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Cape Gooseberry Seeds (Physalis peruviana) 1.5 - 1

1000 Seeds Gooseberry...

Price €42.00 (SKU: V 63 XXL)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>1000 Seeds Gooseberry (Physalis peruviana)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1000 (0,5g) Seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><i style="font-size:14px;"><b>Physalis peruviana</b></i><span style="font-size:14px;">, a plant species of the genus</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><i style="font-size:14px;">Physalis</i><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">in the nightshade family</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">Solanaceae, has its origin in</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">Peru.</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">The plant and its fruit are commonly called</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><b style="font-size:14px;">Cape gooseberry</b><span style="font-size:14px;">,</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><b style="font-size:14px;">goldenberry</b><span style="font-size:14px;">, and</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><b style="font-size:14px;">physalis</b><span style="font-size:14px;">, among numerous regional names.</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">The history of Physalis cultivation in</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">South America</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">can be traced to</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">Inca</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">Indians.</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">It has been cultivated in</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">England</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">since the late 18th century, and in</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">South Africa</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">in the</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">Cape of Good Hope</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">since at least the start of the 19th century.</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">Widely introduced in the 20th century,</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><i style="font-size:14px;">P. peruviana</i><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">is cultivated or grows wild across the world in</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">temperate</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">and</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">tropical</span><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><span style="font-size:14px;">regions.</span></p> <p><i>P. peruviana</i> is an economically useful crop as an exotic exported fruit and favored in breeding and cultivation programs in many countries.</p> <div> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/97/Physalis_fruchthuelle_fcm.jpg/220px-Physalis_fruchthuelle_fcm.jpg" width="220" height="293" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Immature fruit in green calyx</div> </div> </div> <p><i>P. peruviana</i><span> </span>is closely related to the<span> </span>tomatillo<span> </span>and the<span> </span>Chinese lantern, also members of the genus<span> </span><i>Physalis</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-morton_2-3" class="reference">[2]</sup><span> </span>As a member of the plant family Solanaceae, it is more distantly related to a large number of edible plants, including<span> </span>tomato,<span> </span>eggplant,<span> </span>potato, and other members of the<span> </span>nightshades.<sup id="cite_ref-morton_2-4" class="reference">[2]</sup><span> </span>Despite its name, it is not botanically related to other<span> </span>gooseberries.</p> <p><i>P. peruviana</i><span> </span>is an<span> </span>annual<span> </span>in temperate locations, but<span> </span>perennial<span> </span>in the tropics.<sup id="cite_ref-morton_2-5" class="reference">[2]</sup><span> </span>As a perennial, it develops into a diffusely branched shrub reaching 1–1.6 m (3.3–5.2 ft) in height, with spreading branches and velvety, heart-shaped leaves.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_3-2" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>The<span> </span>hermaphrodite<span> </span>flowers are bell-shaped and drooping, 15–20 mm (0.59–0.79 in) across, yellow with purple-brown spots internally. After the flower falls, the calyx expands, ultimately forming a beige husk fully enclosing the fruit.<sup id="cite_ref-morton_2-6" class="reference">[2]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-cabi_3-3" class="reference">[3]</sup></p> <p>The<span> </span>fruit<span> </span>is a round, smooth<span> </span>berry, resembling a miniature yellow tomato 1.25–2 cm (0.49–0.79 in) wide.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_3-4" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>Removed from its calyx, it is bright yellow to orange in color, and sweet when ripe, with a characteristic, mildly tart tomato flavor.<sup id="cite_ref-morton_2-7" class="reference">[2]</sup></p> <p>A prominent feature is the inflated, papery<span> </span>calyx<span> </span>enclosing each berry. The calyx is<span> </span>accrescent<span> </span>until the fruit is fully grown; at first, it is of normal size, but after the petals fall, it continues to grow until it forms a protective cover around the growing fruit. If the fruit is left inside the intact calyx husks, its shelf life at room temperature is about 30–45 days. The calyx is inedible.</p> <p><i>P. peruviana</i><span> </span>has dozens of common names across the world in its regions of distribution.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_3-5" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>For example, in Hawaii is known as<span> </span><i>poha berry</i>. In northeastern China<span> </span>Heilongjiang<span> </span>Province, it is informally referred to as<span> </span><i>deng long guo</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_3-6" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>In French, it is called<span> </span><i>amour en cage</i>("love in a cage"), as well as other possible names, such as Peruvian<span> </span><i>coqueret, alkékenge, lanterne chinoise</i><span> </span>("Chinese lantern") (<i>Physalis alkekengi</i>),<span> </span><i>cerise de terre</i><span> </span>("earth cherry"), or tomatillo (<i>Physalis philadelphica</i>).<sup id="cite_ref-love-in-a-cage_7-0" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Origins">Origins</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f3/Solanales_-_Physalis_peruviana_2.jpg/220px-Solanales_-_Physalis_peruviana_2.jpg" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Ripe fruit cut in half, showing seeds</div> </div> </div> <p>Native to the<span> </span>mountain slope<span> </span>regions of<span> </span>Peru<span> </span>and<span> </span>Chile<sup id="cite_ref-morton_2-8" class="reference">[2]</sup><span> </span>where the fruit grows wild. Physalis is locally consumed and sold in western South America. It has been widely introduced into cultivation in other tropical, subtropical, and temperate areas such as Australia, China, India, Malaysia, and the Philippines.<sup id="cite_ref-morton_2-9" class="reference">[2]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-cabi_3-7" class="reference">[3]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <p>The plant was grown in England in 1774 and by early settlers of the<span> </span>Cape of Good Hope<span> </span>before 1807.<sup id="cite_ref-morton_2-10" class="reference">[2]</sup><span> </span>Whether it was grown there before its introduction to England is not known, but sources since the mid-19th century attribute the common name, "Cape gooseberry" to this fact.<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference">[9]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference">[10]</sup><span> </span>One suggestion is that the name properly refers to the calyx surrounding the fruit like a<span> </span>cape, possibly an example of<span> </span>false etymology, because it does not appear in publications earlier than the mid-20th century. Not long after its introduction to South Africa,<span> </span><i>P. peruviana</i><span> </span>was introduced into Australia, New Zealand, and various<span> </span>Pacific islands.<sup id="cite_ref-morton_2-11" class="reference">[2]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Natural_habitat_and_cultivation">Natural habitat and cultivation</span></h2> <p>In the wild, Cape gooseberry grows in forests, forest margins,<span> </span>riparian<span> </span>and uncultivated locations.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_3-8" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>In South America, it grows at high elevations of 500–3,000 m (1,600–9,800 ft), but may also be at<span> </span>sea level<span> </span>in<span> </span>Oceania<span> </span>and Pacific islands where it occurs widely in subtropical and warm, temperate conditions.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_3-9" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>Its<span> </span>latitude<span> </span>range is about 45 to 60, and its altitude range is generally from<span> </span>sea level<span> </span>to 3,000 m (9,800 ft).<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_3-10" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span><i>P. peruviana</i><span> </span>thrives at an annual average temperature from 13–18 °C (55–64 °F), tolerating temperatures as high as 30 °C (86 °F).<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_3-11" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>It grows well in<span> </span>Mediterranean<span> </span>climates and is hardy to<span> </span>USDA hardiness zone<span> </span>8, meaning it can be damaged by<span> </span>frost.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_3-12" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>It grows well in rainfall amounts from 800–4,300 mm (31–169 in) if the soil is well drained, and prefers full sun or partial shade in well-drained soil, and grows vigorously in sandy<span> </span>loam.<sup id="cite_ref-morton_2-12" class="reference">[2]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-cabi_3-13" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>The plant has become<span> </span>invasive<span> </span>in some natural habitats, forming<span> </span>thickets, particularly in<span> </span>Hawaii<span> </span>and on other Pacific islands.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_3-14" class="reference">[3]</sup></p> <p>The plant is readily grown from seeds, which are abundant (100 to 300 in each fruit), but with low<span> </span>germination<span> </span>rates, requiring thousands of seeds to sow a<span> </span>hectare.<sup id="cite_ref-morton_2-13" class="reference">[2]</sup><span> </span>Year-old stem cuttings treated with hormones to promote rooting are successful for planting, but have a lower rate of success than growing from seed.<sup id="cite_ref-morton_2-14" class="reference">[2]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Pests_and_diseases">Pests and diseases</span></h3> <p>In South Africa,<span> </span>cutworms<span> </span>attack the Cape gooseberry in seedbeds,<span> </span>red spiders<span> </span>in the field, and<span> </span>potato tuber moths<span> </span>near potato fields.<span> </span>Hares<span> </span>damage young plants, and birds eat the fruits.<span> </span>Mites,<span> </span>whiteflies, and<span> </span>flea beetles<span> </span>can be problematic.<sup id="cite_ref-morton_2-15" class="reference">[2]</sup><span> </span>Powdery mildew, soft brown<span> </span>scale,<span> </span>root rot, and viruses may affect plants.<sup id="cite_ref-morton_2-16" class="reference">[2]</sup><span> </span>In<span> </span>New Zealand, plants can be infected by<span> </span><i>Candidatus<span> </span>liberibacter</i><span> </span>subsp.<span> </span><i>solanacearum</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2> <p><i>P. peruviana</i><span> </span>is an economically useful crop as an exotic exported fruit, and is favored in breeding and cultivation programs of many countries.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_3-15" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span><i>P. peruviana</i><span> </span>fruits are marketed in the<span> </span>United States<span> </span>as<span> </span><i>goldenberry</i><span> </span>and sometimes<span> </span><i>Pichuberry</i>, named after<span> </span>Machu Picchu<span> </span>in order to associate the fruit with its origin in<span> </span>Peru.<sup id="cite_ref-12" class="reference">[12]</sup></p> <p>Cape gooseberry is made into fruit-based sauces, pies,<span> </span>puddings,<span> </span>chutneys, jams, and ice cream, or eaten fresh in salads and fruit salads.<sup id="cite_ref-morton_2-17" class="reference">[2]</sup><span> </span>Because of the fruit's decorative appearance in its showy husk, it is popular in restaurants as an exotic garnish for<span> </span>desserts. To enhance its food uses, hot air drying improved qualities of<span> </span>dietary fiber<span> </span>content, texture, and appearance.<sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference">[13]</sup></p> <p>In<span> </span>basic research<span> </span>on fruit maturation, the content of<span> </span>polyphenols<span> </span>and<span> </span>vitamin C<span> </span>varied by<span> </span>cultivar, harvest time, and ripening stage.<sup id="cite_ref-14" class="reference">[14]</sup><span> </span>The fruit has a limited history for treating disorders in<span> </span>traditional medicine.<sup id="cite_ref-morton_2-18" class="reference">[2]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Nutrients_and_basic_research">Nutrients and basic research</span></h2> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/92/Physalis.jpg/220px-Physalis.jpg" width="220" height="173" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Calyx open, exposing the ripe fruit</div> </div> </div> <p>According to<span> </span>nutrient<span> </span>analyses by the<span> </span>USDA, a 100 g serving of Cape gooseberries is low in energy (53 kcal) and contains moderate levels of<span> </span>vitamin C,<span> </span>thiamin, and<span> </span>niacin, while other nutrients are negligible (see table).<sup id="cite_ref-15" class="reference">[15]</sup><span> </span>Analyses of<span> </span>oil<span> </span>from different berry components, primarily its seeds, showed that<span> </span>linoleic acid<span> </span>and<span> </span>oleic acid<span> </span>were the main<span> </span>fatty acids,<span> </span>beta-sitosterol<span> </span>and<span> </span>campesterolwere principal<span> </span>phytosterols, and the oil contained<span> </span>vitamin K<span> </span>and<span> </span>beta-carotene.<sup id="cite_ref-16" class="reference">[16]</sup></p> <p>Basic research<span> </span>on Cape gooseberry includes studies on<span> </span>polyphenols<span> </span>and/or<span> </span>carotenoids.</p> </div>
V 63 XXL
Cape Gooseberry Seeds (Physalis peruviana) 1.5 - 1

Variety from Italy
Bean Seeds Merveille de Piemonte 2.5 - 1

Bean Seeds Merveille de...

Price €2.50 (SKU: VE 138 (3g))
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5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2 id="short_description_content"><strong>Vegetable Bean Seeds Merveille de Piemonte</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 (3g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>A spectacular French Bean that loses its purple markings in the pan and turns green. These long beans (approx. 16-20 cm) taste terrific! They taste great as a cooked dry bean too!</p> <p>So-called 'stringless' French Beans are considered the tastiest. It is actually hard to find them with 'string' nowadays as most modern cultivars are stringless.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>There are also yellow French Beans which a called Butter Beans when dried - not surprisingly because of the colour. They have a somewhat milder flavour than the green variety.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>French Beans are tastiest when eaten shortly after picking but they will last several days in the fridge. Chop into 2 cm pieces and steam or boil - but not too long as they are best when still crunchy. A short turn in the wok is great too! French Beans freeze well too although they may loose some of their crispiness. Chop finely and blanche them before freezing.</p> <p><strong>Special Directions For Short Season Climates </strong></p> <p><strong>SOWING:&nbsp;</strong>Plant outdoors in late spring after weather has warmed and all dan-ger of frost has passed. Plant 4 to 6 seeds per pole in hills. Plant seeds on their side covering seed with 1 to 1 1/2 inches of fine soil firmed down.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>SPACING:</strong> Provide 2 1/2 to 3 feet between hills. When planted in rows space rows 3 feet apart.</p> <p><strong>THINNING:</strong> Thin to 3 strongest plants per pole in hills, when they are about 4 inches tall. Thin to 4 to 6 inches apart in rows.</p> <p><strong>GERMINATION:&nbsp;</strong>1 to 2 weeks depending upon soil and weather conditions. Keep soil moderately moist during germination.</p> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 138 (3g)
Bean Seeds Merveille de Piemonte 2.5 - 1

Variety from Hungary
Bell Pepper Seeds Shaman...

Bell Pepper Seeds Shaman...

Price €1.35 (SKU: P 467 S)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Bell Pepper Seeds Shaman</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Constantly growing, white Bell Pepper. The fruits are 10-12 cm long, thick fleshed, drooping, sweet, shoulder width of 6-8 cm, weight 110-120 g. Suitable for production in the greenhouse as well as open fields.</p> <p>It tolerates stress well, is resistant to cucumber mosaic virus, and is tolerant to powdery mildew.</p> </body> </html>
P 467 S
Bell Pepper Seeds Shaman (Táltos)
  • On sale!
Bolivian Coriander - Papalo Seeds (Porophyllum ruderale)

Bolivian Coriander - Papalo...

Price €2.25 (SKU: MHS 80)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Bolivian Coriander - Papalo Seeds (Porophyllum ruderale)</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Porophyllum ruderale is an herbaceous annual plant whose leaves can be used for seasoning food. The taste has been described as "somewhere between arugula, cilantro and rue."[1] The plant is commonly grown in Mexico and South America for use in salsas. When fully grown, this plant grows to about 5 feet in height and 3 feet in diameter.</p> <p>The plant is easy to grow from seed in a well drained soil, which should be allowed to dry between watering.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Culture</strong></p> <p>Having been used by many cultures, Porophyllum ruderale is known by many names, including Bolivian coriander, quillquiña (also spelled quirquiña or quilquiña), yerba porosa, killi, pápalo, tepegua, "mampuritu" and pápaloquelite. Despite the name "Bolivian coriander", this plant is not botanically related to Coriandrum sativum.</p> <p> </p> <p>This plant is known in Mexico as pápaloquelite, commonly accompanying the famous Mexican tacos. Not all Mexicans enjoy its taste, but some find that it improves the flavor of tacos and typical Mexican salsas and soups.</p> <p> </p> <p>In Puebla cuisine, pápalo is used as a condiment on traditional cemita sandwiches, a regional type of Mexican torta.</p> <p>Papalo was used in the Azteca era, but never as medicine, only as food.[citation needed]</p> <p>One study claims that Papalo exhibits some health benefits such as: lowering cholesterol, lowering blood pressure, and aiding digestion.</p> <p> </p> <table style="width:551px;" border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Sowing Instructions</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Propagation:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Pretreat:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Stratification:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Sowing Time:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">all year round</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Sowing Depth:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Sowing Mix:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Germination temperature:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">20-25°C</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Location:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Germination Time:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">1 - 8 weeks</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Watering:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p><strong><span style="color:#008000;"> </span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><br /><strong><span style="color:#008000;"> <em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></strong></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table>
MHS 80
Bolivian Coriander - Papalo Seeds (Porophyllum ruderale)

Buddha bamboo - Buddha's-belly bamboo Seeds 1.95 - 3

Buddha bamboo -...

Price €1.95 (SKU: B 4)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2 id="short_description_content" class="rte align_justify"><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Buddha bamboo - Buddha's-belly bamboo Seeds (Bambusa ventricosa)</strong></span></h2> <h2 class="rte align_justify"><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This beautiful form of Buddha Belly bamboo has culms that emerge green and soon turn a beautiful golden-yellow with green stripes. Like the green form, it will grow straight and slender, given ideal conditions. This bamboo is best as a container plant where with proper care and pruning it can be a delightful specimen.</p> <p>Maximum Height: 55 feet, 30-40 feet average</p> <p>Container Height: 10 to 15 ft?</p> <p>Diameter: 1.5 - 2 inches</p> <p>Hardiness: 21° F</p> <p>Recommended for USDA zone 9b - 10</p> <p><strong>Wikipedia:</strong></p> <p>Bambusa ventricosa is a species of bamboo which is native to Guangdong province in China. The species is widely cultivated in subtropical regions around the world for the bulbous and ornamental culms. The species is used in bonsai.</p> <p>Common names include Buddha bamboo and Buddha's-belly bamboo.</p> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">25-30°C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">1 - 8 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><br /><span style="color: #008000;"> <em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </body> </html>
B 4
Buddha bamboo - Buddha's-belly bamboo Seeds 1.95 - 3
Chili Cayenne Long Slim Seeds

Chili Cayenne Long Slim Seeds

Price €1.85 (SKU: C 19 L)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Chili Cayenne Long Slim Seeds</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 50 seeds.<br /></strong></span></h3> <div> <p class="description">Long Slim Red Cayenne is one of the best known hot chili peppers, it is a good long hot chilli that always performs well and dries nicely. <br />Producing an abundance of very wrinkled fruits that grow 12 to 15cm (5 to 6in) long, the fruits have thin flesh and are used fresh in hot sauces or dried and ground for cayenne pepper. At a heat level of around 30,000 to 50,000 SHU, they are one of the best peppers for seasoning pickles and salsa. Good for deep freezing and perfect for adding a kick to a Bloody Mary or to vodka. <br /><br />Long Slim Red Cayenne is a very productive plant, it is upright-growing and reaches about 60cm in height. The plants are covered with long, thin peppers which mature from emerald green to a scarlet red in approximately 70 days. <br />This very attractive plants also make quite a spectacle when grown as a conservatory or patio plant.<br /><br />According to one anonymous writer, this variety was first documented in 1493 by Christopher Columbus and that one of his passengers, a man named de Cuneo, described how Native Americans ate peppers like one would eat an apple. Cayenne peppers are used threaded onto a string as attractive 'Ristra' craft decorations.</p> <p><strong><span class="headings">Storage of Seeds:</span> </strong><br />Store seeds away from children, sealed in their packaging in a cool, dry, dark place, or in a fridge. Never store them in a freezer as the sudden temperature drop is likely to kill them. Don't leave the seeds in direct sunlight as the heat generated may kill them.</p> <p><span class="headings"><strong>Sowing</strong>:</span> Sow from mid February to mid June<br />The temperature, moisture, and air circulation all play a role in growing plants from seeds. Too little heat, too much moisture, and lack of air circulation will cause poor results. Do not use jiffy peat pots, plugs, or potting soil as the soil becomes too dry or too wet, which can lead to low germination, disease and fungus.<br />Fill small cells or trays with a good sterile seed compost and sow the seeds on the surface. “Just cover” with a fine sprinkling (3mm) of soil or vermiculite.<br />Keep the compost moist - don't let the top of the compost dry out (a common cause of germination failure) If you wish, spray the surface with a dilute copper-based fungicide.<br />Cover the pot or tray with plastic film or place in a heated propagator, south facing window or a warm greenhouse. <br />The ideal temperature is around 18 to 20°C (65 to 72°F)</p> <p><span class="headings"><strong>Transplanting</strong>:</span> <br />When the seedlings have produced their first pair of true leaves they can be potted on into individual 7 to 10cm (3 to 4in) pots. Use good quality potting compost and mix in some organic slow release fertiliser. Pot the chilli on again before it becomes root-bound.<br />Water the seedlings regularly, but don't let them become waterlogged as this encourages rot. Don't let them dry out as they rarely recover at this stage. Water the soil, not the foliage. Once the plants have established, it is better to water heavy and infrequently, allow the top inch or so to dry out in between watering.</p> <p>Seedlings should be grown in good light, but should not be exposed to direct sunlight from late spring to early autumn. Weaker sunlight from autumn to spring is unlikely to do them harm. Once seedlings have put on some growth they need lots of light. Growing them under a grow-light produces excellent stocky plants, as will a warm sunny windowsill. Adult chilli plants need lots of light. However, more than 4 hours or so in hot direct sunlight will dry them out quickly.<br />Acclimatise to outdoor conditions for 2 to 3 weeks before they are moved permanently outside. Plant them into rich moist soil. Flower do not form and fruit will not set if the temperature is much below 17°C (62°F) for most of the day, so wait until June/July for best results with outdoor planting.</p> <p><span class="headings"><strong>Fertilising</strong>: </span><br />After the first flowers appear, feed every one or two weeks with a half-strength liquid tomato feed. You could also add Seaweed extract to the water once a week.</p> <p><strong><span class="headings">Pollinating Flowers:</span> (optional)</strong><br />Chilli plants are self fertile and will generally pollinate themselves. However, if you want to give them a helping hand to ensure that lots of fruit are set indoors, use a cotton wool bud to gently sweep the inside of the flowers, spreading the pollen as you go. The flower's petals will drop off as the green middle part of the flower starts to swell slightly. This is the chilli pepper beginning to grow.</p> <p><span class="headings"><strong>Harvesting</strong>:</span> Harvest in 90 to 110 days <br />Chillies will take a few weeks to develop and a further couple weeks to turn from green to red. Harvest any time after they are fully developed. Use scissors to snip the fruits so you don't damage the plant.</p> <p><span class="headings"><strong>Storage</strong>:</span> <br />After being roasted and peeled, Poblanos can be preserved by either canning or freezing. Storing poblanos in airtight containers will suffice for several months.</p> <p><span class="warning"><strong>WARNING</strong>: </span><br />Be careful handling chilli seeds as they can cause a painful burning sensation: Avoid contact with the eyes or any sensitive skin before washing your hands thoroughly.</p> <p><span class="headings"><strong>Origin</strong>:</span> <br />Chiles originated in South America, where they have been under cultivation since prehistoric times. The seed's long viability facilitated the rapid spread of the plant throughout the tropics and sub-tropics by the Spanish and Portuguese, the spice becoming as popular there as vine pepper. Chiles were long known as 'Indian' pepper - meaning 'of the New World' rather than 'of India'. <br />The Cayenne is known to be Pre-Columbian in origin. It is said to be named after the Cayenne River in French Guyana. First offered in the seed trade by Joseph Breck &amp; Son in 1883</p> </div>
C 19 L
Chili Cayenne Long Slim Seeds
Cumin Seed (Cuminum cyminum)  - 2

Cumin Seed (Cuminum cyminum)

Price €1.65 (SKU: VE 199 (1g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Cumin Seed (Cuminum cyminum)</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 240 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Cumin (/ˈkjuːmᵻn/ or UK /ˈkʌmᵻn/, US /ˈkuːmᵻn/), sometimes spelled cummin, (Cuminum cyminum) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native from the east Mediterranean to India.</p> <p>Its seeds (each one contained within a fruit, which is dried) are used in the cuisines of many different cultures, in both whole and ground form. It also has many uses as a traditional medicinal plant.</p> <p>Cumin is the dried seed of the herb Cuminum cyminum, a member of the parsley family. The cumin plant grows to 30–50 cm (12–20 in) tall and is harvested by hand. It is an annual herbaceous plant, with a slender, glabrous, branched stem that is 20–30 cm (8–12 in) tall and has a diameter of 3–5 cm (1 1⁄4–2 in).[9] Each branch has two to three sub-branches. All the branches attain the same height, therefore the plant has a uniform canopy.[9] The stem is coloured grey or dark green. The leaves are 5–10 cm (2–4 in) long, pinnate or bipinnate, with thread-like leaflets. The flowers are small, white or pink, and borne in umbels. Each umbel has five to seven umbellts.[9] The fruit is a lateral fusiform or ovoid achene 4–5 mm (1⁄6–1⁄5 in) long, containing two mericarps with a single seed.[9] Cumin seeds have eight ridges with oil canals.[9] They resemble caraway seeds, being oblong in shape, longitudinally ridged, and yellow-brown in colour, like other members of the Umbelliferae family such as caraway, parsley, and dill.</p> <p><strong>Etymology</strong></p> <p>The English "cumin" is derived from the Old English, from Latin cuminum,[3] which is the Latinisation of the Greek κύμινον (kyminon),[4] cognate with Hebrew כמון (kammon) and Arabic كمون (kammūn).[5] The earliest attested form of the word in Greek is the Mycenaean.</p> <div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <h3 align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Sowing Instructions</span></h3> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Needs Light to germinate!</strong></span> Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">20-25°C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">1 - 8 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap">&nbsp;</td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;</em></strong></span></p> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><em></em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">&nbsp;</span></p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 199 (1g)
Cumin Seed (Cuminum cyminum)  - 2

Variety from Serbia
Dwarf Bean Seeds ’Maxidor’

Dwarf Bean Seeds Maxidor

Price €1.50 (SKU: VE 57 (7.5g))
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong>Dwarf Bean Seeds ’Maxidor’</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 (7g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>Dwarf bean, with rounded, yellow, stringless pods that can be used in a fresh, canned or frozen state.</div> <div>The beans are white and ovoid-shaped.</div> <div>Plant height: 50 - 55cm.</div> <div>Vegetation period: 54 - 57 days.</div> <div>Minimum temperature for germination:180C</div> <div>Bean pod color: yellow</div> <div>Bean pod length: 13 - 15cm</div> <div>Pod thickness: 0,9 - 1,1cm</div> <div>Cultivation method: direct seeding.</div> <div>Cultivated ground: open field, protected crops</div> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 57 (7.5g)
Dwarf Bean Seeds ’Maxidor’
Kohlrabi Seeds "Best of All"

Kohlrabi Seeds "Best of All"

Price €1.25 (SKU: VE 111)
,
5/ 5
<div> <div id="more_info_block" class="clear"> <div id="more_info_sheets" class="sheets align_justify"> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Kohlrabi Seeds "Best of All"</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span><strong><span style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 70 seeds.</span><br /></strong></span></h3> <div>This an easy to grow swede which produces medium sized swedes with yellow flesh and with an excellent, mild, sweet flavour. The fine textured roots store well and they are absolutely delicious cooked and added to mashed potatoes, casseroles etc.</div> <div>Sowing Instructions</div> <div>Site &amp; Soil</div> <div>Swedes prefer a medium soil which contains lots of nutrients although they will be happy growing in most soil types. They are unfortunately prone to club root so make sure the soil is not too acidic. Acid soils encourage club root. The ideal pH for swedes is somewhere between 7.0 and 7.4. If the soil is short of nutrients then add some well-rotted manure a month or so prior to sowing seed. If manure is not available then add a long lasting fertiliser such as bonemeal or similar. Swedes don't like being waterlogged. If your soil is not free draining then either dig in some well-rotted compost or grow them on a ridge so that the water drains away.</div> <div>When to Sow</div> <div>Sow seeds mid May to late June.</div> <div>How to Sow</div> <div>Sow seeds thinly, 1cm (½ inch) deep in drills 38cm (15 inches) apart in soil that has been raked to a fine tilth.</div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="crossselling"> </div> </div>
VE 111
Kohlrabi Seeds "Best of All"
Moringa the Miracle Tree Seeds (Moringa oleifera PKM 1)

Moringa the Miracle Tree...

Price €2.65 (SKU: T 38)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Moringa the Miracle Tree Seeds (Moringa oleifera PKM 1)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 or 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>For those of you who have never heard of Moringa, at all --- we'll just give you a really quick education on it.  Moringa Oleifera is the most commonly known variety of Moringa, and it has been grown in many countries, worldwide for thousands of years. Moringa Oleifera, the variety with which most people are familiar, is a slender tree, loaded with long, delicate-looking branches, which are covered with small, oval-shaped dark green leaves. Those lovely leaves are just packed with healthy, and tasty, nutrients. It is basically a tropical tree, but with care, it can be grown just about anywhere. It does NOT like the cold, so in areas where the temperatures get into the 40's, it needs to be kept warm. When the temperatures average in the low 60's, they tend to lose their leaves, and look a bit sickly. When the temperatures rise, they thrive! Ours made it through several winters here in FL, when the temperatures got as low as 28 degrees F, but we kept them sprinkled with water several times a day, and ran Christmas-type lights up, around and between the rows of seedlings.</p> <p>The Moringa Oleifera tree can reach great heights, left to itself, but that puts its harvest WAY out of reach.  Ideally, they should be kept to 6-12 feet, maximum, so you can easily prune the branches,</p> <p>cut the flowers, and harvest the pods. You can plant the seeds in a row, and maintain the Moringa Oleifera plants as a low hedge, if all you want to do is eat the leaves. They will provide you with abundant greens, as the more you trim them - the faster they seem to grow, the more branches they put out, and the bushier they get. If you do not prune them, the leaves will be hard to reach.</p> <p>Moringa Oleifera seeds are round and brown with tan "frilled" edges, while the seeds of the Moringa Stenopetala are a light tan, with a shape reminiscent of almonds or pistachios. Click on the bottom box on the right side of the page, to see the differences. It is unusual to see how different the seeds are, for a tree that is still Moringa. The little thumbnail photos above enlarge when you click on them</p> <p><strong><em>WIKIPEDIA:</em></strong></p> <p>Moringa oleifera is the most widely cultivated species of the genus Moringa, which is the only genus in the family Moringaceae. English common names include: moringa,[2] drumstick tree[2] (from the appearance of the long, slender, triangular seed-pods), horseradish tree[2] (from the taste of the roots, which resembles horseradish), ben oil tree or benzoil tree[2] (from the oil which is derived from the seeds). It is a fast-growing, drought-resistant tree, native to the southern foothills of the Himalayas in northwestern India, and widely cultivated in tropical and sub-tropical areas where its young seed pods and leaves are used as a vegetable.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>Moringa oleifera is a fast growing, evergreen, deciduous tree. It can reach a height of 10–12 m [5] and the trunk can reach a diameter of 45 cm.[6] The bark has a whitish-grey colour and is surrounded by thick cork. Young shoots have purplish or greenish-white hairy bark. The tree has an open crown of drooping, fragile branches and the leaves build up a feathery foliage of tripinnate leaves.</p> <p>The flowers are fragrant and bisexual, surrounded by five unequal thinly veined yellowish-white petals. The flowers are approximately 1-1.5 cm long and 2 cm broad. They grow on slender hairy stalks in spreading or drooping later flower clusters which have a longitude of 10–25 cm.[5]</p> <p>Flowering begins within the first six months after planting. In seasonally cool regions, flowering will only occur once a year between April and June. In more constant seasonal temperature and with constant rainfall, flowering can happen twice or even all year-round.</p> <p>The fruit is a hanging, three-sided brown capsule of 20–45 cm size which holds dark brown, globular seeds with a diameter of approximately 1 cm. The seeds have three whitish papery wings and are dispersed by wind and water.</p> <p>In cultivation, it is often cut back annually to 1–2 meters and allowed to regrow so the pods and leaves remain within arm's reach.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>The moringa tree is grown mainly in semiarid, tropical, and subtropical areas, corresponding in the United States to USDA hardiness zones 9 and 10. It grows best in dry sandy soil and tolerates poor soil, including coastal areas. As with all plants, optimum cultivation depends on producing the right environment for the plant to thrive. Moringa is a sun and heat-loving plant, and thus does not tolerate freeze or frost. Moringa is particularly suitable for dry regions, as it can be grown using rainwater without expensive irrigation techniques.</p> <p><strong>Production area</strong></p> <p>As of 2010, cultivation in Hawaii, for commercial distribution in the United States, is in its early stages.</p> <p>"India is the largest producer of moringa, with an annual production of 1.1 to 1.3 million tonnes of tender fruits from an area of 380 km². Among the states, Andhra Pradesh leads in both area and production (156.65 km²) followed by Karnataka (102.8 km²) and Tamil Nadu (74.08 km²). In other states, it occupies an area of 46.13 km². Tamil Nadu is the pioneering state in·so·much as it has varied genotypes from diversified geographical areas and introductions from Sri Lanka."</p> <p>Moringa is grown in home gardens and as living fences in Southern India and Thailand, where it is commonly sold in local markets.[11] In the Philippines, it is commonly grown for its leaves which are used in soup. Moringa is also actively cultivated by the World Vegetable Center in Taiwan, a center for vegetable research with a mission to reduce poverty and malnutrition in developing countries through improved production and consumption of vegetables. Tamil Nadu, Southern India has moringa in its folk stories and use in home gardens. In Haiti it is grown as windbreaks and to help reduce soil erosion.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation practice</strong></p> <p>Moringa can be grown as an annual or perennial plant. In the first year all pods are edible. Later years also bear non edible bitter pods. Therefore Moringa is often commercially cultivated annually. On less favorable locations the perennial cultivation has big advantages. Erosion is much smaller with perennial cultivation.[13] Perennial cultivation of Moringa is also practiced in agroforestry.</p> <p><strong>Soil preparations</strong></p> <p>In tropical cultivation sides the soil erosion is a major problem. Therefore the soil treatment has to be as low as possible. Plowing is required only for high planting densities. In low planting densities "it is better to dig pits and refill them with the soil. This ensures good root system penetration without causing too much land erosion. The pits must be 30 to 50 cm deep, and 20 to 40 cm wide."</p> <p><strong>Propagation</strong></p> <p>Moringa can be propagated from seed or cuttings. Direct seeding is possible because the germination rate of Moringa oleifera is high. After 12 days the germination rate is about 85%.[8] Production in seedbeds or containers is very time consuming. In these technics the plants can be better protected from insects and other pests. They are also used in areas where soil erosion is a problem.</p> <p>Cuttings of 1 meter length and a diameter of at least 4 cm can be also used for propagation.[8] At least one third of the cutting must be buried in the soil. In the Philippines, moringa is propagated by planting 1–2 m-long limbs cuttings, preferably from June to August. It can also be propagated by seeds, which are planted an inch below the surface and can be germinated year-round in well-draining soil.</p> <p><strong>Planting</strong></p> <p>For intensive leaf production "the spacing of plants should be 15 x 15 cm or 20 x 10 cm, with conveniently spaced alleys (for example: every 4 meters) to facilitate plantation management and harvests. Another option is to space the seeding lines 45 cm apart and to sow every 5cm on those lines. One can also space the lines only 30 cm apart and sow at a larger distance on the lines (10 to 20 cm)".[8] Weeding and disease prevention are difficult because of the high density.</p> <p>In a semi-intensive production the plants are spaced 50 cm to 1 m apart. This gives good results with less maintenance.</p> <p>Moringa trees can also be cultivated in alleys, as natural fences and associated with other crops. The distance between moringa rows in an agroforestry cultivation are usually between 2 to 4 meters.[8]In Haiti it is being used as fencing and windbreaks on farms.</p> <p><strong>Breeding</strong></p> <p>In India, from which Moringa most likely originates, the diversity of Moringa in cultivars in wild types is large.[13] This gives a good basis for breeding programs. In countries where Moringa has been introduced as a cultivar, the diversity is usually much smaller among the cultivar types. Locally well adapted wild types on the other hand, can be found in most regions.</p> <p>Because Moringa is cultivated and used in different ways, exist different breeding aims. The breeding aims for an annual or a perennial plant are obviously different. The yield stability of fruits are an important breeding aim for the commercial cultivation in India where Moringa is cultivated annually. On less favorable locations the perennial cultivation has big advantages. Erosion is much smaller with perennial cultivation.[13] Perennial cultivation of Moringa is also used in agroforestry. In Pakistan varieties have been tested for their nutritional composition of the leaves on different locations.[14] The different breeding aims result in a different selection. India selects for a higher number of pods and dwarf or semi-dwarf varieties. Breeders in Tanzania on the other hand are selecting for a higher oil content.[15] In total, only little breeding has been achieved so far.</p> <p><strong>Yield and Harvest</strong></p> <p>Moringa oleifera can be cultivated for its leaves, pods and/or its kernels for oil extraction and water purification. The yields vary widely, depending on season, variety, fertilization, and irrigation regime. Moringa yields best under warm, dry conditions with some supplemental fertilizer and irrigation.[16] Moringa harvest is done manually with knifes, sickles and stabs with hooks attached to it.</p> <p><strong>Fruits</strong></p> <p>When the plant is grown up from cuttings the first harvest can already take place after 6-8 month after plantation. Often, the fruits are not yielded in the first year and the yield is generally low during the first years. By year 2 it produces around 300 pods, by year 3 around 400-500. A good tree can yield 1000 or more pods.[17] In India a hectare can produce 31 tons of pods per year.[16] Under North Indian conditions the fruits ripen during the summer. Sometimes, particularly in South India, flowers and fruits appear twice a year and so there are 2 harvests, in July to September and March to April.</p> <p><strong>Leaves</strong></p> <p>Average yields of 6 tons/ha/year in fresh matter are can be achieved. The harvest differs strongly between the rainy and dry season with 1120 kg/ha per harvest and 690 kg/ha per harvest. The leaves and stems can be harvested from the young plants 60 days after seeding and then another 7 times in the year. At every harvest the plants are cut back to within 60 cm of the ground.[19] In some production systems the leaves are harvested every 2 weeks. Foidl. et al. (2001) showed that the cultivation of Moringa oleifera can also be done intensively with irrigation and fertilization with suitable varieties. Trials in Nicaragua with 1 million plant/ha and 9 cuttings/year over 4 years gave an average fresh matter production of 580 metric tons per ha/year equivalent to about 174 metric tons of fresh leaves.</p> <p><strong>Oil</strong></p> <p>One estimate for yield of oil from kernels is 250 liters per hectare.[16]The oil can be used as a food supplement, as a base for cosmetics and for hair and the skin.</p> <p><strong>Pests and diseases</strong></p> <p>The moringa tree is not affected by any serious diseases in its native or introduced ranges.</p> <p>In India there are several insect pests, including various caterpillars such as the bark-eating caterpillar, the hairy caterpillar or the green leaf caterpillar. The budworms Noctuidae are known to cause serious defoliation. Damaging agents can also be aphids, stem borers and fruity flies. In some regions termites can also cause minor damages. If termites are numerous in soils the insects management costs are not bearable.</p> <p>The moringa tree is a host to Leveillula taurica, a powdery mildew which causes damage in papaya crops in south India. Cultivation management should therefore be checked.</p> <p><strong>Leaves</strong></p> <p>The leaves are the most nutritious part of the plant, being a significant source of B vitamins, vitamin C, provitamin A as beta-carotene, vitamin K, manganese and protein, among other essential nutrients.[22][23] When compared with common foods particularly high in certain nutrients per 100 g fresh weight, cooked moringa leaves are considerable sources of these same nutrients. See chart on the right for nutritional value for fresh leaves. See chart below for nutrional value of dried leaves.</p> <p>Some of the calcium in moringa leaves is bound as crystals of calcium oxalate[26] though at levels 25-45 times less than that found spinach, which is a negligible amount.</p> <p>The leaves are cooked and used like spinach. In addition to being used fresh as a substitute for spinach, its leaves are commonly dried and crushed into a powder used in soups and sauces. As with most foods, heating moringa above 140 degrees Fahrenheit destroys some of the nutritional value.</p> <p><strong>Drumsticks</strong></p> <p>The immature seed pods, called "drumsticks", are commonly consumed in South Asia. They are prepared by parboiling, and cooked in a curry until soft.[27] The seed pods/fruits, even when cooked by boiling, remain particularly high in vitamin C[28] (which may be degraded variably by cooking) and are also a good source of dietary fiber, potassium, magnesium and manganese.</p> <p><strong>Seeds</strong></p> <p>The seeds, sometimes removed from more mature pods and eaten like peas or roasted like nuts, contain high levels of vitamin C and moderate amounts of B vitamins and dietary minerals (right table, USDA).</p> <p><strong>Seed oil</strong></p> <p>Mature seeds yield 38–40% edible oil called ben oil from its high concentration of behenic acid. The refined oil is clear and odorless, and resists rancidity. The seed cake remaining after oil extraction may be used as a fertilizer or as a flocculent to purify water.[29] Moringa seed oil also has potential for use as a biofuel.</p> <p><strong>Roots</strong></p> <p>The roots are shredded and used as a condiment in the same way as horseradish; however, they contain an alkaloid, potentially having nerve-paralyzing properties.</p> <p><strong>Malnutrition relief</strong></p> <p>Moringa trees have been used to combat malnutrition, especially among infants and nursing mothers. Five NGOs in particular — Trees for Life International, The Christian and Missionary Alliance, Church World Service, Educational Concerns for Hunger Organization, and Volunteer Partnerships for West Africa — have advocated moringa as "natural nutrition for the tropics."[25] One author stated that "the nutritional properties of Moringa are now so well known that there seems to be little doubt of the substantial health benefit to be realized by consumption of Moringa leaf powder in situations where starvation is imminent."</p> <p>Moringa is especially promising as a food source in the tropics because the tree is in full leaf at the end of the dry season when other foods are typically scarce.</p> <p><strong>Culinary uses</strong></p> <p>Moringa has numerous applications in cooking throughout its regional distribution. It may be preserved by canning and exported.</p> <p>In Bangladesh, it is made into a variety of curry dishes by mixing with coconut, poppy seeds, and mustard or boiled until the drumsticks are semisoft and consumed directly without any extra processing or cooking. It is used in curries, sambars, kormas, and dals, although it is also used to add flavor to cutlets and other recipes.</p> <p>The fruit meat of drum sticks, including young seeds, is used for soup. Young leaves can either be fried with shrimp or added as a topping in fish soup.</p> <p>There are several traditional Cambodian dishes using leaves (sluc) of the moringa tree known as daum m'rum,[37] such as korko (a mixed vegetable soup). As it is a favorite vegetable, Cambodians traditionally grow moringa trees close to their residences.</p> <p>In South India, Sri Lanka and Java, it is used to prepare a variety of sambar, is fried, or made into curry dishes by mixing with coconut, poppy seeds, and mustard or boiled until the drumsticks are semisoft and consumed directly without any extra processing or cooking. It is used in curries, sambars, kormas, and dals, although it is also used to add flavors, such as in ghee and soups. In Maharashtra, the pods are used in sweet and sour curries. In Gujarat and Rajasthan, the pods are used in to cook a spicy curry.</p> <p>Tender drumstick leaves, finely chopped, are used as garnish for vegetable dishes and salads. It is also used in place of or along with coriander. In some regions, the flowers are gathered and cleansed to be cooked with besan to make pakoras.</p> <p>The leaves may be fried and mixed with dried-fried tuna chips (Maldive fish), onions and dried chillies. This is equivalent to a sambal and eaten along with rice and curry. In one area in the Maldives, a soup is made with these leaves and rice, and eaten especially for breakfast during the month of Ramazan. It is also a common ingredient in an omelet. The pods are used to cook a mild curry.</p> <p>In the Punjab region of India and Pakistan, moringa called Soanjhna flowers are first separated from the stem, boiled, mashed and cooked. Curdle is an important element of its recipe to create a specific taste and favorite dish.</p> <p>The green pods, the leaves and the flowers are used in a variety of Thai dishes, such as curries, stir-fries, soups, omelets and salads. One of the most traditional dishes is sour Thai curry made with the drumstick pods and fish.</p> <p>In the Philippines, moringa leaves, known as kamunggay, malunggay or marungay, are commonly added to broth as a simple soup. The leaves may also be used as a typical ingredient in tinola, a traditional chicken dish consisting of chicken in a broth, moringa leaves, and either green papaya or another vegetable or in the all vegetable dish known as utan. The leaves can also be processed with olive oil and salt for a pesto-like pasta sauce that has become popular on the Filipino culinary scene. Moringa juice may be mixed with lemonsito juice to make ice candies or cold drinks, possibly more palatable to those who dislike vegetables.</p> <p>In 2007, Filipino Senator Loren Legarda campaigned for the popularization of moringa. She asked the government to make moringa among its priority crops for propagation, citing a Bureau of Plant Industry report about moringa's nutritional content.[38][39] The leaves may also be used in making polvoron (a milky, powdered snack), biofuel, and ben oil.</p> <p><strong>Other uses</strong></p> <p>In developing countries, moringa has the potential to improve nutrition, boost food security, foster rural development, and support sustainable landcare.[35] It may be used as forage for livestock, a micronutrient liquid, a natural anthelmintic and possible adjuvant.</p> <p>Moringa has been used in folk medicine,[36] including Siddha medicine and Ayurvedic traditional medicines and in the Philippines.[43] In Ayurvedic traditional medicine, the leaves are believed to affect blood pressure and glucose levels.[44] In Africa, Indonesia and Philippines, moringa leaves are given to nursing mothers in the belief that they increase lactation.</p> <p><iframe width="640" height="385" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/txbXMGnCERU?rel=0&amp;hd=1" frameborder="0" class="embed-responsive-item"> </iframe></p> </div> </body> </html>
T 38 10S
Moringa the Miracle Tree Seeds (Moringa oleifera PKM 1)

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.
Musa nagensium Banana Seeds...

Musa nagensium Banana Seeds...

Price €5.00 (SKU: V 111 MN)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Musa nagensium Banana Seeds Cold Hardy -20 °C</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Musa nagensium is a beautiful, slender banana with a striking dark purple-red to almost black pseudo-stem which is very waxy.</p> <p>The abaxial surface of the leaf has a dark red midrib and the lamina is so waxy that is nearly white.</p> <p>The pseudo-stem may exceed 6 m high. Produces suckers. The leaf is up to 3 m long and blue-gray. The leaves are quite far from each other compared to other bananas from the Eumusa group, further adding to the slender appearance of the plant .</p> <p>Inflorescence is pendulous. The bracts are oblong and lanceolate, the lower are 20-25 cm long and 10 cm wide, the top ones are 15-18 cm long, almost 8 cm wide, red outside, bright orange on the inside. Each with 18 to 20 flowers in two rows. The perianth is orange, 6 cm long, 1.3 cm wide, four-lobed, free petal ovate-lanceolate, more than 2.5 cm long, pointed.</p> <p>The fruits are 13-15 cm long, petiolate, not recurved. The seeds are very big: nearly 1.3 cm long and 1 cm wide.</p> <p><strong>Origin:</strong></p> <p>India, Assam, Naga mountains</p> <p><strong>Hardiness: </strong>-20 °C</p> <p><strong>Soil:</strong></p> <p>Rich and well drained</p> <p><strong>Height:</strong></p> <p>6 m</p> <p><strong>Exposure:</strong></p> <p>Sun</p> <p><strong>Propagation:</strong></p> <p>Seed</p> <p>Suckers</p> <p><strong>Germination</strong></p> <p>Banana seeds are not easy to germinate, with germination taking weeks or months, but it is extremely rewarding to see them succeed.</p> <p>Prepare the seeds by soaking in tepid, sterilised or distilled water.  Using a very small amount of the saltpetre powder provided (no more than half a teaspoon per 3 litres of water) will help remove and residue from the seeds and may aide germination by removing residue from the seeds.</p> <p>Soak the seeds for two days, using the saltpetre on the first day and switching to distilled/sterilised water only on the second day.</p> <p>Sow seeds into sterilised compost, vermiculite or a coir/perlite mix.</p> <p>Use a heated propagator or place the planted seeds in a warm airing cupboard, away from direct sunlight.  A temperature of 30-35 Celsius is required.</p> </body> </html>
V 111 MN
Musa nagensium Banana Seeds Cold Hardy -20 °C
Pannonian smooth parsnip seeds

Pannonian smooth parsnip seeds

Price €1.55 (SKU: VE 30 P (1g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Pannonian smooth parsnip seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #fd0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 150 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div class="">Pannonian smooth parsnip is a slightly aromatic spice plant in which only the root is used. Spindle root has a specific aroma that is used in cooking. Plant: medium lush, erect rosettes, height 40 - 50 cm<br><br>Root: slightly conical, 18 - 25 cm long, whitebark, light yellow marrow, juicy and aromatic, head diameter 6 - 8 cm, and body about 5 cm, weight 350 - 500 g, contains 16 - 17% dry matter<br><br>Maturation: medium-aged variety<br><br>Note: it is intended for industrial processing and household use, yields range from 30 - 50 t / ha<br>It is sown in early spring in loose soil 40-50 cm x 7-10 cm, depth 2-3 cm. <br>It germinates already at 0 ◦C.&nbsp;</div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 30 P (1g)
Pannonian smooth parsnip seeds
Passiflora colinvauxii Seeds 1.85 - 1

Passiflora colinvauxii Seeds

Price €3.00 (SKU: V 18 PCX)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Passiflora colinvauxii Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Passiflora colinvauxii or Colinvaux's Passion Flower. This Rare Passiflora climber is under threat in its natural habitat and is one of 45 Passiflora listed in The 1997 IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants. It is listed as rare. This plant is an extremely prolific bloomer who likes to live in partial shade.</p> <p>It smells like honeysuckle and attracts bees and butterflies. It is a fast-growing climber with bi-lobed leaves 7-16 cm. It flowers profusely in summer which will attract bees.</p> <p>The flowers are medium in size. The sepals and petals are white. The corona consists of a series of filaments, purple with white ends.</p> <p>The fruits are oval, 2-4 cm long, and 1-1.5 cm wide.</p> <p>It is found on the famous Galapagos Islands where it was discovered in 1966, but it probably traveled there from Ecuador.</p> <p>USDA Hardiness Zones 10 to 11</p> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>about 24-48 hours soak in warm water</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.5 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>25 ° C +</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>2-4 Weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p>&nbsp;</p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 18 PCX
Passiflora colinvauxii Seeds 1.85 - 1

Variety from Serbia
Prizrenka sweet pepper seeds  - 2

Prizrenka sweet pepper seeds

Price €1.75 (SKU: P 293 P)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Prizrenka sweet pepper seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Prizrenka is sweet pepper from Serbia, with increased content of dry matter. It is intended for cultivation in the open field. The plant is robust with many sweet fruits 12-15 long and 5 cm in diameter. The flesh of the fruit is thick, sweet.</p> <p>Young fruits are dark green and ripe dark red, weighing 120-150 g.</p> <h3><strong>Variety from Serbia</strong><strong></strong><strong></strong></h3>
P 293 P
Prizrenka sweet pepper seeds  - 2

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.
Purple Apple Berry Seeds (Billardiera longiflora) 2.5 - 5

Purple Apple Berry Seeds...

Price €2.50 (SKU: V 31)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Purple Apple Berry Seeds (Billardiera longiflora)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The Purple Apple Berry, also known as the Mountain Blue Berry, is a small vine native to the cool, moist forests of Australia. The wonderfully shiny, edible purple fruit start off white; becoming fully ripe in early winter after the greenish-yellow tubular trumpet-flowers are pollinated. The fruits are best harvested in late summer, before becoming over ripened.</p> <p class="">Tasting similar to apples, hence the name, these unusual plants are wonderful eaten raw or even fried and spiced. Ideally grown along trellis, or allowed to climb other plants, the purple apple berry is a hardy (withstanding temperatures as low as -5°C / 23°F), sun loving plant that appreciates being sheltered from high winds. Accustomed to moist, well drained soil, the Billardiera Longiflora is a Royal Horticultural Society Garden Merit Award Winner.<span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000; font-size: 12pt;"></span></p> <p><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Sowing Instructions:</strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Sow in trays or pots on the surface of a mix of two-thirds peat based compost, eg. Levington and one third sand, and just cover the seed with a sprinkling of sieved compost or vermiculite.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Place in a propagator or seal inside a polythene bag and maintain an optimum temperature of 15-18C . </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Germination should take place in 30-60 days .</span></p> <p><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">PROPAGATION-SMOKE TREATMENT</strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Smoke treatment is absolutely essential for some Australian native plants and greatly improves germination in others. Simply put, the chemicals in smoke 'break' the seed's dormancy which is the first stage of germination - no smoke, no germination!</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">There are several methods of smoke treatment short of lighting a bushfire in your backyard. The simplest method is to sow the seed and cover them with smoke impregnated vermiculite as part of the sowing process. When you water, the chemicals are slowly leached out of the vermiculite and bathe the seed in smoke chemicals.</span></p> <p><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Growing Instructions:</strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Transplant seedlings when large enough to handle into 7.5cm pots. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Over-winter at a temperature of about 5C. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Harden off and plant out when all risk of frost has passed in full sun or semi-shade. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Will be ok outside in mild areas but protect in cold areas with fleece or by maintaining in a container and over-wintering in a frost free place</span></p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 31
Purple Apple Berry Seeds (Billardiera longiflora) 2.5 - 5

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