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Tomato Seeds BLACK FROM TULA

BLACK FROM TULA Tomato Seeds

Regular price 1,95 € -19% Ár 1,58 € (SKU: P 303)
Offer ends in:
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Tomato Seeds BLACK FROM TULA</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The Black from Tula is an excellent delicious Russian tomato. A dark high-yielding old tomato variety that came to from an old Russian city Tula from Russia. This old Russian variety produces tomatoes with a unique deep purple color with a rich sweet flavor.</p> <p>The Black from Tula is widely known as one of the best flavored dark tomatoes and when mature, fruits grow up to 400 grams (14 ounces) and have a diameter of approx. 7-10 cm.</p> <p>Fruits are medium to large ripening to a black-red with a deep colored pulp. The plant has vigorous growth and reaches a size of almost 2 meters. Even with less sun in summer, lots of ripe fruit. High yield.</p> <p>Indeterminate.</p> </body> </html>
P 303
Tomato Seeds BLACK FROM TULA
  • -19%

Carolina Reaper Powder World Record Hottest! HP22B  - 3

Carolina Reaper Powder...

Regular price 2,00 € -2% Ár 1,96 € (SKU: Z 81)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Carolina Reaper Powder World Record Hottest! HP22B</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>5, 50, 500 grams of powder per package.</strong></span></h2> <p><strong>Mint minden évben, 2021-ben is 1200 növényünk lesz, amelyekből magokat és őrölt Carolina Reapert is kínálunk.</strong></p> <p>Extremely spicy Carolina Reaper is great for meats, rubs, fish, soups, and much more! The small-sized packets are an excellent way to try out how spicy they are.</p> <p>The Carolina Reaper, originally named the HP22BNH7, is a cultivar of chili pepper of the Capsicum chinense species. Bred in the Rock Hill, South Carolina greenhouse by Ed Currie, who runs the PuckerButt Pepper Company in Fort Mill, South Carolina, it has been rated as the world's hottest chili pepper by Guinness World Records since August 7, 2013. The original crossbreed was between a ghost pepper (a former world record holder) and a red habanero. The official Guinness World Record heat level is 1,569,300 Scoville Heat Units (SHU), according to tests conducted by Winthrop University in South Carolina.</p> <p>At the second annual New York City Hot Sauce Expo on 30 March 2014, Ed Currie was presented with his world record by Guinness World Records and an eating competition was held in which the fastest time to consume three Carolina Reapers was determined for a new Guinness World Records at 12.23 seconds by Russel Todd. This record was beaten in September 2014 by Jason McNabb, who finished three peppers in 10.95 seconds.</p> </body> </html>
Z 81
Carolina Reaper Powder World Record Hottest! HP22B  - 3
  • -2%

Chickpea Seeds (Cicer arietinum)  - 7

Chickpea Seeds (Cicer...

Regular price 1,85 € -27% Ár 1,35 € (SKU: P 166)
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Chickpea Seeds (Cicer arietinum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 6g (20) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The chickpea (Cicer arietinum) is a legume of the family Fabaceae, subfamily Faboideae. Formerly known as the gram,[1] it is also commonly known as garbanzo or garbanzo bean and sometimes known as ceci, cece, channa, or Bengal gram. Its seeds are high in protein. It is one of the earliest cultivated legumes: 7,500-year-old remains have been found in the Middle East.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>The plant grows to between 20–50 cm (8–20 inches) high and has small feathery leaves on either side of the stem. Chickpeas are a type of pulse, with one seedpod containing two or three peas. It has white flowers with blue, violet or pink veins.</p> <p><strong>Etymology</strong></p> <p>The name "chickpea" traces back through the French chiche to cicer, Latin for ‘chickpea’ (from which the Roman cognomen Cicero was taken). The Oxford English Dictionary lists a 1548 citation that reads, "Cicer may be named in English Cich, or ciche pease, after the Frenche tongue." The dictionary cites "Chick-pea" in the mid-18th century; the original word in English taken directly from French was chich, found in print in English in 1388.</p> <p>The word garbanzo came first to English as garvance in the 17th century, from an alteration of the Old Spanish word arvanço (presumably influenced by garroba), being gradually anglicized to calavance, though it came to refer to a variety of other beans (cf. Calavance). The current form garbanzo comes directly from modern Spanish. This word is still used in Latin America and Spain to designate chickpeas.[3] Some have suggested that the origin of the word arvanço is in the Greek erebinthos. Another possible origin is the word garbantzu, from Basque — a non-Indo-European tongue, believed to be one of the oldest languages in Europe — in which it is a compound of garau, seed + antzu, dry.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Domesticated chickpeas have been found in the aceramic levels of Jericho (PPNB) along with Cayönü in Turkey and in Neolithic pottery at Hacilar, Turkey. They were found in the late Neolithic (about 3500 BCE) at Thessaly, Kastanas, Lerna and Dimini, Greece. In southern France Mesolithic layers in a cave at L'Abeurador, Aude have yielded wild chickpeas carbon dated to 6790±90 BCE.[4]</p> <p>By the Bronze Age, chickpeas were known in Italy and Greece. In classical Greece, they were called erébinthos and eaten as a staple, a dessert, or consumed raw when young. The Romans knew several varieties such as venus, ram, and punic chickpeas. They were both cooked down into a broth and roasted as a snack. The Roman gourmet Apicius gives several recipes for chickpeas. Carbonized chickpeas have been found at the Roman legion fort at Neuss (Novaesium), Germany in layers from the first century CE, along with rice.</p> <p>Chickpeas are mentioned in Charlemagne's Capitulare de villis (about 800 CE) as cicer italicum, as grown in each imperial demesne. Albertus Magnus mentions red, white and black varieties. Nicholas Culpeper noted "chick-pease or cicers" are less "windy" than peas and more nourishing. Ancient people also associated chickpeas with Venus because they were said to offer medical uses such as increasing sperm and milk, provoking menstruation and urine and helping to treat kidney stones.[5] "White cicers" were thought to be especially strong and helpful.</p> <p>In 1793, ground-roast chickpeas were noted by a German writer as a substitute for coffee in Europe. In the First World War, they were grown for this use in some areas of Germany. They are still sometimes brewed instead of coffee.</p> <p><strong>Sequencing the chickpea genome</strong></p> <p>Sequencing of the chickpea genome has been completed for 90 chickpea genotypes, including several wild species. A collaboration of 20 research organizations, led by the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) identified more than 28,000 genes and several million genetic markers. Scientists expect this work will lead to the development of superior varieties. The new research will benefit the millions of developing country farmers who grow chickpea as a source of much needed income, as well as for its ability to add nitrogen to the soil in which it grows. Production is growing rapidly across the developing world, especially in West Asia where production has grown four-fold over the past 30 years. India is by far the world largest producer but is also the largest importer.</p> <p><strong><em>Uses</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Human consumption</strong></p> <p>Mature chickpeas can be cooked and eaten cold in salads, cooked in stews, ground into a flour called gram flour (also known as chickpea flour and besan and used frequently in Indian cuisine), ground and shaped in balls and fried as falafel, stirred into a batter and baked to make farinata or panelle.</p> <p>In the Iberian Peninsula, chickpeas are very popular: In Portugal it is one of the main ingredients in Rancho, consumed with pasta, and meat, including Portuguese sausages, or with rice. they are also often used in other hot dishes with bacalhau and in soup. In Spain they are often used cold in different tapas and salads, as well as in cocido madrileño. In Egypt, chickpeas are used as a topping for Kushari.</p> <p>Hummus is the Arabic word for chickpeas, which are often cooked and ground into a paste and mixed with tahini, sesame seed paste, the blend called hummus bi tahini, or chickpeas are roasted, spiced, and eaten as a snack, such as leblebi. By the end of the 20th century, hummus had emerged as part of the American culinary fabric. By 2010, 5% of Americans consumed hummus on a regular basis, and it was present in 17% of American households.</p> <p>Some varieties of chickpeas can be popped and eaten like popcorn.</p> <p>Chickpeas and Bengal grams are used to make curries and are one of the most popular vegetarian foods in the Indian Subcontinent and in diaspora communities of many other countries. Popular dishes in Indian cuisine are made with chickpea flour, such as Mirchi Bajji and Mirapakaya bajji Telugu. In India, as well as in the Levant, unripe chickpeas are often picked out of the pod and eaten as a raw snack and the leaves are eaten as a green vegetable in salads.</p> <p>Chickpea flour is used to make "Burmese tofu" which was first known among the Shan people of Burma. The flour is used as a batter to coat various vegetables and meats before frying, such as with panelle, a chickpea fritter from Sicily.[14] Chickpea flour is used to make the Mediterranean flatbread socca and a patty called panisse in Provence, southern France, made of cooked chickpea flour, poured into saucers, allowed to set, cut in strips, and fried in olive oil, often eaten during Lent.</p> <p>In the Philippines, garbanzo beans preserved in syrup are eaten as sweets and in desserts such as halo-halo. Ashkenazi Jews traditionally serve whole chickpeas at a Shalom Zachar celebration for baby boys.</p> <p>Guasanas is a Mexican chickpea recipe in which the beans are cooked in water and salt.</p> <p>Dried chickpeas need a long cooking time (1–2 hours) but will easily fall apart when cooked longer. If soaked for 12–24 hours before use, cooking time can be shortened by around 30 minutes. To make smooth hummus the cooked chickpeas must be processed while quite hot, since the skins disintegrate only when hot.</p> <p>Chickpeas (Cicer arietinum) do not cause lathyrism. Similarly named "chickling peas" (Lathyrus sativus) and other plants of the genus Lathyrus contain the toxins associated with lathyrism.</p> <p><strong>Nutrition</strong></p> <p>Chickpeas are an excellent source of the essential nutrients iron, folate, phosphorus, protein and dietary fiber (USDA nutrient table). Chickpeas are low in fat and most of this is polyunsaturated. The nutrient profile of the smaller variety appears to be different, especially for fiber content which is higher than in the larger light colored variety.</p> <p>Preliminary research has shown that chickpea consumption may lower blood cholesterol.</p>
P 166 (6 g)
Chickpea Seeds (Cicer arietinum)  - 7
  • -27%

"DUKE" Highbush Blueberry Seeds (Vaccinium Corymbosum)

DUKE Blueberry Seeds...

Regular price 1,95 € -18% Ár 1,60 € (SKU: V 194 D)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>DUKE Northern highbush Blueberry Seeds (Vaccinium Corymbosum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 (0,015g) seeds. </strong></span></h2> <p>Duke blueberries are the leading early-ripening (berries begin ripening in early June) blueberry variety. It is known for its high yields (one Duke plant can produce over 9 kg (20 lbs) of uniform-sized, quality fruits. Duke’s mild flavor seems to improve with cold storage.</p> <p>Maintaining the plant vigor of Duke blueberries can be a challenge over a long period of time. Growers must choose a quality growing site and continually employ good cultural practices.</p> <p>The Duke blueberry is one of the leading candidates for mechanical harvest, fresh, and process sales.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Many wild species of Vaccinium are thought to have been cultivated by Native Americans for thousands of years, with intentional crop burnings in northeastern areas being apparent from archeological evidence.[9] V. corymbosum, being one of the species likely used by these peoples, was later studied and domesticated in 1908 by Frederick Vernon Coville.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>In natural habitats it is a food source for native and migrating birds, bears, and small mammals.</p> <p>The berries were collected and used in Native American cuisine in areas where Vaccinium corymbosum grew as a native plant.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Vaccinium corymbosum is the most common commercially grown blueberry in present-day North America. It is also cultivated as an ornamental plant for home and wildlife gardens and natural landscaping projects.</p> <h2><em><span style="color: #000000;"><strong>Germination instructions</strong></span></em></h2> <p>Northern Highbush Blueberry (Vaccinium Corymbosum) – Soak the seeds in a small container of hand hot water and leave to cool for 24 hours. Then sow the seeds on the surface of free-draining, damp, lime-free seed compost and only just cover with compost. 90 days cold stratification at approx 3C° is now required, which can be achieved by either, covering and placing outside in a cold shaded area, or by sealing the pot in a plastic bag and place in a refrigerator. Then move indoors or to a propagator at a minimum temperature of 21C°, until after germination. When large enough to handle, transplant individual seedlings into 9cm pots of ericaceous compost and grow on. Protect from frost. Plant outdoors from June onwards, after hardening off.</p> </body> </html>
V 194 D
"DUKE" Highbush Blueberry Seeds (Vaccinium Corymbosum)
  • -18%

Fekete Szezámmag mag...

Fekete Szezámmag mag...

Regular price 1,65 € -23% Ár 1,27 € (SKU: P 285 B)
Offer ends in:
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Fekete Szezámmag mag (Sesamum indicum)</strong><br><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Ára csomag 1 g (350) magot.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">A<span>&nbsp;</span></span><b style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">szezámmag</b><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span></span><i style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">(Sesamum indicum, Syn:Sesamum orientale)</i><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>egy<span>&nbsp;</span></span>Indiából<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>származó, körülbelül egy méteres magasságú,<span>&nbsp;</span></span>lágyszárú<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>trópusi növény<span>&nbsp;</span></span>magja<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">. A növény virágai kétajkúak,<span>&nbsp;</span></span>rózsaszínűek<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">. A szezám a termesztésbe elsőként bevont növények egyike.<br></span></p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Történelmi_vonatkozások">Történelmi vonatkozások</span></h2> <p>A<span>&nbsp;</span>hindu mitológia<span>&nbsp;</span>szerint a<span>&nbsp;</span>Jama<span>&nbsp;</span>isten által megáldott mag az<span>&nbsp;</span>örök élet<span>&nbsp;</span>szimbóluma.<span>&nbsp;</span>Indiából<span>&nbsp;</span>terjedt el, először<span>&nbsp;</span>Kínában<span>&nbsp;</span>és<span>&nbsp;</span>Japánban<span>&nbsp;</span>jelent meg, majd hamarosan meghonosodott az összes<span>&nbsp;</span>mediterrán<span>&nbsp;</span>országban.<span>&nbsp;</span>III. Ramszesz<span>&nbsp;</span>idején már<span>&nbsp;</span>Egyiptomban<span>&nbsp;</span>is ültették, amelyről<span>&nbsp;</span>hieroglifákon<span>&nbsp;</span>is megemlékeztek. A római hadseregben<span>&nbsp;</span>mézzel<span>&nbsp;</span>elkevert szezámmagot etettek a katonákkal erejük és<span>&nbsp;</span>férfiasságuk<span>&nbsp;</span>növelése érdekében.<span>&nbsp;</span>Hippokratész<span>&nbsp;</span>többször megemlékezik műveiben a szezámmag gyógyító erejéről.</p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span id="Beltartalmi_jellemz.C5.91i"></span><span class="mw-headline" id="Beltartalmi_jellemzői">Beltartalmi jellemzői</span></h2> <p>Különös módon az európaiak a szezámmagot legtöbbször csak<span>&nbsp;</span>kenyerek<span>&nbsp;</span>vagy rágcsálnivalók tetejére hintve használják. Szinte sehol nem használják a<span>&nbsp;</span>magokat<span>&nbsp;</span>ételek ízesítésére vagy alapanyagként.<span>&nbsp;</span>Kínában<span>&nbsp;</span>ötezer éve használják a szezámmagból sajtolt<span>&nbsp;</span>olajat<span>&nbsp;</span>tintához<span>&nbsp;</span>és<span>&nbsp;</span>főzéshez. A szinte teljesen tejtermék-mentes<span>&nbsp;</span>kínai konyhában<span>&nbsp;</span>elengedhetetlen<span>&nbsp;</span>kalciumforrásként<span>&nbsp;</span>épült be használata. Súlyarányosan több<span>&nbsp;</span>kalciumot<span>&nbsp;</span>tartalmaz, mint a<span>&nbsp;</span>tehéntej<span>&nbsp;</span>(hétszer annyit), vetekszik a tehénsajtok<span>&nbsp;</span>kalciumtartalmával, az<span>&nbsp;</span>olajos magvak<span>&nbsp;</span>közül pedig egyenesen kiemelkedik. A<span>&nbsp;</span>kalcium<span>&nbsp;</span>mellett jelentős mennyiségben található benne<span>&nbsp;</span>magnézium,<span>&nbsp;</span>kálium,<span>&nbsp;</span>foszfor,<span>&nbsp;</span>vas, valamint<span>&nbsp;</span>A-,<span>&nbsp;</span>E-,<span>&nbsp;</span>B1-<span>&nbsp;</span>és<span>&nbsp;</span>B2-vitamin. Rendkívül sokrétű a felhasználhatósága: pirítva, őrleményként, krémként, sózva (szezámsó) hidegen sajtolt olaj formájában tehetjük péksüteményekre, salátákra, köretekbe.</p> <p>A vizsgálatok szerint az olajok közül leginkább a szezámmag olaja gátolja a melanoma sejtek növekedését. A szezámmag beltartalmi értékei (100 g): 20 g<span>&nbsp;</span>fehérje, 50 g<span>&nbsp;</span>zsír, 21 g<span>&nbsp;</span>szénhidrát, 4,5&nbsp;mg<span>&nbsp;</span>nátrium, 458&nbsp;mg<span>&nbsp;</span>kálium, 783&nbsp;mg<span>&nbsp;</span>kalcium, 607&nbsp;mg<span>&nbsp;</span>foszfor, 347&nbsp;mg<span>&nbsp;</span>magnézium, 10&nbsp;mg<span>&nbsp;</span>vas, 6&nbsp;mg<span>&nbsp;</span>A-vitamin, 5,7&nbsp;mg<span>&nbsp;</span>E-vitamin, 1,00&nbsp;mg<span>&nbsp;</span>B1-vitamin, 0,25&nbsp;mg<span>&nbsp;</span>B2-vitamin, 5,0&nbsp;mg<span>&nbsp;</span>niacin. Energiatartalma: 2385<span>&nbsp;</span>kJ<span>&nbsp;</span>(570<span>&nbsp;</span>kcal). (Forrás: Institut für Ernährung-wissender Universität Giessen: Tápanyagtáblázat)</p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span id="Haszn.C3.A1lata"></span><span class="mw-headline" id="Használata">Használata</span></h2> <p>A szezámmagot rendkívül sokféle módon tudjuk elkészíteni. Készülhet belőle pirított és sózott formájában szezámsó (gomasszió), kenyérbe és péksüteménybe süthetjük, salátára, köretre szórhatjuk. Fontos azonban, hogy a nehezen elrágható piciny magokat az emészthetőség megnövelése érdekében durvára daráljuk és így fogyasszuk el, mert ha a<span>&nbsp;</span>mag<span>&nbsp;</span>nincs feltárva, kevéssé hasznosul a szervezetünkben.</p> <p>A szezámmag több formában kapható. Megvásárolhatjuk hántolatlan vagy hántolt formában (ez a gyakoribb), de vehetünk pirított vagy fekete magokat is. A legtöbb pék hántolatlan szezámmagot használ. Az előpirított szezámmagnak csodálatos illata van, de a csomag kibontása után hamar elveszti aromáját. Jobb, ha mindig csak a főzéshez szükséges mennyiséget pirítjuk meg. A fekete szezámmag kevésbé elterjedt, kissé erősebb aromájú és különösen finom olyan ételekben, ahol a magokat egészben fogyasztják. Mindegyik fajtát (hántolatlan, hántolt fehér és fekete) piríthatjuk olaj nélkül,<span>&nbsp;</span>serpenyőben,<span>&nbsp;</span>grillezve<span>&nbsp;</span>illetve forró<span>&nbsp;</span>olajba<span>&nbsp;</span>dobva. Mindegyik módszer más illatot eredményez.<span>&nbsp;</span>Salátához<span>&nbsp;</span>talán a<span>&nbsp;</span>serpenyőben<span>&nbsp;</span>szárazon pirított fekete szezámmag illik a leginkább.</p> <p>Évszázadokon szezámból sajtolták a világ számos részén a legfontosabb főzőolajat.<span>&nbsp;</span>Marco Polo<span>&nbsp;</span>először<span>&nbsp;</span>Perzsiában<span>&nbsp;</span>találkozott a szezámolajjal, ahol<span>&nbsp;</span>olíva<span>&nbsp;</span>helyett használták, mivel az olajnövény azon a vidéken nem termett. Úgy fogalmazott egy írásában, hogy még életében nem ízlelt ilyen finom olajat. A<span>&nbsp;</span>szezámolaj<span>&nbsp;</span>többek között azért olyan jó, mert magas hőmérsékleten sem savasodik, és olyan intenzív az illata, hogy már egy kis mennyiség is rengeteg ételhez elegendő.</p> <p>Cukorsziruppal keverve,<span>&nbsp;</span>halva<span>&nbsp;</span>formájában közvetlenül fogyasztható.</p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="A_szezám_növény">A szezám növény</span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">A növényt könnyű termeszteni, inkább a betakarítás okoz gondot. A termést ugyanis rendkívül óvatosan kell eltávolítani a növényről, mivel a legkisebb rázkódásra a földre hullanak a<span>&nbsp;</span>magok. Jelenleg olyan<span>&nbsp;</span>genetikailag módosított<span>&nbsp;</span>változatokat termesztenek, melyek kevésbé hullatják el a magokat. A szezámmag árára ez a változás egyelőre nem gyakorolt hatást.</p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">Virágai<span>&nbsp;</span>általában sárgák, bár más, változatos színben is megjelenhetnek a kéktől a liláig. Magassága 50-től 100&nbsp;cm-ig terjed.</p> <p><br><br></p> <p><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"></span></p>
P 285 B (1 g)
Fekete Szezámmag mag (Sesamum indicum)
  • -23%
  • Új

Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds (Argyreia nervosa) 1.95 - 1

Hawaiian Baby Woodrose...

Regular price 1,95 € -19% Ár 1,58 € (SKU: T 25)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds (Argyreia nervosa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Argyreia nervosa is a perennial climbing vine that is native to the Indian subcontinent and introduced to numerous areas worldwide, including Hawaii, Africa, and the Caribbean. Though it can be invasive, it is often prized for its aesthetic value. Common names include Hawaiian Baby Woodrose, Adhoguda अधोगुडा or Vidhara विधारा (Sanskrit), Elephant Creeper and Woolly Morning Glory. There are two botanical varieties: Argyreia nervosavar. nervosa described here, and Argyrea nervosa var. speciosa, a species used in ayurvedic medicine, but with little to no psychoactive value.</p> <p>Hawaiian Baby Woodrose seeds may be consumed for their various ergoline alkaloids, such as Lysergic acid amide, which can produce psychedelic effects.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>The plant is a rare example of a plant whose hallucinogenic properties were not recognized until recent times. While its cousins in the Convolvulaceae family, such as the Rivea corymbosa (Ololiuhqui) and Ipomoea tricolor (Tlitliltzin), were used in shamanic rituals of Latin America for centuries, the Hawaiian Baby Woodrose was not traditionally recognized as a hallucinogen. Its properties were first brought to attention in the 1960s, despite the fact that the chemical composition of its seeds is nearly identical to those of the two species mentioned above, and the seeds contain the highest concentration of psychoactive compounds in the entire family.</p> <p><strong>Seeds</strong></p> <p>In most countries, it is legal to purchase, sell or germinate Argyreia nervosa seeds, but they are generally unapproved for human consumption. Depending on the country, it may be illegal to buy seeds with the intention to consume them, and several countries have outlawed ergine-containing seeds altogether. In Australia, retailers are required to treat their seeds with chemicals to discourage consumption, and it is illegal to buy or possess untreated seeds.</p> <p><strong>Extracted chemicals</strong></p> <p>Extracting ergine from Argyreia speciosa seeds is illegal in the USA since it is a scheduled substance. It is classified as a schedule III depressant by the DEA, although the substance has hallucinogenic/psychedelic properties.</p> <p>Extracts</p> <p>In an animal model of ulcers in rats, large doses of the extract of Argyreia speciosa leaves (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight) showed dose-dependent antiulcer activity and cured the Ulcers.</p> </body> </html>
T 25
Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds (Argyreia nervosa) 1.95 - 1
  • -19%

Quinoa Seeds Red or White (Chenopodium quinoa)

Quinoa Seeds Red or White...

Regular price 2,00 € -31% Ár 1,38 € (SKU: P 219)
Offer ends in:
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5/ 5
<div class="&quot;rte&quot;"><h2><strong>Quinoa Seeds (Chenopodium quinoa)</strong></h2><h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 700+- (2g) seeds.</strong></span></h2><p>Quinoa (/ˈkiːnwɑː/, from Quechua kinwa or kinuwa ) is a species of the goosefoot genus (Chenopodium quinoa), a grain crop grown primarily for its edible seeds. It is a pseudocereal rather than a true cereal, as it is not a member of the true grass family. As a chenopod, quinoa is closely related to species such as beetroots, spinach and tumbleweeds. As a member of the Amaranthaceae family, it is related to and resembles amaranth, which is also a pseudocereal.</p><p>It is high in protein, and is tolerant of dry soil.</p><p>Quinoa (the name is derived from the Spanish spelling of the Quechua name kinwa) originated in the Andean region of Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Chile and Colombia, where it was domesticated 3,000 to 4,000 years ago for human consumption, though archaeological evidence shows a non-domesticated association with pastoral herding some 5,200 to 7,000 years ago.</p><p>Similar Chenopodium species, such as pitseed goosefoot (Chenopodium berlandieri) and fat hen (Chenopodium album), were grown and domesticated in North America as part of the Eastern Agricultural Complex before maize agriculture became popular. Fat hen, which has a widespread distribution in the Northern Hemisphere, produces edible seeds and greens much like quinoa, but in smaller quantities.</p><p>The nutrient composition is favourable compared with common cereals. Quinoa seeds contain essential amino acids like lysine and acceptable quantities of calcium, phosphorus, and iron.</p><p>After harvest, the seeds must be processed to remove the coating containing the bitter-tasting saponins. The seeds are in general cooked the same way as rice and can be used in a wide range of dishes. The leaves are eaten as a leaf vegetable, much like amaranth, but commercial availability of quinoa greens is limited.</p><p>Chenopodium quinoa is a dicotyledonous annual plant usually about 1–2 metres (3.3–6.6 ft) high. It has broad, generally pubescent, powdery, smooth (rarely) to lobed leaves normally arranged alternately. The woody central stem is branched or unbranched depending on the variety and may be green, red or purple. The flowering panicles arise from the top of the plant or from leaf axils along the stem. Each panicle has a central axis from which a secondary axis emerges either with flowers (amaranthiform) or bearing a tertiary axis carrying the flowers (glomeruliform). The green hypogynous flowers have a simple perianth and are generally bisexual and self-fertilizing. The fruits are about 2 millimetres (0.079 in) in diameter and of various colours—from white to red or black, depending on the cultivar.</p><p><strong>Natural distribution</strong></p><p>Chenopodium quinoa is believed to have been domesticated in the Peruvian Andes from wild or weed populations of the same species. There are non-cultivated quinoa plants (Chenopodium quinoa var. melanospermum) that grow in the area it is cultivated; these may either be related to wild predecessors, or they could be descendants of cultivated plants.</p><p><strong>Saponin content</strong></p><p>In their natural state, the seeds have a coating of bitter-tasting saponins, making them unpalatable. Most of the grain sold commercially has been processed to remove this coating. This bitterness has beneficial effects during cultivation, as it is unpopular with birds and therefore requires minimal protection. The genetic control of bitterness involves quantitative inheritance; lowering the saponin content through selective breeding to produce sweeter, more palatable varieties is complicated by about 10% cross-pollination.</p><p>The toxicity category rating of quinoa saponins treats them as mild eye and respiratory irritants and as a low gastrointestinal irritant. The saponin is a toxic glycoside, a main contributor to its hemolytic effects when combined directly with blood cells. In South America, quinoa saponin has many uses, including as a detergent for clothing and washing and as an antiseptic for skin injuries. High levels of oxalic acid are in the leaves and stems of all species of the Chenopodium genus, and are also in the related genera of the Amaranthaceae family. The risks associated with quinoa are minimal, provided it is properly prepared and the leaves are not eaten to excess.</p><p><strong>Nutritional value</strong></p><p>Quinoa was important to the diet of pre-Columbian Andean civilizations. Quinoa grain has been called a superfood, a term which is not in common use by dietitians and nutrition scientists. Protein content is very high for a cereal/pseudo-cereal (14% by mass), but not as high as most beans and legumes. This includes a "low gluten content" that appears to be well tolerated when consumed at normal levels by people with celiac disease. The protein content per 100 calories is higher than brown rice, potatoes, barley and millet, but is less than wild rice and oats. Nutritional evaluations indicate that quinoa is a source of complete protein. Other sources claim its protein is not complete but relatively high in essential amino acids. Other pseudo grains derived from seeds are similar in complete protein levels; buckwheat is 18% protein compared to 14% for Quinoa; Amaranth, a related species to Quinoa, ranges from 12% to 17.5%.</p><p>Quinoa is a rich source (&gt;20% of the Daily value, DV) of the B vitamins thiamine, riboflavin, vitamin B6, and folate and is a rich source of the dietary minerals iron, magnesium, phosphorus, and zinc. Quinoa is also a good source (10-19% of DV) of the B vitamins niacin and pantothenic acid, vitamin E, and the dietary mineral potassium. The pseudo cereal contains a modest amount of calcium, and thus is useful for vegans and those who are lactose intolerant. It is gluten-free and considered easy to digest. Because of these characteristics, it is being considered a possible crop in NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System for long-duration human occupied space flights.</p><p>The grain may be germinated in its raw form to boost its nutritional value, provided that the grains are rinsed thoroughly to remove any saponin.[26] It has a notably short germination period: only 2–4 hours in a glass of clean water is enough to make it sprout and release gases, as opposed to 12 hours with wheat. This process, besides its nutritional enhancements, softens the seeds, making them suitable to be added to salads and other cold foods.</p><h3><strong>Cultivation</strong></h3><p>The plant's growth is highly variable due to a high complexity of different subspecies, varieties and landraces (domesticated plants or animals adapted to the environment in which they originated). However, in general it is undemanding and altitude-hardy. It is grown from coastal regions to over 4,000 m (13,000 ft) in the Andes near the equator, with most of the cultivars being grown between 2,500 metres (8,200 ft) and 4,000 metres (13,000 ft). Depending on the variety, optimal growing conditions are in cool climates with temperatures that vary between −4 °C (25 °F) during the night to near 35 °C (95 °F) during the day. Some cultivars can withstand lower temperatures without damage. Light frosts normally do not affect the plants at any stage of development, except during flowering. Mid-summer frosts during flowering, often occurring in the Andes, lead to sterilization of the pollen. Rainfall conditions are highly variable between the different cultivars, ranging from 300 to 1,000 millimetres (12 to 39 in) during growing season. Growth is optimal with well-distributed rainfall during early growth and development and dry conditions during seed maturation and harvesting.</p><p>Quinoa has been cultivated in the United States, primarily in the high elevation San Luis Valley (SLV) of Colorado where it was introduced in 1982. In this high-altitude desert valley, maximum summer temperatures rarely exceed 30 °C (86 °F) and night temperatures are about 7 °C (45 °F). Due to the short growing season, North American cultivation requires short-maturity varieties, typically of Bolivian origin.</p><h2><strong>Sowing</strong></h2><p>Quinoa plants do best in sandy, well-drained soils with a low nutrient content, moderate salinity, and a soil pH of 6 to 8.5.</p><p>The seedbed must be well prepared and drained to avoid waterlogging. In the Andes, the seeds are normally broadcast over the land and raked into the soil. Sometimes it is sown in containers of soil and transplanted later.</p><p><strong>Cultivation management</strong></p><p>Yields are maximised when 170 to 200 kg (370 to 440 lb) N/hectare is available.[citation needed] The addition of phosphorus does not improve yield. In eastern North America, it is susceptible to a leaf miner that may reduce crop success and which also affects the common weed and close relative Chenopodium album, but C. album is much more resistant.</p><p><strong><em>History and culture</em></strong></p><p><strong>Early history</strong></p><p>Quinoa was first domesticated by Andean peoples around 3,000 to 4,000 years ago. It has been an important staple in the Andean cultures where the plant is indigenous but relatively obscure in the rest of the world. The Incas, who held the crop to be sacred, referred to it as chisaya mama or "mother of all grains", and it was the Inca emperor who would traditionally sow the first seeds of the season using "golden implements". During the Spanish conquest of South America, the colonists scorned it as "food for Indians", and suppressed its cultivation, due to its status within indigenous religious ceremonies. The conquistadors forbade quinoa cultivation for a time and the Incas were forced to grow wheat instead.</p><p>The grain has become increasingly popular in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, China and Japan where it is not typically grown, increasing crop value. Between 2006 and early 2013 quinoa crop prices tripled. In 2011, the average price was US$3,115 per ton with some varieties selling as high as $8,000 per ton. This compares with wheat prices of $9 per bushel (about $340 per ton). Since the 1970s, producers’ associations and cooperatives have worked toward greater producer control of the market. The higher prices make it harder for people to purchase, but also brings a livable income for farmers and enables many urban refugees to return to working the land.</p><p>The popularity of quinoa grain in non-indigenous regions has raised concerns over food security. Due to continued widespread poverty in regions where it is produced and because few other crops are compatible with the soil and climate in these regions, it has been suggested that the inflated price disrupts local access to food supplies. In 2013, The Guardian compared it to asparagus cultivated in Peru, a cash crop criticized for excessive water use, as "feeding our apparently insatiable 365-day-a-year hunger for this luxury vegetable" It has been suggested that, as people rise above subsistence-level income, they choose higher-status Western processed foods. However, anthropologist Pablo Laguna states that farmers are still saving a portion of the quinoa crop for their own use, and that the high prices affect nearby city dwellers more, but consumption in cities has traditionally been lower. According to Laguna, the net benefit of increased revenue for farmers outweighs the costs, saying that it is "very good news for small, indigenous farmers". The transformation from a healthy staple food for farming families and communities into a product that is held to be worth too much to keep for oneself and one's family is an ongoing process. It is seen as a valuable resource that can bring in far greater amounts[clarification needed] of cheap, low nutrient foods such as pasta and rice. It used to be seen as a peasant food that provided farming families with a very important source of nutrition, but now occupies a spectrum from an everyday food of urban Bolivia's middle class to a luxury food in the Peruvian capital of Lima where "it sells at a higher per pound price than chicken, and four times as much as rice". Efforts are being made in some areas to distribute it more widely and ensure that farming and poorer populations have access to it and have an understanding of its nutritional importance. These include incorporating it into free school breakfasts and in government provisions distributed to pregnant and nursing women in need.</p><p><strong>Kosher controversy</strong></p><p>Quinoa has become popular in the Jewish community as a substitute for the leavened grains that are forbidden during the Passover holiday. Several kosher certification organizations refuse to certify it as being kosher for Passover, citing reasons including its resemblance to prohibited grains or fear of cross-contamination of the product from nearby fields of prohibited grain or during packaging.</p><p>In December 2013, the Orthodox Union, the world's largest kosher certification agency, announced it would begin certifying quinoa as kosher for Passover.</p><p><strong>International Year of Quinoa</strong></p><p>The United Nations General Assembly declared 2013 as the "International Year of Quinoa"  in recognition of ancestral practices of the Andean people, who have preserved it as food for present and future generations, through knowledge and practices of living in harmony with nature. The objective is to draw the world’s attention to the role that quinoa could play in providing food security, nutrition and poverty eradication, in support of achieving Millennium Development Goals.</p><p>The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations is as the Secretariat of the international year. Bolivia has the presidency of the Coordination Committee and Ecuador, Peru and Chile share the vice presidency, with the rapporteurship in the hands of Argentina and France.</p></div>
P 219 C
Quinoa Seeds Red or White (Chenopodium quinoa)
  • -31%


Radicchio - Chicory Seeds ‘‘Red Verona‘‘  - 2

Radicchio - Chicory Seeds...

Regular price 1,65 € -23% Ár 1,27 € (SKU: P 108)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Radicchio - Chicory Seeds ‘‘Red Verona‘‘</strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 500 seeds (1g).</strong></span></h3> <div>Small, red, cabbage-like heads ready to pick in fall. Leaves are sharp-flavored, use sparingly in green salads. May also be sautéed, steamed or grilled with meats. Garden Hints: Do not plant too early in spring or plants may bolt (go to seed). In early fall, cut off all leaves above the crown. New growth in cool weather produces the small, red, cabbage-like heads.</div> <div>Sun: Full Sun&nbsp;</div> <div>Spread: 4 &nbsp;inches</div> <div>Height: 6 &nbsp;inches</div> <div>Days to Maturity: 90 &nbsp;days</div> <div>Sowing Method: Direct Sow</div>
P 108 (1g)
Radicchio - Chicory Seeds ‘‘Red Verona‘‘  - 2
  • -23%

White mustard Seeds...

White mustard Seeds...

Regular price 2,15 € -29% Ár 1,53 € (SKU: MHS 27 W)
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>White mustard Seeds (Sinapis alba)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 180 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div><b>White mustard</b><span>&nbsp;(</span><i>Sinapis alba</i><span>) is an&nbsp;</span>annual plant<span>&nbsp;of the family&nbsp;</span>Brassicaceae<span>. It is sometimes also referred to as&nbsp;</span><i>Brassica alba</i><span>&nbsp;or&nbsp;</span><i>B. hirta</i><span>. Grown for its seeds, used to make the condiment&nbsp;</span>mustard<span>, as fodder crop, or as a&nbsp;</span>green manure<span>, it is now widespread worldwide, although it probably originated in the Mediterranean region.</span></div> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2> <p>White mustard is an annual, growing to 70&nbsp;cm high with stalkless pinnate leaves, similar to<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Sinapis arvensis</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-1" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Distribution">Distribution</span></h2> <p>Most common in Europe, North Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia, it can be found worldwide. It has been found as far north as Greenland,<sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>and naturalized throughout<span>&nbsp;</span>Great Britain<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>Ireland.<sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Culinary_uses">Culinary uses</span></h2> <p>The yellow flowers of the plant produce hairy seed pods, with each pod containing roughly a half dozen seeds. These seeds are harvested just prior to the pods becoming ripe and bursting.</p> <p>White mustard seeds are hard round seeds, usually around 1.0 to 1.5&nbsp;mm (0.039 to 0.059&nbsp;in) in diameter,<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>with a color ranging from beige or yellow to light brown. They can be used whole for pickling or toasted for use in dishes. When ground and mixed with other ingredients, a paste or more standard<span>&nbsp;</span>condiment<span>&nbsp;</span>can be produced.<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Sinapis alba</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is used to make the commonplace yellow table mustard, with additional yellow coloring provided by<span>&nbsp;</span>turmeric<span>&nbsp;</span>in some formulations.</p> <p>The seeds contain<span>&nbsp;</span>sinalbin, which is a<span>&nbsp;</span>thioglycoside<span>&nbsp;</span>responsible for their pungent taste. White mustard has fewer<span>&nbsp;</span>volatile oils<span>&nbsp;</span>and the flavor is considered to be milder than that produced by<span>&nbsp;</span>black mustard<span>&nbsp;</span>seeds.<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>In Greece, the plant's leaves can be eaten during the winter, before it blooms. Greeks call it<span>&nbsp;</span><i>vrouves (βρούβα)</i><span>&nbsp;</span>or<span>&nbsp;</span><i>lapsana (λαψάνα)</i>. The blooming season of this plant (February–March) is celebrated with the Mustard Festival, a series of festivities in the wine country of California (Napa and Sonoma Counties).</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Other_uses">Other uses</span></h2> <p>White mustard is commonly used as a cover and green manure crop in Europe (between UK and Ukraine). A large number of varieties exist, e.g. in<span>&nbsp;</span>Germany,<span>&nbsp;</span>Netherlands, mainly differing in lateness of flowering and resistance against white beet-cyst nematode (<i>Heterodera schachtii</i>). Farmers prefer late-flowering varieties, which do not produce seeds, as they may become weeds in the subsequent year. Early vigour is important to cover the soil quickly to suppress weeds and protect the soil against erosion. In rotations with<span>&nbsp;</span>sugar beets, suppression of the white beet-cyst nematode is an important trait. Resistant white mustard varieties reduce nematode populations by 70-90%.</p>
MHS 27 W (1g)
White mustard Seeds (Sinapis alba)
  • -29%

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