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This plant is resistant to winter and frost.
Trumpet vine or Trumpet creeper Seeds 1.95 - 1

Trumpet vine or Trumpet...

Price €1.95 (SKU: F 45)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Trumpet vine or Trumpet creeper Seeds (Campsis radicans)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Campsis radicans (trumpet vine or trumpet creeper, also known in North America as cow itch vine[citation needed] or hummingbird vine[citation needed]), is a species of flowering plant of the family Bignoniaceae, native to the eastern United States and naturalized in parts of the western United States as well as in Ontario, parts of Europe, and scattered locations in Latin America. Growing to 10 m (33 ft), it is a vigorous, deciduous woody vine, notable for its showy trumpet-shaped flowers. It inhabits woodlands and riverbanks, and is also a popular garden subject.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>The leaves are opposite, ovate, pinnate, 3–10 cm long, and emerald green when new, maturing into a dark green. The flowers come in terminal cymes of 4–12, orange to red in color with a yellowish throat, and generally appear after several months of warm weather.</p> <p><strong>Ecology</strong></p> <p>The flowers are very attractive to hummingbirds, and many types of birds like to nest in the dense foliage. The flowers are followed by large seed pods. As these mature, they dry and split. Hundreds of thin, brown, paper-like seeds are released. These are easily grown when stratified.</p> <p>Etymology</p> <p>The Latin specific epithet radicans means "with stems that take root".</p> <p><strong>Garden history</strong></p> <p>The flamboyant flowering of Campsis radicans made it obvious to even the least botanically-minded of the first English colonists in Virginia. Consequently the plant quickly made its way to England early in the 17th century. Its botanical parentage, as a hardy member of a mostly subtropical group, made its naming problematic: according to John Parkinson, the Virginia settlers were at first calling it a jasmine or a honeysuckle, and then a bellflower; he classed it in the genus Apocynum (dogbane). Joseph Pitton de Tournefort erected a catch-all genus Bignonia in 1700, from which it has since been extricated.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>The vigor of the trumpet vine should not be underestimated. In warm weather, it puts out huge numbers of tendrils that grab onto every available surface, and eventually expand into heavy woody stems several centimeters in diameter. It grows well on arbors, fences, telephone poles, and trees, although it may dismember them in the process. Ruthless pruning is recommended. Outside of its native range this species has the potential to be highly invasive, even as far north as New England. The trumpet vine thrives in many places in southern Canada as well.</p> <p>Away from summer heat, C. radicans is less profuse of flower. A larger-flowered hybrid 'Mme Galen' was introduced about 1889 by the Tagliabue nurserymen of Laniate near Milan.</p> <p>The form C. radicans f. flava has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.</p> </body> </html>
F 45
Trumpet vine or Trumpet creeper Seeds 1.95 - 1

This plant has giant fruits

Chayote Seeds (Sechium edule)

Chayote Seeds (Sechium edule)

Price €5.00 (SKU: P)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Chayote Seeds (Sechium edule)</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Chayote (Sechium edule), also known as christophene or christophine, cho-cho, mirliton or merleton (Creole/Cajun), chuchu (Brazil), Cidra (Antioquia, Caldas, Quindio and Risaralda regions of Colombia), Guatila (Boyacá and Valle del Cauca regions of Colombia), Centinarja (Malta), pimpinela (Madeira), Pipinola (Hawaii), pear squash, vegetable pear, chouchoute, choko, güisquil (El Salvador), Labu Siam (Indonesia), Squash, Ishkus or Chowchow (India), బెంగళూరు వంకాయ ( తెలుగు - Telugu), Pataste (Honduras),Tayota (Dominican Republic), Sayote (Philippines)[5] is an edible plant belonging to the gourd family Cucurbitaceae, along with melons, cucumbers and squash.</p> <p>Chayote is originally native to Mexico where it grows abundantly and has little commercial value. It has been introduced as a crop all over Latin America, and worldwide. The main growing regions are Brazil, Costa Rica and Veracruz, Mexico. Costa Rican chayotes are predominantly exported to the European Union, whereas Veracruz is the main exporter of chayotes to the United States.</p> <p>The word chayote is a Spanish derivative of the Nahuatl word chayohtli (pronounced /t͡ʃaˈjoʔt͡ɬi/). Chayote was one of the many foods introduced to Europe by early explorers, who brought back a wide assortment of botanical samples. The Age of Conquest also spread the plant south from Mexico, ultimately causing it to be integrated into the cuisine of many other Latin American nations.</p> <p>The chayote fruit is used in mostly cooked forms. When cooked, chayote is usually handled like summer squash, it is generally lightly cooked to retain the crisp flavor[clarification needed]. Though rare and often regarded as especially unpalatable and tough in texture, raw chayote may be added to salads or salsas, most often marinated with lemon or lime juice. Whether raw or cooked, chayote is a good source of amino acids and vitamin C.</p> <p>Although most people are familiar only with the fruit as being edible, the root, stem, seeds and leaves are edible as well. The tubers of the plant are eaten like potatoes and other root vegetables, while the shoots and leaves are often consumed in salads and stir fries, especially in Asia. Like other members of the gourd family, such as cucumbers, melons, and squash, chayote has a sprawling habit, and it should only be planted if there is plenty of room in the garden. The roots are also highly susceptible to rot, especially in containers, and the plant in general is finicky to grow. However, in Australia and New Zealand, it is an easily grown yard or garden plant, set on a chicken wire support or strung against a fence.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>In the most common variety, the fruit is roughly pear-shaped, somewhat flattened and with coarse wrinkles, ranging from 10 to 20 cm in length. It looks like a green pear, and it has a thin, green skin fused with the green to white flesh, and a single, large, flattened pit. Some varieties have spiny fruits. The flesh has a fairly bland taste, and a texture is described as a cross between a potato and a cucumber. Although generally discarded, the seed has a nutty flavor[citation needed] and may be eaten as part of the fruit.</p> <p>The chayote vine can be grown on the ground, but as a climbing plant, it will grow into anything, and can easily rise as high as 12 meters when support is provided. It has heart-shaped leaves, 10–25 cm wide and tendrils on the stem. The plant bears male flowers in clusters and solitary female flowers. The plant’s fruit is light green and elongated with deep ridges lengthwise.</p> <p><strong>Taxonomy</strong></p> <p>The plant was first recorded by modern botanists in P. Browne's 1756 work, the Civil and Natural History of Jamaica. In 1763, it was classified by Jacquin as Sicyos edulis and by Adanson as Chocho edulis.  Swartz included it in 1800 in its current genus Sechium.</p> <p><strong>Culinary and medicinal uses</strong></p> <p>The fruit does not need to be peeled to be cooked or fried in slices. Most people regard it as having a very mild flavor by itself (though some find it unpalatable). It is commonly served with seasonings (e.g. salt, butter and pepper in Australia) or in a dish with other vegetables and/or flavorings. It can also be boiled, stuffed, mashed, baked, fried, or pickled in escabeche sauce. Both fruit and seed are rich in amino acids and vitamin C.[8] Fresh green fruit are firm and without brown spots or signs of sprouting. Smaller ones are more tender.</p> <p>The tuberous part of the root is starchy and eaten like a yam (can be fried). It can be used as pig or cattle fodder, as well.</p> <p> </p> <p>The leaves and fruit have diuretic, cardiovascular and anti-inflammatory properties, and a tea made from the leaves has been used in the treatment of arteriosclerosis and hypertension, and to dissolve kidney stones.</p> <p> </p> <p>In Louisiana Creole and Cajun cuisine, the fruit, known as mirliton (pronounced IPA: [ˈmɜːlɪtɒn]) also spelled mirletons or merletons (plural—the r is often silent, e.g. Cajun me-lay-taw or urban Creole miʁl-uh-tɔ̃ns) is a popular seasonal dish for the holidays, especially around Thanksgiving, in a variety of recipes.</p> <p> </p> <p>Chayote is an important part of traditional diets across Mesoamerica, and can be found in a variety of dishes.</p> <p> </p> <p>In the Philippines, the plant is known as "Sayote" and is grown mostly on Mountainous part of the country such as Benguet and parts of Cordillera Administrative Region. Chayote is used in many kinds of dishes such as soup, stir-fried vegetables and chop suey.</p> <p> </p> <p>In Indonesia, chayotes are called labu siam and widely planted for their shoots and fruit. It's generally used in Sundanese food as "lalap" and one of ingredients for Sundanese cuisine called "sayur asem".</p> <p> </p> <p>In Taiwan, chayotes are widely planted for their shoots, known as lóng xü cài (龍鬚菜, literally "dragon-whisker vegetable"). Along with the young leaves, the shoot is a commonly consumed vegetable in the region.</p> <p> </p> <p>In Thai cuisine, the plant is known as sayongte (Thai: ซายองเต้) or fak maeo (Thai: ฟักแม้ว, literally meaning "Miao melon"). It grows mainly in the mountains of northern Thailand. The young shoots and greens are often eaten stir-fried or in certain soups.</p> <p> </p> <p>In Brazil and other Latin American countries, it is breaded and fried, or used cooked in salads, soups and soufflés.</p> <p> </p> <p>In Darjeeling, India and Nepal, the plant and fruit is called ishkus (इस्कुस in Nepali), probably derived from the word squash. Its shoots, fruit and roots are widely used for different varieties of curries.</p> <p> </p> <p>Chayote is also popular in South Indian cuisine. It is popularly referred to as "Bangalore brinjal (Bengaluru vankayya)", called in Kannada as "seeme badanekai" - brinjal/eggplant/aubergine of the plateau. It is used in vegetable stews like "sambar" and "palya".</p> <p> </p> <p>In Tamil Nadu in South India, it is known as "chow chow" and widely used in everyday cooking for "sambar" or "kootu". In Andhra Pradesh, it is called Bengaluru vankayya and sold in vegetable markets in the name of "chow chow".</p> <p> </p> <p>In Réunion, the French overseas territory in the Indian Ocean near Mauritius, chou chou, as it is known, is served in many dishes especially in the highlands. A popular starter of Chou chou au Gratin (baked with a cheese sauce), as a side with a meal and even as a desert.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Folklore</strong></p> <p>"Apple pie"</p> <p>In Australia, where it is called choko, a persistent urban legend is that McDonald's apple pies were made of chokos, not apples.[ This eventually led McDonald's to emphasise the fact that real apples are used in their pies. This legend was based on an earlier belief that tinned pears were often disguised chokos. A possible explanation for the rumour is that there are a number of recipes in Australia that advise chokos can be used in part replacement of canned apples to make the fruit go farther in making apple pies. This likely arose because of the economies of "mock" food substitutes during the Depression Era, shortages of canned fruit in the years following World War II, and the fact apples do not grow in many tropical and subtropical parts of Australia, making them scarce. Chokos, on the other hand, grow extensively in Australia, with many suburban backyards featuring choko vines growing along their fence lines.</p> <p> </p> <p>Another possible reason for the rumour of McDonald's apple pies containing chokos was that it was thought that apples would degenerate and become soggy and inedible in a McDonald's pie, whereas chokos are well known to retain their firmness and consistency after cooking, freezing, and reheating. It was thought that the "chunks" of apple in the pie were in fact chunks of choko, and the sauce and filling were simply a spiced, apple-flavoured concoction.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Mummies</strong></p> <p>Due to its purported cell-regenerative properties, it is believed as a contemporary legend that this fruit caused the mummification of people from the Colombian town of San Bernardo who extensively consumed it. The very well preserved skin and flesh can be seen in the mummies today.</p> </body> </html>
P
Chayote Seeds (Sechium edule)
Allspice Seeds (Pimenta dioica)

Allspice Seeds (Pimenta...

Price €2.25 (SKU: MHS 39)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Allspice Seeds (Pimenta dioica)</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 6 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Jamaica pepper, pepper, myrtle pepper, pimenta, pimento, English pepper  or newspice</p> <p>Allspice, also called Jamaica pepper, pepper, myrtle pepper, pimenta, pimento, English pepper or newspice, is the dried unripe fruit ("berries", used as a spice) of Pimenta dioica, a midcanopy tree native to the Greater Antilles, southern Mexico, and Central America, now cultivated in many warm parts of the world. The name 'allspice' was coined as early as 1621 by the English, who thought it combined the flavour of cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves.</p> <p> </p> <p>Several unrelated fragrant shrubs are called "Carolina allspice" (Calycanthus floridus), "Japanese allspice" (Chimonanthus praecox), or "wild allspice" (Lindera benzoin). Allspice is also sometimes used to refer to the herb costmary (Tanacetum balsamita).</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Preparation/form</strong></p> <p>Allspice is the dried fruit of the P. dioica plant. The fruit are picked when green and unripe and are traditionally dried in the sun. When dry, they are brown and resemble large brown peppercorns. The whole fruit have a longer shelf life than the powdered product and produce a more aromatic product when freshly ground before use.</p> <p> </p> <p>Fresh leaves are used where available. They are similar in texture to bay leaves and are thus infused during cooking and then removed before serving. Unlike bay leaves, they lose much flavour when dried and stored, so do not figure in commerce. The leaves and wood are often used for smoking meats where allspice is a local crop. Allspice can also be found in essential oil form.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>Allspice is one of the most important ingredients of Caribbean cuisine. It is used in Caribbean jerk seasoning (the wood is used to smoke jerk in Jamaica, although the spice is a good substitute), in moles, and in pickling; it is also an ingredient in commercial sausage preparations and curry powders. Allspice is also indispensable in Middle Eastern cuisine, particularly in the Levant, where it is used to flavour a variety of stews and meat dishes. In Palestinian cuisine, for example, many main dishes call for allspice as the sole spice added for flavouring. In the U.S., it is used mostly in desserts, but it is also responsible for giving Cincinnati-style chili its distinctive aroma and flavour. Allspice is commonly used in Great Britain, and appears in many dishes, including cakes. Even in many countries where allspice is not very popular in the household, as in Germany, it is used in large amounts by commercial sausage makers. It is a main flavour used in barbecue sauces.[citation needed] In the West Indies, an allspice liqueur called "pimento dram" is produced.</p> <p> </p> <p>Allspice has also been used as a deodorant. Volatile oils found in the plant contain eugenol, a weak antimicrobial agent.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>The allspice tree, classified as an evergreen shrub, reaches heights between 10 and 18 m (32 and 60 ft). Allspice can be a small, scrubby tree, quite similar to the bay laurel in size and form. It can also be a tall, canopy tree, sometimes grown to provide shade for coffee trees planted underneath it. It can be grown outdoors in the tropics and subtropics with normal garden soil and watering. Smaller plants can be killed by frost, although larger plants are more tolerant. It adapts well to container culture and can be kept as a houseplant or in a greenhouse.</p> <p> </p> <p>To protect the pimenta trade, the plant was guarded against export from Jamaica. Many attempts at growing the pimenta from seeds were reported, but all failed. At one time, the plant was thought to grow nowhere except in Jamaica, where the plant was readily spread by birds. Experiments were then performed using the constituents of bird droppings; however, these were also totally unsuccessful. Eventually, passage through the avian gut, either the acidity or the elevated temperature, was found to be essential for germinating the seeds. Today, pimenta is spread by birds in Tonga and Hawaii, where it has become naturalized on Kauaʻi and Maui.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Western history</strong></p> <p>Allspice (P. dioica) was encountered by Christopher Columbus on the island of Jamaica during his second voyage to the New World, and named by Dr. Diego Álvarez Chanca. It was introduced into European and Mediterranean cuisines in the 16th century. It continued to be grown primarily in Jamaica, though a few other Central American countries produced allspice in comparatively small quantities.</p> <p> </p> <p>Note: when you receive the package carefully break the membrane, and remove the seeds from it. In each berry there are two seeds. See picture number</p>
MHS 39
Allspice Seeds (Pimenta dioica)

Best seller product

Variety from Spain
Cherry Kumato Black Tomato Seeds  - 2

Cherry Kumato Black Tomato...

Price €2.35 (SKU: VT 8 CK)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Cherry Kumato Black Tomato Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10, 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The Kumato cherry tomato is a non-genetically modified hybrid variety tomato created from the cross of wild and domestic tomato (varieties SX387 and/or OLMECA) by the Swiss agricultural company, Syngenta. It was created to have a superior flavor and texture compared to other tomatoes on the market and is uniquely marketed for use at all stages of ripeness. Its name comes from a George and Ira Gershwin song titled, 'Let's Call the Whole Thing Off'. The line of the song, 'You say tomato, I say tomato' playfully emphasizes the way that the Kumato is similar to the tomato yet at the same time quite unique as well.</p> <p><strong>Description/Taste</strong></p> <p>The Kumato cherry tomato is distinguishable from other cherry tomatoes by its skin which varies in color from dark green-brown when young to dark red mahogany when fully mature. The darker-hued skin of the Kumato cherry tomato is a result of their high fructose content. The shape of the Kumato cherry tomato is very round and has an extremely juicy inner flesh. Kumato cherry tomatoes offer a rich tomato flavor that has a slightly sour taste when young and when ripe will develop an exceptionally sweet flavor.</p> <p><strong>Nutritional Value</strong></p> <p>Kumato cherry tomatoes are cholesterol-free and rich in vitamins A and C as well as in potassium and magnesium.</p> <p><strong>Applications</strong></p> <p>Kumato cherry tomatoes are a delicious substitute for classic cherry tomatoes. They can be utilized at all stages of ripeness. When dark green to brown their mild flavor and firm texture make them ideal for use raw and sliced in salads, sandwiches, pasta, and flatbread. When they take on a rich red hue their texture is juicy and flavor much sweeter, at this stage they are exceptional in cooked preparations. They can be roasted, grilled, sautéed or boiled down to make sauces.</p> <p><strong>Geography/History</strong></p> <p>A variety of Kumato tomato was first grown in the Mediterranean on the Almerian coast. It was discovered growing on the outskirts of the family farm of Luis Ortega in the 1970s. Ortega noted the tomato was darker than a normal tomato and had a sweeter flavor. A characteristic that inspired him to create a tomato like that of what he had found, one that possessed an authentic yet superior tomato flavor and unique coloring. Specialists at the Swiss agricultural company Syngenta spent ten years experimenting with cross-breeding to perfect the Kumato tomato and create what is on the market today. Tomatoes sold under the Kumato brand are grown under strict regulations in order to ensure a consistently high-quality tomato. They are grown today in Spain, France, Greece, Belgium, Holland, Switzerland, Turkey, and Canada.</p> </body> </html>
VT 8 CK (10 S)
Cherry Kumato Black Tomato Seeds  - 2
Chickpea Seeds (Cicer arietinum)  - 7

Chickpea Seeds (Cicer...

Price €1.85 (SKU: VE 85 (6g))
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Chickpea Seeds (Cicer arietinum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 6g (20) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The chickpea (Cicer arietinum) is a legume of the family Fabaceae, subfamily Faboideae. Formerly known as the gram,[1] it is also commonly known as garbanzo or garbanzo bean and sometimes known as ceci, cece, channa, or Bengal gram. Its seeds are high in protein. It is one of the earliest cultivated legumes: 7,500-year-old remains have been found in the Middle East.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>The plant grows to between 20–50 cm (8–20 inches) high and has small feathery leaves on either side of the stem. Chickpeas are a type of pulse, with one seedpod containing two or three peas. It has white flowers with blue, violet or pink veins.</p> <p><strong>Etymology</strong></p> <p>The name "chickpea" traces back through the French chiche to cicer, Latin for ‘chickpea’ (from which the Roman cognomen Cicero was taken). The Oxford English Dictionary lists a 1548 citation that reads, "Cicer may be named in English Cich, or ciche pease, after the Frenche tongue." The dictionary cites "Chick-pea" in the mid-18th century; the original word in English taken directly from French was chich, found in print in English in 1388.</p> <p>The word garbanzo came first to English as garvance in the 17th century, from an alteration of the Old Spanish word arvanço (presumably influenced by garroba), being gradually anglicized to calavance, though it came to refer to a variety of other beans (cf. Calavance). The current form garbanzo comes directly from modern Spanish. This word is still used in Latin America and Spain to designate chickpeas.[3] Some have suggested that the origin of the word arvanço is in the Greek erebinthos. Another possible origin is the word garbantzu, from Basque — a non-Indo-European tongue, believed to be one of the oldest languages in Europe — in which it is a compound of garau, seed + antzu, dry.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Domesticated chickpeas have been found in the aceramic levels of Jericho (PPNB) along with Cayönü in Turkey and in Neolithic pottery at Hacilar, Turkey. They were found in the late Neolithic (about 3500 BCE) at Thessaly, Kastanas, Lerna and Dimini, Greece. In southern France Mesolithic layers in a cave at L'Abeurador, Aude have yielded wild chickpeas carbon dated to 6790±90 BCE.[4]</p> <p>By the Bronze Age, chickpeas were known in Italy and Greece. In classical Greece, they were called erébinthos and eaten as a staple, a dessert, or consumed raw when young. The Romans knew several varieties such as venus, ram, and punic chickpeas. They were both cooked down into a broth and roasted as a snack. The Roman gourmet Apicius gives several recipes for chickpeas. Carbonized chickpeas have been found at the Roman legion fort at Neuss (Novaesium), Germany in layers from the first century CE, along with rice.</p> <p>Chickpeas are mentioned in Charlemagne's Capitulare de villis (about 800 CE) as cicer italicum, as grown in each imperial demesne. Albertus Magnus mentions red, white and black varieties. Nicholas Culpeper noted "chick-pease or cicers" are less "windy" than peas and more nourishing. Ancient people also associated chickpeas with Venus because they were said to offer medical uses such as increasing sperm and milk, provoking menstruation and urine and helping to treat kidney stones.[5] "White cicers" were thought to be especially strong and helpful.</p> <p>In 1793, ground-roast chickpeas were noted by a German writer as a substitute for coffee in Europe. In the First World War, they were grown for this use in some areas of Germany. They are still sometimes brewed instead of coffee.</p> <p><strong>Sequencing the chickpea genome</strong></p> <p>Sequencing of the chickpea genome has been completed for 90 chickpea genotypes, including several wild species. A collaboration of 20 research organizations, led by the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) identified more than 28,000 genes and several million genetic markers. Scientists expect this work will lead to the development of superior varieties. The new research will benefit the millions of developing country farmers who grow chickpea as a source of much needed income, as well as for its ability to add nitrogen to the soil in which it grows. Production is growing rapidly across the developing world, especially in West Asia where production has grown four-fold over the past 30 years. India is by far the world largest producer but is also the largest importer.</p> <p><strong><em>Uses</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Human consumption</strong></p> <p>Mature chickpeas can be cooked and eaten cold in salads, cooked in stews, ground into a flour called gram flour (also known as chickpea flour and besan and used frequently in Indian cuisine), ground and shaped in balls and fried as falafel, stirred into a batter and baked to make farinata or panelle.</p> <p>In the Iberian Peninsula, chickpeas are very popular: In Portugal it is one of the main ingredients in Rancho, consumed with pasta, and meat, including Portuguese sausages, or with rice. they are also often used in other hot dishes with bacalhau and in soup. In Spain they are often used cold in different tapas and salads, as well as in cocido madrileño. In Egypt, chickpeas are used as a topping for Kushari.</p> <p>Hummus is the Arabic word for chickpeas, which are often cooked and ground into a paste and mixed with tahini, sesame seed paste, the blend called hummus bi tahini, or chickpeas are roasted, spiced, and eaten as a snack, such as leblebi. By the end of the 20th century, hummus had emerged as part of the American culinary fabric. By 2010, 5% of Americans consumed hummus on a regular basis, and it was present in 17% of American households.</p> <p>Some varieties of chickpeas can be popped and eaten like popcorn.</p> <p>Chickpeas and Bengal grams are used to make curries and are one of the most popular vegetarian foods in the Indian Subcontinent and in diaspora communities of many other countries. Popular dishes in Indian cuisine are made with chickpea flour, such as Mirchi Bajji and Mirapakaya bajji Telugu. In India, as well as in the Levant, unripe chickpeas are often picked out of the pod and eaten as a raw snack and the leaves are eaten as a green vegetable in salads.</p> <p>Chickpea flour is used to make "Burmese tofu" which was first known among the Shan people of Burma. The flour is used as a batter to coat various vegetables and meats before frying, such as with panelle, a chickpea fritter from Sicily.[14] Chickpea flour is used to make the Mediterranean flatbread socca and a patty called panisse in Provence, southern France, made of cooked chickpea flour, poured into saucers, allowed to set, cut in strips, and fried in olive oil, often eaten during Lent.</p> <p>In the Philippines, garbanzo beans preserved in syrup are eaten as sweets and in desserts such as halo-halo. Ashkenazi Jews traditionally serve whole chickpeas at a Shalom Zachar celebration for baby boys.</p> <p>Guasanas is a Mexican chickpea recipe in which the beans are cooked in water and salt.</p> <p>Dried chickpeas need a long cooking time (1–2 hours) but will easily fall apart when cooked longer. If soaked for 12–24 hours before use, cooking time can be shortened by around 30 minutes. To make smooth hummus the cooked chickpeas must be processed while quite hot, since the skins disintegrate only when hot.</p> <p>Chickpeas (Cicer arietinum) do not cause lathyrism. Similarly named "chickling peas" (Lathyrus sativus) and other plants of the genus Lathyrus contain the toxins associated with lathyrism.</p> <p><strong>Nutrition</strong></p> <p>Chickpeas are an excellent source of the essential nutrients iron, folate, phosphorus, protein and dietary fiber (USDA nutrient table). Chickpeas are low in fat and most of this is polyunsaturated. The nutrient profile of the smaller variety appears to be different, especially for fiber content which is higher than in the larger light colored variety.</p> <p>Preliminary research has shown that chickpea consumption may lower blood cholesterol.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 85 (6g)
Chickpea Seeds (Cicer arietinum)  - 7
Lentil Seeds (Lens culinaris) 1.85 - 1

Lentil Seeds (Lens culinaris)

Price €1.85 (SKU: VE 84 B (5g))
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Lentil Seeds (Lens culinaris)</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 70 (5g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The lentil (Lens culinaris) is an edible pulse. It is a bushy annual plant of the legume family, grown for its lens-shaped seeds. It is about 40 cm (16 in) tall, and the seeds grow in pods, usually with two seeds in each.</p> <p>Lentils have been part of the human diet since the aceramic (before pottery) Neolithic times, being one of the first crops domesticated in the Near East. Archeological evidence shows they were eaten 9,500 to 13,000 years ago.</p> <p>Lentil colors range from yellow to red-orange to green, brown and black. Lentils also vary in size, and are sold in many forms, with or without the skins, whole or split.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The seeds require a cooking time of 10 to 40 minutes, depending on the variety—shorter for small varieties with the husk removed, such as the common red lentil — and have a distinctive, earthy flavor. Lentil recipes[2] are used throughout South Asia, the Mediterranean regions and West Asia. They are frequently combined with rice, which has a similar cooking time. A lentil and rice dish is referred to in western Asia as mujaddara or mejadra. Rice and lentils are also cooked together in khichdi, a popular dish in the Indian subcontinent (India and Pakistan); a similar dish, kushari, made in Egypt, is considered one of two national dishes. Lentils are used to prepare an inexpensive and nutritious soup all over Europe and North and South America, sometimes combined with some form of chicken or pork.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dried lentils can also be sprouted by soaking in water for one day and keeping moist for several days, which changes their nutrition profile.</p> <p>Lentils with husk remain whole with moderate cooking; lentils without husk tend to disintegrate into a thick purée, which leads to quite different dishes.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Nutritional value and health benefits</strong></p> <p>With about 30% of their calories from protein, lentils have the third-highest level of protein, by weight, of any legume or nut, after soybeans and hemp.[4] Proteins include the essential amino acids isoleucine and lysine, and lentils are an essential source of inexpensive protein in many parts of the world, especially in West Asia and the Indian subcontinent, which have large vegetarian populations. Lentils are deficient in two essential amino acids, methionine and cysteine. However, sprouted lentils contain sufficient levels of all essential amino acids, including methionine and cysteine.</p> <p>Lentils also contain dietary fiber, folate, vitamin B1, and minerals. Red (or pink) lentils contain a lower concentration of fiber than green lentils (11% rather than 31%).[8] Health magazine has selected lentils as one of the five healthiest foods.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The low levels of Readily Digestible Starch (RDS) 5%, and high levels of Slowly Digested Starch (SDS) 30%, make lentils of great interest to people with diabetes. The remaining 65% of the starch is a resistant starch that is classified RS1, being a high quality resistant starch, which is 32% amylose.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Lentils also have some anti-nutritional factors, such as trypsin inhibitors and relatively high phytate content. Trypsin is an enzyme involved in digestion, and phytates reduce the bio-availability of dietary minerals. &nbsp;The phytates can be reduced by soaking the lentils in warm water overnight.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Lentils are a good source of iron, having over half of a person's daily iron allowance in a one cup serving.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Production</strong></p> <p>Lentils are relatively tolerant to drought, and are grown throughout the world. The FAO reported that the world production of lentils for calendar year 2009 was 3.917 million metric tons, primarily coming from Canada, India, Turkey and Australia.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>About a quarter of the worldwide production of lentils is from India, most of which is consumed in the domestic market. Canada is the largest export producer of lentils in the world and Saskatchewan is the most important producing region in Canada. Statistics Canada estimates that Canadian lentil production for the 2009/10 year is a record 1.5 million metric tons.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Palouse region of eastern Washington and the Idaho panhandle, with its commercial center at Pullman, Washington, constitute the most important lentil-producing region in the United States. Montana and North Dakota are also significant lentil growers. The National Agricultural Statistics Service reported United States 2007 production at 154.5 thousand metric tons.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>In culture</strong></p> <p>The lens (double-convex shaped) is so called because the shape of a lens is basically the same shape as lentils. Lens is the Latin name for lentil.</p> <p>Lentils are mentioned many times in the Hebrew Bible, the first time recounting the incident in which Jacob purchases the birthright from Esau with stewed lentils (a "mess of pottage").[16] In Jewish mourning tradition, lentils are traditional as food for mourners, together with boiled eggs, because their round shape symbolizes the life cycle from birth to death.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Lentils were a chief part of the diet of ancient Iranians, who consumed lentils daily in the form of a stew poured over rice.</p> <p>Lentils are also commonly used in Ethiopia in a stew-like dish called kik, or kik wot, one of the dishes people eat with Ethiopia's national food, injera flat bread. Yellow lentils are used to make a non-spicy stew, which is one of the first solid foods Ethiopian women feed their babies. In Pakistan, lentils are often consumed with Roti/bread or rice.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In India, lentils soaked in water and sprouted lentils are offered to gods in many temples. It is also a practice in South India to give and receive sprouted peas by women who perform Varalakshmi Vratam. It is considered to be one of the best foods because the internal chemical structures are not altered by cooking.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In Italy and Hungary, eating lentils on New Year's Eve traditionally symbolizes the hope for a prosperous new year, most likely because of their round, coin-like form.</p> <p>In Shia narrations, lentils are said to be blessed by seventy Prophets, including Jesus and Mohammed.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 84 B (5g)
Lentil Seeds (Lens culinaris) 1.85 - 1
Navy beans Seeds 1.95 - 1

Navy beans Seeds

Price €1.95 (SKU: VE 80 (7,5g))
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Navy beans Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 40 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Navy beans are not navy in color. In fact, they are small white beans. Why call them navy beans? Navy beans were named as such because they were a staple food in the United States Navy during the early 20th century. Navy beans and other dried beans are known as Phaseolus vulgaris and are referred to as “common beans” because they all come from a common bean ancestor that originated in Peru. Navy beans are about the size of a pea, mild in flavor and one of 13,000 species in the family of legumes. They can be found canned and dried in bulk or prepackaged. The United States Navy was no doubt looking for a low cost.</p> <p>Navy beans can sometimes be found under the name French navy bean or, more commonly, Michigan pea bean.</p> <p>The Navy bean is one of the best cooking beans around. Great flavor and taste. A small, delicious, white bean that can be used in soup or for baking. Will not “mush up” when cooked. Great bean for cooking and offers great flavor. The plant is about 60 centimeters high and resistant to beans' diseases.</p> <p>Pods are about 12 cm long with 5-6 beans inside. Navy beans typically require between 85-90 days of growth before harvesting</p> <h3><strong>Growing Guide</strong></h3> <h3><strong>GROWING NOTES</strong></h3> <p>Beans generally do not respond well to transplanting, and are usually direct sown around or just after the last spring frost. The most important point about growing beans is not to plant them too early. They will rot in cool, damp soil. Even so, many beans require a long growing season of 80 days or more. To get an earlier start, you can put down black plastic, to warm the soil.</p> <p>Most beans should be sown with the eye of the been facing downward, 1-2" deep, approximately 4-6" apart, with 24" or more between rows. The ideal site will be sunny, well-drained, moderately fertile, and slightly acidic (pH 6.0-7.0). Additionally, bean plants should be well-ventilated to promote proper development and deter mildew or mold that can trouble plants. Beans should not be grown in the same spot more than once every four years, and can be mutually beneficial with corn, strawberries and cucumber. Avoid planting beans near onion or fennel.</p> <p>Plant bush beans in either rows or blocks, with 4-6 inches between each seed. Plant the seeds 1-2 inches deep and be sure to water the soil immediately and regularly, until it sprouts. Pole beans will need some type of support to grow on. Be sure the trellis, teepee, fence or whatever is in place before you seed. Plant seeds at a rate of about 3-6 seeds per teepee or every 6 inches apart.</p> <h3><strong>MAINTAINING</strong></h3> <p>When watering, try to avoid getting the leaves wet as this can promote fungus or other damaging conditions that beans can be susceptible to. Most types of beans are somewhat drought resistant, but check the surface of the soil frequently and water when the top layer has become dried out.</p> <p>Once established, beans generally will not require fertilizing and will generate their own nitrogen. However, if the leaves of young plants are pale this is an indication of nitrogen deficiency and starts can be fertilized with with fish emulsion or other natural nitrogen rich fertilizer.</p> <p>Bush beans begin producing before pole beans and often come in all at</p> <p>once. Staggered planting, every 2 weeks, will keep your bush beans going longer. Pole beans need time to grow their vines, before they start setting beans. The pole bean crop will continue to produce for a month or two.</p> <p>Pole beans may need some initial help in climbing. Keep the bean plants well watered. Mulch helps keep their shallow roots moist. Long producing pole beans will benefit from a feeding or a side dressing of compost or manure about half way through their growing season.</p> <h3><strong>Harvesting Guide</strong></h3> <h3><strong>HARVESTING</strong></h3> <p>Harvesting beans is an ongoing process. You can start to harvest anytime, but gardeners usually wait until the beans begin to firm up and can be snapped. They are generally about as think as a pencil then. Don't wait too long, because beans can become overgrown and tough almost overnight. Harvest by gently pulling each bean from the vine or by snapping off the vine end, if you are going to be using the beans right away.</p> <p>Depending on whether the bean is a snap, shell, or dry variety will impact when and how the bean should be harvested.</p> <p> </p> <p>Snap beans are harvested while the pod and enclosed seeds are still relatively immature. Compared to the other two types of beans, snap beans have the smallest window for an ideal crop. Beans that are harvested too early will not develop the proper flavor and texture. On the other hand, beans that are allowed to develop on the plant too long will be tough and somewhat unpalatable. Perhaps the best simple indicator for snap beans is the diameter of the pods. Generally, most varieties will yield the best snap beans with a diameter between ⅛-1/4". Maybe the best way to determine suitability for harvest is to sample a pod or two before making a complete harvest. It is worth noting that many varieties of snap beans that are allowed to develop completely also make good dry beans.</p> <p> </p> <p>Shell beans are harvested at a later time than snap beans, once the pods have started to fill out and the enclosed seeds developing inside are apparent. Beans of such varieties are removed from pods and are often eaten fresh, but are sometimes dried.</p> <p> </p> <p>Dry beans are not harvested until the pods and enclosed seeds have reached complete maturity, and will often require threshing to remove extraneous pod material. When growing dry beans, it is especially important that growing plants have plenty of space and ventilation so that pods will dry out. If experiencing a spell of rain late in the season once pods have matured, plants can be removed from ground and hung upside down indoors to allow dessication to continue.</p> <h3><strong>SAVING SEEDS</strong></h3> <p>It is a suggested that you earmark a couple of plants at the beginning of the season for seed saving. Don't pick ANY pods from them to eat - just pick the crisp brown pods at the end of the season. Don't feed them, or water them unless it is very dry - as this can encourage leafy growth rather than pod development. There is no point in picking green pods as the seeds are not mature enough at this stage.</p> <p> </p> <p>Did you know you can save the roots, overwinter in a frost-free place, and replant next year? Runner beans are perennial, but are frost sensitive, so die back in our climate. However, if the roots are dug up and kept in suitable conditions, the plants often get away early and crop faster. If you grow a lot of beans, this may not be a practical option, but you could try it with one or two plants perhaps. Store the roots in a frost-free place, buried in slightly moist sand or leafmould, or something similar.</p> </body> </html>
VE 80 (7,5g)
Navy beans Seeds 1.95 - 1

This plant has giant fruits
Magic Growing Message Beans Seeds 1.55 - 6

Magic Growing Message Beans...

Price €1.55 (SKU: P 1)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Magic Growing Message Beans Seeds</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>This Magic bean is used for Gift Mesages. on one side there is word ' ? ', at the other side there is word ' ? ' . It's easy to plant the seeds as well: get some soil from your garden and put the bean in a small pot, then, occassionally water the soil to moisturize the bean and just wait. Keeping the environmental temperature between 18 and 25 degrees celsius (that's between 64'F and 77'F) helps ensure a successful growth. After 3 to 7 days, you will see the sprout of the seeds. And soon after that you will see a little green plant showing your message to the receiver. It's an unique live gift!</div> <div>How to show your love with your sweet?</div> <div>To plant one or more magic bean with word 'I love you' and your love will embed to the green seeds.</div> <div>More words are as below:</div> <div>Miss you, Happy birthday, Good Luck, My angel, Kiss you,Honey,Happ new year,Only you.</div>
P 1
Magic Growing Message Beans Seeds 1.55 - 6

Variety from America
INDIGO ROSE Tomato Seeds 2.5 - 1

INDIGO ROSE Tomato Seeds

Price €2.50 (SKU: VT 12)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>INDIGO ROSE Tomato Seeds Organically Grown</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><strong>Indigo Rose Blue Tomato, YES, IT'S BLUE AND IT TASTE GOOD.&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>Yes, this is the extremely rare Indigo Rose BlueTomato, one of the best and rarest tomatoes we know of.</p> <p>The flavor is sweet and rich, a firm juicy taste treat.</p> <p>The very attractive fruit is perfect for salads or as a fresh taste treat, right from the vine. As they start to ripen on the vine the tops of the fruits are a vivid blue, which darkens. The more sun they receive, the bluer they become. Definitely a variety that won’t be missing from our garden. We believe you’ll feel the same way also after your first taste.</p> <p>All of the seeds we list are grown by us in our own organic garden. The seeds we sell are cleaned and saved by us, from our own organically grown plants. We don’t use pesticides or chemicals in gardening, everything is grown naturally, the way it was intended to be.</p> <p>"'Super Tomato' was bred specifically to contain high levels of antioxidants called anthocyanins that turn the tomatoes purple. Blueberries also contain anthocyanins, which, you guessed it, are responsible for their high level of antioxidants and purplish hue."</p> <p>"You might be wondering, why go through all the trouble to breed a new tomato when blueberries already contain higher levels of the same antioxidants? The researchers explained that tomatoes are eaten extremely often in the world, almost on a daily basis per person. They also rank top five for most popular fresh vegetable, trailing potatoes, lettuce, and onions."</p> <p>Ripening time: 75 days from transplanting.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VT 10 (10 S)
INDIGO ROSE Tomato Seeds 2.5 - 1
Giant Italian Tree Tomato seeds 5 - 1

Giant Italian Tree Tomato...

Price €2.85 (SKU: VT 6)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Giant Italian Tree Tomato seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.<br /></strong></span></h2> <div>The Famous Italian Tree Tomato produces large crimson tomatoes that grow as big as 6 inches across! It has meaty centers with solid divisions. It is by far the most productive tomato, often producing 3 bushels from just one plant! When grown on a trellis the vines soar 12-18 feet and often to 25 feet. Even without a trellis The Famous Italian Tree tomatoes will out-yield other varieties. 70 days from setting out plants until first fruits mature...</div> </body> </html>
VT 6 (5 S)
Giant Italian Tree Tomato seeds 5 - 1
Blue Tomato Seeds "Bosque Blue" 2.5 - 1

Blue Tomato Seeds "Bosque...

Price €2.50 (SKU: VT 11)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Amazing Bosque Blue Tomato Seeds Organically Grown</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Parent plants were grown organically. The Bosque Blue tomato is a select &nbsp;strain bred here from the Oregon State Universit y P20 Blue tomato. The dark blue is t he result &nbsp;of antioxidant compounds (Ant hroc ynan) in the tomatoes skin, (like a blueberry), so not &nbsp;onl its beautiful, it is good for you! The more sun the fruit gets, the more blue color becomes. The fruit is perfect for salads, about &nbsp;2" in diameter.</p> <p>Ripe fruit &nbsp;in about &nbsp;65- 70 days from transplant . Seeds are from open pollinated plants. You can save your seeds year after year to have the true Heirloom Tradition</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VT 11 (10 S)
Blue Tomato Seeds "Bosque Blue" 2.5 - 1
Snow White Cherry Tomato seeds Seeds Gallery - 3

Snow White Cherry Tomato seeds

Price €1.75 (SKU: VT 14)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Snow White Cherry Tomato seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 7 or 25 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Snow White tomatoes are a medium-large sized variety of cherry tomato weighing approximately 20-30 grams (one to two ounces) per fruit. They ripen (in 80 days) from green to a pale yellow, and that ivory-cream color persists throughout the interior flesh. They are deliciously sweet and juicy without being sugary, and notes of citrus and pineapple balance their flavor. The compact indeterminate plants grow an average of four to 180 cm (six feet) tall and are highly productive throughout the season.</p> <p>Snow White cherry tomatoes are a variety of Solanum lycopersicum in the Nightshade family. Tomatoes are categorized in subgroups that represent variations observed within the tomato species, referred to as their cultivar: a botanical term that is a contraction of the two-word term cultivated variety, and is equivalent to what growers simply call a “variety.” Therefore, Cherry tomato varieties are more specifically called Lycopersicon esculentum var. cerasiforme. Their pale color earned them their name, which is appropriately pure and sweet although they actually turn more of a creamy yellow color when fully mature. They offer far more of a concentrated tomato flavor than most other white varieties.</p> <p><strong>Nutritional Value</strong><br />Tomatoes are rich in vitamin C, and they contain good amounts of vitamin B and vitamin A. They are a good source of iron and calcium, and also contain decent amounts of phosphorus, sulfur, and potassium.</p> <p><strong>Applications</strong><br />Snow White cherry tomatoes are great for snacking or as an addition to fresh salads. They are sweet and delicious on their own, but can also be enhanced by fresh herbs and spices, such as basil, cilantro, chives, dill, garlic, mint, paprika, rosemary, oregano, parsley, thyme, and tarragon. Store tomatoes at room temperature until ripe, after which refrigeration can slow the process of decay.</p> <p><strong>Ethnic/Cultural Info</strong><br />Cherry tomatoes were the first tomato species to be domesticated. They are descendants of the wild tomato, which traces back millions of years the coastal regions of South America. However, archeological evidence suggests that cherry tomatoes were first cultivated further north in Central America by the Aztecs and Incas as early as 700 AD. The tomato was introduced to Spain in the 16th century by the conquistadors and soon spread throughout Europe, however, it wasn’t until the mid-1800’s that the tomato became widespread in the United States.</p> <p>Geography/History<br />The Snow White cherry tomato was developed by Joe Bratka, a famous tomato collector from New Jersey who has bred several other varieties including the popular isis candy cherry tomato. Tomatoes are warm-weather plants that are not at all hardy, as cold soil and air temperatures can stress plants. It is recommended that you wait at least a week or two after the last frost of the season before planting outdoors.</p>
VT 14 (7 S)
Snow White Cherry Tomato seeds Seeds Gallery - 3

Variety from America
Banana Legs Tomato Seeds 1.85 - 1

Banana Legs Tomato Seeds

Price €1.85 (SKU: VT 17)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Banana Legs Tomato Seeds Organically Grown</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.<br></strong></span></h2> <p>It looks like a banana Sweet pepper, banana tomatoes are also known as sausage tomatoes. Bright yellow and pointed. An extremely prolific variety producing 10 cm long yellow fruits with thick meaty flesh, with few seeds and fruiting late in the season (until the first frost). The fruits have a slightly pointed end, ideal for salads or as a paste tomato. Plants reach a height from over 2 meters. We advise you to use support for this tomato since 1 plant can give 40 kg of tomatoes.</p> <p><span style="color: #000000;">Sow in spring under glass or on a windowsill 1/16 inch deep. &nbsp;Germination takes around 6- 14 days at 65- 75F. </span><span style="color: #000000;">Transplant the seedlings when large enough to handle into 3-inch pots.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000;">Grow on under cooler conditions and when about 8 inches tall, either plant in their growing position in the greenhouse or gradually acclimatize them to outdoor conditions and </span><span style="color: #000000;">plant out 18 inches apart in a warm and sunny spot in moist, fertile well-drained soil and keep watered.</span></p> <p><strong><span style="color: #000000;">What's the difference between "indeterminate" and "determinate" tomatoes?</span></strong></p> <p><span style="color: #000000;">Determinate tomatoes, or "bush" tomatoes, are varieties that grow to a compact height (generally 3 - &nbsp;4'). Determinates stop growing when fruit sets on the top bud. All the </span><span style="color: #000000;">tomatoes from the plant ripen at approximately the same time (usually over a period of 1- &nbsp;2 weeks). They require a limited amount of staking for support and are perfectly suited </span><span style="color: #000000;">for container planting.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000;">Indeterminate tomatoes will grow and produce fruit until killed by frost. They can reach heights of up to 12 feet although 6 feet is normal. &nbsp;Indeterminates will bloom, set new fruit </span><span style="color: #000000;">and ripen fruit all at the same time throughout the season. They require substantial staking for support and benefit from being constrained to a central growing stem.</span><span style="color: #000000;"></span></p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VT 17 (10 S)
Banana Legs Tomato Seeds 1.85 - 1

Variety from Peru

Product with time reduced price
Garden Peach Tomato Seeds 1.95 - 1

Garden Peach Tomato Seeds

Regular price €1.65 -18% Price €1.35 (SKU: VT 15)
Offer ends in:
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Garden Peach Tomato Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of<strong> 10 or 20 </strong>seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Peach tomatoes, like other peach-type tomato varieties, have a soft fuzz that covers their skin. The creamy yellow fruit (approx weight 80-90 grams) is about 5 centimeters (two inches) in size with superb taste and texture and is allegedly the sweetest of all peach tomato varieties. The fruity flavor is complex, with sweet well-balanced components. The fruits ripening approximately 80 days after transplanting. The indeterminate, regular leaf plant is extremely productive, yielding thousands of the round, delicate fruit continuously over the course of the season.</p> <p>Peach tomatoes have such a great natural flavor that they are fit for eating right off the vine. Their depth of sweetness is best eaten fresh, so they are not often used for preserves. They work beautifully in salads, or they can simply be drizzled with a bit of olive oil and sprinkled with chopped basil. They are also a nice complement to the dark, rich, slightly salty black Krim heirloom tomato. Store tomatoes at room temperature until fully ripe, after which refrigeration can slow the process of decay.</p> <p>Garden Peach tomatoes are a cultivar of tomato, native South American fruit mainly from Peru. It was the winner of the heirloom taste test in 2006 and has won numerous other contests thanks to its fruity yet spicy, complex tomato flavor.</p> </body> </html>
VT 15 (10 S)
Garden Peach Tomato Seeds 1.95 - 1
  • -18%
Black Cherry Tomato Seeds Seeds Gallery - 4

Black Cherry Tomato Seeds

Price €1.95 (SKU: VT 16)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Black Cherry Tomato Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>A beautiful ornamental edible, which forms compact, bushy, determinate, 150 cm tall plants. Black Cherry averages over 100+ fruits per plant.</p> <p>Their flavor delivers an excellent balance of sweetness and acidity. However, the weight of the fruit clusters will often provide the plants with a more spreading appearance. Black Cherry has excelled in taste tests and is a superb plant for providing a wealth of delicious fruits, whether planted in the garden or in moderate-sized containers.</p>
VT 16 (10 S)
Black Cherry Tomato Seeds Seeds Gallery - 4

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seeds-gallery.shop www.seeds-gallery.shop This cookie helps keep user sessions open while they are visiting a website, and help them make orders and many more operations such as: cookie add date, selected language, used currency, last product category visited, last seen products, client identification, name, first name, encrypted password, email linked to the account, shopping cart identification. 480 hours
Statistic cookies
Statistic cookies help website owners to understand how visitors interact with websites by collecting and reporting information anonymously.
Cookie name Provider Purpose Expiry
collect Google It is used to send data to Google Analytics about the visitor's device and its behavior. Track the visitor across devices and marketing channels. Session
r/collect Google It is used to send data to Google Analytics about the visitor's device and its behavior. Track the visitor across devices and marketing channels. Session
_ga Google Registers a unique ID that is used to generate statistical data on how the visitor uses the website. 2 years
_gat Google Used by Google Analytics to throttle request rate 1 day
_gd# Google This is a Google Analytics Session cookie used to generate statistical data on how you use the website which is removed when you quit your browser. Session
_gid Google Registers a unique ID that is used to generate statistical data on how the visitor uses the website. 1 day
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