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This plant is resistant to winter and frost.

Giant Kumquats or cumquats Seeds (Fortunella margarita) exotic tropical fruit

Giant Kumquats or cumquats...

Price €3.25 (SKU: V 50 G)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;color:#000000;"><em><strong>Giant Kumquats or cumquats Seeds - exotic tropical fruit</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p><strong><span style="font-size:10pt;">This is a gigantic kumquat, which is more than three times bigger than ordinary kumquat.</span></strong></p> <p><span style="font-size:10pt;">Kumquats or cumquats are a group of small fruit-bearing trees in the flowering plant family Rutaceae, either forming the genus Fortunella, or placed within Citrus sensu lato. The edible fruit closely resembles that of the orange (Citrus sinensis), but it is much smaller and ovular, being approximately the size and shape of an olive. The English name "kumquat" derives from the Cantonese pronunciation gam1 gwat1 (given in Jyutping romanization).</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:10pt;">They are slow-growing evergreen shrubs or short trees, from 2.5 to 4.5 meters (8 to 15 ft) tall, with dense branches, sometimes bearing small thorns. The leaves are dark glossy green, and the flowers white, similar to other citrus flowers, borne singly or clustered in the leaf-axils. Depending on size, the kumquat tree can produce hundreds or even thousands of fruits each year.[1] The tree can be hydrophytic, with the fruit often found floating on water near shore during the ripe season.[citation needed]</span></p> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">The plant is native to south Asia and the Asia-Pacific region. The earliest historical reference to kumquats appears in literature of China in the 12th century. They have long been cultivated in Japan, Taiwan, the Philippines, and southeast Asia. They were introduced to Europe in 1846 by Robert Fortune, collector for the London Horticultural Society, and shortly thereafter into North America.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Classification</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Carl Peter Thunberg originally classified the kumquats as Citrus japonica in his 1784 book Flora Japonica. In 1915, Walter T. Swingle reclassified them in a segregate genus, Fortunella, named in honor of Robert Fortune. Seven species of Fortunella have generally been recognized—F. japonica, F. margarita, F. crassifolia, F. hindsii, F. obovata and F. polyandra, as well as the recently described F. bawangica . The Flora of China returns the kumquat to Citrus and combines the species into the single species as Citrus japonica.[2]</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Varieties :</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Round kumquat</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">The round kumquat (also Marumi kumquat or Morgani kumquat) is an evergreen tree, producing edible golden-yellow colored fruit. The fruit is small and usually round but can be oval shaped. The peel has a sweet flavor but the fruit has a sour center. The fruit can be eaten cooked but is mainly used to make marmalade and jelly. It is grown as an ornamental plant and can be used in bonsai. This plant symbolizes good luck in China and other Asian countries, where it is sometimes given as a gift during the Lunar New Year. It's more commonly cultivated than most other kumquats as it is cold tolerant. It can be kept as a houseplant.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">When the kumquats are divided into multiple species the name Fortunella japonica (Citrus japonica) is retained by this group.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Oval kumquat</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Fortunella margarita, also known as the oval kumquat or the Nagami kumquat, is a close relative to Citrus species. It is a small evergreen tree, that can reach more than 12 ft (4 m) high and 9 ft (3 m) large. It is native to southeastern Asia, and more precisely to China. The oval kumquat has very fragrant citrus-like white flowers, and small edible oval orange fruits. The oval kumquat is an ornamental little tree, with showy foliage, flowers and fruits. It is also fairly frost-hardy, and will withstand negative temperatures such as 14 °F (-10 °C), and even a little lower for very brief periods. It can be grown in USDA hardiness zones 9 and warmer, but can also be tried in sheltered places, in USDA hardiness zone 8. Unlike most citrus species, the oval kumquat has a shorter growth period, and goes into dormancy fairly earlier in autumn. This partly explains its better frost hardiness.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Characteristics</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">The evergreen leaves of oval kumquats are deep-green and relatively small. They can reach up to 3 in (7 cm) long and 1.5 in (3.5 cm) wide. The white flowers of the oval kumquat are similar to the citrus flowers. They are strongly perfumed, and they appear relatively late in the growing season, generally late spring.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">The oval kumquat is a fruit that looks like any citrus fruit, with an orange rind. The fruits are oblong, up to 2 in (5 cm) long. Unlike the common citrus, which have a rind which is inedible raw, oval kumquats have an edible sweet rind. The flesh, however, is not as sweet as the rind, and the juice is quite acidic and sour, with a lemon-like flavor. This fruit is generally eaten fresh, with its rind. It can also be processed into preserves, jams, and other products.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Cultivation</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">The oval kumquat needs a well-drained and fertile ground. It dislikes alkaline soils. The oval kumquat is susceptible to common citrus pests and diseases.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Jiangsu kumquat</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">The Jiangsu kumquat or Fukushu kumquat bears edible fruit that can be eaten raw. The fruit can be made into jelly and marmalade. The fruit can be round or bell shaped; it is bright orange when fully ripe. It may also be distinguished from other kumquats by its round leaves that make this species unique within the genus. It is grown for its edible fruit and as an ornamental plant. It cannot withstand frost.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">When the kumquats are divided into multiple species the name Fortunella obovata (Citrus obovata) is used for this group.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Cultivation and uses</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Kumquats are cultivated in China, South Korea, North Korea, Taiwan, Southeast Asia, Japan, the Middle East, Europe (notably Corfu, Greece), southern Pakistan, and the southern United States (notably Florida, Louisiana, Alabama) and California.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">They are much hardier than other citrus plants such as oranges. The 'Nagami' kumquat requires a hot summer, ranging from 25 °C to 38 °C (77 °F to 100 °F), but can withstand frost down to about −10 °C (14 °F) without injury. They grow in the tea hills of Hunan, China, where the climate is too cold for other citrus fruits, even the Mikan (also known as the Satsuma) orange. The trees differ also from other citrus species in that they enter into a period of winter dormancy so profound that they will remain in it through several weeks of subsequent warm weather without putting out new shoots or blossoms. Despite their ability to survive low temperatures, kumquat trees grow better and produce larger and sweeter fruits in warmer regions.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Uses</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Kumquats are often eaten raw. As the rind is sweet and the juicy center is sour, the raw fruit is usually consumed either whole—to savor the contrast—or only the rind is eaten. The fruit is considered ripe when it reaches a yellowish-orange stage and has just shed the last tint of green.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Culinary uses include candying and kumquat preserves, marmalade, and jelly. Kumquats can also be sliced and added to salads. In recent years kumquats have gained popularity as a garnish for cocktail beverages, including the martini as a replacement for the more familiar olive. A kumquat liqueur mixes the fruit with vodka or other clear spirit. Kumquats are also being used by chefs to create a niche for their desserts and are common in European countries.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">The Cantonese often preserve kumquats in salt or sugar. A batch of the fruit is buried in dry salt inside a glass jar. Over time, all the juice from the fruit is diffused into the salt. The fruit in the jar becomes shrunken, wrinkled, and dark brown in color, and the salt combines with the juice to become a dark brown brine. A few salted kumquats with a few teaspoons of the brine/juice may be mixed with hot water to make a remedy for sore throats.[citation needed] A jar of such preserved kumquats can last several years and still keep its flavor.[citation needed]</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">In the Philippines and Taiwan, kumquats are a popular addition to green tea and black tea, either hot or iced.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">In Vietnam, kumquat bonsai trees (round kumquat plant) are used as a decoration for the Tết (Lunar New Year) holiday. Kumquat fruits are also boiled or dried to make a candied snack called mứt quất.</span></div> <div> <div> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">                                      all year round                                    </span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">0.5-1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">min. 20° C.</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">Until it Germinates 7days - 2 Months</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">Seeds Gallery 05.11.2012.</span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table></div> </div> </div>
V 50 G
Giant Kumquats or cumquats Seeds (Fortunella margarita) exotic tropical fruit
Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds  - 3

Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo...

Price €1.95 (SKU: B 6)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds (Phyllostachys bambusoides)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Phyllostachys bambusoides, commonly called madake, giant timber bamboo or Japanese timber bamboo, is a bamboo species in the genus Phyllostachys.</p> <p>Madake is typically known for being the most common type of bamboo used in the making of shakuhachi flutes and is utilized in numerous Japanese, as well as Chinese, arts, and crafts.</p> <p>Phyllostachys bambusoides can reach a height of 15–22 m and a diameter of 10–15 cm. The culms are dark green, quite thick and very straight. The leaves are dark green. New stalks emerge in late spring and grow quite rapidly, up to 1 meter each day. The flowering interval of this species is very long, about 120 years. This strong plant is in Asia one of the preferred bamboos for building and in the manufacture of furniture.</p> <p>This species is native to China, but it is commonly grown worldwide, especially in Japan.</p> </body> </html>
B 6
Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds  - 3

GOLIATH Giant Pumpkin Seeds

GOLIATH Giant Pumpkin Seeds

Price €3.00 (SKU: P 342)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>GOLIATH Giant Pumpkin Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 4 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This is a monster of a pumpkin with fruits often in the weight of 400-500 kg and with a measurement of 3 m around, so ideal for competitions may be bright orange. Skin covers thick bright yellow-orange flesh, this is delicious in pies and don’t forget Halloween.</p> <h2>How to Grow World Record Giant Pumpkins</h2> <p>The world record for giant pumpkins is 2323.7 pounds, set by Beni Meier of Germany 2014. That's well over one ton!! People, who see these giant pumpkins, want to know "how do they grow them so big?" Growing pumpkins isn't difficult. Growing a big pumpkin takes a bit of work and effort. Growing a giant pumpkin, weighing a ton or more... now that takes a lot of effort and requires a lot of knowledge.</p> <p>If you already grow pumpkins, you are off to a good start towards producing a monster this fall. As you enter the world of giant pumpkin growing, plan to spend much more time, to pamper and nurture your plants, to grow gigantic pumpkins at a phenomenal speed.</p> <p>Did you Know?  At peak growth, record-breaking giant pumpkins can grow 40-50 pounds a day, or more!</p> <h2><strong><em>Top Ten Secrets to Growing Record-Breaking Giant Pumpkins:</em></strong></h2> <ol><li>Super Soil - First, get out your soil tester, to assure that the soil pH is ideal for growing pumpkins. Average soil just will not do. Add ample amounts of compost and manure to your soil. It is best to till it into your soil in the fall, especially if the manure is raw (not decomposed). Check the pH again, after adding soil amendments.</li> </ol><p></p> <ol><li>Great Genetics -To grow a giant pumpkin, find seeds that have the genetics to grow huge fruit. Goliath Giant pumpkin seeds and Atlantic Giant pumpkin seeds are readily available. This will get you started. After a year or two of learning and attending the giant pumpkin weighoffs, you will come in contact with growers, who can give you some of the best genetic seeds available. The very best genetics are not available in stores. The top growers have them. Armed with good genetic seeds, you  have the potential to grow your first, and hopefully record breaking, giant pumpkin. The rest is up to you.</li> </ol><p></p> <ol><li>An early, indoor start -  Giant pumpkin plants require 140 days or more from the time you plant a seed, to the time you harvest the fruit. Growers seeking to break the world record, start seeds in mid to late April, and harvest fruit in early October. That means as many as 160 days, from when the seed was planted! Chances are, you will have to start them indoors. When you do, the young seedlings will need your attention, and as much sunlight as you can provide. It also means, you may need to provide cold and frost protection when you transfer them outdoors. As October nears, you may again have to protect them from cold and frost.</li> </ol><p></p> <ol><li>Lots of Fertilizer, the  right stuff, at the right time -  Throw away what you've learned about fertilizing, and re-learn the art of fertilizing giant pumpkins. It is truely an art form, as giant pumpkins require huge amounts of fertilizer. Start with a high nitrogen formula in the spring. Apply a high phosphorous fertilizer in advance of the blooming/fruit set stage. Finally, switch to a high potassium formula, for fruit growth and plant health.</li> </ol><p></p> <ol><li>Pour on the Water - The top growers have elaborate drip systems, to deliver the right amount of water (moist, not wet soil), 24/7.  They add liquid fertilizers, fish emulsions, and seaweed fertilizer in their water tanks.</li> </ol><p></p> <ol><li>Liquid Calcium - All the fertilizer and nutrients in the world, can not be used efficiently, if soluble calcium is not present in your soil. Liquid calcium significantly increases the ability of plants to take up those nutrients and use them, to grow big fruit.</li> </ol><p></p> <ol><li>Nurturing Plant Growth and Pruning Vines - Prior to flowering and fruit set, the trick is to get your plant growing fast and furious. But, that's not enough. Here is how the  top growers train and develop their vines: Grow the vines in a "Christmas tree" shape. Let secondary vines grow out and away from the main vine, to a length of 10' to 12'. At this point pinch off the growing tip, and bury it in the ground. Also, prune off any tertiary vines (those that grow off the secondary vine), as they appear. Pruning is vital, to maximize growth of the fruit. It encourages, or "trains" the vine, to focus upon sending nutrients to the fruit.</li> </ol><p></p> <ol><li>Promoting Secondary Root Growth - Secondary root growth can have a HUGE impact upon the final weight of the fruit. Secondary roots will form at the point where a a leaf stem meets the vine. Cover the vine at this point, with a couple inches of rich garden soil. Keep it well watered, and the roots will grow deeply. When fertilizing, feed secondary roots, too. More on Secondary Roots</li> </ol><p></p> <ol><li>Insect and Pumpkin Disease Protection - Many growers have had a great big pumpkin growing strongly on the vine, only to have it slowed, or even felled, by insect problems or plant disease. Pumpkins are susceptible to a number of insect and disease problems. Fortunately, there are insecticides and fungicides that will treat many of the most common pumpkin plant problems. It is vital to begin a treatment plant early, BEFORE insect or disease problems can take hold.  Begin applying insecticides early in the season. Begin using fungicides before heat and humidity arrives in your area.</li> </ol><p></p> <ol><li>Shading the Fruit - Giant pumpkin fruit begins its life, as a soft shelled, yellow fruit. The skin is very pliable, allowing it to quickly grow and expand. Hot, sun and dry wind, can harden the skin, signaling the fruit to ripen. The trick, is to keep the skin soft, and pliable. Giant pumpkin growers quickly learn, that a shade cover over the fruit is essential to growing 'em big. Shade covers can be simple, or elaborate.</li> </ol><p>Did You Know? Like regular field pumpkins, giant pumpkins are edible. There are plenty of recipes for cooking with giant pumpkins. But, the bigger they get, the coarser the texture of the pulp.</p> <p>You are now armed with the top grower secrets to growing giant pumpkins. Now, go and plant some seeds, and produce a new, world record giant pumpkin!</p>
P 342
GOLIATH Giant Pumpkin Seeds

Variety from Spain
Ramiro sweet Giant pepper Seeds

Ramiro sweet Giant pepper...

Price €2.05 (SKU: P 315)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Ramiro sweet Giant pepper Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Ramiro sweet pointed peppers are a sweet variety of the common pepper. Higher sugar content their taste is sweeter than that of normal peppers. They have a longish pointed shape and exist in three different colours, red, yellow, green. Ideal for salads, grilled or as finger food. Also very decorative as antipasti stuffed with feta cheese for example.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Ramiro came into existence through crossings of old varieties. Probably based on the Eastern-European-Turkish-Indian type of pepper. Dutch growers rediscovered this variety three years ago and made it a success product.</p> <p><strong>Fruit length: </strong>24 – 30 cm</p> <p><strong>Fruit weight:</strong> 100g</p> <p><strong>Fruit width:</strong> 4,5 - 5 cm</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Nutrition Information</strong></p> <p>Serving size: 100 grams</p> <p>Calories: 31</p> <p>Protein: 0.99 grams</p> <p>Fat: 0.30 grams</p> <p>Carbohydrate: 6.03 grams</p> <p><strong><em>Use Tips</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Stuffed Ramiro Peppers</strong></p> <p><em>Ingredients</em></p> <p>½ pepper</p> <p>drizzle of olive oil</p> <p>55g/2oz sausage meat</p> <p>30g/1oz Caerphilly cheese</p> <p>For the sauce</p> <p>pinch of chilli flakes</p> <p>dash of soy sauce</p> <p>1 tbsp tomato ketchup</p> <p>1 tsp sesame oil</p> <p>drizzle of olive oil</p> <p><strong>Method</strong></p> <p>Preheat the oven to 220C/425F/Gas 7.</p> <p>Drizzle the pepper half with olive oil, place on a baking sheet and bake in the oven for 5-6 minutes.</p> <p>Remove from the oven and spoon in the sausage meat and cheese. Return to the oven and cook for 10-12 minutes or until cooked through.</p> <p>To make the sauce, mix the chilli flakes, soy sauce, ketchup, sesame oil and olive oil together in a bowl.</p> <p>Transfer the stuffed pepper to a serving plate and spoon the sauce over to serve.</p>
P 315
Ramiro sweet Giant pepper Seeds

Variety from Serbia
Giant Sweet Cherry Seeds...

Giant Sweet Cherry Seeds...

Price €1.95 (SKU: V 98 G)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Giant Sweet Cherry Seeds (Prunus avium)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><b>The fruits are 3 times bigger than any other Sweet Cherry!</b></p> <p>Prunus avium, commonly called wild cherry,[1] sweet cherry,[1] bird cherry,[1] or gean,[1] is a species of cherry native to Europe, western Turkey, northwestern Africa, and western Asia, from the British Isles[2] south to Morocco and Tunisia, north to the Trondheimsfjord region in Norway and east to the Caucasus and northern Iran, with a small disjunct population in the western Himalaya.[3][4] This species, in the rose family (Rosaceae), has a diploid set of sixteen chromosomes (2n=16).[5] All parts of the plant except for the ripe fruit are slightly toxic, containing cyanogenic glycosides.</p> <p><strong>Nomenclature</strong></p> <p>The early history of its classification is somewhat confused. In the first edition of Species Plantarum (1753), Linnaeus treated it as only a variety, Prunus cerasus var. avium, citing Gaspard Bauhin's Pinax theatri botanici (1596) as a synonym;[clarification needed] his description, Cerasus racemosa hortensis ("Cherry with racemes, of gardens")[clarification needed] shows it was described from a cultivated plant.[6] Linnaeus then changed from a variety to a species Prunus avium in the second edition of his Flora Suecica in 1755.[7]</p> <p>Sweet cherry was known historically as Gean or Mazzard (also 'massard'), until recently, both were largely obsolete names in modern English.</p> <p>The name "wild cherry" is also commonly applied to other species of Prunus growing in their native habitats, particularly to the North American species Prunus serotina.</p> <p>Prunus avium means "bird cherry" in the Latin language.[4] In English "bird cherry" often refers to Prunus padus.</p> <p><strong>Mazzard</strong></p> <p>More recently[when?] 'Mazzard' has been used to refer to a selected self-fertile cultivar that comes true from seed, and which is used as a seedling rootstock for fruiting cultivars.[9][10] This term is still used particularly for the varieties of P. avium grown in North Devon and cultivated there, particularly in the orchards at Landkey.</p> <p><strong>Description and ecology</strong></p> <p>Prunus avium is a deciduous tree growing to 15–32 m (50-100 ft) tall, with a trunk up to 1.5 m (5 ft) in diameter. Young trees show strong apical dominance with a straight trunk and symmetrical conical crown, becoming rounded to irregular on old trees. The bark is smooth purplish-brown with prominent horizontal grey-brown lenticels on young trees, becoming thick dark blackish-brown and fissured on old trees. The leaves are alternate, simple ovoid-acute, 7–14 cm (3–6 in) long and 4–7 cm (2–3 in) broad, glabrous matt or sub-shiny green above, variably finely downy beneath, with a serrated margin and an acuminate tip, with a green or reddish petiole 2–3.5 cm (0.8-1.4 in) long bearing two to five small red glands. The tip of each serrated edge of the leaves also bear small red glands.[11] In autumn, the leaves turn orange, pink or red before falling. The flowers are produced in early spring at the same time as the new leaves, borne in corymbs of two to six together, each flower pendent on a 2–5 cm (0.8-2 in) peduncle, 2.5–3.5 cm (1-1.4 in) in diameter, with five pure white petals, yellowish stamens, and a superior ovary; they are hermaphroditic, and pollinated by bees. The fruit is a drupe 1–2 cm (0.4-0.8 in) in diameter (larger in some cultivated selections), bright red to dark purple when mature in midsummer, edible, variably sweet to somewhat astringent and bitter to eat fresh. Each fruit contains a single hard-shelled stone 8–12 mm long, 7–10 mm wide and 6–8 mm thick, grooved along the flattest edge; the seed (kernel) inside the stone is 6–8 mm long.</p> <p>The fruit are readily eaten by numerous kinds of birds and mammals, which digest the fruit flesh and disperse the seeds in their droppings. Some rodents, and a few birds (notably the Hawfinch), also crack open the stones to eat the kernel inside. All parts of the plant except for the ripe fruit are slightly toxic, containing cyanogenic glycosides.</p> <p>See also List of Lepidoptera that feed on Prunus</p> <p>The leaves provide food for some animals, including Lepidoptera such as the case-bearer moth Coleophora anatipennella.</p> <p>The tree exudes a gum from wounds in the bark, by which it seals the wounds to exclude insects and fungal infections.</p> <p><strong>Fruit</strong></p> <p>Some eighteenth and nineteenth century botanical authors[who?] assumed a western Asia origin for the species based on the writings of Pliny; however, archaeological finds of seeds from prehistoric Europe contradict this view. Wild cherries have been an item of human food for several thousands of years. The stones have been found in deposits at Bronze Age settlements throughout Europe, including in Britain.[9] In one dated example, wild cherry macrofossils were found in a core sample from the detritus beneath a dwelling at an Early and Middle Bronze Age pile-dwelling site on and in the shore of a former lake at Desenzano del Garda or Lonato, near the southern shore of Lake Garda, Italy. The date is estimated at Early Bronze Age IA, carbon dated there to 2077 BC plus or minus 10 years. The natural forest was largely cleared at that time.[16]</p> <p>By 800 BC, cherries were being actively cultivated in Asia Minor, and soon after in Greece.[9]</p> <p>As the main ancestor of the cultivated cherry, the sweet cherry is one of the two cherry species which supply most of the world's commercial cultivars of edible cherry (the other is the sour cherry Prunus cerasus, mainly used for cooking; a few other species have had a very small input).[9] Various cherry cultivars are now grown worldwide wherever the climate is suitable; the number of cultivars is now very large.[9] The species has also escaped from cultivation and become naturalised in some temperate regions, including southwestern Canada, Japan, New Zealand, and the northeast and northwest of the United States.</p> <p><strong>Ornamental</strong></p> <p>It is often cultivated as a flowering tree. Because of the size of the tree, it is often used in parkland, and less often as a street or garden tree. The double-flowered form, 'Plena', is commonly found, rather than the wild single-flowered forms.</p> <p>Two interspecific hybrids, P. x schmittii (P. avium x P. canescens) and P. x fontenesiana (P. avium x P. mahaleb) are also grown as ornamental trees.</p> <p><strong>Timber</strong></p> <p>The hard, reddish-brown wood (cherry wood) is valued as a hardwood for woodturning, and making cabinets and musical instruments.[15] Cherry wood is also used for smoking foods, particularly meats, in North America, as it lends a distinct and pleasant flavor to the product.[citation needed]</p> <p><strong>Other uses</strong></p> <p>The gum from bark wounds is aromatic and can be chewed as a substitute for chewing gum.</p> <p>Medicine can be prepared from the stalks of the drupes that is astringent, antitussive, and diuretic.</p> <p>A green dye can also be prepared from the plant.</p> <p><strong>Contribution to other species</strong></p> <p>Prunus avium is thought to be one of the parent species of Prunus cerasus (sour cherry) by way of ancient crosses between it and Prunus fruticosa (dwarf cherry) in the areas where the two species overlap. All three species can breed with each other. Prunus cerasus is now a species in its own right having developed beyond a hybrid and stabilised.</p> </body> </html>
V 98 G
Giant Sweet Cherry Seeds (Prunus avium)

Variety from Greece
Greek Traditional Giant Melon Kalambaka Seeds

Greek Traditional Giant...

Price €1.95 (SKU: V 169)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Greek Traditional Giant Melon Kalambaka Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This is an old traditional variety of the Greek melon, which gets the name from the town of Kalambaka from which originates. The fruits of this variety have a weight of 8 to 10 kilograms and have a length of 60 cm and more. The bark of the fruit is orange in color, and the flesh is also orange. It has an excellent and sweet aroma and a unique and intense smell.</p> <p>Truly one of the most beautiful varieties of melon which we In latest years tried!</p>
V 169
Greek Traditional Giant Melon Kalambaka Seeds

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.
Giant Kiwifruit Seeds

Giant Kiwifruit Seeds...

Price €1.95 (SKU: V 28 G)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>GIANT KIWIFRUIT SEEDS</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;"><strong>Gigant fruits which have a weight of 170 grams.</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Once known as Chinese gooseberry in Europe, the kiwi first came to the United States in the early 1900s. Fuzzy, brown and oblong, the kiwi does not require peeling before eating. The kiwi plant has a life expectancy of 50 years. If you live within USDA hardiness zone seven through nine, you can grow a kiwi plant from the seeds of a kiwi fruit. But keep in mind, you must plant more than one kiwi plant, spaced 10 feet apart, in order for the plants to produce kiwi fruits in three to four years</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Health Benefits of Kiwi Fruit</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">1. Prevents asthma and other respiratory diseases</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">2. Fights cardiovascular diseases</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">3. Anti cancer</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">4. Digestive health</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">5. Protects your eyes</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">6. Manage blood pressure</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">7. Good for skin</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">8. Boosts immunity</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">9. Fights male impotency</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">10. Supports healthy birth</span></p> <h2><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;"><strong>How to Grow:</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">1. Lay the seeds on a paper towel to dry out. Place the seeds in an area where they will remain undisturbed for two days.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">2. Fill a plastic baggie with perlite. Add the dried kiwi seeds to the perlite, seal the baggie and place it in the refrigerator for a minimum of four months.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">3. Fill a 6-inch pot with sterilized potting soil. Remove the kiwi seeds from the refrigerator and plant them in the potting soil at a depth of 1/8 of an inch.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">4. Moisten the soil with a spray bottle of water and cover the pot with a piece of saran wrap, secured with a rubber band. Place the pot in a warm area while the kiwi seeds germinate.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">5. Remove the plastic wrap once the kiwi seeds begin to sprout, and continue spraying the kiwi seeds with water to keep the soil moist. Place the pot in an area that receives direct sunlight for at least six hours per day.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">6. Transplant the kiwi seedlings outdoors, in the spring, in well-drained soil that has a pH between 5.5 to 7.0. Test the soil to determine the acidity before planting, using a soil pH testing kit. If necessary, amend the soil with lime raise the pH and peat moss to lower it.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">7. Water the kiwi plants at a rate of 1-inch of water per week for the first year, using a soaker hose. Fertilize the kiwi with a 10-10-10 fertilizer according to label instructions.</span></p> <div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>about 2-3 months in a moist substrate at 2-5 ° C refrigerator</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>all year round&gt; Autumn / Winter preferred</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>10-15 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>3-12 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"></td> <td valign="top"> <p><span><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery </em></span><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table></div>
V 28 G
Giant Kiwifruit Seeds

Variety from Greece
Giant Beefsteak Greek Tomato Seeds PREVEZA

Giant Beefsteak Greek...

Price €2.25 (SKU: P 291)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant Beefsteak Greek Tomato Seeds PREVEZA</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The huge fruits that reach a weight of over 1 kg, and with it more and excellent taste, either in salads or cooked meals. Greece variety of tomatoes from the district Elpida that there called giant Pervez. Indeed, from a few dozen fruits none of them were less than 500 grams. The plants are robust and highly prolific and fruit red and slightly wrinkled.</p>
P 291
Giant Beefsteak Greek Tomato Seeds PREVEZA
1100+ Seeds Giant Sweet Pepper Elephant's Ear 13 - 1

1100+ Seeds Giant Sweet...

Price €13.00 (SKU: P 53 (9g))
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>1100+ Seeds Giant Sweet Pepper Elephant's Ear</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price is for package of 1100+ seeds.</strong><strong><br /></strong></span></h2> <div> <p>Big fruity, aromatic. Elephant ear is one of the favorite Serbian varieties in<span> </span><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/tomato-seeds/" target="_blank" title="Here you can buy organic tomato seeds at the lowest prices... We have old and new varieties in all colors, black tomato, blue tomato, yellow tomato, red tomato ..." rel="noopener">Serbia</a>, it is mostly used for making "<span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajvar" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><strong>ajvar</strong></a></span>", "pinđur", stuffing as well as for deep freezing. They can be used well for pickling, for grilling, in<span> </span><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/tomato-seeds/" target="_blank" title="Here you can buy organic tomato seeds at the lowest prices... We have old and new varieties in all colors, black tomato, blue tomato, yellow tomato, red tomato ..." rel="noopener">vegetable</a><span> </span>dishes, in meat dishes, and as a<span> </span><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/vegetable-seeds/" target="_blank" title="Here you can buy organic vegetable high-quality seeds at the lowest prices... We have seeds of Vegetable, Vegetables, Pepper, capsicum, Peppers, Cucumber, Cucumbers, tomato, tomatoes, Gourd, Gourds, Carrot, Carrots, Lettuce, Cabbage, Cabbages, Beetroot, Beetroots, Cauliflower, Cauliflowers, Corn, Bean, Beans, Onion, Onions, Potato, Potatoes, Radish, Radishes, Watermelon, Watermelons, melon, melons, sunflower, sunflowers, Lycopersicon, Cucumis sativus, Cucumis, Cucurbitaceae, Cucurbita, Lagenaria, Daucus carota, Lactuca sativa, Brassica oleracea, Beta vulgaris, Zea mays, Phaseolus vulgaris, Allium cepa, Solanum tuberosum, Solanaceae, Raphanus sativus, Citrullus lanatus, Cucumis melo, Helianthus, " rel="noopener">salad</a>.</p> <p>Excellent in taste.</p> <p>Elephant's Ear is sweet<span> </span><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/vegetable-seeds/" target="_blank" title="Here you can buy organic vegetable high-quality seeds at the lowest prices... We have seeds of Vegetable, Vegetables, Pepper, capsicum, Peppers, Cucumber, Cucumbers, tomato, tomatoes, Gourd, Gourds, Carrot, Carrots, Lettuce, Cabbage, Cabbages, Beetroot, Beetroots, Cauliflower, Cauliflowers, Corn, Bean, Beans, Onion, Onions, Potato, Potatoes, Radish, Radishes, Watermelon, Watermelons, melon, melons, sunflower, sunflowers, Lycopersicon, Cucumis sativus, Cucumis, Cucurbitaceae, Cucurbita, Lagenaria, Daucus carota, Lactuca sativa, Brassica oleracea, Beta vulgaris, Zea mays, Phaseolus vulgaris, Allium cepa, Solanum tuberosum, Solanaceae, Raphanus sativus, Citrullus lanatus, Cucumis melo, Helianthus, " rel="noopener">pepper</a>, with very large and fleshy fruits. The color of the fruit changes from dark green to bright red when ripe. Reaches a weight of 150-350gr.  It is very disease resistant and provides a stable yield of 50/60 tons per acre. This variety is suitable for the greenhouse, for cold frames, and also for outdoors.</p> </div> </body> </html>
P 53 (9g)
1100+ Seeds Giant Sweet Pepper Elephant's Ear 13 - 1
  • On sale!
Endive Giant Seeds

Endive Giant Seeds

Price €1.65 (SKU: P 269)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span><em><strong><span style="text-decoration:underline;color:#000000;">ENDIVE GIANT SEEDS</span><br /></strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Package of 100 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <div>Beware! Once you acquire a taste for this interesting and attractive-looking salad plant, you will find salads based on the ubiquitous Lettuce insipid and dull. Although grown like Lettuce, it has the advantage that it will withstand without complaint both heat and a few degrees of frost. Best if blanched a few days before harvesting and - a personal opinion - tastes better with a home-made French dressing rather than salad cream out of a bottle. If you´ve never grown Endives, do give them a trial.</div>
P 269
Endive Giant Seeds
Giant White LIMA Bean Seeds

Giant White LIMA Bean Seeds

Price €1.95 (SKU: P 258)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Giant White LIMA Bean Seeds</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.  </strong></span></h3> <p>Phaseolus lunatus is a legume grown for its edible seeds. It is commonly known as the butter bean, sieva bean or lima bean.</p> <p>Phaseolus lunatus is of Andean and Mesoamerican origin. Two separate domestication events are believed to have occurred. The first, taking place in the Andes around 2000 BC, produced a large-seeded variety (lima type), while the second, taking place in Mesoamerica around 800 AD, produced a small-seeded variety (Sieva type). By around 1300, cultivation had spread north of the Rio Grande, and in the 1500s, the plant began to be cultivated in the Old World.</p> <p> </p> <p>The small-seeded (Sieva) type is found distributed from Mexico to Argentina, generally below 1,600 m (5,200 ft) above sea level, while the large-seeded wild form (lima type) is found distributed in the north of Peru, from 320 to 2,030 m (1,050 to 6,660 ft) above sea level.</p> <p> </p> <p>The Moche Culture (0–800 CE) cultivated lima beans heavily and often depicted them in their art. During the Spanish Viceroyalty of Peru, lima beans were exported to the rest of the Americas and Europe, and since the boxes of such goods had their place of origin labeled "Lima, Peru", the beans got named as such. Despite the origin of the name, when referring to the bean, the word "lima" is generally pronounced differently than the Peruvian capital.</p> <p> </p> <p>The term "butter bean" is widely used for a large, flat and yellow/white variety of lima bean (P. lunatus var. macrocarpus, or P. limensis).</p> <p> </p> <p>In the United States Sieva-type beans are traditionally called butter beans, also otherwise known as the Dixie or Henderson type. In that area, lima beans and butter beans are seen as two distinct types of beans.</p> <p> </p> <p>In Spain, it is called garrofón, and constitutes one of the main ingredients of the famous Valencian paella.</p> <p> </p> <p>In the United Kingdom and the United States, "butter beans" refers to either dried beans which can be purchased to rehydrate, or the canned variety which are ready to use. In culinary use there, lima beans and butter beans are distinct, the latter being large and yellow, the former small and green. In areas where both are considered to be lima beans, the green variety may be labelled as "baby" (and less commonly "junior") limas.</p> <p> </p> <p>Both bush and pole (vine) cultivars exist, the latter range from 1 to 5 m in height. The bush cultivars mature earlier than the pole cultivars. The pods are up to 15 cm (5.9 in) long. The mature seeds are 1 to 3 cm (0.39 to 1.18 in) long and oval to kidney-shaped. In most cultivars the seeds are quite flat, but in the "potato" cultivars, the shape approaches spherical. White seeds are common, but black, red, orange, and variously mottled seeds are also known. The immature seeds are uniformly green. Lima beans typically yield 2,900 to 5,000 kg (6,400 to 11,000 lb) of seed and 3,000 to 8,000 kg (6,600 to 17,600 lb) of biomass per hectare.</p> <p> </p> <p>The seeds of the cultivars listed below are white unless otherwise noted. Closely related or synonymous names are listed on the same line.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Bush types</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>    'Henderson' / 'Thorogreen', 65 days (heirloom)</p> <p>    'Eastland', 68 days</p> <p>    'Jackson Wonder', 68 days (heirloom, seeds brown mottled with purple)</p> <p>    'Dixie Butterpea', 75 days (heirloom, two strains are common: red speckled and white seeded)</p> <p>    'Fordhook 242', 75 days, 1945 AAS winner</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Pole types</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>    'Carolina' / 'Sieva', 75 days (heirloom)</p> <p>    'Christmas' / 'Giant Speckled' / 'Speckled Calico', 78 days (heirloom, seeds white mottled with red)</p> <p>    'Big 6' / 'Big Mama', 80 days</p> <p>    'King of the Garden', 85 days (heirloom)</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Health and nutrition</strong></p> <p>Lima beans, like many other legumes, are a good source of dietary fiber, and a virtually fat-free source of high-quality protein.</p> <p> </p> <p>Lima beans contain both soluble fiber, which helps regulate blood sugar levels and lowers cholesterol, and insoluble fiber, which aids in the prevention of constipation, digestive disorders, irritable bowel syndrome and diverticulitis.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Health hazards</strong></p> <p>Like many beans, butter beans are toxic if not boiled for 10-15 minutes. In one case all the people who ate falafel made with dried butter beans (rather than traditional broad beans or chickpeas) that had been soaked but not boiled, then ground, made into patties, and shallow fried, had serious food poisoning.</p> </body> </html>
P 258
Giant White LIMA Bean Seeds
Giant Radish Seeds “ROSSO GIGANTE“ 1.95 - 2

Giant Radish Seeds ROSSO...

Price €1.95 (SKU: P 156 RG)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Giant Radish Seeds “ROSSO GIGANTE“</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Solid white flesh is firm, crisp and mild.  Globe-shaped roots have deep crimson skin, and reach 10cm in diameter, without becoming hollow or pithy. Solid white flesh is firm, crisp and mild. Ready to harvest 29 days after seeding.</p> <p>GARDEN HINTS: Thrives in cool weather. Make successive plantings every 2 weeks until late spring, then again a month before frost.</p> <p> </p> <p>Sun: Full Sun</p> <p>Spread: 3  inches</p> <p>Height: 4-6  inches</p> <p>Thinning: 3 inches</p> <p>Days to Maturity: 30  days</p> <p>Sowing Method: Direct Sow</p> </div> </body> </html>
P 156 RG
Giant Radish Seeds “ROSSO GIGANTE“ 1.95 - 2
Giant Rhubarb Seeds (Gunnera  manicata) 1.95 - 6

Giant Rhubarb Seeds...

Price €1.95 (SKU: UT 2)
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Giant Rhubarb - Seeds (Gunnera  manicata)<br /></strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong><span style="font-size:14pt;">Price for Package of 10 seeds.</span></strong></span></h2> <div>Gunnera manicata syn. Gunnera brasiliensis is also known as giant rhubarb. It is a perennial herbaceous plant which is native to the mountains of Brasil and Colombia. Giant gunneras are huge ornamental plants that need a lot of space, which are fitted for big gardens with damps areas or ponds. The leaves usually die back in winter, but the plant itself with survive lower temperatures, down to about 14°F (-10°C) and even lower with some protection. This plant can thus be grown in USDA zones 8a and warmer, and could be tried in sheltered places in zones 7.</div> <div>This plant has huge decidious leaves, that can be up to 8 ft (2,40 m) wide in its native area. Leaf stems are thorny, and can be up to 4 or 5 ft. (Up to 1,50 m) Gunnera manicata has tiny green-red flowers, which are grouped in erected inflorescences. These inflorescences bear both male and female flowers.</div> <div> <p>This plant bear tiny red-green fruits, which are about .1 in (2.5 mm) long.</p> </div> <div>Gunnera manicata requiert les expositions suivantes : ombre,mi-ombre,lumière</div> <div>These plants thrive in damp bog conditions, in a moist and fertile soil.</div> </div>
UT 2
Giant Rhubarb Seeds (Gunnera  manicata) 1.95 - 6

Giant Staghorn Fern Seeds (Platycerium Superbum)

Giant Staghorn Fern Seeds...

Price €1.70 (SKU: UT 1)
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5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Giant Staghorn Fern Seeds (Platycerium Superbum)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong><span style="font-size:14pt;">Price for Package of 50 seeds.</span></strong></span></h2> <div>Platycerium superbum, commonly known as the Staghorn fern is found in Queensland, northern New South Wales and Malaysia. Platycerium is a genus of about 18 species of ferns, four of which occur in eastern Australia. Two, the elkhorn (Platycerium bifurcatum) and the staghorn (P.superbum) are well-known in cultivation.</div> <div>Staghorns are generally epiphytic (growing on trees), or occasionally lithophytic (growing on rocks). These ferns have broad nest fronds, or sterile fronds, to 60 cm diameter, which grow and embrace the host and from a humus-collecting bowl, which can reach impressive dimensions of 1 metre across. The laminae of these fronds are erect and simple with deeply lobed upper margins. Fertile fronds are quite different in appearance, being broad at the base and hanging down from the plant, with forked laminae up to 200 cm in length and 2-6 cm wide. . The Staghorn entirely lacks the ability to produce plantlets, and the single plant simply gets larger each season. Brown sori, which contain spores, occur on the underside of the fertile fronds.</div> <div>In nature, these ferns often grow high up in trees, where they receive much light filtering through the canopy. Similarly, plenty of light is important for good growth in cultivation and dense shade is resented. Filtered sunlight with some humidity is best. </div> <div>Growing Platycerium from spore is not difficult given the right techniques and conditions. This species is frost tender and will not tolerate temperatures below 1*C. Some protection from drying wind is important, however, overwatering must be avoided. If the peaty centre remains continually wet, rot may occur and eventually kill the fern. Soaking intermittently, say, once weekly (but also depending on rainfall) is best. Fertilise with liquid organic fertilisers and sprinkle about 5g slow release fertiliser capsules into the bowl at intervals. Every few months place small pieces of aged hardened cow manure in the bowl. Staghorn ferns appreciate a slightly acidic environment and some growers find the remnants of a teapot emptied into the bowl to be helpful.</div> <div>Because of their relatively large size, staghorn ferns are rarely grown in pots except when small specimens are purchased. Utilizing their natural growth habit, staghorn ferns are well suited for mounting on cypress wood or tree fern fiber plaque or wire baskets. To mount a fern on a slab of wood, place a few handfuls of growing medium on the wood slightly below center, shaping it in a circular mound. Place the fern on the medium so the bud is slightly below center of the mount and basal fronds are in contact with the medium. Using wire (not copper) or plastic stripping, secure the fern tightly to its mount. This same method is also used for tree fern fiber plaques. Wire baskets can also be used when packed with medium and hung so the top of the basket is vertical. The fern is secured to the basket using wire or plastic stripping. Clay pots can also be used if hung sideways. </div> <div>Remounting to larger containers will be needed periodically as the fern grows. How often these are remounted depends on the size of the original mount, rate of medium breakdown, and growth rate of the fern. When the basal fronds reach the sides of the mount, it's time to place the fern on a larger mount. If the staghorn fern becomes too large, it may become impractical to remove the fern from its mount. In this case, enlarging the original mount periodically is suggested.</div> </div>
UT 1
Giant Staghorn Fern Seeds (Platycerium Superbum)
McKanas Giant Mixed Seeds

McKanas Giant Mixed Seeds

Price €1.85 (SKU: F 12)
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5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>McKanas Giant Mixed Seeds (Aquilegia)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div> <div>Mckana's Columbine is a superior strain developed for its very large, 7 to 8cm (3in) flowers with long graceful spurs. This exciting group of hybrid aquilegia in a very wide colour range, including combinations of white, pink, blue, yellow, pink, pale-blue, purple and scarlet, with crisp coloured outer petals, and cream/white coloured inner petals.</div> <div>Mckana’s Giant Columbine will grow to around 75cm (30in) tall at maturity, with a spread of 45cm (18in). Its foliage tends to remain dense right to the ground. It grows and blooms well in shady areas, they are excellent for rock gardens, perennial beds and borders.  Sowing: Sow February to June or September to October. </div> <div>Seeds can either be sown directly where they are to flower or can be sown into pots and grown on, before transplanting. Avoid the hottest and coldest parts of the year and sow in early spring to early summer or sow in autumn. </div> <div>Sowing Direct: </div> <div>Find a cooler part of the garden that enjoys dappled shade. If you have plenty of seed start by sprinkling seeds straight onto the ground in late-summer. Rake so that the seeds are covered with a small amount of soil. The seeds will germinate by the following spring. </div> <div>Aquilegias will self-sow into choice plants, so only sprinkle the seeds where it will not matter.</div> <div>Sowing Indoors: </div> <div>Sow seed on the surface of lightly firmed, seed compost in pots or trays. Cover seed with a light sprinkling of vermiculite. Stand the pot in water until the soil is moist and drain. Either use a plastic lid or seal container inside a polythene bag to keep the moisture in. Keep at 15 to 20°C (59 to 68°F).</div> <div>After sowing, do not exclude light as this helps germination. Keep the surface of the compost moist but not waterlogged. Always stand the pots in water: never water on the top of seeds. </div> <div>Expect germination within 2 to 3 weeks. Overwinter September sowings in a cold frame and plant out the following spring. When large enough to handle, transplant seedlings into 7.5cm (3in) pots or trays. Gradually acclimatise to outdoor conditions for 10 to 15 days before planting out after all risk of frost, 30cm (12in) apart. </div> <div>Cultivation: </div> <div>Feeding is unnecessary unless the soil is exceptionally poor. An aquilegia should not need staking, but an overfed plant will flop. Their rounded foliage is attractive, even in winter, but it looks much more impressive when given a late-autumn haircut. Cut the leaves right back and fresh foliage will appear.</div> <div>When the flowers are finished, around the end of June, cut the stalks off and let the leaves do their stuff without the distraction of drying spikes of stem.</div> <div>Lift and divide large clumps in early spring and apply a generous 5 to 7cm (2 to 3in) mulch of well-rotted manure or garden compost around the plant. Divided specimens may take some time to establish since they don’t like having their roots disturbed. Contact with the sap may cause skin irritation.</div> <div>Columbines tend to cross-pollinate, hybridise, and self seed freely, creating new strains and colours. The formation of seeds will shorten the productive lifespan of the plant, so it is best to remove the spent flowers promptly. Columbines tend to lose vitality after 4 to 5 years and are best replaced at that time.</div> <div>Plant Uses: </div> <div>Cottage/Informal Garden, Borders and Beds. Shade Gardens.</div> <div>Origin: </div> <div>Columbines in the wild are identified by species characteristics and often are endemic to a specific geographic area. </div> <div>There are at least seventy species of Aquilegia, including Britain’s native Aquilegia vulgaris. Aquilegia vulgaris has been grown in gardens since the 13th century, when it first appears in illuminated manuscripts. </div> <div>Columbines (even those in the wild) will hybridise easily between species, many of those bought in nurseries are cultivars and are bred and sold for their showy blooms and hardiness. </div> <div>Long-spurred hybrids are derived from crosses with A. caerulea, (coerulea.) introduced into British gardens from the Rocky Mountains in the 1860s, and hybrids with A. chrysantha from Arizona have widened the range of colours available. </div> <div>Nomenclature: </div> <div>The genus name Aquilegia comes from the Latin word aquil meaning eagle, in reference to the flower’s five spurs at the back of the flower that resemble an eagle’s talon. </div> <div>The common name, columbine, comes from the Latin columbinus, meaning 'dove-like'. If you up-end an aquilegia to reveal the spurs, they resemble birds feeding and 'Doves round a Dish', another common name, reflects this perfectly. The flower was often depicted in medieval paintings to represent the dove of peace. </div> <div>The family name Ranunculus is a diminutive form of the Latin rana meaning 'little frog'; because many of its members grow in moist places.</div> </div> </div>
F 12
McKanas Giant Mixed Seeds