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All Green Bush Courgette Seeds

All Green Bush Courgette Seeds

Regular price 2,10 € -17% Ár 1,74 € (SKU: P 140)
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<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2 id="short_description_content"><strong>All Green Bush Courgette Seeds&nbsp; </strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;"><strong>Price for a Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This reliable variety is quick to mature and will crop all summer long and with regular harvesting. The abundant, dark-skinned fruits of Courgette ‘All green Bush’ should be harvested as baby courgettes at about 10cm (4”) long for the best flavor. This heavy-yielding courgette has tender skins making it ideal for cooking whole. Height: 45cm (18”). Spread 90cm (35”).</p> <p><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></p> <p>Sow seeds in spring 1cm (½in) deep in good seed compost. Germination usually takes 6-10 days at 24C (75F). Can also be sown where they are to crop in late spring/early summer once the soil has warmed up. Sow 3 seeds every 60cm (24in) and thin out to the best seedling.</p> <p><strong>Growing Instructions</strong></p> <p>Transplant when large enough to handle into 8cm (3in) pots and grow on in cooler conditions. Gradually acclimatise to outdoor conditions for 10-15 days before planting out after all risk of frost, 60cm (24in) apart in a sunny sheltered spot on rich well-drained soil.</p> <p><strong>Aftercare</strong></p> <p class="">Water regularly and feed every 14 days once the courgettes start to develop. Pick regularly while small 10-16cm (4-6in) and don't leave any on to grow large or cropping will be impaired.</p> </div> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
P 140 (10 S)
All Green Bush Courgette Seeds
  • -17%

Amaranth Seeds (Amaranthus) 2.25 - 1

Amaranth Seeds (Amaranthus)

Regular price 1,35 € -22% Ár 1,05 € (SKU: VE 77 W (1g))
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<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2 class=""><strong>Amaranth Seeds (Amaranthus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1235 seeds (1g).</strong></span></h2> <p>Amaranthus, collectively known as amaranth, is a cosmopolitan genus of annual or short-lived perennial plants. Some amaranth species are cultivated as leaf vegetables, cereals, and ornamental plants. Most of the species from Amaranthus are summer annual weeds and are commonly referred to as pigweed. Catkin-like cymes of densely packed flowers grow in summer or autumn.</p> <p>Approximately 60 species are recognized, with inflorescences and foliage ranging from purple and red to green or gold. Members of this genus share many characteristics and uses with members of the closely related genus Celosia.</p> <p>"Amaranth" derives from Greek ἀμάραντος (amarantos), "unfading," with the Greek word for "flower," ἄνθος (anthos), factoring into the word's development as "amaranth." The more accurate "amarant" is an archaic variant.</p> <p><strong>Taxonomy</strong></p> <p>Amaranthus shows a wide variety of morphological diversity among and even within certain species. Although the family (Amaranthaceae) is distinctive, the genus has few distinguishing characters among the 70 species included. This complicates taxonomy and Amaranthus has generally been considered among systematists as a "difficult" genus.</p> <p>Formerly, Sauer (1955) classified the genus into two subgenera, differentiating only between monoecious and dioecious species: Acnida (L.) Aellen ex K.R. Robertson and Amaranthus.</p> <p>Although this classification was widely accepted, further infrageneric classification was (and still is) needed to differentiate this widely diverse group.</p> <p>Currently, Amaranthus includes three recognized subgenera and 70 species, although species numbers are questionable due to hybridization and species concepts. Infrageneric classification focuses on inflorescence, flower characters and whether a species is monoecious/dioecious, as in the Sauer (1955) suggested classification. A modified infrageneric classification of Amaranthus was published by Mosyakin &amp; Robertson (1996) and includes three subgenera: Acnida, Amaranthus, and Albersia. The taxonomy is further differentiated by sections within each of the subgenera.</p> <p><strong><em>Human uses</em></strong></p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Known to the Aztecs as huauhtli, it is thought to have represented up to 80% of their caloric consumption before the conquest. Another important use of amaranth throughout Mesoamerica was to prepare ritual drinks and foods. To this day, amaranth grains are toasted much like popcorn and mixed with honey, molasses or chocolate to make a treat called alegría, meaning "joy" in Spanish. Diego Duran described the festivities for Huitzilopochtli, whose name means "hummingbird of the left side" or "left-handed hummingbird". (Real hummingbirds feed on amaranth flowers.) The Aztec month of Panquetzaliztli (7 December to 26 December) was dedicated to Huitzilopochtli. People decorated their homes and trees with paper flags; there were ritual races, processions, dances, songs, prayers, and finally human sacrifices. This was one of the more important Aztec festivals, and the people prepared for the whole month. They fasted or ate very little; a statue of the god was made out of amaranth (huautli) seeds and honey, and at the end of the month, it was cut into small pieces so everybody could eat a little piece of the god. After the Spanish conquest, cultivation of amaranth was outlawed, while some of the festivities were subsumed into the Christmas celebration.</p> <p>Because of its importance as a symbol of indigenous culture, its gluten-free palatability, ease of cooking, and a protein that is particularly well-suited to human nutritional needs, interest in grain amaranth (especially A. cruentus and A. hypochondriacus) revived in the 1970s. It was recovered in Mexico from wild varieties and is now commercially cultivated. It is a popular snack sold in Mexico, sometimes mixed with chocolate or puffed rice, and its use has spread to Europe and parts of North America. Amaranth and quinoa are non-grasses and are called pseudocereals because of their flavor and cooking similarities to cereals.</p> <p><strong>Amaranth seed</strong></p> <p>Several species are raised for amaranth "grain" in Asia and the Americas.</p> <p>Ancient amaranth grains still used to this day include the three species, Amaranthus caudatus, Amaranthus cruentus, and Amaranthus hypochondriacus.[10] Although amaranth was cultivated on a large scale in ancient Mexico, Guatemala, and Peru, nowadays it is only cultivated on a small scale there, along with India, China, Nepal, and other tropical countries; thus, there is potential for further cultivation in those countries, as well as in the U.S. In a 1977 article in Science, amaranth was described as "the crop of the future." It has been proposed as an inexpensive native crop that could be cultivated by indigenous people in rural areas for several reasons:</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; It is easily harvested.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Its seeds are a good source of protein. Compared to grains, amaranth is unusually rich in the essential amino acid lysine. Common grains such as wheat and corn are comparatively rich in amino acids that amaranth lacks; thus, amaranth and grains can complement each other.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The seeds of Amaranthus species contain about thirty percent more protein than cereals like rice, sorghum and rye. In cooked and edible forms, amaranth is competitive with wheat germ and oats - higher in some nutrients, lower in others.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; It is easy to cook.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; As befits its weedy life history, amaranth grains grow very rapidly and their large seedheads can weigh up to 1 kilogram and contain a half-million seeds in three species of amaranth.</p> <p><strong>Amaranth seed flour</strong></p> <p>Amaranth seed flour has been evaluated as an additive to wheat flour by food specialists. To determine palatability, different levels of amaranth grain flour were mixed with the wheat flour and baking ingredients (1% salt, 2.5% fat, 1.5% yeast, 10% sugar and 52–74% water), fermented, molded, pan-proofed and baked. The baked products were evaluated for loaf volume, moisture content, color, odor, taste and texture. The amaranth containing products were then compared with bread made from 100% wheat flour. The loaf volume decreased by 40% and the moisture content increased from 22 to 42% with increase in amaranth grain flour. The study found that the sensory scores of the taste, odor, color, and texture decreased with increasing amounts of amaranth. Generally, above 15% amaranth grain flour, there were significant differences in the evaluated sensory qualities and the high amaranth-containing product was found to be of unacceptable palatability to the population sample that evaluated the baked products.</p> <p><strong>Leaves, roots, and stems</strong></p> <p>Amaranth species are cultivated and consumed as a leaf vegetable in many parts of the world. There are four species of Amaranthus documented as cultivated vegetables in eastern Asia: Amaranthus cruentus, Amaranthus blitum, Amaranthus dubius, and Amaranthus tricolor.</p> <p>In Indonesia and Malaysia, leaf amaranth is called bayam. In the Philippines, the Ilocano word for the plant is "kalunay"; the Tagalog word for the plant is kilitis or "kulitis". In the state of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar in India, it is called Chaulai and is a popular green leafy vegetable (referred to in the class of vegetable preparations called saag). It is called Chua in Kumaun area of Uttarakhand, where it is a popular red-green vegetable. In Karnataka state in India, it is called Harive (ಹರಿವೆ). It is used to prepare curries like Hulee, palya, Majjigay-hulee and so on. In the state of Kerala, it is called 'Cheera' and is consumed by stir-frying the leaves with spices and red chillies to make 'Cheera Thoran'. In Tamil Nadu State, it is called முளைக்கீரை and is regularly consumed as a favourite dish, where the greens are steamed, and mashed, with light seasoning of salt, red chillis and cumin. It is called keerai masial (கீரை மசியல்). In Andhra Pradesh this leaf is added in preparation of a popular dal called thotakura pappu తొట కూర పప్పు (Telugu). In Maharashtra, it is called "Shravani Maath" (literally माठ grown in month of Shravan) and it is available in both red and white colour. In Orissa, it is called "Khada saga", it is used to prepare 'Saga Bhaja', in which the leaf is fried with chillies and onions.</p> <p>The root of mature amaranth is a popular vegetable. It is white and cooked with tomatoes or tamarind gravy. It has a milky taste and is alkaline.</p> <p>In China, the leaves and stems are used as a stir-fry vegetable, or in soups, and called 苋菜 (Mandarin Pinyin: xiàncài; Cantonese Jyutping: jin6 coi3) with variations in various dialects). Amaranth greens are believed to help enhance eyesight.[citation needed] In Vietnam, it is called rau dền and is used to make soup. There are two species popular as edible vegetable in Vietnam: dền đỏ- amaranthus tricolor and dền cơm or dền trắng- amaranthus viridis.</p> <p>A traditional food plant in Africa, amaranth has the potential to improve nutrition, boost food security, foster rural development and support sustainable land care.[19] In East Africa, amaranth leaf is known in chewa as bonongwe, and in Swahili as mchicha, as terere in Kikuyu, Meru and Embu; and as telele in Kamba. In Bantu regions of Uganda it is known as doodo.[20] It is recommended by some doctors for people having low red blood cell count. It is also known among the Kalenjin as a drought crop (chepkerta). In Lingala (spoken in the Congo), it is known as lɛngalɛnga or bítɛkutɛku.[21] In Nigeria, it is a common vegetable and goes with all Nigerian starch dishes. It is known in Yoruba as Shoko a short form of Shokoyokoto (meaning make the husband fat) or arowo jeja (meaning "we have money left over for fish"). In the Caribbean, the leaves are called bhaji in Trinidad and callaloo in Jamaica, and are sautéed with onions, garlic and tomatoes, or sometimes used in a soup called pepperpot soup.</p> <p>In Greece, green amaranth (Amaranthus viridis) is a popular dish and is called βλήτα, vlita or vleeta. It is boiled, then served with olive oil and lemon juice like a salad, sometimes alongside fried fish. Greeks stop harvesting the plant (which also grows wild) when it starts to bloom at the end of August.</p> <p>In Sri Lanka, it is called "koora thampala". Sri Lankans cook it and eat it with rice. Fiji Indians call it choraiya bhaji.</p> <p><strong>Dyes</strong></p> <p>The flowers of the 'Hopi Red Dye' amaranth were used by the Hopi (a tribe in the western United States) as the source of a deep red dye. There is also a synthetic dye that has been named "amaranth" for its similarity in color to the natural amaranth pigments known as betalains. This synthetic dye is also known as Red No. 2 in North America and E123 in the European Union.</p> <p><strong>Ornamentals</strong></p> <p>The genus also contains several well-known ornamental plants, such as Amaranthus caudatus (love-lies-bleeding), a native of India and a vigorous, hardy annual with dark purplish flowers crowded in handsome drooping spikes. Another Indian annual, A. hypochondriacus (prince's feather), has deeply veined lance-shaped leaves, purple on the under face, and deep crimson flowers densely packed on erect spikes.</p> <p>Amaranths are recorded as food plants for some Lepidoptera (butterfly and moth) species including the nutmeg moth and various case-bearer moths of the genus Coleophora: C. amaranthella, C. enchorda (feeds exclusively on Amaranthus), C. immortalis (feeds exclusively on Amaranthus), C. lineapulvella and C. versurella (recorded on A. spinosus).</p> <p><strong>Nutritional value</strong></p> <p>Amaranth greens are a common leaf vegetable throughout the tropics and in many warm temperate regions. See Callaloo</p> <p>Cooked amaranth leaves are a good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, and folate; they are also a complementing source of other vitamins such as thiamine, niacin, and riboflavin, plus some dietary minerals including calcium, iron, potassium, zinc, copper, and manganese. Cooked amaranth grains are a complementing source of thiamine, niacin, riboflavin, and folate, and dietary minerals including calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, and manganese - comparable to common grains such as wheat germ, oats and others.</p> <p>Amaranth seeds contain lysine, an essential amino acid, limited in grains or other plant sources.</p> <p>&nbsp;Most fruits and vegetables do not contain a complete set of amino acids, and thus different sources of protein must be used. Amaranth too is limited in some essential amino acids, such as leucine and threonine. Amaranth seeds are therefore a promising complement to common grains such as wheat germ, oats, and corn because these common grains are abundant sources of essential amino acids found to be limited in amaranth.</p> <p>Amaranth may be a promising source of protein to those who are gluten sensitive, because unlike the protein found in grains such as wheat and rye, its protein does not contain gluten. According to a 2007 report, amaranth compares well in nutrient content with gluten-free vegetarian options such as buckwheat, corn, millet, wild rice, oats and quinoa.</p> <p>Several studies have shown that like oats, amaranth seed or oil may be of benefit for those with hypertension and cardiovascular disease; regular consumption reduces blood pressure and cholesterol levels, while improving antioxidant status and some immune parameters.</p> <p>While the active ingredient in oats appears to be water-soluble fiber, amaranth appears to lower cholesterol via its content of plant stanols and squalene.</p> <p>Amaranth remains an active area of scientific research for both human nutritional needs and foraging applications. Over 100 scientific studies suggest a somewhat conflicting picture on possible anti-nutritional and toxic factors in amaranth, more so in some particular strains of amaranth. Lehmann, in a review article, identifies some of these reported anti-nutritional factors in amaranth to be phenolics, saponins, tannins, phytic acid, oxalates, protease inhibitors, nitrates, polyphenols and phytohemagglutinins. Of these, oxalates and nitrates are of more concern when amaranth grain is used in foraging applications. Some studies suggest thermal processing of amaranth, particularly in moist environment, prior to its preparation in food and human consumption may be a promising way to reduce the adverse effects of amaranth's anti-nutritional and toxic factors.</p> <p><strong>Ecology</strong></p> <p>Amaranth weed species have an extended period of germination, rapid growth, and high rates of seed production, and have been causing problems for farmers since the mid-1990s. This is partially due to the reduction in tillage, reduction in herbicidal use and the evolution of herbicidal resistance in several species where herbicides have been applied more often.[35] The following 9 species of Amaranthus are considered invasive and noxious weeds in the U.S and Canada: A. albus, A. blitoides, A. hybridus, A. palmeri, A. powellii, A. retroflexus, A. spinosus, A. tuberculatus, and A. viridis.</p> <p>A new herbicide-resistant strain of Amaranthus palmeri has appeared; it is glyphosate-resistant and so cannot be killed by herbicides using the chemical. Also, this plant can survive in tough conditions.This could be of particular concern to cotton farmers using glyphosate-resistant cotton. The species Amaranthus palmeri (Palmer amaranth) causes the greatest reduction in soybean yields and has the potential to reduce yields by 17-68% in field experiments. Palmer amaranth is among the "top five most troublesome weeds" in the southeast of the United States and has already evolved resistances to dinitroaniline herbicides and acetolactate synthase inhibitors. This makes the proper identification of Amaranthus species at the seedling stage essential for agriculturalists. Proper weed control needs to be applied before the species successfully colonizes in the crop field and causes significant yield reductions.</p> <p><strong>Seed saving</strong></p> <p>There are a multitude of varieties which cross with one another very easily. Some species have been found to cross with one another e.g. Amaranthus caudatus and Amaranthus hypochondriacus. For most types, flowering occurs as the days become shorter.</p> <p>Being wind-pollinated, they will cross with one another if less than 400 metres apart at flowering time. If the seed is to be used for planting, roguing is necessary to remove inferior individuals before they can flower and pollinate better plants.</p> <p>The seed heads mature gradually from bottom to top, requiring harvesters to be selective when choosing plants for seed harvesting. Seed harvest is maximized by shaking the near-mature seed heads into a paper bag or onto a canvas. In large growing areas the heads are cut all at once when most of the seeds are ripe. Once the heads have fully ripened, they tend to drop their seeds, so harvesting is done just before this point.</p> <p>Heads are then dried for a week and threshed with gloved hands or feet on canvas as the chaff is somewhat prickly. Care is required not to lose the seeds when winnowing because the chaff and seeds are of similar size and the seeds are of a light weight. Heaping uncleaned seeds in a bowl and tossing them will concentrate the light debris on the top, and it can then blow away. The process is repeated until only seeds remain.</p> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 77 W (1g)
Amaranth Seeds (Amaranthus) 2.25 - 1
  • -22%

Buckwheat Seeds (Fagopyrum esculentum)

Buckwheat Seeds (Fagopyrum...

Regular price 1,85 € -19% Ár 1,50 € (SKU: VE 75 (3g))
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Buckwheat Seeds (Fagopyrum esculentum)</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 150 (3g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) is a plant cultivated for its grain-like seeds and as a cover crop. To distinguish it from a related species, Fagopyrum tataricum, it is also known as Japanese buckwheat[2] and silverhull buckwheat.</p> <p>Despite the name, buckwheat is not related to wheat, as it is not a grass. Instead, buckwheat is related to sorrel, knotweed, and rhubarb. Because its seeds are eaten and rich in complex carbohydrates, it is referred to as a pseudocereal. The cultivation of buckwheat grain declined sharply in the 20th century with the adoption of nitrogen fertilizer that increased the productivity of other staples.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The name 'buckwheat' or 'beech wheat' comes from its triangular seeds, which resemble the much larger seeds of the beech nut from the beech tree, and the fact that it is used like wheat. The word may be a translation of Middle Dutch boecweite: boec (Modern Dutch beuk), "beech" (see PIE *bhago-) and weite (Mod. Dut. weit), wheat, or may be a native formation on the same model as the Dutch word.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>The wild ancestor of common buckwheat is F. esculentum ssp.ancestrale. F. homotropicum is interfertile with F. esculentum and the wild forms have a common distribution, in Yunnan, a southwestern province of China. The wild ancestor of tartary buckwheat is F. tataricum ssp. potanini.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Common buckwheat was domesticated and first cultivated in inland Southeast Asia, possibly around 6000 BCE, and from there spread to Central Asia and Tibet, and then to the Middle East and Europe. Domestication most likely took place in the western Yunnan region of China.[5] Buckwheat is documented in Europe in Finland by at least 5300 BCE[6] as a first sign of agriculture, and in the Balkans by circa 4000 BCE in the Middle Neolithic. Russian-speakers call buckwheat гречка (grechka) meaning "little Greek", due to its introduction in the seventh century by the Byzantine Greeks; the same is the case in Ukrainian.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The oldest remains found in China so far date to circa 2600 BCE, while buckwheat pollen found in Japan dates from as early as 4000 BCE. It is the world's highest-elevation domesticate, being cultivated in Yunnan on the edge of the Tibetan Plateau or on the plateau itself. Buckwheat was one of the earliest crops introduced by Europeans to North America. Dispersal around the globe was complete by 2006, when a variety developed in Canada was widely planted in China. In India, buckwheat flour is known as kuttu ka atta and is culturally associated with Navratri festival. On the day of this festival, food items made only from buckwheat are consumed.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Buckwheat, a short-season crop, does well on low-fertility or acidic soils, but the soil must be well drained. Too much fertilizer, especially nitrogen, reduces yields. In hot climates it can only be grown by sowing late in the season, so that it blooms in cooler weather. The presence of pollinators greatly increases the yield. The nectar from buckwheat flower makes a dark-colored honey. It is sometimes used as a green manure, as a plant for erosion control, or as wildlife cover and feed.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Agricultural production</strong></p> <p>The plant has a branching root system with one primary root that reaches deeply into the moist soil.[8] Buckwheat has triangular seeds and produces a flower that is usually white, although can also be pink or yellow.[9] Buckwheat branches freely, as opposed to tillering or producing suckers, causing a more complete adaption to its environment than other cereal crops.[8] The seed hull density is less than that of water, making the hull easy to remove.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Buckwheat is raised for grain where a short season is available, either because it is used as a second crop in the season, or because the climate is limiting. Buckwheat can be a reliable cover crop in summer to fit a small slot of warm season. It establishes quickly, which suppresses summer weeds.[10] Buckwheat has a growing period of only 10–12 weeks[11] and it can be grown in high latitude or northern areas.[12] It grows 30 to 50 inches (75 to 125 cm) tall.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Historical data</strong></p> <p>A century ago, the Russian Empire was the world leader in buckwheat production.[13] Growing areas in the Russian Empire were estimated at 6.5 million acres (2,600,000 ha), followed by those of France at 0.9 million acres (360,000 ha).[14] In 1970, the Soviet Union grew an estimated 4.5 million acres (1,800,000 ha) of buckwheat. It remains in 2014 a key cereal.[15] Production in China expanded greatly during the 2000s, to rival Russia's output.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In the northeastern United States, buckwheat was a common crop in the 18th and 19th centuries. Cultivation declined sharply in the 20th century due to the use of nitrogen fertilizer, to which maize and wheat respond strongly. Over 1,000,000 acres (400,000 ha) were harvested in the United States in 1918. By 1954, that had declined to 150,000 acres (61,000 ha), and by 1964, the last year annual production statistics were gathered by USDA, only 50,000 acres (20,000 ha) were grown. However it may benefit from an "explosion in popularity of so-called ancient grains" reported in the years 2009-2014.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><em>Uses</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Food</strong></p> <p>The fruit is an achene, similar to sunflower seed, with a single seed inside a hard outer hull. The starchy endosperm is white and makes up most or all of buckwheat flour. The seed coat is green or tan, which darkens buckwheat flour. The hull is dark brown or black, and some may be included in buckwheat flour as dark specks. The dark flour is known as blé noir (black wheat) in French, along with the name sarrasin (saracen).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Buckwheat noodles have been eaten by people from Tibet and northern China for centuries, as wheat can not be grown in the mountain regions. A special press made of wood is used to press the dough into hot boiling water when making buckwheat noodles. Old presses found in Tibet and Shanxi share the same basic design features. The Japanese and Koreans may have learned the making of buckwheat noodles from them.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In India, on Hindu fasting days (Navaratri, Ekadashi, Janmashtami, Maha Shivaratri etc.), fasting people in northern states of India eat items made of buckwheat flour. Eating cereals such as wheat or rice is prohibited during such fasting days. However, since buckwheat is not a cereal, it is considered acceptable for consumption during Hindu fasting days. While strict Hindus do not even drink water during their fast (observing Nirjal Upwas), others just give up cereals and salt and take a meal prepared from non-cereal ingredients such as buckwheat (kuttu). The preparation of buckwheat flour varies across India. The famous ones are kuttu ki puri (buckwheat pancakes) and kuttu pakoras (potato slices dipped in buckwheat flour and deep-fried in oil). In most of northern and western states, buckwheat flour is called kuttu ka atta.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Buckwheat noodles play a major role in the cuisines of Japan (soba),[40] Korea (naengmyeon, makguksu and memil guksu) and the Valtellina region of Northern Italy (pizzoccheri). Soba noodles are the subject of deep cultural importance in Japan. In Korea, guksu (noodles) were widely made from buckwheat before it was replaced by wheat.[citation needed] The difficulty of making noodles from flour with no gluten has resulted in a traditional art developed around their manufacture by hand.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Buckwheat groats are commonly used in western Asia and eastern Europe. The porridge was common, and is often considered the definitive peasant dish. It is made from roasted groats that are cooked with broth to a texture similar to rice or bulgur. The dish was brought to America by Ukrainian, Russian, and Polish immigrants who called it kasha, and they mixed it with pasta or used it as a filling for cabbage rolls, knishes, and blintzes, hence buckwheat prepared in this fashion is most commonly called kasha in America. Groats were the most widely used form of buckwheat worldwide during the 20th century, eaten primarily in Estonia, Russia, Ukraine, and Poland, called grechka in Ukrainian or Russian. The groats can also be sprouted and then eaten raw or cooked.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Buckwheat pancakes, sometimes raised with yeast, are eaten in several countries. They are known as buckwheat blinis in Russia, galettes in France (savoury crêpes made with buckwheat flour, water, and eggs are associated with Lower Brittany, whilst savoury galettes made without eggs are from Higher Brittany), ployes in Acadia, and boûketes (which are named after the buckwheat plant) in the Wallonia region of Belgium. Similar pancakes were a common food in American pioneer days.[41] They are light and foamy. The buckwheat flour gives them an earthy, mildly mushroom-like taste. In Ukraine, yeast rolls called hrechanyky are made from buckwheat. Buckwheat flour is also used to make Nepali dishes such as dhedo and kachhyamba.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Farina made from groats are used for breakfast food, porridge, and thickening materials in soups, gravies, and dressings. In Korea, buckwheat starch is used to make a jelly called memilmuk. It is also used with wheat, maize (polenta taragna in northern Italy) or rice in bread and pasta] products.</p> <p>Buckwheat is a good honey plant, producing a dark, strong monofloral honey.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><em>Beverages</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Beer</strong></p> <p>In recent years, buckwheat has been used as a substitute for other grains in gluten-free beer. Although it is not an actual cereal (being a pseudocereal), buckwheat can be used in the same way as barley to produce a malt that can form the basis of a mash that will brew a beer without gliadin or hordein (together gluten) and therefore can be suitable for coeliacs or others sensitive to certain glycoproteins.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Whisky</strong></p> <p><strong>Shōchū</strong></p> <p>Buckwheat shōchū is a Japanese distilled beverage produced since the 16th Century. The taste is milder than barley shōchū.</p> <p><strong>Tea</strong></p> <p><strong>Upholstery filling</strong></p> <p>Buckwheat hulls are used as filling for a variety of upholstered goods, including pillows and zafu. The hulls are durable and do not conduct or reflect heat as much as synthetic fills. They are sometimes marketed as an alternative natural fill to feathers for those with allergies. However, medical studies to measure the health effects of buckwheat hull pillows manufactured with unprocessed and uncleaned hulls, concluded such buckwheat pillows do contain higher levels of a potential allergen that may trigger asthma in susceptible individuals than do new synthetic-filled pillows.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Biological control</strong></p> <p>Buckwheat is currently being studied and used as a pollen and nectar source to increase natural predator numbers to control crop pests in New Zealand.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Cultural</strong></p> <p>The buckwheat plant is celebrated in Kingwood, West Virginia, at the Preston County Buckwheat Festival, where people can participate in swine-, cattle-, and sheep-judging contests, vegetable contests, and craft fairs. The area fire departments also play an important role in the series of parades that occur there. Each year, a King Buckwheat and Queen Ceres are elected. Also, many rides are available, and homemade, homegrown buckwheat cakes and sausage are served.</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 75 (3g)
Buckwheat Seeds (Fagopyrum esculentum)
  • -19%

Chokeberry Seeds (Aronia...

Chokeberry Seeds (Aronia...

Regular price 2,15 € -33% Ár 1,44 € (SKU: V 29)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Chokeberry Seeds (Aronia melanocarpa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 250-400 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Aronia melanocarpa is an extraordinary medicine plant that has been developed in Poland. It has an incredible array of health qualities. Known as Chokeberry, the native Americans used it to prepare pemmican (dried meat). It has a higher concentration of vitamin C than blackcurrants, but it also contains a host of other valuable substances, especially antioxidants, polyphenols, bioflavonoids, and tannins. It is a very hardy and vigorous plant and can survive most conditions.</p> <div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">soak in water for 8- 12 hours&nbsp;</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1 months in moist sowing mix at 2-5 ° C refrigerator</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2-8 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;</em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> <div> <div style="text-align: center;">Genus: Aronia</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Species: melanocarpa</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Common Name: Black Chokeberry</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Other Name: Chokeberry, Gueles Noires</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Pre-treatment: required</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Zone Hardiness Cold: 3</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Zone Hardiness warm: 8</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Plant Type: Small Shrub</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Growth rate: medium</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Vegetation type: deciduous</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Leaf /Flower color: Green/White</div> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 29 (1g)
Chokeberry Seeds (Aronia melanocarpa)
  • -33%

Common Flax Seed or Linseed

Common Flax Seeds (Linum...

Regular price 1,35 € -32% Ár 0,92 € (SKU: VE 215)
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5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong>Common Flax Seeds (Linum usitatissimum)</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 120 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Flax (also known as common flax or linseed), with the binomial name Linum usitatissimum, is a member of the genus Linum in the family Linaceae. It is a food and fiber crop that is grown in cooler regions of the world. In addition to referring to the plant itself, the word "flax" may refer to the unspun fibers of the flax plant. The plant species is known only as a cultivated plant, and appears to have been domesticated just once from the wild species Linum bienne, called pale flax.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>Several other species in the genus Linum are similar in appearance to Linum usitatissimum, cultivated flax, including some that have similar blue flowers, and others with white, yellow, or red flowers. Some of these are perennial plants, unlike L. usitatissimum, which is an annual plant.</p> <p>Cultivated flax plants grow to 1.2 m (3 ft 11 in) tall, with slender stems. The leaves are glaucous green, slender lanceolate, 20–40 mm long and 3 mm broad.</p> <p>The flowers are pure pale blue, 15–25 mm diameter, with five petals. The fruit is a round, dry capsule 5–9 mm diameter, containing several glossy brown seeds shaped like an apple pip, 4–7 mm long.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>Flax is grown for its oil, used as a nutritional supplement, and as an ingredient in many wood-finishing products. Flax is also grown as an ornamental plant in gardens. Flax fibers are used to make linen. The Latin species name usitatissimum means most useful.</p> <p>Flax fibres are taken from the stem of the plant and are two to three times as strong as those of cotton. As well, flax fibers are naturally smooth and straight. Europe and North America depended on flax for vegetable-based cloth until the nineteenth century, when cotton overtook flax as the most common plant used for making rag-based paper. Flax is grown on the Canadian Prairies for linseed oil, which is used as a drying oil in paints and varnish and in products such as linoleum and printing inks.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>The earliest evidence of humans using wild flax as a textile comes from the present day Republic of Georgia, where spun, dyed, and knotted wild flax fibers were found in Dzudzuana Cave and dated to the Upper Paleolithic, 30,000 years ago. Flax was first domesticated in the Fertile Crescent region. There is evidence of a domesticated oil-seed flax with increased seed size by 9,000 years ago from Tell Ramad in Syria. Use of the crop steadily spread, reaching places as far as Switzerland and Germany by 5,000 years ago (3,000 BCE). In China and India domesticated flax was cultivated by at least 5,000 years ago (3,000 BCE).</p> <p>Flax was extensively cultivated in ancient Egypt, where temple walls had paintings of flowering flax and mummies were entombed in linen. Egyptian priests only wore linen, as flax was considered a symbol of purity. Phoenicians traded Egyptian linen throughout the Mediterranean, and the Romans used it for their sails. As the Roman Empire declined, so did flax production, but Charlemagne revived the crop in the 8th century CE with laws designed to publicize the hygiene of linen textiles and the health of linseed oil. Eventually, Flanders became the major center of the linen industry in the European Middle Ages. In North America, flax was introduced by the colonists and it flourished there. But by the early 20th century cheap cotton and rising farm wages had caused production of flax to become concentrated in northern Russia, which came to provide 90% of the world's output. Since then flax has lost its importance as a commercial crop, due to the easy availability of more durable fibers.</p> <p><strong>Flax seeds</strong></p> <p>Flax seeds come in two basic varieties: 1. brown; and 2. yellow or golden (also known as golden linseeds). Most types have similar nutritional characteristics and equal numbers of short-chain omega-3 fatty acids. The exception is a type of yellow flax called solin (trade name Linola), which has a completely different oil profile and is very low in omega-3 FAs. Flax seeds produce a vegetable oil known as flaxseed oil or linseed oil, which is one of the oldest commercial oils. It is an edible oil obtained by expeller pressing, sometimes followed by solvent extraction. Solvent-processed flax seed oil has been used for many centuries as a drying oil in painting and varnishing.</p> <p>Although brown flax can be consumed as readily as yellow, and has been for thousands of years, its better-known uses are in paints, for fiber, and for cattle feed.</p> <p><strong>Culinary</strong></p> <p>One hundred grams of ground flax seed supplies about 450 calories, 41 grams of fat, 28 grams of fiber, and 20 grams of protein.</p> <p>Flax seed sprouts are edible, with a slightly spicy flavor. Excessive consumption of flax seeds with inadequate water can cause bowel obstruction. In northern India, flaxseed, called (tisi or alsi), is traditionally roasted, powdered, and eaten with boiled rice, a little water, and a little salt.</p> <p>Whole flax seeds are chemically stable, but ground flaxseed can go rancid at room temperature in as little as one week, although there is contrary evidence. Refrigeration and storage in sealed containers will keep ground flax from becoming rancid for a longer period; under conditions similar to those found in commercial bakeries, trained sensory panelists could not detect differences between bread made with freshly ground flax and bread made with milled flax stored for four months at room temperature. Milled flax is stable to oxidation when stored for nine months at room temperature if packed immediately without exposure to air and light and for 20 months at ambient temperatures under warehouse conditions.</p> <p>Three natural phenolic glucosides, secoisolariciresinol diglucoside, p-coumaric acid glucoside and ferulic acid glucoside, can be found in commercial breads containing flaxseed.</p> <p><strong>Medicinal</strong></p> <p>Linum usitatissimum seeds are mentioned in the Ayurveda and have been used in the traditional Austrian medicine internally (directly soaked or as tea) and externally (as compresses or oil extracts) for treatment of disorders of the respiratory tract, eyes, infections, cold, flu, fever, rheumatism and gout.</p> <p><strong>Nutrients and clinical research</strong></p> <p>Flax seeds contain high levels of dietary fiber as well as lignans, an abundance of micronutrients and omega-3 fatty acids (table). Studies have shown that flax seeds may lower cholesterol levels, although with differing results depending on the sex of the consumer. One study found results were better for women whereas a later study found benefits only for men. Initial studies suggest that flax seeds taken in the diet may benefit individuals with certain types of breast&nbsp; and prostate cancers.</p> <p>A study done at Duke University suggests that flaxseed may stunt the growth of prostate tumors, although a meta-analysis found the evidence on this point to be inconclusive. Flax may also lessen the severity of diabetes by stabilizing blood-sugar levels. There is some support for the use of flax seed as a laxative due to its dietary fiber content &nbsp;though excessive consumption without liquid can result in intestinal blockage. Consuming large amounts of flax seed may impair the effectiveness of certain oral medications, due to its fiber content,. Flaxseed has shown to lower the concentration of pro-inflammatory oxylipins in humans &nbsp;as well as lower blood pressure in patients with peripheral arterial disease and high blood pressure.</p> <p>Flax seeds contain 23% 18:3 Omega-3 fatty acids (mostly ALA) and 6% 18:2 Omega-6 fatty acids. Flaxseed oil contains 53% 18:3 Omega-3 fatty acids (mostly ALA) and 13% 18:2 Omega-6 fatty acids.</p> <p>One of the main components of flax is lignan, which has plant estrogen as well as antioxidants (flax contains up to 800 times more lignans than other plant foods contain).</p> <p><strong>Toxicity</strong></p> <p>Flaxseed oil has repeatedly been demonstrated to be non-toxic and is generally recognized as safe for human consumption. The cyanogenic glycoside linamarin occurs at low levels in the seed and cannot be detected in flaxseed oil. Cyanogenic glycosides are common food substances and are particularly toxic when consumed in larger quantities in staple foods like cassava. Flaxseed is not a staple food and the cyanogenic glycosides do not present a feasible risk in flaxseed product consumption.</p> <p><strong>Flax fibers</strong></p> <p>Flax fiber is extracted from the bast or skin of the stem of the flax plant. Flax fiber is soft, lustrous and flexible; bundles of fiber have the appearance of blonde hair, hence the description "flaxen". It is stronger than cotton fiber but less elastic. The best grades are used for linen fabrics such as damasks, lace and sheeting. Coarser grades are used for the manufacturing of twine and rope, and historically for canvas and webbing equipment. Flax fiber is a raw material used in the high-quality paper industry for the use of printed banknotes and rolling paper for cigarettes and tea bags. Flax mills for spinning flaxen yarn were invented by John Kendrew and Thomas Porthouse of Darlington in 1787. New methods of processing flax and the rising price of cotton have led to renewed interest in the use of flax as an industrial fiber.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>The soils most suitable for flax, besides the alluvial kind, are deep loams, and containing a large proportion of organic matter. Flax is often found growing just above the waterline in cranberry bogs. Heavy clays are unsuitable, as are soils of a gravelly or dry sandy nature. Farming flax requires few fertilizers or pesticides. Within eight weeks of sowing, the plant will reach 10–15 cm in height and will grow several centimeters per day under its optimal growth conditions, reaching 70–80 cm within fifteen days.</p> <p><strong><em>Harvesting</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Maturation</strong></p> <p>Flax is harvested for fiber production after approximately 100 days, or a month after the plant flowers and two weeks after the seed capsules form. The base of the plant will begin to turn yellow. If the plant is still green, the seed will not be useful, and the fiber will be underdeveloped. The fiber degrades once the plant is brown.</p> <p><strong>Methods</strong></p> <p>There are two ways to harvest flax, one involving mechanized equipment (combines), and a second method, more manual and targeted towards maximizing the fiber length.</p> <p><strong>Mechanical</strong></p> <p>The mature plant is cut with mowing equipment, similar to hay harvesting, and raked into windrows. When dried sufficiently, a combine then harvests the seeds similar to wheat or oat harvesting. The amount of weeds in the straw affects its marketability, and this coupled with market prices determined whether the farmer chose to harvest the flax straw. If the flax was not harvested, it was typically burned, since the straw stalk is quite tough and decomposes slowly (i.e., not in a single season), and still being somewhat in a windrow from the harvesting process, the straw would often clog up tillage and planting equipment. It was common, in the flax growing regions of western Minnesota, to see the harvested flax straw (square) bale stacks start appearing every July, the size of some stacks being estimated at 10-15 yards wide by 50 or more yards long, and as tall as a two-story house</p> <p><strong>Manual</strong></p> <p>The mature plant is pulled up with the roots (not cut), so as to maximize the fiber length. After this, the flax is allowed to dry, the seeds are removed, and is then retted. Dependent upon climatic conditions, characteristics of the sown flax and fields, the flax remains on the ground between two weeks and two months for retting. As a result of alternating rain and the sun, an enzymatic action degrades the pectins which bind fibers to the straw. The farmers turn over the straw during retting to evenly rett the stalks. When the straw is retted and sufficiently dry, it is rolled up. It will then be stored by farmers before scutching to extract fibers.</p> <p>Flax grown for seed is allowed to mature until the seed capsules are yellow and just starting to split; it is then harvested by combine harvester and dried to extract the seed.</p> <p><strong>Threshing flax</strong></p> <p>Threshing is the process of removing the seeds from the rest of the plant. As noted above in the Mechanical section, the threshing could be done in the field by a machine, or in another process, a description of which follows:</p> <p>The process is divided into two parts: the first part is intended for the farmer, or flax-grower, to bring the flax into a fit state for general or common purposes. This is performed by three machines: one for threshing out the seed, one for breaking and separating the straw (stem) from the fiber, and one for further separating the broken straw and matter from the fiber. In some cases the farmers thrash out the seed in their own mill and therefore, in such cases, the first machine will be unnecessary.</p> <p>The second part of the process is intended for the manufacturer to bring the flax into a state for the very finest purposes, such as lace, cambric, damask, and very fine linen. This second part is performed by the refining machine only.</p> <p>The threshing process would be conducted as follows:</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Take the flax in small bundles, as it comes from the field or stack, and holding it in the left hand, put the seed end between the threshing machine and the bed or block against which the machine is to strike; then take the handle of the machine in the right hand, and move the machine backward and forward, to strike on the flax, until the seed is all threshed out.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Take the flax in small handfuls in the left hand, spread it flat between the third and little finger, with the seed end downwards, and the root-end above, as near the hand as possible.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Put the handful between the beater of the breaking machine, and beat it gently till the three or four inches, which have been under the operation of the machine, appear to be soft.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Remove the flax a little higher in the hand, so as to let the soft part of the flax rest upon the little finger, and continue to beat it till all is soft, and the wood is separated from the fiber, keeping the left hand close to the block and the flax as flat upon the block as possible.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The other end of the flax is then to be turned, and the end which has been beaten is to be wrapped round the little finger, the root end flat, and beaten in the machine till the wood is separated, exactly in the same way as the other end was beaten.</p> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 215 (1g)
Common Flax Seed or Linseed
  • -32%



Datterino - Datterini...

Datterino - Datterini...

Regular price 2,45 € -22% Ár 1,91 € (SKU: VT 3 D)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Datterino - Datterini Cherry Tomato Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Datterini is a super productive tomato variety native to Italy from the island of Sicily, a healthy variety, easily grown. Clusters with fruits of 15-20 gr weight on average. The fruits are sweet, mushy and firm, the skin of the fruit is very thin.</p> <p>Datterini tomatoes are by far the sweetest tomatoes and have a lovely inviting aroma. Their elongated shape holds fewer seeds than other varieties, and they also boast a thicker skin with more flesh.</p> <p>Excellent resistance to cracking and apical rot, the fruits can stay ripe for a long time on the plants without being damaged. The variety is resistant to many diseases that attack tomatoes</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VT 3 D (10 S)
Datterino - Datterini Cherry Tomato Seeds
  • -22%


Édes paprika magokat aranyérem

Édes paprika magokat aranyérem

Regular price 1,95 € -14% Ár 1,68 € (SKU: VE 206 (1g))
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Édes paprika magokat aranyérem</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;"><strong>A 120 (1 g) mag csomagjának ára.</strong></span></h2> Közepesen korai szerbiai fajta szarvpaprika típusú, szántóföldi termelésre és üvegházakban. A gyümölcsök élénkpirosak, átlagos súlyuk 150-200 g, hossza 18-22 cm. A gyümölcs húsa nagyon lédús és édes, ezért szívesen használják salátákhoz, grillekhez, főtt ételekhez ...<br><br>Alkalmas friss piaci és ipari feldolgozásra. <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 206 (1g)
Édes paprika magokat aranyérem
  • -14%
  • Új

Fortal yellow french bean seeds  - 3

Fortal yellow french bean...

Regular price 1,25 € -18% Ár 1,03 € (SKU: VE 50 F (4g))
Offer ends in:
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Fortal french bean seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 20 (4g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Fortal is an early low bush bean with light yellow round pods, very high yielding with light yellow pods of average length 13-14 cm and white seeds. The plant is very strong, up to 50 cm high and very disease tolerant. The bean pods ripening in 45-55 days.</p> <p>Excellent variety for fresh use, salads, etc.</p> <p>It is mainly intended for fresh consumption, but it can very well be frozen and stored for winter use.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 50 F (4g)
Fortal yellow french bean seeds  - 3
  • -18%

Főzeléklencse magok (Lens...

Főzeléklencse magok (Lens...

Regular price 1,85 € -25% Ár 1,39 € (SKU: VE 82 Y (2.5g))
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Főzeléklencse magok (Lens culinaris)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Ár csomag 100 (2.5g) mag.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>A </span><b>főzeléklencse</b><span> </span><i>(Lens culinaris)</i><span> egyik legrégebbi kultúrnövényünk, </span>Közép-Európában<span> már a </span>kőkorszak<span> idején termesztették. </span>Ázsia<span> </span>hegyvidékeiről<span> terjedt el. A </span>faj<span> a </span>lencse<span> </span><i>(Lens)</i><span> </span>növénynemzetségbe<span> és a </span>pillangósvirágúak<span> </span><i>(Fabaceae)</i><span> </span>családjába<span> tartozik. A legnagyobb lencsetermelő országok: </span>Kanada<span>, </span>India<span> és </span>Ausztrália<span>.</span><sup id="cite_ref-1" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>Európának<span> főleg a </span>déli<span>, délkeleti részein, főleg a </span>Földközi-tenger<span> mentén fekvő </span>országokban<span> termesztik. Hazánkban vetésterülete csekély.</span></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Növénytani_jellemzői">Növénytani jellemzői</span></h2> <p>A<span> </span><b>lencse</b><span> </span>(<i>Lens culinaris</i><span> </span>Medik.)<span> </span>morfológiailag<span> </span>nagyon hasonlít a<span> </span>bükkönyfélékhez, amelyekkel egyébként könnyen korcsosodik (Lencse-bükköny).</p> <p>Egyéves,<span> </span>lágy szárú, önbeporzó.<span> </span>Gyökérzete<span> </span>40–60 cm mélyre hatol a<span> </span>talajba. A nitrogéngyűjtő<span> </span>baktériumok<span> </span>gyökérgumói<span> </span>oldalgyökérzetén fejlődnek. Szárrendszere vékony, 35–50 cm magas, 2-3 élű. Levélzete párosan szárnyasan összetett, a felső levelek rendszerint<span> </span>kacsban<span> </span>végződnek. Az egész növény a hüvely kivételével pelyhesen szőrözött.<span> </span>Virágzata<span> </span>kevés virágú fürt. A<span> </span>párta<span> </span>színe lila vagy fehérlő (ez értékesebb). Május végétől július elejéig virágzik.<span> </span>Termése<span> </span>kopasz, majd megbarnuló trapéz alakú kis hüvely. Magva lapított, kerek, zöldessárga vagy barnás színű.</p> <h2><span id=".C3.89lett.C3.A9nyez.C5.91k_ir.C3.A1nti_ig.C3.A9nye"></span><span class="mw-headline" id="Élettényezők_iránti_igénye">Élettényezők iránti igénye</span></h2> <p>Kedveli a napsütést,<span> </span>hosszú nappalos növény, legjobban díszlik a mérsékelten meleg és nem szélsőségesen száraz vidékeken. A késői tavaszi fagyokkal szemben kevésbé érzékeny, ezért március első felében vethető. Kívánja ugyan a mérsékelt<span> </span>csapadékot, tartós esőzések után azonban érzékenyebb a betegségekre. A kis magvúak a száraz körülményeket jól bírják. A lazább szerkezetű jó táperejű talajokat kedveli, de sekély rétegű, termesztésre alkalmas talajon is jól díszlik, istállótrágyát nem igényel. A<span> </span>foszfor- és a<span> </span>káliumtrágyázást<span> </span>jobban meghálálja, mint a többi hüvelyes.</p> <h2><span id="T.C3.ADpusai"></span><span class="mw-headline" id="Típusai">Típusai</span></h2> <p>A mag nagysága alapján három változata van: nagymagvú, közepes magvú és kis magvú lencse. A kismagvú lencsék ezermagtömege 25-30 g, a magvak átmérője 4–5 mm-nél kisebb. Színük szürkés-zöld, vagy zöldes-sárga. Kiváló ízűek, könnyen fővők, vékony héjúak. Biztosan és bőven teremnek, korai érésükkel a<span> </span>zsizsikfertőzést<span> </span>megelőzik. A legtöbb<span> </span>tájfajtánk<span> </span>- 'Kalocsai', 'Nagylétai, 'Baranyai', 'Francia' - ide tartozik. Vízfelvevő képességük jó, ezért megfőzve csaknem olyan nagyok, mint a nagy magvúak. A közepes nagyságú lencsék<span> </span>ezermagtömege<span> </span>30-35 g, magátmérője 4–6 mm. Színük többnyire sárgás-zöld. A nagymagvú lencsék<span> </span>ezermagtömege<span> </span>50 g-nál több, a magvak<span> </span>átmérője<span> </span>6 mm-nél nagyobb. Színük a fajtára jellemzően eltérő. Hazai fogyasztásra ezek a legkedveltebb lencsék.</p> <h2><span id="Termeszt.C3.A9se"></span><span class="mw-headline" id="Termesztése">Termesztése</span></h2> <p>Főnövényként termesztik, mivel a területet március elejétől július közepéig veszi igénybe. Előnövénye valamennyi trágyázott kapásnövény, utónövényeként a legtöbb<span> </span>zöldségnövény<span> </span>szépen díszlik. Talaj-előkészítése az őszi ásás vagy szántás. Helyrevetését március legelején végezzük 3–6 cm mélyen. Tenyészterülete 24–30 cm (sortávolság) x 3–5 cm (tőtávolság).</p> <p>Öntözést<span> </span>nem igényel. Júliusban történik a betakarítása, amikor az alsó hüvelyek sárgásbarna színűek és bennük a<span> </span>mag<span> </span>kemény. Teljes éréskor a<span> </span>mag<span> </span>könnyen pereg. Kora reggel, általában kézzel gyűjtik, csomókban szárítják, majd száraz helyen kiverik. Kedvezőtlen - csapadékos - időben egyenetlenül érik a lencse, ezért az érés elősegítése érdekében a lencsét deszikkálni kell. A permetezés a deszikálószertől függően a betakarítás előtt 5-14 nappal végezhető. Az elcsépelt magot még tisztítani és osztályozni kell, és csak azután tárolható. A lencseszalmát is be kell takarítani, ami a magtermés 1-1,5-szerese és kitűnő takarmány, ha nem tartalmaz növényvédőszer-maradványt.</p> <h2><span id="K.C3.A1rtev.C5.91k.2C_betegs.C3.A9gek"></span><span class="mw-headline" id="Kártevők,_betegségek">Kártevők, betegségek</span></h2> <p>A lencse káros<span> </span>gyomnövényei<span> </span>a<span> </span>bükkönyfélék, az<span> </span>apró szulák<span> </span><i>(Convolvulus arvensis)</i><span> </span>és a<span> </span>mogyorós lednek. Termést csökkentő gyomok a<span> </span>libatopfélék<span> </span>és a<span> </span>porcsin, továbbá az<span> </span>egyszikű<span> </span>gyomok. A gyökérrothadás megelőzhető jó minőségű alapozó talaj-előkészítéssel és a talaj jó megválasztásával. A<span> </span>peronoszpóra<span> </span>ellen<span> </span>gombaölőszer<span> </span>használatán kívül 4 éves vetésváltással védekezhetünk. Károsíthatja a<span> </span>lisztharmat<span> </span>és a<span> </span>szürkepenész. Kártevői közül a<span> </span>gabonaszipolyok<span> </span>jó alapozó talaj-előkészítéssel,<span> </span>lencsebimbó-gubacsszúnyog<span> </span>vetésváltással, megjelenése esetén a következő évben a tábla helyétől távoli táblába való vetéssel védekezhetünk. Károsítják még a<span> </span>levéltetvek, a barkók és a<span> </span>lencse zsizsik.</p> <h2><span id="Feldolgoz.C3.A1sa.2C_hasznos.C3.ADt.C3.A1sa"></span><span class="mw-headline" id="Feldolgozása,_hasznosítása">Feldolgozása, hasznosítása</span></h2> <p>Házi, haszon-, iskola-, bemutató, hobbikiskertben ágyásnak, üde színfoltnak ültethető. Előtérnövénynek is alkalmas. Kötészetben is használható.</p> <h2><span id=".C3.89tkez.C3.A9si_jelent.C5.91s.C3.A9ge"></span><span class="mw-headline" id="Étkezési_jelentősége">Étkezési jelentősége</span></h2> <p>Étrendi hatása sokkal jobb a<span> </span>borsóénál<span> </span>és a<span> </span>babénál, 23% könnyen emészthető<span> </span>fehérjét, szabad<span> </span>aminosavakat, közte sok (1-2%)<span> </span>lizint<span> </span>tartalmaz.<span> </span>Keményítőértéke<span> </span>pedig 720 g/kg.<span> </span>Szénhidrát-, nyerszsír-, továbbá<span> </span>B1-,<span> </span>B2-vitamin,<span> </span>inozittartalma<span> </span>is jelentős. Polyvája, törekje jó<span> </span>takarmány. A lencse a<span> </span>pillangós<span> </span>vetésforgó<span> </span>fontos tagja is.</p> <p>A<span> </span><b>főzeléklencsét</b><span> </span>vagy<span> </span><b>lencsét</b><span> </span>sok országban (például<span> </span>Anglia,<span> </span>India) megőrlik és<span> </span>lisztet<span> </span>készítenek belőle,<span> </span>ételek<span> </span>alkotórészeként is felhasználják. Lepényszerű, sült<span> </span>burgonya<span> </span>(crisp) állagú állapota is ismert, ami indiai éttermekben előétel, amelyből törve különböző édes mártásokból lehet mártogatni.<span> </span>Magyarországon<span> </span>levesként<span> </span>illetve<span> </span>főzelékként<span> </span>elkészítve fogyasztják.</p> <h2><span id="Kult.C3.BAra"></span><span class="mw-headline" id="Kultúra">Kultúra</span></h2> <p>A<span> </span>Bibliában<span> </span>az<span> </span>Ószövetségben,<span> </span>Mózes első könyvében<span> </span>olvashatjuk, hogy<span> </span>Ézsau<span> </span>eladta elsőszülöttségi jogát<span> </span>Jákobnak<span> </span>egy tál lencséért (1Mózes 25:27-34).</p> </body> </html>
VE 82 Y (2.5g)
Főzeléklencse magok (Lens culinaris)
  • -25%

Fruit and Vegetable Mould, Heart Shape, Change Fruits Shape

Fruit and Vegetable Mould,...

Regular price 15,00 € -13% Ár 13,05 € (SKU: M Heart)
Offer ends in:
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Fruit and Vegetable Mould, Heart Shape, Change Fruits Shape</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price is for 1 Mold.</strong></span></h3> <div>The Heart Shape mold is made of PC plastic material, it is a safe, fully transparent and non-toxin material, are completely friendly to the nature and human health, it is very tough and strong, many years' use is guaranteed, and it has been tested well works the past few years.</div> <div> </div> <h2><strong>How to shape the cucumber, tomato or any other vegetable into Heart Shape :</strong></h2> <div><strong>1.</strong> Get the molds ,and choose a proper cucumber for the mold , it can be used on shorter cucumber or just about the size of the mold. it is important.</div> <div> </div> <div><strong>2.</strong> Put the molds on the cucumber while it is maller than the molds , you shall connect 2 part of the molds tightly with screws .</div> <div> </div> <div><strong>3.</strong> After the above things done , what you need to do is await, and take the mold off when u think it is the right time of ripen, it is kind if easy to get the shape . </div> <div> </div> <div>you will be amazed by what you have done, and have fun with it .</div>
M Heart
Fruit and Vegetable Mould, Heart Shape, Change Fruits Shape
  • -13%

Giant White fig seeds from...

Giant White fig seeds from...

Regular price 1,95 € -24% Ár 1,48 € (SKU: V 19 GWF)
Offer ends in:
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant White fig seeds from Dalmatia</strong></h2><h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" data-mce-style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2><p>We personally picked and brought this fig from Herzegovina for the first time on August 10.08.2020. As you can see from our pictures, fruits are huge and have an average weight of 100 - 130 grams.</p><p>The white fig is an old Italian variety known as Fico ottato (dottato). It has lush growth and a high pyramidal crown. The white fig is a variety of very high yields.</p><p>The white fig is two-leaved, it is a very old variety of fig. The fruit is very large. The flesh is sweet and the color of the fruit is yellow-green. It is a lush tree, bears abundant fruit, and blooms twice.</p><p>The white fig ripens in late July and early September, and the ripening period is short (one month).</p><p>Spring bloom from degenerated female flowers, fleshy and grows to normal size, but never edible. The summer inflorescence develops an edible fruit, elongated by a short neck, and can reach a weight of over 150 g.</p><p>The fruits are of good quality, suitable for transport and consumption in fresh condition and drying. The flesh is light white under the skin and pale honey on the inside, very juicy, pleasantly sweet.</p><p>White fig very widespread in the Neretva valley in southern and central Dalmatia.</p><p>The fruits have great dietary and nutritional value, and medicinal for stomach diseases, anemia, etc.</p><p>White fig is consumed fresh, dry, like jam, sweet, compote, jelly, and juice.</p><p>Due to its nutritional composition and medicinal properties, the fig tree rises above many types of fruit. We all already know that it is proven to erase wrinkles and rejuvenate, and we also know that the fig or fig leaf used to be the first clothing a long time ago.</p><p>Fig fruits are very nutritious and of high dietary therapeutic value. They are especially in demand in the fresh state during the tourist season, but also processed differently during the year, mostly as dried fruits (dried figs).</p>
V 19 GWF (20 S)
Giant White fig seeds from Dalmatia
  • -24%


Goldoral Yellow Beans Seeds  - 2

Goldoral Yellow Beans Seeds

Regular price 1,25 € -13% Ár 1,09 € (SKU: VE 53 G)
Offer ends in:
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Goldoral Yellow Beans Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 20 (8,5g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>A very early variety of low bush beans in romano type, with flat pods, pods are bright yellow in color, average length 14-16 cm. The plant is strong and gives excellent yield, the variety is very disease tolerant.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Goldoral variety is excellent for fresh use (in salads) and for cooking. It can be frozen in the freezer and will not lose its flavor.&nbsp;</p> <p>Great appearance, yield, and taste. The variety is suitable for mechanical harvesting.</p> <p>It is sown from early spring to mid-summer. The vegetation length is 40-50 days after sprouting seeds.</p> <h3><strong>How to Grow Beans from Seed</strong></h3> <p>Climbing French beans tend to be smaller than runner beans and have more tender pods. The immature pods are eaten whole, semi-mature pods are shelled and the beans inside eaten, mature pods can also be shelled and the beans are eaten fresh or dried and stored like kidney beans. Climbing varieties can reach up to 2.5m in height and are best grown-up canes.</p> <p>Dwarf French beans produce the same type of beans and pods as climbing beans and are used in the same way, but the plants are more compact generally about 45cm tall. Dwarf beans are good for growing in containers.</p> <p>Runner beans have a more pronounced flavor than French beans. The plants are more prolific, some can grow up to 2.5m tall, and the beans produced are very long and flat.</p> <p>Dwarf runner beans produce beans like standard runner beans on very compact plants. Some varieties of dwarf runner beans are can be quite ornamental in containers.</p> <p>Quintessentially British, runner beans are one of the easiest of all vegetables to grow. To many people, both summer and the vegetable plot would be incomplete without them.</p> <p>Bean seeds are large and easy to sow. They can be started indoors or planted directly into the vegetable garden but need warm conditions to germinate.</p> <p>Sowing bean seeds indoors gives a faster and more reliable germination rate, particularly for runner beans. At the end of April through to early May sow a single bean seed, 4cm or 1 and a half inches deep, in a 3 inch pot filled with multi-purpose compost.</p> <p>Seedlings will be ready to plant out after about three weeks. Before planting out, put them in a cold frame or a cool porch for a few days so that they can acclimatise to the conditions outside.</p> <p>Alternatively, climbing, runner and dwarf beans can be grown from seed sown directly in the soil between the second half of May and the middle of June.</p> <p>Before sowing outdoors you will need to construct a support for your beans, wigwams or a double row of inward sloping 8ft canes are popular support options for runners and climbing beans.</p> <p>Sow beans outdoors from mid-May until July, 5cm deep, two seeds per support cane, spaced 15cm (6in) apart. After germination remove the smaller and less robust of the two young plants thinning to one plant per cane.</p> <p>As they grow, ensure the plants continue to twine around their canes and water well. Runner beans are particularly thirsty. Picking beans regularly and often will encourage a longer cropping period.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 53 G (8.5g)
Goldoral Yellow Beans Seeds  - 2
  • -13%

Lentil Seeds (Lens culinaris) 1.85 - 1

Lentil Seeds (Lens culinaris)

Regular price 1,85 € -25% Ár 1,39 € (SKU: VE 84 B (5g))
Offer ends in:
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Lentil Seeds (Lens culinaris)</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 70 (5g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The lentil (Lens culinaris) is an edible pulse. It is a bushy annual plant of the legume family, grown for its lens-shaped seeds. It is about 40 cm (16 in) tall, and the seeds grow in pods, usually with two seeds in each.</p> <p>Lentils have been part of the human diet since the aceramic (before pottery) Neolithic times, being one of the first crops domesticated in the Near East. Archeological evidence shows they were eaten 9,500 to 13,000 years ago.</p> <p>Lentil colors range from yellow to red-orange to green, brown and black. Lentils also vary in size, and are sold in many forms, with or without the skins, whole or split.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The seeds require a cooking time of 10 to 40 minutes, depending on the variety—shorter for small varieties with the husk removed, such as the common red lentil — and have a distinctive, earthy flavor. Lentil recipes[2] are used throughout South Asia, the Mediterranean regions and West Asia. They are frequently combined with rice, which has a similar cooking time. A lentil and rice dish is referred to in western Asia as mujaddara or mejadra. Rice and lentils are also cooked together in khichdi, a popular dish in the Indian subcontinent (India and Pakistan); a similar dish, kushari, made in Egypt, is considered one of two national dishes. Lentils are used to prepare an inexpensive and nutritious soup all over Europe and North and South America, sometimes combined with some form of chicken or pork.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dried lentils can also be sprouted by soaking in water for one day and keeping moist for several days, which changes their nutrition profile.</p> <p>Lentils with husk remain whole with moderate cooking; lentils without husk tend to disintegrate into a thick purée, which leads to quite different dishes.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Nutritional value and health benefits</strong></p> <p>With about 30% of their calories from protein, lentils have the third-highest level of protein, by weight, of any legume or nut, after soybeans and hemp.[4] Proteins include the essential amino acids isoleucine and lysine, and lentils are an essential source of inexpensive protein in many parts of the world, especially in West Asia and the Indian subcontinent, which have large vegetarian populations. Lentils are deficient in two essential amino acids, methionine and cysteine. However, sprouted lentils contain sufficient levels of all essential amino acids, including methionine and cysteine.</p> <p>Lentils also contain dietary fiber, folate, vitamin B1, and minerals. Red (or pink) lentils contain a lower concentration of fiber than green lentils (11% rather than 31%).[8] Health magazine has selected lentils as one of the five healthiest foods.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The low levels of Readily Digestible Starch (RDS) 5%, and high levels of Slowly Digested Starch (SDS) 30%, make lentils of great interest to people with diabetes. The remaining 65% of the starch is a resistant starch that is classified RS1, being a high quality resistant starch, which is 32% amylose.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Lentils also have some anti-nutritional factors, such as trypsin inhibitors and relatively high phytate content. Trypsin is an enzyme involved in digestion, and phytates reduce the bio-availability of dietary minerals. &nbsp;The phytates can be reduced by soaking the lentils in warm water overnight.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Lentils are a good source of iron, having over half of a person's daily iron allowance in a one cup serving.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Production</strong></p> <p>Lentils are relatively tolerant to drought, and are grown throughout the world. The FAO reported that the world production of lentils for calendar year 2009 was 3.917 million metric tons, primarily coming from Canada, India, Turkey and Australia.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>About a quarter of the worldwide production of lentils is from India, most of which is consumed in the domestic market. Canada is the largest export producer of lentils in the world and Saskatchewan is the most important producing region in Canada. Statistics Canada estimates that Canadian lentil production for the 2009/10 year is a record 1.5 million metric tons.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Palouse region of eastern Washington and the Idaho panhandle, with its commercial center at Pullman, Washington, constitute the most important lentil-producing region in the United States. Montana and North Dakota are also significant lentil growers. The National Agricultural Statistics Service reported United States 2007 production at 154.5 thousand metric tons.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>In culture</strong></p> <p>The lens (double-convex shaped) is so called because the shape of a lens is basically the same shape as lentils. Lens is the Latin name for lentil.</p> <p>Lentils are mentioned many times in the Hebrew Bible, the first time recounting the incident in which Jacob purchases the birthright from Esau with stewed lentils (a "mess of pottage").[16] In Jewish mourning tradition, lentils are traditional as food for mourners, together with boiled eggs, because their round shape symbolizes the life cycle from birth to death.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Lentils were a chief part of the diet of ancient Iranians, who consumed lentils daily in the form of a stew poured over rice.</p> <p>Lentils are also commonly used in Ethiopia in a stew-like dish called kik, or kik wot, one of the dishes people eat with Ethiopia's national food, injera flat bread. Yellow lentils are used to make a non-spicy stew, which is one of the first solid foods Ethiopian women feed their babies. In Pakistan, lentils are often consumed with Roti/bread or rice.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In India, lentils soaked in water and sprouted lentils are offered to gods in many temples. It is also a practice in South India to give and receive sprouted peas by women who perform Varalakshmi Vratam. It is considered to be one of the best foods because the internal chemical structures are not altered by cooking.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In Italy and Hungary, eating lentils on New Year's Eve traditionally symbolizes the hope for a prosperous new year, most likely because of their round, coin-like form.</p> <p>In Shia narrations, lentils are said to be blessed by seventy Prophets, including Jesus and Mohammed.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 84 B (5g)
Lentil Seeds (Lens culinaris) 1.85 - 1
  • -25%


Popcorn 100 seeds - Grow your own 3 - 3

Pattogatott kukorica 50 mag...

Regular price 1,95 € -48% Ár 1,01 € (SKU: VE 104)
Offer ends in:
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Pattogatott kukorica 50 mag - termelje meg sajátját</strong><br><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Ár csomag 50 (10 g) magokat.</strong></span></h2> <p>100% NATURAL POPCORN</p> <p>NON-GMO, NOT GENETICALLY MODIFIED. SIMPLY PURE AND NATURAL!</p> <p><b>Popcorn</b><span>&nbsp;</span>(<b>popped corn</b>,<span>&nbsp;</span><b>popcorns</b><span>&nbsp;</span>or<span>&nbsp;</span><b>pop-corn</b>) is a variety of<span>&nbsp;</span>corn<span>&nbsp;</span>kernel, which expands and puffs up when heated.</p> <p>A popcorn kernel's strong hull contains the seed's hard, starchy<span>&nbsp;</span>endosperm<span>&nbsp;</span>with 14–20% moisture, which turns to steam as the kernel is heated.<span>&nbsp;</span>Pressure<span>&nbsp;</span>from the steam continues to build until the hull ruptures, allowing the kernel to forcefully expand from 20 to 50 times its original size—and finally, cool.<sup id="cite_ref-ref5_1-0" class="reference">[1]</sup></p> <p>Some<span>&nbsp;</span>strains<span>&nbsp;</span>of corn (taxonomized as<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Zea mays</i>) are cultivated specifically as popping corns. The<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Zea mays</i><span>&nbsp;</span>variety<span>&nbsp;</span><i>everta,</i><span>&nbsp;</span>a special kind of<span>&nbsp;</span>flint corn, is the most common of these.</p> <p>The six major types of corn are<span>&nbsp;</span>dent corn,<span>&nbsp;</span>flint corn,<span>&nbsp;</span>pod corn, popcorn,<span>&nbsp;</span>flour corn, and<span>&nbsp;</span>sweet corn.<sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="History">History</span></h2> <p>Corn was first domesticated about 10,000 years ago in what is now<span>&nbsp;</span>Mexico.<sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference">[3]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Archaeologists discovered that people have known about popcorn for thousands of years. In Mexico, for example, remnants of popcorn have been found that date to around 3600 BC.<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup></p> <p>Popping of the kernels was achieved by hand on the stove-top through the 19th century. Kernels were sold on the<span>&nbsp;</span>East Coast of the United States<span>&nbsp;</span>under names such as<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Pearls</i><span>&nbsp;</span>or<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Nonpareil</i>. The term<span>&nbsp;</span><i>popped corn</i><span>&nbsp;</span>first appeared in<span>&nbsp;</span>John Russell Bartlett's 1848<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Dictionary of Americanisms</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-:1_5-0" class="reference">[5]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference">[6]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Popcorn is an ingredient in<span>&nbsp;</span>Cracker Jack, and in the early years of the product, it was popped by hand.<sup id="cite_ref-:1_5-1" class="reference">[5]</sup></p> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Popcorn seeds - Grow your own Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.&nbsp;" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/e/ec/Improved_no2_Wagon.jpg/170px-Improved_no2_Wagon.jpg" class="thumbimage" title="Popcorn seeds - Grow your own Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.&nbsp;" width="170" height="204"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> An early popcorn machine in a street cart, invented in the 1880s by Charles Cretors in Chicago.</div> </div> </div> <p>Popcorn's accessibility increased rapidly in the 1890s with Charles<span>&nbsp;</span>Cretors' invention of the popcorn maker. Cretors, a Chicago candy store owner, created a number of steam-powered machines for roasting nuts and applied the technology to the corn kernels. By the turn of the century, Cretors had created and deployed street carts equipped with steam-powered popcorn makers.<sup id="cite_ref-:0_7-0" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <p>During the<span>&nbsp;</span>Great Depression, popcorn was fairly inexpensive at 5–10 cents a bag and became popular. Thus, while other businesses failed, the popcorn business thrived and became a source of income for many struggling farmers, including the Redenbacher family, namesake of the<span>&nbsp;</span>famous popcorn brand. During<span>&nbsp;</span>World War II, sugar<span>&nbsp;</span>rations<span>&nbsp;</span>diminished<span>&nbsp;</span>candy<span>&nbsp;</span>production, and Americans compensated by eating three times as much popcorn as they had before.<sup id="cite_ref-popcorn.org_8-0" class="reference">[8]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The snack was popular at theaters, much to the initial displeasure of many of the theater owners, who thought it distracted from the films. Their minds eventually changed, however, and in 1938 a Midwestern theater owner named Glen W. Dickson installed popcorn machines in the lobbies of his theaters. The venture was a financial success, and the trend soon spread.<sup id="cite_ref-:1_5-2" class="reference">[5]</sup></p> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Popcorn seeds - Grow your own Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.&nbsp;" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f5/Gangnaengi_%28Korean_popcorn%29.jpg/220px-Gangnaengi_%28Korean_popcorn%29.jpg" class="thumbimage" title="Popcorn seeds - Grow your own Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.&nbsp;" width="220" height="159"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> <i>gangnaengi</i>, Korean popcorn</div> </div> </div> <p>In 1970,<span>&nbsp;</span>Orville Redenbacher's namesake brand of popcorn was launched. In 1981, General Mills received the first patent for a microwave popcorn bag, with popcorn consumption seeing a sharp increase by tens of thousands of pounds in the years following.<sup id="cite_ref-:0_7-1" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <p>At least six localities (all in the<span>&nbsp;</span>Midwestern United States) claim to be the "Popcorn Capital of the World;":<span>&nbsp;</span>Ridgway, Illinois;<span>&nbsp;</span>Valparaiso, Indiana;<span>&nbsp;</span>Van Buren, Indiana;<span>&nbsp;</span>Schaller, Iowa;<span>&nbsp;</span>Marion, Ohio; and<span>&nbsp;</span>North Loup, Nebraska. According to the<span>&nbsp;</span>USDA,<span>&nbsp;</span>corn<span>&nbsp;</span>used for popcorn production is specifically planted for this purpose; most is grown in<span>&nbsp;</span>Nebraska<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>Indiana, with increasing area in<span>&nbsp;</span>Texas.<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference">[9]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference">[10]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>As the result of an<span>&nbsp;</span>elementary school<span>&nbsp;</span>project, popcorn became the official state snack food of<span>&nbsp;</span>Illinois.<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference">[11]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Popping_mechanism">Popping mechanism</span></h2> <div class="center"> <div class="thumb tnone"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Popcorn seeds - Grow your own Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.&nbsp;" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ac/Slowmotion_popcorn.gif/300px-Slowmotion_popcorn.gif" class="thumbimage" title="Popcorn seeds - Grow your own Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.&nbsp;" width="300" height="97"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> The sequence of a kernel popping</div> </div> </div> </div> <p>Each kernel of popcorn contains a certain amount of moisture and oil. Unlike most other grains, the outer hull of the popcorn kernel is both strong and impervious to moisture and the starch inside consists almost entirely of a hard type.<sup id="cite_ref-Lusas_388_12-0" class="reference">[12]</sup></p> <p>As the oil and the water within the kernel are heated, they turn the moisture in the kernel into pressurized steam. Under these conditions, the starch inside the kernel<span>&nbsp;</span>gelatinizes, softens, and becomes pliable. The internal pressure of the entrapped steam continues to increase until the breaking point of the hull is reached: a pressure of approximately 135&nbsp;psi (930&nbsp;kPa)<sup id="cite_ref-Lusas_388_12-1" class="reference">[12]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>and a temperature of 180&nbsp;°C (356&nbsp;°F). The hull thereupon ruptures rapidly and explodes, causing a sudden drop in pressure inside the kernel and a corresponding rapid expansion of the steam, which expands the starch and<span>&nbsp;</span>proteins<span>&nbsp;</span>of the endosperm into airy<span>&nbsp;</span>foam. As the foam rapidly cools, the starch and protein<span>&nbsp;</span>polymers<span>&nbsp;</span>set into the familiar crispy puff.<sup id="cite_ref-Lusas_388_12-2" class="reference">[12]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Special varieties are grown to give improved popping yield. Though the kernels of some wild types will pop, the cultivated strain is<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Zea mays everta,</i><span>&nbsp;</span>which is a special kind of<span>&nbsp;</span>flint corn.</p> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Popcorn seeds - Grow your own Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.&nbsp;" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0c/PopcornCobs2007.jpg/220px-PopcornCobs2007.jpg" class="thumbimage" title="Popcorn seeds - Grow your own Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.&nbsp;" width="220" height="165"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Popcorn on the cob before shelling</div> </div> </div> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cooking_methods">Cooking methods</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Popcorn seeds - Grow your own Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.&nbsp;" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/ec/Popcornmaker.jpg/170px-Popcornmaker.jpg" class="thumbimage" title="Popcorn seeds - Grow your own Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.&nbsp;" width="170" height="227"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> An in-home hot-air popcorn maker</div> </div> </div> <p>Popcorn can be cooked with butter or oil. Although small quantities can be popped in a stove-top<span>&nbsp;</span>kettle<span>&nbsp;</span>or pot in a home kitchen, commercial sale of freshly popped popcorn employs specially designed popcorn machines, which were invented in<span>&nbsp;</span>Chicago, Illinois, by<span>&nbsp;</span>Charles Cretors<span>&nbsp;</span>in 1885. Cretors successfully introduced his invention at the<span>&nbsp;</span>Columbian Exposition<span>&nbsp;</span>in 1893. At this same world's fair, F.W. Rueckheim introduced a<span>&nbsp;</span>molasses-flavored "Candied Popcorn," the first<span>&nbsp;</span>caramel corn; his brother, Louis Ruekheim, slightly altered the recipe and introduced it as<span>&nbsp;</span>Cracker Jack<span>&nbsp;</span>popcorn in 1896.<sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference">[13]</sup></p> <p>Cretors's invention introduced the first<span>&nbsp;</span>patented<span>&nbsp;</span>steam-driven<span>&nbsp;</span>popcorn machine that popped corn in oil. Previously, vendors popped corn by holding a wire basket over an open flame. At best, the result was a hot, dry, unevenly cooked snack. Cretors's machine popped corn in a mixture of one-third<span>&nbsp;</span>clarified butter, two-thirds<span>&nbsp;</span>lard, and<span>&nbsp;</span>salt. This mixture can withstand the 450&nbsp;°F (232&nbsp;°C) temperature needed to pop corn and it produces little smoke. A fire under a<span>&nbsp;</span>boiler<span>&nbsp;</span>created steam that drove a small engine; that engine drove the gears, shaft, and agitator that stirred the corn and powered a small automated clown puppet-like figure, "the Toasty Roasty Man," an attention attracting amusement intended to drum up business. A wire connected to the top of the cooking pan allowed the operator to disengage the drive mechanism, lift the cover, and dump popped corn into the storage bin beneath. Exhaust from the steam engine was piped to a hollow pan below the corn storage bin and kept freshly popped corn uniformly warm for the first time. Excess steam was also used to operate a small, shrill whistle to further attract attention.<sup id="cite_ref-14" class="reference">[14]</sup></p> <p>A very different method of popcorn-making can still be seen on the streets of some<span>&nbsp;</span>Chinese<span>&nbsp;</span>cities and Korea today. The un-popped corn kernels are poured into a large<span>&nbsp;</span>cast-iron<span>&nbsp;</span>canister—sometimes called a 'popcorn hammer'—that is then sealed with a heavy lid and slowly turned over a curbside fire in<span>&nbsp;</span>rotisserie<span>&nbsp;</span>fashion. When a<span>&nbsp;</span>pressure gauge<span>&nbsp;</span>on the canister reaches a certain level, the canister is removed from the fire, a large<span>&nbsp;</span>canvas<span>&nbsp;</span>sack is put over the lid and the seal is released. With a huge boom, all of the popcorn explodes at once and is poured into the sack.<sup id="cite_ref-15" class="reference">[15]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-16" class="reference">[16]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-17" class="reference">[17]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>This method is believed to have originally been developed during the<span>&nbsp;</span>Song dynasty<span>&nbsp;</span>as a method of<span>&nbsp;</span>puffing rice.</p> <p>Individual consumers can also buy and use specialized popping appliances that typically generate no more than a gallon or about four liters of popped corn per batch. Some of these appliances also accept a small volume of oil or melted butter to assist thermal transfer from a stationary heating element, but others are "air poppers" which rapidly circulate heated air up through the interior, keeping the un-popped kernels in motion to avoid burning and then blowing the popped kernels out through the chute. The majority of popcorn sold for home consumption is now packaged in a<span>&nbsp;</span>microwave popcorn<span>&nbsp;</span>bag for use in a microwave oven.<sup id="cite_ref-AmericanOriginal_18-0" class="reference">[18]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Expansion_and_yield">Expansion and yield</span></h3> <p>Popping results are sensitive to the rate at which the kernels are heated. If heated too quickly, the steam in the outer layers of the kernel can reach high pressures and rupture the hull before the starch in the center of the kernel can fully gelatinize, leading to partially popped kernels with hard centers. Heating too slowly leads to entirely unpopped kernels: the tip of the kernel, where it attached to the cob, is not entirely moisture-proof, and when heated slowly, the steam can leak out of the tip fast enough to keep the pressure from rising sufficiently to break the hull and cause the pop.<sup id="cite_ref-Lusas_388_389_19-0" class="reference">[19]</sup></p> <p>Producers and sellers of popcorn consider two major factors in evaluating the quality of popcorn: what percentage of the kernels will pop, and how much each popped kernel expands. Expansion is an important factor to both the consumer and vendor. For the consumer, larger pieces of popcorn tend to be more tender and are associated with higher quality. For the grower, distributor, and vendor, expansion is closely correlated with profit: vendors such as theaters buy popcorn by weight and sell it by volume. For both these reasons, higher-expansion popcorn fetches a higher profit per unit weight.</p> <p>Popcorn will pop when freshly harvested, but not well: its high moisture content leads to poor expansion and chewy pieces of popcorn. Kernels with a high moisture content are also susceptible to mold when stored. For these reasons, popcorn growers and distributors dry the kernels until they reach the moisture level at which they expand the most. This differs by variety and conditions, but is generally in the range of 14–15% moisture by weight. If the kernels are over-dried, the expansion rate will suffer and the percentage of kernels that pop at all will decline.</p> <p>When the popcorn has finished popping, sometimes unpopped kernels remain. Known in the popcorn industry as "old maids,"<sup id="cite_ref-OldMaids_20-0" class="reference">[20]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>these kernels fail to pop because they do not have enough moisture to create enough steam for an explosion. Re-hydrating prior to popping usually results in eliminating the unpopped kernels.</p> <p>Popcorn varieties are broadly categorized by the shape of the kernels, the color of the kernels, or the shape of the popped corn. While the kernels may come in a variety of colors, the popped corn is always off-yellow or white as it is only the hull (or pericarp) that is colored. "Rice" type popcorn have a long kernel pointed at both ends; "pearl" type kernels are rounded at the top. Commercial popcorn production has moved mostly to pearl types.<sup id="cite_ref-Hallauer_213_21-0" class="reference">[21]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Historically, pearl popcorn were usually yellow and rice popcorn usually white. Today both shapes are available in both colors, as well as others including black, red,<span>&nbsp;</span>mauve, purple, and<span>&nbsp;</span>variegated. Mauve and purple popcorn usually has smaller and nutty kernels. Commercial production is dominated by white and yellow.<sup id="cite_ref-Hallauer_214_22-0" class="reference">[22]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Terminology">Terminology</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Popcorn seeds - Grow your own Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.&nbsp;" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/47/Mushroom_and_butterfly_popcorn.jpg/220px-Mushroom_and_butterfly_popcorn.jpg" class="thumbimage" title="Popcorn seeds - Grow your own Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.&nbsp;" width="220" height="134"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> "Mushroom"-shaped popcorn, left, is less fragile and less tender than "butterfly"-shaped, right.</div> </div> </div> <p>In the popcorn industry, a popped kernel of corn is known as a "flake." Two shapes of flakes are commercially important. "Butterfly" (or "snowflake")<sup id="cite_ref-23" class="reference">[23]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>flakes are irregular in shape and have a number of protruding "wings". "Mushroom" flakes are largely ball-shaped, with few wings. Butterfly flakes are regarded as having better<span>&nbsp;</span>mouthfeel, with greater tenderness and less noticeable hulls. Mushroom flakes are less fragile than butterfly flakes and are therefore often used for packaged popcorn or<span>&nbsp;</span>confectionery, such as<span>&nbsp;</span>caramel corn.<sup id="cite_ref-Hallauer_214_22-1" class="reference">[22]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The kernels from a single cob of popcorn may form both butterfly and mushroom flakes; hybrids that produce 100% butterfly flakes or 100% mushroom flakes exist, the latter developed only as recently as 1998.<sup id="cite_ref-Hallauer_214_22-2" class="reference">[22]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Growing conditions and popping environment can also affect the butterfly-to-mushroom ratio.</p> <p>When referring to multiple pieces of popcorn, it is acceptable to use the term "popcorn". When referring to a singular piece of popcorn, the accepted terminology is kernel.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Consumption">Consumption</span></h2> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Popcorn seeds - Grow your own Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.&nbsp;" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d4/Popcorn_%28pipoca%29.jpg/220px-Popcorn_%28pipoca%29.jpg" class="thumbimage" title="Popcorn seeds - Grow your own Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.&nbsp;" width="220" height="146"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Popcorn grown in Mozambique and sold in the marketplace</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Popcorn seeds - Grow your own Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.&nbsp;" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/f/fe/Movie_Theater_Popcorn_in_Bucket.jpg/150px-Movie_Theater_Popcorn_in_Bucket.jpg" class="thumbimage" title="Popcorn seeds - Grow your own Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.&nbsp;" width="150" height="200"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Movie theater popcorn in a bucket in the United States</div> </div> </div> <p>Popcorn is a popular<span>&nbsp;</span>snack food<span>&nbsp;</span>at sporting events and in<span>&nbsp;</span>cinemas, where it has been served since the 1930s.<sup id="cite_ref-24" class="reference">[24]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Cinemas have come under fire due to their high markup on popcorn; Stuart Hanson, a film historian at De Montfort University in Leicester once said<span>&nbsp;</span><i>"One of the great jokes in the industry is that popcorn is second only to cocaine or heroin in terms of profit."</i><sup id="cite_ref-25" class="reference">[25]</sup></p> <p>Popcorn smell has an unusually attractive quality for human beings. This is largely because it contains high levels of the chemicals<span>&nbsp;</span>6-acetyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydropyridine<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, very powerful<span>&nbsp;</span>aroma compounds<span>&nbsp;</span>that are used by food and other industries to make products that either smell like popcorn, bread, or other foods containing the compound in nature, or for other purposes.<sup class="noprint Inline-Template Template-Fact">[<i><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (July 2018)">citation needed</span></i>]</sup></p> <p>Popcorn as a<span>&nbsp;</span>breakfast cereal<span>&nbsp;</span>was consumed by Americans in the 1800s and generally consisted of popcorn with milk and a sweetener.<sup id="cite_ref-26" class="reference">[26]</sup></p> <p>Popcorn balls (popped kernels stuck together with a sugary "glue") were hugely popular around the turn of the 20th century, but their popularity has since waned. Popcorn balls are still served in some places as a traditional<span>&nbsp;</span>Halloween<span>&nbsp;</span>treat.<span>&nbsp;</span>Cracker Jack<span>&nbsp;</span>is a popular, commercially produced candy that consists of<span>&nbsp;</span>peanuts<span>&nbsp;</span>mixed in with<span>&nbsp;</span>caramel-covered popcorn.<span>&nbsp;</span>Kettle corn<span>&nbsp;</span>is a variation of normal popcorn, cooked with white sugar and salt, traditionally in a large copper kettle. Once reserved for specialty shops and county fairs,<span>&nbsp;</span>kettle corn<span>&nbsp;</span>has recently become popular, especially in the<span>&nbsp;</span>microwave<span>&nbsp;</span>popcorn market. The<span>&nbsp;</span>popcorn maker<span>&nbsp;</span>is a relatively new<span>&nbsp;</span>home appliance, and its popularity is increasing because it offers the opportunity to add flavors of the consumer's own choice and to choose healthy-eating popcorn styles.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Nutritional_value">Nutritional value</span></h3> <table class="infobox nowrap"><caption>Popcorn, air-popped, no additives</caption> <tbody> <tr> <th colspan="2">Nutritional value per 100&nbsp;g (3.5&nbsp;oz)</th> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Energy</th> <td>1,598&nbsp;kJ (382&nbsp;kcal)</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Carbohydrates</b></div> </th> <td> <div>78 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Dietary fiber</th> <td>15 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Fat</b></div> </th> <td> <div>4 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Protein</b></div> </th> <td> <div>12 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Vitamins</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Thiamine<span>&nbsp;</span><span>(B1)</span></th> <td> <div>17%</div> 0.2 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Riboflavin<span>&nbsp;</span><span>(B2)</span></th> <td> <div>25%</div> 0.3 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Minerals</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Iron</th> <td> <div>21%</div> 2.7 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"><hr> <div class="wrap">One cup is 8 grams.</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <div class="plainlist"> <ul> <li>Units</li> <li>μg =<span>&nbsp;</span>micrograms&nbsp;• mg =<span>&nbsp;</span>milligrams</li> <li>IU =<span>&nbsp;</span>International units</li> </ul> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" class="wrap"><sup>†</sup>Percentages are roughly approximated using<span>&nbsp;</span>US&nbsp;recommendations<span>&nbsp;</span>for adults.<span>&nbsp;</span><br><span class="nowrap"><span>Source:&nbsp;USDA Nutrient Database</span></span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Air-popped popcorn is naturally high in<span>&nbsp;</span>dietary fiber<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>antioxidants,<sup id="cite_ref-27" class="reference">[27]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>low in calories and fat, and free of sugar and sodium.<sup id="cite_ref-28" class="reference">[28]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>This can make it an attractive snack to people with dietary restrictions on the intake of calories, fat or sodium. For the sake of flavor, however, large amounts of fat, sugar, and sodium are often added to prepared popcorn, which can quickly convert it to a very poor choice for those on restricted diets.</p> <p>One particularly notorious example of this first came to public attention in the mid-1990s, when the<span>&nbsp;</span>Center for Science in the Public Interest<span>&nbsp;</span>produced a report about "Movie Popcorn", which became the subject of a widespread publicity campaign. The movie theaters surveyed used<span>&nbsp;</span>coconut oil<span>&nbsp;</span>to pop the corn, and then topped it with<span>&nbsp;</span>butter<span>&nbsp;</span>or<span>&nbsp;</span>margarine. "A medium-size buttered popcorn", the report said, "contains more fat than a breakfast of<span>&nbsp;</span>bacon<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>eggs, a<span>&nbsp;</span>Big Mac<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>fries, and a<span>&nbsp;</span>steak<span>&nbsp;</span>dinner combined."<sup id="cite_ref-29" class="reference">[29]</sup>The practice continues today. For example, according to DietFacts.com, a small popcorn from<span>&nbsp;</span>Regal Cinema Group<span>&nbsp;</span>(the largest theater chain in the United States)<sup id="cite_ref-30" class="reference">[30]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>still contains 29&nbsp;g of saturated fat.<sup id="cite_ref-31" class="reference">[31]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>the equivalent of a full day-and-a-half's<span>&nbsp;</span>reference daily intake.<sup id="cite_ref-32" class="reference">[32]</sup></p> <p>However, in studies conducted by the<span>&nbsp;</span>Motion Picture Association of America<span>&nbsp;</span>it was found that the average American only attends six movies a year and that movie theater popcorn and other movie theater snacks are viewed as a treat that is not intended to be part of a regular diet.<sup id="cite_ref-33" class="reference">[33]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Health_risks">Health risks</span></h3> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Popcorn seeds - Grow your own Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.&nbsp;" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/ca/Eatingpopcorn.JPG/220px-Eatingpopcorn.JPG" class="thumbimage" title="Popcorn seeds - Grow your own Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.&nbsp;" width="220" height="147"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> A person eating popcorn out of a bowl</div> </div> </div> <p>Popcorn is included on the list of foods that the<span>&nbsp;</span>American Academy of Pediatrics<span>&nbsp;</span>recommends not serving to children under four, because of the risk of<span>&nbsp;</span>choking.<sup id="cite_ref-34" class="reference">[34]</sup></p> <p>Microwaveable popcorn represents a special case, since it is designed to be cooked along with its various flavoring agents. One of these formerly common artificial-butter flavorants,<span>&nbsp;</span>diacetyl, has been implicated in causing respiratory illnesses in microwave popcorn factory workers, also known as "popcorn lung." Major manufacturers in the United States have stopped using this chemical, including:<span>&nbsp;</span>Orville Redenbacher's,<span>&nbsp;</span>Act II,<span>&nbsp;</span>Pop Secret<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>Jolly Time.<sup class="noprint Inline-Template Template-Fact">[<i><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (April 2015)">citation needed</span></i>]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-35" class="reference">[35]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-36" class="reference">[36]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Other_uses">Other uses</span></h2> <p>Popcorn, threaded onto a string, is used as a wall or<span>&nbsp;</span>Christmas tree decoration<span>&nbsp;</span>in some parts of<span>&nbsp;</span>North America,<sup id="cite_ref-37" class="reference">[37]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-38" class="reference">[38]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>as well as on the<span>&nbsp;</span>Balkan peninsula.<sup id="cite_ref-39" class="reference">[39]</sup></p> <p>Some shipping companies have experimented with using popcorn as a<span>&nbsp;</span>biodegradable<span>&nbsp;</span>replacement for<span>&nbsp;</span>expanded polystyrene<span>&nbsp;</span>packing material. However, popcorn has numerous undesirable properties as a packing material, including attractiveness to<span>&nbsp;</span>pests,<span>&nbsp;</span>flammability, and a higher cost and greater density than expanded polystyrene. A more processed form of expanded corn foam has been developed to overcome some of these limitations.<sup id="cite_ref-40" class="reference">[40]</sup></p> <p>Currently the world's largest popcorn ball (by weight) is located in<span>&nbsp;</span>Sac City,<span>&nbsp;</span>Iowa, and weighs 9,370 pounds (4,250&nbsp;kg). Former title holders were located in<span>&nbsp;</span>Indianapolis,<span>&nbsp;</span>Indiana, and three more times previously in Sac City.</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 104 (10g)
Popcorn 100 seeds - Grow your own 3 - 3
  • -48%


Radicchio - Chicory Seeds ‘‘Red Verona‘‘  - 2

Radicchio - Chicory Seeds...

Regular price 1,65 € -18% Ár 1,35 € (SKU: VE 34 (1g))
Offer ends in:
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Radicchio - Chicory Seeds ‘‘Red Verona‘‘</strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 500 seeds (1g).</strong></span></h3> <div>Small, red, cabbage-like heads ready to pick in fall. Leaves are sharp-flavored, use sparingly in green salads. May also be sautéed, steamed or grilled with meats. Garden Hints: Do not plant too early in spring or plants may bolt (go to seed). In early fall, cut off all leaves above the crown. New growth in cool weather produces the small, red, cabbage-like heads.</div> <div>Sun: Full Sun&nbsp;</div> <div>Spread: 4 &nbsp;inches</div> <div>Height: 6 &nbsp;inches</div> <div>Days to Maturity: 90 &nbsp;days</div> <div>Sowing Method: Direct Sow</div>
VE 34 (1g)
Radicchio - Chicory Seeds ‘‘Red Verona‘‘  - 2
  • -18%

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