citation that reads, "Cicer may be named in English Cich, or ciche pease, after the Frenche tongue." The dictionary cites "Chick-pea" in the mid-18th century; the original word in English taken directly from French was chich, found in print in English in 1388.</p> <p>The word garbanzo came first to English as garvance in the 17th century, from an alteration of the Old Spanish word arvanço (presumably influenced by garroba), being gradually anglicized to calavance, though it came to refer to a variety of other beans (cf. Calavance). The current form garbanzo comes directly from modern Spanish. This word is still used in Latin America and Spain to designate chickpeas.[3] Some have suggested that the origin of the word arvanço is in the Greek erebinthos. Another possible origin is the word garbantzu, from Basque — a non-Indo-European tongue, believed to be one of the oldest languages in Europe — in which it is a compound of garau, seed + antzu, dry.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Domesticated chickpeas have been found in the aceramic levels of Jericho (PPNB) along with Cayönü in Turkey and in Neolithic pottery at Hacilar, Turkey. They were found in the late Neolithic (about 3500 BCE) at Thessaly, Kastanas, Lerna and Dimini, Greece. In southern France Mesolithic layers in a cave at L'Abeurador, Aude have yielded wild chickpeas carbon dated to 6790±90 BCE.[4]</p> <p>By the Bronze Age, chickpeas were known in Italy and Greece. In classical Greece, they were called erébinthos and eaten as a staple, a dessert, or consumed raw when young. The Romans knew several varieties such as venus, ram, and punic chickpeas. They were both cooked down into a broth and roasted as a snack. The Roman gourmet Apicius gives several recipes for chickpeas. Carbonized chickpeas have been found at the Roman legion fort at Neuss (Novaesium), Germany in layers from the first century CE, along with rice.</p> <p>Chickpeas are mentioned in Charlemagne's Capitulare de villis (about 800 CE) as cicer italicum, as grown in each imperial demesne. Albertus Magnus mentions red, white and black varieties. Nicholas Culpeper noted "chick-pease or cicers" are less "windy" than peas and more nourishing. Ancient people also associated chickpeas with Venus because they were said to offer medical uses such as increasing sperm and milk, provoking menstruation and urine and helping to treat kidney stones.[5] "White cicers" were thought to be especially strong and helpful.</p> <p>In 1793, ground-roast chickpeas were noted by a German writer as a substitute for coffee in Europe. In the First World War, they were grown for this use in some areas of Germany. They are still sometimes brewed instead of coffee.</p> <p><strong>Sequencing the chickpea genome</strong></p> <p>Sequencing of the chickpea genome has been completed for 90 chickpea genotypes, including several wild species. A collaboration of 20 research organizations, led by the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) identified more than 28,000 genes and several million genetic markers. Scientists expect this work will lead to the development of superior varieties. The new research will benefit the millions of developing country farmers who grow chickpea as a source of much needed income, as well as for its ability to add nitrogen to the soil in which it grows. Production is growing rapidly across the developing world, especially in West Asia where production has grown four-fold over the past 30 years. India is by far the world largest producer but is also the largest importer.</p> <p><strong><em>Uses</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Human consumption</strong></p> <p>Mature chickpeas can be cooked and eaten cold in salads, cooked in stews, ground into a flour called gram flour (also known as chickpea flour and besan and used frequently in Indian cuisine), ground and shaped in balls and fried as falafel, stirred into a batter and baked to make farinata or panelle.</p> <p>In the Iberian Peninsula, chickpeas are very popular: In Portugal it is one of the main ingredients in Rancho, consumed with pasta, and meat, including Portuguese sausages, or with rice. they are also often used in other hot dishes with bacalhau and in soup. In Spain they are often used cold in different tapas and salads, as well as in cocido madrileño. In Egypt, chickpeas are used as a topping for Kushari.</p> <p>Hummus is the Arabic word for chickpeas, which are often cooked and ground into a paste and mixed with tahini, sesame seed paste, the blend called hummus bi tahini, or chickpeas are roasted, spiced, and eaten as a snack, such as leblebi. By the end of the 20th century, hummus had emerged as part of the American culinary fabric. By 2010, 5% of Americans consumed hummus on a regular basis, and it was present in 17% of American households.</p> <p>Some varieties of chickpeas can be popped and eaten like popcorn.</p> <p>Chickpeas and Bengal grams are used to make curries and are one of the most popular vegetarian foods in the Indian Subcontinent and in diaspora communities of many other countries. Popular dishes in Indian cuisine are made with chickpea flour, such as Mirchi Bajji and Mirapakaya bajji Telugu. In India, as well as in the Levant, unripe chickpeas are often picked out of the pod and eaten as a raw snack and the leaves are eaten as a green vegetable in salads.</p> <p>Chickpea flour is used to make "Burmese tofu" which was first known among the Shan people of Burma. The flour is used as a batter to coat various vegetables and meats before frying, such as with panelle, a chickpea fritter from Sicily.[14] Chickpea flour is used to make the Mediterranean flatbread socca and a patty called panisse in Provence, southern France, made of cooked chickpea flour, poured into saucers, allowed to set, cut in strips, and fried in olive oil, often eaten during Lent.</p> <p>In the Philippines, garbanzo beans preserved in syrup are eaten as sweets and in desserts such as halo-halo. Ashkenazi Jews traditionally serve whole chickpeas at a Shalom Zachar celebration for baby boys.</p> <p>Guasanas is a Mexican chickpea recipe in which the beans are cooked in water and salt.</p> <p>Dried chickpeas need a long cooking time (1–2 hours) but will easily fall apart when cooked longer. If soaked for 12–24 hours before use, cooking time can be shortened by around 30 minutes. To make smooth hummus the cooked chickpeas must be processed while quite hot, since the skins disintegrate only when hot.</p> <p>Chickpeas (Cicer arietinum) do not cause lathyrism. Similarly named "chickling peas" (Lathyrus sativus) and other plants of the genus Lathyrus contain the toxins associated with lathyrism.</p> <p><strong>Nutrition</strong></p> <p>Chickpeas are an excellent source of the essential nutrients iron, folate, phosphorus, protein and dietary fiber (USDA nutrient table). Chickpeas are low in fat and most of this is polyunsaturated. The nutrient profile of the smaller variety appears to be different, especially for fiber content which is higher than in the larger light colored variety.</p> <p>Preliminary research has shown that chickpea consumption may lower blood cholesterol.</p>
P 166 (6 g)
Chickpea Seeds (Cicer arietinum)  - 7
  • -27%

MAIDENHAIR TREE Seeds (Ginkgo biloba) 3.5 - 1

Ginkgo, Gingko Seeds...

Normale prijs € 3,50 -18% Prijs € 2,87 (SKU: T 58)
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5/ 5
<h2 style="font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; color: #333333;" class=""><strong>Ginkgo, Gingko,&nbsp;Maidenhair Tree&nbsp;Seeds (Ginkgo biloba)</strong></h2> <h2 style="font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; color: #333333;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Ginkgo biloba, known as ginkgo or as the maidenhair tree, is the only living species in the division Ginkgophyta, all others being extinct. It is found in fossils dating back 270 million years. Native to China, the tree is widely cultivated and was introduced early to human history. It has various uses in traditional medicine and as a source of food. The genus name Ginkgo is regarded as a misspelling of the Japanese gin kyo, "silver apricot".</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>Ginkgos are large trees, normally reaching a height of 20–35 m (66–115 ft), with some specimens in China being over 50 m (160 ft). The tree has an angular crown and long, somewhat erratic branches, and is usually deep rooted and resistant to wind and snow damage. Young trees are often tall and slender, and sparsely branched; the crown becomes broader as the tree ages. During autumn, the leaves turn a bright yellow, then fall, sometimes within a short space of time (one to 15 days). A combination of resistance to disease, insect-resistant wood and the ability to form aerial roots and sprouts makes ginkgos long-lived, with some specimens claimed to be more than 2,500 years old.</p> <p>Ginkgo is a relatively shade-intolerant species that (at least in cultivation) grows best in environments that are well-watered and well-drained. The species shows a preference for disturbed sites; in the "semiwild" stands at Tian Mu Shan, many specimens are found along stream banks, rocky slopes, and cliff edges. Accordingly, ginkgo retains a prodigious capacity for vegetative growth. It is capable of sprouting from embedded buds near the base of the trunk (lignotubers, or basal chi chi) in response to disturbances, such as soil erosion. Old individuals are also capable of producing aerial roots on the undersides of large branches in response to disturbances such as crown damage; these roots can lead to successful clonal reproduction upon contacting the soil. These strategies are evidently important in the persistence of ginkgo; in a survey of the "semiwild" stands remaining in Tianmushan, 40% of the specimens surveyed were multistemmed, and few saplings were present.[45]:86–87</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p><strong>Health</strong></p> <p>An extract of Ginkgo biloba leaf (GBE) is marketed in dietary supplement form with claims it can enhance cognitive function in people without known cognitive problems. Studies have failed to find such effects on memory or attention in healthy people.</p> <p>A standardized medicinal extract of Ginkgo biloba leaf originally called EGb 176 has been studied as a possible treatment for dementia and Alzheimer's disease, with mixed results. Some reviews have concluded there is no good evidence supporting the use of Ginkgo in dementia, &nbsp;whereas others have concluded that the EGB761 extract may help people with dementia.</p> <p>There is no good evidence supporting the use of Ginkgo for treating high blood pressure, menopause-related cognitive decline, tinnitus, post-stroke recovery, peripheral arterial disease, macular degeneration, or altitude sickness.</p> <p><strong>Cooking</strong></p> <p>The nut-like gametophytes inside the seeds are particularly esteemed in Asia, and are a traditional Chinese food. Ginkgo nuts are used in congee, and are often served at special occasions such as weddings and the Chinese New Year (as part of the vegetarian dish called Buddha's delight). In Chinese culture, they are believed to have health benefits; some also consider them to have aphrodisiac qualities. Japanese cooks add ginkgo seeds (called ginnan) to dishes such as chawanmushi, and cooked seeds are often eaten along with other dishes.</p> <p>When eaten in large quantities or over a long period, especially by children,[27] the gametophyte (meat) of the seed can cause poisoning by 4'-O-methylpyridoxine (MPN). MPN is heat stable and not destroyed by cooking.[27] Studies have demonstrated the convulsions caused by MPN can be prevented or terminated with pyridoxine (vitamin B6).</p> <p>Some people are sensitive to the chemicals in the sarcotesta, the outer fleshy coating. These people should handle the seeds with care when preparing the seeds for consumption, wearing disposable gloves. The symptoms are allergic contact dermatitis[28][29] or blisters similar to that caused by contact with poison ivy. However, seeds with the fleshy coating removed are mostly &nbsp;safe to handle.</p> <p><strong>Taxonomy and naming</strong></p> <p>The species was initially described by Carl Linnaeus in 1771, the specific epithet biloba derived from the Latin bis, "two" and loba, "lobed", referring to the shape of the leaves.[5] Two names for the species recognise the botanist Richard Salisbury, a placement by Nelson as Pterophyllus salisburiensis and the earlier Salisburia adiantifolia proposed by James Edward Smith. The epithet of the latter may have been intended to denote a characteristic resembling Adiantum, the genus of maidenhair ferns.</p> <p>The relationship of ginkgo to other plant groups remains uncertain. It has been placed loosely in the divisions Spermatophyta and Pinophyta, but no consensus has been reached. Since its seeds are not protected by an ovary wall, it can morphologically be considered a gymnosperm. The apricot-like structures produced by female ginkgo trees are technically not fruits, but are seeds that have a shell consisting of a soft and fleshy section (the sarcotesta), and a hard section (the sclerotesta).</p> <p>The ginkgo is classified in its own division, the Ginkgophyta, comprising the single class Ginkgoopsida, order Ginkgoales, family Ginkgoaceae, genus Ginkgo and is the only extant species within this group. It is one of the best-known examples of a living fossil, because Ginkgoales other than G. bilobaare not known from the fossil record after the Pliocene.</p> <p><strong>Etymology</strong></p> <p>The older Chinese name for this plant is 銀果, meaning "silver fruit", pronounced yínguǒ in Mandarin or Ngan-gwo in Cantonese. The most usual names today are 白果 (bái guǒ), meaning "white fruit", and 銀杏 (yínxìng), meaning "silver apricot". The former name was borrowed directly in Vietnamese as bạch quả. The latter name was borrowed in Japanese ぎんなん (ginnan) and Korean 은행 (eunhaeng), when the tree itself was introduced from China.</p> <p>The scientific name Ginkgo is the result of a spelling error that occurred three centuries ago. Kanji typically have multiple pronunciations in Japanese, and the characters 銀杏 used for ginnan can also be pronounced ginkyō. Engelbert Kaempfer, the first Westerner to investigate the species in 1690, wrote down this pronunciation in the notes that he later used for the Amoenitates Exoticae (1712) with the "awkward" spelling "ginkgo".[9] This appears to be a simple error of Kaempfer; taking his spelling of other Japanese words containing the syllable "kyō" into account, a more precise romanization following his writing habits would have been "ginkio" or "ginkjo".[10] Linné, who relied on Kaempfer when dealing with Japanese plants, adopted the spelling given in Kaempfer's "Flora Japonica" (Amoenitates Exoticae, p. 811).</p> <p><strong>Side effects</strong></p> <p>Ginkgo may have undesirable effects, especially for individuals with blood circulation disorders and those taking anticoagulants such as aspirin or warfarin, although recent studies have found ginkgo has little or no effect on the anticoagulant properties or pharmacodynamics of warfarin in healthy subjects.</p> <p>Additional side effects include increased risk of bleeding, gastrointestinal discomfort, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headaches, dizziness, heart palpitations, and restlessness. Ginkgo should be used with caution when combined with other herbs known to increase bleeding (e.g. garlic, ginseng, ginger).</p> <p>According to a systemic review, the effects of ginkgo on pregnant women may include increased bleeding time, and it should be avoided during lactation because of inadequate safety evidence.</p> <p><strong>Allergic precautions and contraindications</strong></p> <p>Some authors claim that Ginkgo biloba extracts, which are co-administered with anticoagulant drugs such as warfarin or coumadin, increase the risk for bleeding because of their assumed antiplatelet activity. Concerns that standardized Ginkgo biloba preparations (GBE) significantly impact haemostasis or adversely affect the safety of anticoagulant drugs are however not supported by current medical literature.</p> <p>The presence of amentoflavone in G. biloba leaves would indicate a potential for interactions with many medications through the strong inhibition of CYP3A4 and CYP2C9; however, no empirical evidence supports this. Further, at recommended doses, studies have shown, "[m]ultiple-dose administration of Ginkgo biloba did not affect cytochrome P-450 2D6 or 3A4 activity in normal volunteers."[36] The concentration of amentoflavone found even in commercial ginkgo extracts possibly is too low to be pharmacologically active.</p> <p>Ginkgo biloba leaves and sarcotesta also contain ginkgolic acids,[37] which are highly allergenic, long-chain alkylphenols such as bilobol or adipostatin A[38] (bilobol is a substance related to anacardic acid from cashew nut shells and urushiols present in poison ivy and other Toxicodendron spp.)[29] Individuals with a history of strong allergic reactions to poison ivy, mangoes, cashews and other alkylphenol-producing plants are more likely to experience allergic reaction when consuming non-standardized ginkgo-containing preparations, combinations, or extracts thereof. The level of these allergens in standardized pharmaceutical preparations from Ginkgo biloba was restricted to 5 ppm by the Commission E of the former Federal German Health Authority.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Ginkgo has long been cultivated in China; some planted trees at temples are believed to be over 1,500 years old. The first record of Europeans encountering it is in 1690 in Japanese temple gardens, where the tree was seen by the German botanist Engelbert Kaempfer. Because of its status in Buddhism and Confucianism, the ginkgo is also widely planted in Korea and parts of Japan; in both areas, some naturalization has occurred, with ginkgos seeding into natural forests.</p> <p>In some areas, most intentionally planted ginkgos are male cultivars grafted onto plants propagated from seed, because the male trees will not produce the malodorous seeds. The popular cultivar "Autumn Gold" is a clone of a male plant.</p> <p>The disadvantage of male Ginkgo biloba trees is that they are highly allergenic. Male Ginkgo biloba trees have an OPALS allergy scale rating of 7 (out of 10), whereas female trees, which can produce no pollen, have an OPALS allergy scale rating of 2.</p> <p>Female cultivars include "Liberty Splendor", "Santa Cruz", and "Golden Girl", so named because of the striking yellow color of its leaves in the fall.</p> <p>Ginkgos adapt well to the urban environment, tolerating pollution and confined soil spaces. They rarely suffer disease problems, even in urban conditions, and are attacked by few insects. For this reason, and for their general beauty, ginkgos are excellent urban and shade trees, and are widely planted along many streets.</p> <p>Ginkgos are also popular subjects for growing as penjing and bonsai; they can be kept artificially small and tended over centuries. Furthermore, the trees are easy to propagate from seed.</p> <p>The ginkgo leaf is the symbol of the Urasenke school of Japanese tea ceremony. The tree is the official tree of the Japanese capital of Tokyo, and the symbol of Tokyo is a ginkgo leaf.</p> <p><strong>Palaeontology</strong></p> <p>The ginkgo is a living fossil, with fossils recognisably related to modern ginkgo from the Permian, dating back 270 million years. The most plausible ancestral group for the order Ginkgoales is the Pteridospermatophyta, also known as the "seed ferns", specifically the order Peltaspermales. The closest living relatives of the clade are the cycads,[45]:84 which share with the extant G. biloba the characteristic of motile sperm. Fossils attributable to the genus Ginkgo first appeared in the Early Jurassic, and the genus diversified and spread throughout Laurasia during the middle Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. It declined in diversity as the Cretaceous progressed, and by the Paleocene, Ginkgo adiantoides was the only Ginkgo species left in the Northern Hemisphere, while a markedly different (and poorly documented) form persisted in the Southern Hemisphere. At the end of the Pliocene, Ginkgo fossils disappeared from the fossil record everywhere except in a small area of central China, where the modern species survived. It is doubtful whether the Northern Hemisphere fossil species of Ginkgo can be reliably distinguished. Given the slow pace of evolution and morphological similarity between members of the genus, there may have been only one or two species existing in the Northern Hemisphere through the entirety of the Cenozoic: present-day G. biloba (including G. adiantoides) and G. gardneri from the Paleocene of Scotland.</p> <p>At least morphologically, G. gardneri and the Southern Hemisphere species are the only known post-Jurassic taxa that can be unequivocally recognised. The remainder may have been ecotypes or subspecies. The implications would be that G. biloba had occurred over an extremely wide range, had remarkable genetic flexibility and, though evolving genetically, never showed much speciation. While it may seem improbable that a species may exist as a contiguous entity for many millions of years, many of the ginkgo's life-history parameters fit. These are: extreme longevity; slow reproduction rate; (in Cenozoic and later times) a wide, apparently contiguous, but steadily contracting distribution coupled with, as far as can be demonstrated from the fossil record, extreme ecological conservatism (restriction to disturbed streamside environments).</p> <p>Modern-day G. biloba grows best in environments that are well-watered and drained,[45]:87 and the extremely similar fossil Ginkgo favored similar environments: the sediment record at the majority of fossil Ginkgo localities indicates it grew primarily in disturbed environments along streams and levees.[45] Ginkgo, therefore, presents an "ecological paradox" because while it possesses some favorable traits for living in disturbed environments (clonal reproduction) many of its other life-history traits (slow growth, large seed size, late reproductive maturity) are the opposite of those exhibited by modern plants that thrive in disturbed settings.</p> <p>Given the slow rate of evolution of the genus, Ginkgo possibly represents a preangiosperm strategy for survival in disturbed streamside environments. Ginkgo evolved in an era before flowering plants, when ferns, cycads, and cycadeoids dominated disturbed streamside environments, forming low, open, shrubby canopies. Ginkgo's large seeds and habit of "bolting" - growing to a height of 10 m before elongating its side branches - may be adaptions to such an environment. Because diversity in the genus Ginkgo drops through the Cretaceous (along with that of ferns, cycads, and cycadeoids) at the same time the flowering plants were on the rise, the notion that flowering plants with better adaptations to disturbance displaced Ginkgo and its associates over time is supported.[45]:93</p> <p>Ginkgo has been used for classifying plants with leaves that have more than four veins per segment, while Baiera for those with fewer than four veins per segment. Sphenobaiera has been used to classify plants with a broadly wedge-shaped leaf that lacks a distinct leaf stem. Trichopitys is distinguished by having multiple-forked leaves with cylindrical (not flattened), thread-like ultimate divisions; it is one of the earliest fossils ascribed to the Ginkgophyta.</p> <p><strong>Phytochemicals</strong></p> <p>Extracts of ginkgo leaves contain phenolic acids, proanthocyanidins, flavonoid glycosides, such as myricetin, kaempferol, isorhamnetin and quercetin, and the terpene trilactones, ginkgolides and bilobalides. The leaves also contain unique ginkgo biflavones, as well as alkylphenols and polyprenols.</p> <p><strong>Branches</strong></p> <p>Ginkgo branches grow in length by growth of shoots with regularly spaced leaves, as seen on most trees. From the axils of these leaves, "spur shoots" (also known as short shoots) develop on second-year growth. Short shoots have very short internodes (so they may grow only one or two centimeters in several years) and their leaves are usually unlobed. They are short and knobby, and are arranged regularly on the branches except on first-year growth. Because of the short internodes, leaves appear to be clustered at the tips of short shoots, and reproductive structures are formed only on them (see pictures below - seeds and leaves are visible on short shoots). In ginkgos, as in other plants that possess them, short shoots allow the formation of new leaves in the older parts of the crown. After a number of years, a short shoot may change into a long (ordinary) shoot, or vice versa.</p> <p><strong>Leaves</strong></p> <p>The leaves are unique among seed plants, being fan-shaped with veins radiating out into the leaf blade, sometimes bifurcating (splitting), but never anastomosing to form a network.[48] Two veins enter the leaf blade at the base and fork repeatedly in two; this is known as dichotomous venation. The leaves are usually 5–10 cm (2.0–3.9 in), but sometimes up to 15 cm (5.9 in) long. The old popular name "maidenhair tree" is because the leaves resemble some of the pinnae of the maidenhair fern, Adiantum capillus-veneris. Ginkgos are prized for their autumn foliage, which is a deep saffron yellow.</p> <p>Leaves of long shoots are usually notched or lobed, but only from the outer surface, between the veins. They are borne both on the more rapidly growing branch tips, where they are alternate and spaced out, and also on the short, stubby spur shoots, where they are clustered at the tips.</p> <p><strong>Reproduction</strong></p> <p>Ginkgos are dioecious, with separate sexes, some trees being female and others being male. Male plants produce small pollen cones with sporophylls, each bearing two microsporangia spirally arranged around a central axis.</p> <p>Female plants do not produce cones. Two ovules are formed at the end of a stalk, and after pollination, one or both develop into seeds. The seed is 1.5–2 cm long. Its fleshy outer layer (the sarcotesta) is light yellow-brown, soft, and fruit-like. It is attractive in appearance, but contains butyric acid[49] (also known as butanoic acid) and smells like rancid butter or vomit[50] when fallen. Beneath the sarcotesta is the hard sclerotesta (the "shell" of the seed) and a papery endotesta, with the nucellus surrounding the female gametophyte at the center.</p> <p>The fertilization of ginkgo seeds occurs via motile sperm, as in cycads, ferns, mosses and algae. The sperm are large (about 70–90 micrometres)[52] and are similar to the sperm of cycads, which are slightly larger. Ginkgo sperm were first discovered by the Japanese botanist Sakugoro Hirase in 1896.</p> <p>&nbsp;The sperm have a complex multi-layered structure, which is a continuous belt of basal bodies that form the base of several thousand flagella which actually have a cilia-like motion. The flagella/cilia apparatus pulls the body of the sperm forwards. The sperm have only a tiny distance to travel to the archegonia, of which there are usually two or three. Two sperm are produced, one of which successfully fertilizes the ovule. Although it is widely held that fertilization of ginkgo seeds occurs just before or after they fall in early autumn, embryos ordinarily occur in seeds just before and after they drop from the tree.</p> <p><strong>Distribution and habitat</strong></p> <p>Although Ginkgo biloba and other species of the genus were once widespread throughout the world, its range shrank until by two million years ago, it was restricted to a small area of China. For centuries, it was thought to be extinct in the wild, but is now known to grow in at least two small areas in Zhejiang province in eastern China, in the Tianmushan Reserve. However, recent studies indicate high genetic uniformity among ginkgo trees from these areas, arguing against a natural origin of these populations and suggesting the ginkgo trees in these areas may have been planted and preserved by Chinese monks over a period of about 1,000 years.[55] This study demonstrates a greater genetic diversity in Southwestern China populations, supporting glacial refugia in mountains surrounding eastern Tibetan Plateau, where several old-growth candidates for wild populations have been reported.[55][56] Whether native ginkgo populations still exist has not been demonstrated unequivocally, but evidence grows favouring these Southwestern populations as wild, from genetic data but also from history of those territories, with bigger Ginkgo biloba trees being older than surrounding human settlements.</p> <p>Where it occurs in the wild, it is found infrequently in deciduous forests and valleys on acidic loess (i.e. fine, silty soil) with good drainage. The soil it inhabits is typically in the pH range of 5.0 to 5.5.[57]</p> <p>In many areas of China, it has been long cultivated, and it is common in the southern third of the country.[57] It has also been commonly cultivated in North America for over 200 years and in Europe for close to 300, but during that time, it has never become significantly naturalized.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>The first use as a medicine is recorded in the late 15th century in China; among western countries, its first registered medicinal use was in Germany in 1965. Despite use, controlled studies do not support the extract's efficacy for most of the indicated conditions.</p> <p><strong>Hiroshima</strong></p> <p>Further information: Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki</p> <p>Extreme examples of the ginkgo's tenacity may be seen in Hiroshima, Japan, where six trees growing between 1–2 km from the 1945 atom bomb explosion were among the few living things in the area to survive the blast. Although almost all other plants (and animals) in the area were killed, the ginkgos, though charred, survived and were soon healthy again, among other hibakujumoku. The six trees are still alive: they are marked with signs at Housenbou (報専坊?) temple (planted in 1850), Shukkei-en (planted about 1740), Jōsei-ji (planted 1900), at the former site of Senda Elementary School near Miyukibashi, at Myōjōin temple, and an Edo period-cutting at Anraku-ji temple.</p> <p><strong>How to germinate Ginkgo seeds:</strong></p> <p><a href="https://rickshory.wordpress.com/2016/02/03/germinating-ginkgo-seeds/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">https://rickshory.wordpress.com/2016/02/03/germinating-ginkgo-seeds/</a></p>
T 58
MAIDENHAIR TREE Seeds (Ginkgo biloba) 3.5 - 1
  • -18%

Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds (Argyreia nervosa) 1.95 - 1

Hawaiian Baby Woodrose...

Normale prijs € 1,95 -19% Prijs € 1,58 (SKU: T 25)
Offer ends in:
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds (Argyreia nervosa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Argyreia nervosa is a perennial climbing vine that is native to the Indian subcontinent and introduced to numerous areas worldwide, including Hawaii, Africa, and the Caribbean. Though it can be invasive, it is often prized for its aesthetic value. Common names include Hawaiian Baby Woodrose, Adhoguda अधोगुडा or Vidhara विधारा (Sanskrit), Elephant Creeper and Woolly Morning Glory. There are two botanical varieties: Argyreia nervosavar. nervosa described here, and Argyrea nervosa var. speciosa, a species used in ayurvedic medicine, but with little to no psychoactive value.</p> <p>Hawaiian Baby Woodrose seeds may be consumed for their various ergoline alkaloids, such as Lysergic acid amide, which can produce psychedelic effects.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>The plant is a rare example of a plant whose hallucinogenic properties were not recognized until recent times. While its cousins in the Convolvulaceae family, such as the Rivea corymbosa (Ololiuhqui) and Ipomoea tricolor (Tlitliltzin), were used in shamanic rituals of Latin America for centuries, the Hawaiian Baby Woodrose was not traditionally recognized as a hallucinogen. Its properties were first brought to attention in the 1960s, despite the fact that the chemical composition of its seeds is nearly identical to those of the two species mentioned above, and the seeds contain the highest concentration of psychoactive compounds in the entire family.</p> <p><strong>Seeds</strong></p> <p>In most countries, it is legal to purchase, sell or germinate Argyreia nervosa seeds, but they are generally unapproved for human consumption. Depending on the country, it may be illegal to buy seeds with the intention to consume them, and several countries have outlawed ergine-containing seeds altogether. In Australia, retailers are required to treat their seeds with chemicals to discourage consumption, and it is illegal to buy or possess untreated seeds.</p> <p><strong>Extracted chemicals</strong></p> <p>Extracting ergine from Argyreia speciosa seeds is illegal in the USA since it is a scheduled substance. It is classified as a schedule III depressant by the DEA, although the substance has hallucinogenic/psychedelic properties.</p> <p>Extracts</p> <p>In an animal model of ulcers in rats, large doses of the extract of Argyreia speciosa leaves (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight) showed dose-dependent antiulcer activity and cured the Ulcers.</p> </body> </html>
T 25
Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds (Argyreia nervosa) 1.95 - 1
  • -19%

White mustard Seeds...

White mustard Seeds...

Normale prijs € 2,15 -26% Prijs € 1,59 (SKU: MHS 27 W)
Offer ends in:
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>White mustard Seeds (Sinapis alba)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 180 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div><b>White mustard</b><span>&nbsp;(</span><i>Sinapis alba</i><span>) is an&nbsp;</span>annual plant<span>&nbsp;of the family&nbsp;</span>Brassicaceae<span>. It is sometimes also referred to as&nbsp;</span><i>Brassica alba</i><span>&nbsp;or&nbsp;</span><i>B. hirta</i><span>. Grown for its seeds, used to make the condiment&nbsp;</span>mustard<span>, as fodder crop, or as a&nbsp;</span>green manure<span>, it is now widespread worldwide, although it probably originated in the Mediterranean region.</span></div> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2> <p>White mustard is an annual, growing to 70&nbsp;cm high with stalkless pinnate leaves, similar to<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Sinapis arvensis</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-1" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Distribution">Distribution</span></h2> <p>Most common in Europe, North Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia, it can be found worldwide. It has been found as far north as Greenland,<sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>and naturalized throughout<span>&nbsp;</span>Great Britain<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>Ireland.<sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Culinary_uses">Culinary uses</span></h2> <p>The yellow flowers of the plant produce hairy seed pods, with each pod containing roughly a half dozen seeds. These seeds are harvested just prior to the pods becoming ripe and bursting.</p> <p>White mustard seeds are hard round seeds, usually around 1.0 to 1.5&nbsp;mm (0.039 to 0.059&nbsp;in) in diameter,<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>with a color ranging from beige or yellow to light brown. They can be used whole for pickling or toasted for use in dishes. When ground and mixed with other ingredients, a paste or more standard<span>&nbsp;</span>condiment<span>&nbsp;</span>can be produced.<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Sinapis alba</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is used to make the commonplace yellow table mustard, with additional yellow coloring provided by<span>&nbsp;</span>turmeric<span>&nbsp;</span>in some formulations.</p> <p>The seeds contain<span>&nbsp;</span>sinalbin, which is a<span>&nbsp;</span>thioglycoside<span>&nbsp;</span>responsible for their pungent taste. White mustard has fewer<span>&nbsp;</span>volatile oils<span>&nbsp;</span>and the flavor is considered to be milder than that produced by<span>&nbsp;</span>black mustard<span>&nbsp;</span>seeds.<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>In Greece, the plant's leaves can be eaten during the winter, before it blooms. Greeks call it<span>&nbsp;</span><i>vrouves (βρούβα)</i><span>&nbsp;</span>or<span>&nbsp;</span><i>lapsana (λαψάνα)</i>. The blooming season of this plant (February–March) is celebrated with the Mustard Festival, a series of festivities in the wine country of California (Napa and Sonoma Counties).</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Other_uses">Other uses</span></h2> <p>White mustard is commonly used as a cover and green manure crop in Europe (between UK and Ukraine). A large number of varieties exist, e.g. in<span>&nbsp;</span>Germany,<span>&nbsp;</span>Netherlands, mainly differing in lateness of flowering and resistance against white beet-cyst nematode (<i>Heterodera schachtii</i>). Farmers prefer late-flowering varieties, which do not produce seeds, as they may become weeds in the subsequent year. Early vigour is important to cover the soil quickly to suppress weeds and protect the soil against erosion. In rotations with<span>&nbsp;</span>sugar beets, suppression of the white beet-cyst nematode is an important trait. Resistant white mustard varieties reduce nematode populations by 70-90%.</p>
MHS 27 W (1g)
White mustard Seeds (Sinapis alba)
  • -26%

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